A Reamp® box is essentially the reverse of a DI box and converts a balanced signal into an unbalanced signal suitable for driving guitar amps. Radial makes three different versions of this device with variations in features and in quality of the transformers. For an introduction to reamping there is the passive ProRMP™, for high quality reamping there is the Reamp JCR™, and at the top of the line is the dual-channel active X-Amp™.

Even with such a lightweight configuration, the Fishman F1 system is still more than capable of rendering the tone of the DCPA4R with a great deal of accuracy due to the superior tight focus on the preamp. This guitar is our pick for the top acoustic electric guitar if price is no object. There are many other awesome models out there and we urge you to check them out as well, but you'll likely find that your search could have ended right here.

Even though recorded sound traces back to late 1877, the widespread access to this technology has only become available some 60 years later. As we go back in time, reaching 1940s, we run into the first ever instance of reverberation being used in music recording. It didn’t really take long for this trend to become popular, spreading throughout the world. However, back then there were no effects pedals or anything similar. Devices we have today were science fiction at best. Old school producers had to resort to various other means to achieve the reverb effect.


I'm seeking a guitar to elicit the rich fat heavy sound. So as I understand a guitar with the H humbucker (double coil) pickup is what I need for that. But there is a wide range of layouts for the guitars. Some of them have S single (single coil) pickup, for example H-S-H layout. Where single coil pickup is mostly used for blues, funk and jazz guitars. And these H-S-H guitars are also recommended for heavy rock (because of the humbuckers).
Gibson’s offerings also differ from Fender in that they largely employ scale lengths of 24.75, resulting in a warmer, more rounded out sound that has come to characterize the brand’s output (3). Playability is also affected by the shorter scale length size, with reduced tension making string bending a bit easier. Gibson’s generally utilize mahogany in their construction, which contributes to a darker tone with increased sustain and warmth.
If you’re a beginner you might not feel like you know enough to be able to test play different guitars, but play whatever you know and see if you notice any difference. If you only know a few chords, or even “Smoke on the Water”, then play that, it’s better than nothing! Don’t care about the staff hearing you play, they’re used to it and are probably just happy to have a potential customer.

Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.


First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.

• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
Replacing or repairing knobs. Knobs are covers for your pots so you can easily turn them, if any of your knobs are unable to be correctly placed on try due to broken or enlarge holes, place a good amount of tape around the pot's shaft that covers it and try to keep the the knob on the tape. If you cannot do so then you may need to replace your knobs.

Having got the technicalities out of the way, it's time to look at recording methods. The traditional method, and still the most satisfactory in many cases, is to mic up a really good amplifier, but where this isn't appropriate, we have a choice of physical modelling guitar preamplifiers, complete guitar/pickup/amp modelling systems using Roland's VG series of products, or the slightly lower-tech approach of using analogue guitar recording preamps (solid state or valve). The latest option is to plug the guitar directly into the computer and use a software plug-in to handle the amp and speaker modelling, but I'll start at the beginning with the miking options.


For example, Al Schmitt starts with the traditional SM57 close mic, on axis but a little off the centre of the cone. "Then I'll put a really good mic up — maybe a Neumann U67 or an M50 — for the room... It could be anywhere from 15 to 20 feet away." It's worth noting that the M50 is an omni microphone and, although the omni polar pattern is only very occasionally mentioned for close-miking, it makes a much more sensible choice for capturing natural room ambience.
You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.
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Dismantled Fender Telecaster neck pick-up, showing the exposed enammeled, very fine, copper wire, wound on a bobbin around 6 magnets sitting below each string. From Mojo Pickups - 50's Telecaster Rewind. In case you are wondering the metallic case (used to be high-chrome content alloy) acts as a hardware low-pass filter, dispersing the magnetic field of the high frequency vibrations of the string across all 6 poles, but allowing long wavelength, low group velocity, bass frequencies to be captured relatively unhindered— the reason for this is quite complicated and the subject of a solid state physics class which we will not go into here.
It makes sense to start with the most famous, the poster-boy of the acoustic guitar world. It’s the first thing non-players imagine when they think of an acoustic guitar and, sure enough, it’s one of the most versatile instruments you can pick up. By versatile, we mean it is just as much at home in a variety of musical settings and genres, from rock to folk, indie to punk.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Custom - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red
One oil finish that many luthiers use and recommend is Tru-Oil, which was originally formulated for finishing gun stocks. It is the oil finish that Luthier's Mercantile carries, and if you Google for Tru-Oil you will find plentry of information about using it on guitars including some very good instructions. And those instructions will help you with Danish Oil as well.
The first thing that strikes you about Nate Savage’s Guitar Lessons YouTube Channel is how well the structured, numbered lessons are organised on the YouTube Home page itself. Overlays on the opening titles screens and the names of the lessons make it very clear about the content and help you to choose exactly what you need, or let you skip over any unnecessary stuff. His complete beginner topics go right back to “How To Hold The Guitar” which might sound really basic, but Nate’s absolutely right to nip any bad habits in the bud at the very beginning and that particular video could the most important 3:26 of your career. And I have to make mention of the high production levels on Nate’s videos. The vision and audio is excellent, the lessons are well made, and Nate’s friendly, easy-going manner makes you feel like he’s your best friend and guitar tutor at the same time.
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Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
I'm pleased more and more people are realising this. It really is blindingly obvious when you think about it. Anyone who talks about "resonance" when talking about a solid electric guitar body is completely missing the point, and the point is to remove, as far as is possible (and that's pretty far), any influence the body has on the amplified sound. So the primary quality you're looking for in a solid electric guitar body is not resonance, but density.
Moving the mic even further back – from a few feet to several – gets into what is generally referred to as “ambient miking” or “room miking.” This can be a great way to achieve even more depth and sense of space in your tracks. Jimmy Page made frequent use of ambient miking in recording his guitar parts with Led Zeppelin, and it was also a major factor in Eric Clapton’s legendary “Beano” tone. The further from the speaker you place the mic, and the more into the center or far side of the room, the great the proportion of reflected to direct sound in the blend, and the greater the sense of “air” and “room” in the sound. Often, it’s combined with a close mic to retain the option of blending in as much punch and directness as necessary, but if you only have one track or one mic available, ambient placement will sometimes do the trick on its own.
T5 (2005) – Abbreviation stands for Thinline 5-way. “5-way” refers to the five position pickup selector switch mounted on the top of the guitar which activates different combinations of components in the T5’s pickup system. When hooked up to an amplification system, it’s capable of producing a variety of acoustic and electric tones in a single guitar.

OM-28: Similar to the 000-28 model in body size and ornamentation, but uses a 25.4″ scale, 1-2/4″ nut spacing, and 2-3/8″ string spacing at the bridge. Also known as the “orchestra” model, so named because of its association with banjo players transitioning to guitar in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The 14-fret neck-to-body design was designed to allow greater upper fret access, and thus feel more comfortable to banjo players accustomed to full acces the length of a 24-fret + neck.


So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.

"It seems a waste to me to work and work for years," Rory Gallagher told Rolling Stone in 1972, "and just turn into some sort of personality." Instead, the Irish guitarist, then only 23, became legendary for his nonstop-touring ethic and fiery craft. Playing a weathered Strat, often wearing a flannel shirt, Gallagher electrified Chicago and Delta styles with scalding slide work and hard-boiled songwriting. His fans included the Edge and Bob Dylan, who was initially turned away backstage at a 1978 show because Gallagher didn't recognize him.

This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
There are several factors to consider when establishing a good guitar tone. Here are some guitar tone tips.  Lets start with electric guitar tone. With electric there are three major factors to consider…the guitar, the amp, and the effects. There are all types of guitars with all types of pickups. Single Coil pickups and humbucking pickups are the two main pickup categories. I prefer humbuckers for the simple reason that they are less noisy. I like the tone of a good single coil pickup but I have never had much luck with keeping them from buzzing terribly. This is especially a factor when you are playing gigs in dive bars or clubs with bad electric wiring. You are much better off with a humbucking pickup. If you are gigging musician I would suggest having at least one in your arsenal. Generally speaking your Fender strats have single coils and your Les Pauls have humbuckers.
And it took a long time because inevitably the tremolo would go out of time with the track because the tremolo doesn't stay in regular clock time. Also we would go out with each other's amps, so we had to keep looking up at each other after every fifteen second bursts and kind of fess up, "Oh yeah, mine kind of went out of time." It took long time, but I'm glad we did it that way because if we had cut and pasted two seconds of audio, it wouldn't have had the same dynamic quality throughout the six minutes of the song, or however long it is.
Wah – a frequency-based effect that creates a sound similar to a voice saying “Wah”. A Wah pedal uses a filter that sweeps across the frequency band. In a pedal wah, pressing the toe down will make the guitar signal brighter; heel down makes the signal darker. The filter can be controlled either automatically by electronics within the pedal or manually by the use of an expression pedal giving the guitarist’s hands-free control over their tone.
With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.
 The world-wide reputation of the company is not based on design data and performance alone. The real key to success of SWING is "Outstanding People". Every staff member at Swing has a background as a professional musician. Moreover, we were all career veterans in guitar engineering with decades of combined experience, well before founding our new vision; Swing Guitar Technology. If you are familiar with musical instruments companies or have seen their ads or brochures, you may notice their catch phrase like "It's about Music." Nothing could be closer to the truth, based on Swing's pedigree. From the selection of materials to their treatment and hand fitting. From mechanics to electronics. Each stage of each final product is mastered by SWINGers.
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.

Many players today have more than one overdrive/distortion stomp box on their pedal boards and sometimes use both at once. My personal preference is to place the lower gain pedals in front of the higher gain ones, but the opposite is absolutely fine if you prefer the sound of that configuration. Placing overdrive/distortion pedals later in the signal chain can increase noise as the noise of several effects chained together can add up, and any noise produced by other effects going into an overdrive/distortion effect will be boosted along with the guitar signal.
Emil Dopyera (also known as Ed Dopera) manufactured Dobros from 1959 under the brand name Dopera’s Original before selling the company and name to Semie Moseley. Moseley merged it with his Mosrite guitar company and manufactured Dobros for a time. Meanwhile, in 1967, Rudy and Emil Dopyera formed the Original Musical Instrument Company (OMI) to manufacture resonator guitars, which were at first branded Hound Dog. However, in 1970, they again acquired the Dobro name, Mosrite having gone into temporary liquidation.
One criticism that some have against these books are they are for people who want to gain technical competence in guitar. From the start, these books expect you to learn notation and strumming patterns. If you are simply hoping to learn some of your favorite songs and become a casual player who memorizes a few melodies, this is not the focus of this book. For that, look elsewhere or purchase a book of tabs of your favorite band or artist. This book series is targeted toward beginner and intermediate players who want to really learn guitar, and it really is a great place for you to start the journey toward being a better player.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
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Every single pickup on this Godin XTSA is awesome in its own right, but the best part of it all is dialing ina combination of the two. By virtue of its quality, it gives plenty of power, possessing a wonderful sounding high end cutting through, which makes it possible for you to hear it over the keyboard and the bass. With this electric guitar, you can get a beautiful acoustic sound and a really fat and great sound as well.

This brand is originally from Japan and  Hoshino Gakki owns it. Ibanez activates in U.S.A, Japan, China and Indonesia, and it is one of the largest, recognized names out there. This manufacturer has developed over 300 models of electric guitars and has collaborated with many musicians that have lent their imagination to the making of customized units.


In 1964 Hohner released The Beatles Harmonica Kit which was sold in a blister package, much like most Hohner harmonicas nowadays, retailed for $2.95, and help what Hohner calls "bring about a new popularity upsurge of the Hohner harmonica on both sides of the Atlantic.".[6] In the 1970s Hohner began manufacturing acoustic guitars,[7] and re-producing electric guitars.[5]
Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.

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SG Special is pretty much the same thing as the Les Paul 100. The most obvious difference is the body style. Other than that, you get very similar electronics and overall build quality. A lot of people learned their first chords on this guitar, still keeping it as one of their favorite axes. I’ve played this thing a few times and it definitely has some juice.

Certainly the most desirable of the Martin body size is the 000, 0M, and D sizes. Many consider the 000 (and OM, which is essentially a 000) to be the ultimate guitar size, where others feel the "D" size is the best. It's personal preference. There are some interesting facts though about the 000 and OM sizes. (In Martin's 1934 catalogue, any flattop guitar that had a 14-fret neck was named an "Orchestra Model", while the older 12-fret design was named a "Standard Model".)
Yamaha is famous around the world for its incredible, quality, instruments. Its electric guitars are no exception. The Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC112V Electric Guitar, Old Violin Sunburst is another example of Yamaha's on point production. This guitar has a solid alder body, a maple bolt neck, rosewood fingerboard, and a five-position switch with coil tap. Plus there's the tremolo - a vintage tremolo with block saddles.

Finally, amidst all the considerations about tops and shapes and tones, don't underestimate the importance of choosing a guitar that you like. Choose one that feels comfortable, whether you are sitting or standing. Make sure you pick a guitar that responds to the way that you play, and don't settle on a "good" guitar if you don't like the way it sounds to your ears.
In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
Frets & Necks did an AMAZING job on my RG7421. They installed my BKP Black Hawk p/u's and new tone/volume pots. Frets & Necks service was above and beyond, fast and super knowledgeable. I am very pick...y about who works on my guitars, I am beyond pleased that I chose Frets& Necks to work on my RG. I will be bringing my RG7421 back to Frets & Necks for future upgrades very soon. Be good to yourself and treat your guitar, give Frets & Necks a try. You won't be disappointed. Thank you F&N. See More

With over 8 decades of development, the electric guitar and music from guitars is getting progressively more sophisticated. Nowadays there are thousands of models available, from a number of manufacturers; electric guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes – some reminiscent of the regular acoustic guitar, and some drastically different from the traditional instrument. Regardless, there's a number of features which are invariably present in practically every electric guitars: the headstock, neck, body and strings. The headstock includes the machine heads, truss rod (may not be used in all models), string guide and nut; this section is used for tuning and holding/adjusting the strings. The neck serves the function of supporting the strings, and it's comprised of a fretboard, the inlay fret markers, the actual frets and a neck joint. The body of the guitar is comprised of several mechanisms including the pickups (neck and bridge), saddles, tuners, pickup switch, control knobs (tone and volume), output connector and strap buttons – sometimes others, in more sophisticated models. Finally, the strings are usual divided in brass and treble variants.


 Everybody needs to start somewhere. However, where you start often decides where you end up. For example, if you buy a bad guitar when you start playing, you are a lot more likely to stop playing, and if it happens, you wouldn't be buying any more guitars. We believe guitar manufacturers have a sort of duty to make and supply reliable guitars for beginners. Guitars at beginners' level are as important as high-end guitars for pro. This is where Smash comes in.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its

Being a PODHD user for many years now, I am but one of the many who commend its balance of versatility and sound quality. Like many reviewers, it allows me to gig and record conveniently, often times plugging straight to PA with great results. I've also seen a number of professionals using PODHD500X's in their concerts, so it's not surprising that even experts at Music Radar were convinced, saying: "The modelling is excellent throughout, with authentic-sounding amps and quality effects".
Finally, if you’ve been looking around at different instruments you may have noticed some really cheap guitars by brand names you’ve never heard of. I always recommend starting out on a quality guitar made by a company you can trust. However, I’m also not going to look down on anyone who has to get something less expensive because it is all they can afford.

In the entry-level market, brand-name guitar companies are usually forced to make their guitars with cheaper materials. There is a simple reason for this. Most major brand-name companies have a brand owner (sometimes an American company). That company buys from a factory in China, and in Australia they will have a distributor who will sell to a retailer (your local music store). It’s pretty easy to see why they can be forced to use cheaper materials. There is a lot of price pressure to get a guitar manufactured at a low enough price for everybody to take their cut of the profit down the chain.
Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.
In low-end instruments laminated or plywood soundboards are often used. Although these materials often impart great strength and stability to the instrument, via layers of perpendicular grains, they do not vibrate the same way that natural wood does, generally producing an inferior tone with less amplification. Instruments with laminated or plywood soundboards should be avoided if possible.

The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
A great player knows a guitar is more than a few pieces of wood and metal.  Every Whalehazard guitar is handcrafted with incredible attention to detail and meets exacting standards of quality.  Each instrument is built in South Minneapolis by Andy Webber.  As a one-man operation, great care will be taken to make sure your custom guitar will take your playing and sound to a new level.  All materials and components are carefully selected for quality and longevity.  Designs are painstakingly contemplated and are constantly evolving.  From custom inlays to a hand-shaped bone nut, every detail of your instrument is studied and considered to make sure your Whalehazard guitar is a unique piece of craftsmanship that will stand the test of time.
For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
Guitar lessons work best if you're putting your skills together to learn how to play songs. That's why Guitar Tricks has a ton of great song tutorials for when you've mastered the Core Learning System, or if you want to try something new. These easy guitar songs are great, especially if you're a beginner that recently picked up an electric guitar. 
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When it comes to guitar amplifiers, especially the ones that we love here at PMT, “cheap” doesn’t mean poor quality! Thanks to huge leaps in manufacturing processes, stringent quality control and the fact brands really care about the products they create, you can spend far less on an amplifier and musical instrument these days and still get a fantastic, highly playable and superb quality option for your needs.
And that's a wrap. If you're new to the pedal game, don't let anyone tell you that there are no rules. There are some very strict rules that apply if you want to sound professional, and these rules quickly reduce the amount of options down to very few, indeed. The honest and realistic among us will tell you the truth that there is a very firm effects pedal order you should connect your pedals in that you don't want to stray from unless you want to ruin your tone and appear to not know what you're doing. Guitar pedal order matters!
The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.
I’m not sure if you’re right about Joe being wrong. My memory of exactly how tone controls are usually wired is kind of failing me, but I think I remember that what you’re saying would be true if the output was taken from the node connected to the capacitor, but it’s not–the output node is the node on the opposite end of the tone pot from the capacitor, unless I’m remembering wrong. I think that filter-characteristics of guitar tone circuits are easier to visualize if you imagine them as reacting to a current source. Meaning “a big resistor in series with a capacitor” reacts the same way that “a big resistor” does. Basically, current above the cutoff frequency is shunted to ground through the tone pot–so if the tone pot is high, very little percentage (compared to if it was just a capacitor) of this current gets shunted, whereas if the tone pot is low, a high percentage gets shunted.
List of guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
THE NECK POCKET The next step is to rout the neck pocket and body cavities. For the neck pocket I like to use a 1/4" bit and leave the scrap wood edge around the body to give the router the extra support it needs when routing the neck area. To find out how deep you will have to rout the pocket measure the total thickness of the heal of the neck. Then measure the hieght of the bridge from the bottom to the top of the groove the string will sit in on the saddle and add about 1/8" to it. That allows for the string clearence over the frets. The subtract that from the overall thickness that you came up with when you measured the heal of the neck. That will give you a pretty accurate depth that you will need to carve the pocket down to. Be very careful when you rout the neck pocket! You don't want to make it too big otherwise you end up with gaps between the neck and the body and you don't want to go too deep because it can be impossible to fix. Rout a little bit at a time, and set the neck in each time to make sure you get the proper fit. It shouldn't fit to tight and the pocket should be slightly lager than the heal of the neck because you will have paint accumulation in it which will shrink it a little.
Now that you know the general protocol to a pedal chain, remember there are no strict rules in music. Introducing alternative ways of setting up your effect signals is what starts new trends and even leads to the development of new genres. There are also indisputably more choices in pedals then ever before. Vintage classics have been reissued in mass, are sounding better then ever, and have become affordable (but I doubt you’ll see that DeArmond toaster pedal version any time soon).

Guitar amplifiers and electronic keyboards may have switch pedals for turning built-in reverb and distortion effects on and off; the pedals contain only a switch, with the circuitry for the effect being housed in the amplifier chassis.[106] Some musicians who use rackmounted effects or laptops employ a MIDI controller pedalboard or armband remote controls to trigger sound samples, switch between different effects or control effect settings.[107][108][109] A pedal keyboard uses pedals, but it is not an effect unit; it is a foot-operated keyboard in which the pedals are typically used to play basslines.


It is a great budget guitar but not very much useful if you want to play this at an advanced level. Actually, this is an ideal and the most popular electric guitar for intermediate players; also it's suitable for the beginners. So make sure you upgrade your guitar once you master the basics of using this guitar. Find out the latest price of this guitar using the button below which takes you to the Amazon product page of this model and tells you all the information about it.
This is called a ‘Rectifier’ or diode. Grid: A fine helix (spiral) wire called ‘Grid’ is placed between the Cathode and Anode. A small variable voltage (music signal) on the Grid varies the large current between the Anode and Cathode. The small varying input signal is now amplified to a large varying current. The result is very linear. Why this happens is a mystery. The fact that it works and the universe exists is a miracle. It pays to be humble. Transistors: (emitter base collector) are complementary to valves (cathode grid anode).
Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.
Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say.  He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston.  It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it!  Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC.  Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!
Accompanying the Supro frying pan in the ’36 Peate catalog was the Supro amplifier. This had a small, rectangular cabinet with a round grillplate with the screws attaching the speaker showing around the edges. The grille cover was still similar to a resonator cover, with large diamond cutouts, backed with cloth, and finished with black wrinkle paint. A leather handle sat on top, and metal bumper guards graced the lower corners. No information is available regarding specs.
I gave one star at the Guitar, the running pegs that are in the product picture are not the same that you send me and sixth string tuning peg is winding back when I try to tune the gears inside has a play. I am really disappointed you put $6+ worth of tuning pegs in this guitar. On the left is is the picture of the T. pegs that Got. on the right is the one you send me as advertised

A very useful way of creating space for guitars in the final mix is to use tunable high-pass and low-pass filters to remove extreme frequencies that do nothing to enhance the guitar tone, but invade the space of other instruments that do perform in those areas. Generally speaking, it’s worth losing everything below 80Hz, although it’s not unusual to set the filter a good degree higher. Shaving off some high end may also be useful to help place the guitar in a specific area of the audio spectrum. Filter at the mixing stage, as the sound of the recording will often determine the optimum filtering points.
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
There are quite a few types of guitar shapes, with the most popular one being the dreadnought. However, contrary to acoustic guitars, many acoustic-electric variants come with some form of cutaway for better access to the higher frets. This can really come in handy for a wide range of techniques so you don’t have to play with your hand over the body, which can be uncomfortable.
Sometimes, your guitar may need more than a standard set-up. The frets need to be in reasonable shape in order to progress with the set-up. Often you will see that the frets are not level - this is crucial to the playability of the instrument. I have a precision technique for achieveing a perfectly true fret dress which I've been developing for 3 years.

One difference today is the number of big-name guitar brands that make affordable acoustic and electric guitars, which are often versions of their pro-level instruments. These days, you can own a Les Paul or a Stratocaster as a beginner or intermediate player. Of course, they aren’t the same as the Gibson or Fender flagship models, but they are still darned good guitars based on those designs.

Those of you familiar with Van William’s former bands Waters and Port O’Brien, will have suspicions about what to expect from the songwriter’s debut solo material: boisterous, vibrant hooks that are easy to swallow but gut you on their way back out.  His latest incarnation represents a bounce back after a period of personal tumult. Two parts power pop bombast, to one part Americana, William’s maturation as a songwriter and guitarist seems to have hit a new high water mark.
Tremolo is a regular and repetitive variation in gain for the duration of a single note, which works like an auto-volume knob; this results in a swelling or fluttering sound. This effect is very popular in psychedelic and trip-hop music. The speed and depth of the flutter are usually user-controlled.This is a volume-related effects pedal. This effect is based on one of the earliest effects that were built into guitar amplifiers. Examples include:

Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.
Ok so currently i run a Mesa 20/20 along with a GSP1101 and a MXR 10-Band EQ pedal. I love the MXR but would like to get a EQ in rack form. I see about a millon rack EQs out there but not sure which ones are made for guitar? They seem more focused on live sound/PA/Home recording..I am not sure if there all the same, Meaning a PA EQ will work for a guitar rack.
Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.
Once you have the essential elements in place-a great amp, guitar, and guitarist-you almost can't help but get a great guitar tone. Crank the amp up to the appropriate level and begin with some mic comparisons. It's especially telling to audition different types of mics: for example, dynamics, ribbons, and large-diaphragm condensers. (I rarely use small-diaphragm condensers for miking guitar amps; on the other hand, I've found that almost any microphone will strike gold once you find the right spot for it.)

This comprehensive set contains the most detailed version of the Yamaha C5 Grand plus a full compliment of performance sounds to cover all your needs from pads, strings, EPs, orchestra, synth, organs, guitars and many other instruments. At 971mb in size (with 592mb dedicated to one outstanding piano with five brightness levels to choose from)  it is designed for the fussy pianist who also wants a full bank of sounds at their fingertips.


Even though pickups are the main component tasked with interpreting string vibrations and indirectly turning them into sound, your choice of wood still matters. Although the effect is subtle, certain woods will give you better sustain, more definition, and so on.  And in the end it's the accumulation of all of these choices that determine your ultimate sound.
The amplifier you choose to use will have a huge impact on the sound. Valve amps are still king for most players, but they can often be impractical in home recording scenarios. Though we’d all love to mic up a cranked Marshall Plexi every time a classic-rock sound is required, these days software and hardware modelling is so good that the results are almost indistinguishable from the ‘real thing’ in a finished mix. Though pricey, the Kemper Profiling Amp and Fractal Audio Axe-Fx produce seriously realistic results, while almost as impressive are software solutions such as IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube and Guitar Rig from Native Instruments. If you are recording on a Mac or iPad using GarageBand, don’t discount the built-in amp and pedal simulations either.

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Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Amplified Parts makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.
Without some kind of amplification, it would of course be possible to “hear” what you’re doing. That is something very different from never hearing what a particular electric guitar sounds like when amplified. In that case get an electric with a soundboard such as an archtop or ask yourself “why would I not amplify a device meant to be amplified through the guitar pickups?”
Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
Another popular value pack comes courtesy of one of the greatest rock'n'roll guitarists of all time. For those who have an appetite for destruction, look no further than the Slash AFD Les Paul Guitar Outfit. Endorsed by the Guns N' Roses shredder himself, this pack comes with the killer AFD Special-II guitar that's equipped with new Ceramic Plus humbucking pickups, and a built-in Shadow pickup ring E-tuner. Additionally, this pack also contains a custom gig bag with the Slash "Snakepit" logo, Slash signature Dunlop Tortex picks, and much more.

You should be aware of some drawbacks to using the 'free' sites over the licensed sites (or purchasing a book of official TAB). First, the versions of the songs at the free sites were created by folks who enjoy music and did their best to document how to play the song. It may not be correct. Second, even though these sites don't charge for access to the TAB, most are in the business of making money. You'll have to put up with advertisements, often including flashing banners and pop-up ads. Finally, the original artists do not get paid for these transcriptions. If you like what you find, you should follow-up by purchasing the official music from an licensed reseller.
There are lot of great amp out there, but there are overpriced. Peavey prove they can do almost as great as other for a really more decent price. Moreover, they have great features and technical improvement that the "classic" manufactureres avoid to be focus on vintage sound and their reputation... The bandit 112 is a bargain. The valveking series was great budget valve amp for metal. Classic 30 and 6505 are interesting too. Vypr series was also great but it seems their recent series have issues... Anyway they build great amp and doesn't scam people as others do... check it out!
You might initially think that Music Lab is narcissistic for creating a line of guitar VSTs with the word “real” in them. But after you hear the first note, you’ll be kicking yourself for doubting it. There is a lot to cover with the “Real” line, and since they share many of the same features, we will slowly go over the components of these VSTs throughout the reviews for them.  
We will use the remaining pole to switch tone pots. Typical strat wiring has two tone controls – one for middle and one for neck pickup. We want to switch neck/middle tone control on when neck/middle pickup is on. To do this, common terminal of the second pole is connected to the common terminal on the first pole (pickup output) and neck and middle terminals of the second pole are connected to their respective pots. When neck pickup is on, the second pole will switch the output to the neck tone control as intended. What happens in position 4 (both neck and middle pickups on)? Both pots will be switched on and will be in parallel. Moving any tone pot would change the overall resistance to the tone cap and change the tone. The result is below:
Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
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Perfect working condition Amp is an absolute beast, if you know anything about these AC30s you'll know that there tone is unbelievable. Make me an offer or trade These amps sell for close to 18k and well above that on oversees markets The amp does have some cosmetic ware but obviously does not affect the sound what so ever Gibson, fender, guitar Watssapp me 0737886874 Amp is based in Durban ...
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Amplified Parts makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.
Since 1996, ESP’s subsidiary LTD has been creating quality guitars at very affordable prices. The EC-256, for example, is a great guitar if you’re looking to spend around $400. With extra-jumbo frets and a thin-U neck, this guitar is super comfortable to play. These guitars are known for their reliability and excellent build quality. And with a lightweight body, they make for great gigging guitars.
Flexibility of the BOSS Katana-50 goes way beyond expectations for establishing a different path referencing to its predecessor the Roland type of practice amps. With 50 watts of power and a custom 12-inch speaker, the Katana-50 can deliver a commanding range of sound playing it clean, crunch, lead, and brown for electric and acoustic electric guitars. Moving on to other controls on the panel, it features customizable effects by using BOSS Tone Studio editor software and for adjusting sounds quickly, it has a dedicated gain, EQ, and effects controls. Tone setting memory is also included for storing and recalling all amp and effect settings.
Tone shaping possibilities of overtone and spacious ambiance of Tera Echo is now versatile, thanks to the Boss’ flagship multi dimensional processing technology. Apart from those vintage options, the updated COSM preamps in this pedalboard include new additions like crunch and metal (for Metal Style players - see our review on the best Noise Gate pedals).
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)

So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
The Police incorporate a ton of reggae influences into the verse before the chorus turns into standard pop rock affair. The entire riff uses only down strums, and starts with the G minor chord while also lifting your fretting hand just enough so that the chord doesn’t ring after each strum. The majority of the chord progression goes from Gm, to Dm, to EbMaj7 chord. 
This list is insanely bad! First of all, John Mayer is only as good as your typical high school amateur. And before anyone starts spouting off, I’ve tried to find some obscure videos of him to prove myself wrong. But I can’t, it’s all Minor Pentatonic stuff with nothing innovative added to it. Secondly, how about some finger pickers on the list: Doyle Dykes, Scotty Anderson, Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, Tommy Emmanuel. Let’s not forget DANNY GATTON the greatest guitar player you’ve never heard. Also, if we’re talking about the best of the best, BRENT MASON should ALWAYS be in a Top Ten list, although he never is. But, you’ve heard him on all sorts of Nashville recordings. Acoustic guitar players like Andy McKee, Ewan Dobson, Don Ross, (I wish I knew more than that but I only recently discovered their Chuck Norris like awesomeness). Never limit yourself to the mainstream! There are many guitar players that are mentioned only because they are famous and have influence because of that. They may come up with a catchy riff or played in a well known band. But, that doesn’t make them a truly great guitar player.

Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.
While the other digital amplifiers we tried (the Blackstone ID:Core Stereo 10 V2 and the Line 6 Spider Classic 15) offered a similarly wide range of good sounds, most of our panelists preferred the Champion 20 simply because it was easier to use. Lynn Shipley Sokolow preferred the simplicity of non-digital amps such as the Vox Pathfinder 10, but she said, “The Fender is the best of the digitals because it’s easy to understand the controls.”
Electronics kit building kind of fell out of favor during the computer age as the home based technology enthusiasts moved to assembling PC’s, and software development. But home brew electronics has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years in what is now called the maker community. Internet electronics stores such as Adafruit and Element 14 are enabling 21st century geeks to build anything from simple circuits to complex embedded computing projects. These sites provide documentation, tutorials, video channels, and of course, a store, where you can purchase the tools and components required to internet enable your toaster, or feed your cat from the couch.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”
Of our five testers, three picked the Fender Champion 20 as their favorite, one ranked it second, and one ranked it the best of the three amps that included digital processing. It simply has everything a beginning guitarist needs. Even if you don’t know much about guitar amps, it’s easy to get a good tone fast. At 12.2 pounds, measuring 13 by 13.7 by 7.5 inches (HWD), it’s easy to carry around or tuck into a corner of a small bedroom.
Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.
Technically, distortion is defined as being any change to the original signal other than in level. However, we tend not to think of processes such as EQ and compression as distortion, and the term is more commonly used to describe processes that change the waveform in some radical and often level-dependent way. These include guitar overdrive, fuzz, and simply overdriving analogue circuitry or tape to achieve 'warmth'. In the analogue domain, heavy overdrive distortion is usually created by adding a lot of gain to the signal to provoke deliberate overloading in a specific part of the circuit. Such high levels of gain invariably bring up the level of hum and background noise, so it may be helpful to gate the source. Though overdriving analogue circuitry is the traditional way of creating intentional distortion, we now have many digital simulations, as well as some new and entirely digital sound-mangling algorithms.

This is a great pedal to learn from. The instructions are clear and the circuit is pretty basic. The kit itself is complete and the components are good quality. The effect is unique when compared to other diy pedals, and adds a nice flavor to your sound. About the only thing I would add is an led to know when the effect is on, the circuit can always be modified. To update, I was able to change the .047cap with a .022 cap to get a clearer sound while using my bass with it.....sounds great for some of our rockabilly type songs. So if you would like to use this for your bass just change that one cap and you're good to go.
Interestingly, it’s the back of this guitar that’s the most visually attractive, with a drop dead gorgeous rosewood fretboard and quilt maple three-piece design. You’ll stare at it for some time before you can bring yourself to flip it over and start playing. That’s not to say the front doesn’t look good - the whole thing feels more upscale than the price.
In the end I decided to go with the .033μ. Everything larger sounded too wooly to me on the neck pickup. If I didn’t play much EBow, I might even consider the .022μ. But you might make a different choice, especially if you were using brighter pickups. You won’t know for sure till you try it out with your instrument, amp, and hands, but I hope this gives you some idea of what to expect.

These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.
Back in the control room, audition each mic, preferably as the guitarist plays along with the other instruments. Listen carefully to how each microphone sounds on its own and, more importantly, to how it works in the mix. Usually, one microphone will come up a winner on the first pass. Don't stop there, however. Instead, leave the "winning" microphone where it is and experiment with the placement of the other two mics. Time-and mic selection-permitting, you may also wish to do a second round of testing with other microphones.
In any given field there are a handful of companies that rise above the others. This is true whether you are talking about cars or golf clubs or chainsaws, and of course it is true if you are talking about electric guitars. Some brands have proven themselves as the best of the best. They’ve created the most legendary instruments in music history. If you are looking for a new guitar, one of these companies is a smart place to start.

“I was trying to help Henry and shoo him away from areas that he was spending a whole lot of money in,” Schon says. “All this electronical, robot crap. I told him, point blank, ‘What you’re doing, Roland and other companies are light-years in front of you, you’ve got this whole building you’ve designated to be working on this synth guitar. I’ve played it. And it just doesn’t work.’ And he refused to believe that.”
Once the electric guitar had been firmly established by the 1960s and 1970s, guitar designs became increasingly distinctive and reflective of popular music trends. And by the 1980s guitarists were more and more concerned with the look as well as sound of their instruments, regarding their guitars as identifying signatures. Eddie Van Halen decorated his guitar with colored sticky tape, and Prince has had guitars of all shapes and colors custom-created for his stage performances.
Though some sophisticated processors combine pitch detection with pitch-shifting, to generate musically correct harmonies in user-defined keys, simple pitch-shifters always change the pitch by the same number of cents or semitones. In musical terms, that means that only the octaves, parallel fourths and fifths are very useful. Other intervals tend to sound discordant, as they don't follow the intervals dictated by typical musical scales.

A 100-watt stack is overkill if you live in an apartment and need an amp only for home recording. Conversely, a 10-watt combo is woefully inadequate if you play in a band with a drummer named Thunder Fist. Choose an amp that’s right for your primary application. You’ll need at least 30 watts for playing live with a rock band, but smaller amps often provide surprisingly huge sounds in the studio—just ask Jimmy Page. Also, as a rule of thumb, if you're playing out often, you might want to shoot for at least 15 watts of tube tone.


Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.

Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:

One problem with adding a tweeter to a bass speaker cabinet is that the tweeter may be damaged by the overdriven amplifier tone that is popular in some musical genres, since overdriving the amplifier adds a great deal of high frequency information to the signal. Horns and speakers in the same cabinet are sometimes wired separately, so that they can be driven by separate amplifiers. Biamplified systems and separately-wired cabinets produced by manufacturers such as Gallien-Krueger and Carvin and other manufacturers allow bassists to send an overdriven low-pitched sound to the speaker, and a crisp, undistorted high-pitched sound to the horn, which prevents this problem. Since the 1960s, some bassists have obtained a similar result by plugging their bass into both an electric guitar guitar amp and a bass amp. This approach does not use a crossover, but since an electric guitar amp will only produce pitches down to about 80 Hz, the guitar amp reproduces the mid- to high frequencies and the bass amp reproduces the low frequencies. With this arrangement, distortion and other effects can be applied to the guitar amp without affecting the solidity of the bass amp tone.


@Joe Mullikin – Yes, you can place each of the Strymon pedals within their own loop while engaged in your switcher using the LEFT INPUT and LEFT OUTPUT jacks of these pedals and just use the loop switcher controls to bring the effects in and out of the signal path. Make sure to use standard mono TS instrument cables as the jacks are unbalanced and do not benefit from TRS connections.
Launch price: $4,149 / £2,999 | Body: 3-piece maple/poplar/maple with figured maple top | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x MHS Alnico II humbuckers | Controls: 2x volume, 2x tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: ABR-1 bridge with titanium inserts and stopbar tailpiece | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Sunburst

There is no real rule on what fretsize is best – it is purely personal preference.  To find out what size is right for you or for a specific guitar and application, you may have to try similar guitars with different fretsizes.  I have heard many differing opinions on fretsize over the years; some say tall wire is too bumpy for sliding into position or that tall wire causes them to play sharp (from overly pressing down the strings, these players are used to feeling fingerboard surface under their finger tips).  Some say that fretwire below a certain height is difficult to bend on.  Bending and fretting hand slurring techniques are easier when the string can be addressed towards the middle of the ball end of the fingertip so that it may be pushed and pulled from the side rather than fretted from directly on top by the lower part of the fingertip. Some folks like a low fretwire as it feels very smooth to them and they don’t do a lot of slurring techniques.
Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston
Consider how many transformations take place during the production of sound from an electric guitar. The guitarist picks a string with a plastic plectrum, which produces vibrations that are picked up by coiled magnets directly positioned behind the strings, inducing an alternating current (hence the name “pick-ups”). The current’s signal is then transmitted through a wire lead, after which it’s amplified by either a vacuum tube or solid-state amplifier, and then reshaped into audible sound by a loudspeaker. Depending on the sound that a guitarist is seeking, he or she may place guitar effect pedals, or stompboxes, in between the pick-ups and the amplifiers. These small, intermediary devices further manipulate the guitar signal to produce a multitude of effects.

Some of Jackson’s most famous models – such as the Soloist, the Kelly and the Rhoads – are a common sight on the biggest stages around the world as the biggest names in metal use them, including Randy Rhoads, Adrian Smith, Marty Friedman and David Ellefson. Thankfully it’s not just premium guitars on offer, meaning guitarists on a budget can easily pick up a quality Jackson (the Dinky Series in particular) for just a few hundred bucks.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.

JS32 Dinky is one of those old school models that has stuck around, and for a good reason. The guitar is similar to the SL2, however it brings a much more neutral experience. It’s all about that Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge, two kicking humbuckers, and a fretboard that is built for speed. While I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar I’ve ever played, Jackson JS32 Dinky gives its competition a run for their money.


The MESA Bigblock 750 has a built-in overdrive channel. The Mesa M2000 has a high gain switch which can be engaged with a footswitch. The Marshall MB450 head and combo bass amplifiers have a tube pre-amp on the "Classic" channel which can be overdriven. The Ashdown ABM 500 EVO III 575W Bass amp head has a built-in overdrive effect. Overdrive is also available on many Crate bass amplifiers. The Yamaha BBT500H has three types of built-in drive effects: overdrive, distortion and fuzz. The Ampeg B5R Bass Amplifier has two channels: clean and overdrive, with the ability to combine the two. Verellen, a boutique amp company, produces a bass amplifier with a built in overdrive channel.
The Fender Stratocaster may be the most widely recognizable electric guitar and the one most associated with the rise of rock and roll music. It featured a distinctive double-cutaway design that allowed musicians to play higher notes by reaching higher on the fingerboard, three pickups (which allowed for a greater range of sounds since previous guitars which had two pickups at most), and a patented tremolo system that allowed players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of guitarists like Buddy Holly, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the Stratocaster became an icon of American rock and roll that took the world by storm. The Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, and other solid-body electrics were nothing if not versatile, and rock guitarists were obsessed with versatility. Guitarists could not only change the tone, volume, and pitch, but they also could manipulate the sound by playing close to the amplifier, grinding the strings against things, and using special effects accessories like the wah-wah pedal. Jimi Hendrix was this instrument’s master of manipulation, influencing generations of guitarists to experiment creatively with their playing techniques and equipment.
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
Technically, distortion is defined as being any change to the original signal other than in level. However, we tend not to think of processes such as EQ and compression as distortion, and the term is more commonly used to describe processes that change the waveform in some radical and often level-dependent way. These include guitar overdrive, fuzz, and simply overdriving analogue circuitry or tape to achieve 'warmth'. In the analogue domain, heavy overdrive distortion is usually created by adding a lot of gain to the signal to provoke deliberate overloading in a specific part of the circuit. Such high levels of gain invariably bring up the level of hum and background noise, so it may be helpful to gate the source. Though overdriving analogue circuitry is the traditional way of creating intentional distortion, we now have many digital simulations, as well as some new and entirely digital sound-mangling algorithms.
Yet another awesome 6 strings right handed electric guitar. The body is finished in solid basswood while the neck has a bolt on . The fingerboard is made of rosewood with 22 frets . It mostly comes in  black colour. It is quite affordable, with prices ranging from INR 9,071 depending on various market factors. you can click below to get more product details such as offers available:
The GT-70 was a re-styled two-pickup, single-cutaway recalling the F-55s. The cutaway retained the wide horizontal angle of before, however the upper bass bout received a more graceful treatment, with a slight inward curve as it met the neck at the 16th fret. The controls were the same as before; the elevated pickguard had become a large white affair, the tailpiece was the V-notched Bigsby. Pickups remained our familiar DeArmond humbuckers. Gone were the plastic bridges in favor of metal adjustable finetune variety. Finishes were either burgundy or black. The first prototype serial number was 203803. Around 1,450 of these were made between January of 1966 and October of 1968.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please
Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.
Your circuit shows a conventional RC tone control with a further small capacitor wired directly across the pickup. If you regard that extra cap, not as an additional component, but instead as the self capacitance of the pickup, which is normally a few hundred pF, then your circuit is already present in almost all electric guitars. OK I realise I’m being a bit smartarse here, it did strike me as another way of looking at this.

I have played all sorts of guitars, Guild, Gibson, Epi, Lowden, Fender etc etc. Walden for a beginner/intermediate are far beyond anything you can get for the same money. Exceptional sounding and great build quality, and because no-one has heard of them you can pick them up for half the price or any of the "named" brands if you get a good used one. I have had my hands on 3 in recent years, I got them for less than £100 each - one for £50 and it held its own with anything else I had that cost nearly £1k new. I would recommend them absolutely.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
By 1968 (and probably with the union of Unicord), Merson and Gulf + Western, Univox amps had begun to employ a Japanese-made chassis in Westbury-made cabinets, still with the high-quality Jensen speakers. These combined tube output with transistorized components. They were covered with a black Rhinohide vinyl and sported a silver plastic logo with stylized block letters – initial cap with a little tail off the left followed by lower case letters – typical of the earliest imported Univox guitars, on the black grillcloth.
The only guitar instrument I can think of that is NOT sampler-based and that actually sounds decent would be RealGuitar. It's not the most realistic (IMO) and it's $160+. But if you ask most people for recommendations on realistic guitar instruments, you will hear stuff like Shreddage, Electri6ity, ProminyLPC, Lyrical Distortion, Strawberry Electric Guitar from Orange Tree... all Kontakt libraries, and all undoubtedly better than the 3 products you listed in your initial post, two of which are simply synths and not at all meant for realistic playing!
The earliest extant six-string guitar is believed to have been built in 1779 by Gaetano Vinaccia (1759 - after 1831) in Naples, Italy; however, the date on the label is a little ambiguous.[37][38] The Vinaccia family of luthiers is known for developing the mandolin. This guitar has been examined and does not show tell-tale signs of modifications from a double-course guitar.[39] The authenticity of guitars allegedly produced before the 1790s is often in question. This also corresponds to when Moretti's 6-string method appeared, in 1792.
Guitar amplifier modeling: Amplifier modeling is a digital effect that replicates the sound of various amplifiers, most often vintage analog "tube" amps and famous brands of speaker cabinets (e.g., the Ampeg SVT 8x10" bass cabinet). Sophisticated modeling effects can simulate different types of speaker cabinets (e.g., the sound of an 8x10" cabinet) and miking techniques. A rotary speaker simulator mimics the doppler and chorus effect sound of a vintage Leslie speaker system by replicating its volume and pitch modulations, overdrive capacity and phase shifts.[95]
To make the OM more suitable for banjo players, the neck was made narrower and less V-shaped than previous Martins. The fingerboard was narrowed from the then-standard 1 7/8" to 1 3/4" at the nut. In addition to make the OM more banjo-like and to give it a distinctive look, banjo style tuning pegs were used. To do these, the headstock had to be made solid, instead of slotted. Previously Martin headstocks had all been slotted with tuners attached to the side mounted on a single plate for three tuners. No single-unit guitar tuners were available, so banjo pegs were a natural.
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A boost pedal is one of the most useful pedals one can have. Simply put, it boosts the signal that goes into it. It can perk up a low output guitar, or bring out more character or a different quality to your amp. This is especially useful for solos where overdrive or distortion would overwhelm the tone you've got. Boost adds more “you” to the sound. Look out for what tone the boost adds, like treble or mids before purchasing. Some boosts claim to be transparent, maintaining the same EQ of your original tone, while others spike a certain part of your EQ intentionally.
Musicians might not want to be replaced by machines - we (or they, as it were, because I lost whatever musician credentials I might have earned annoying people with my wooden flute as a beggar on the streets of a tourist town when I started programming computers to play music) might make a strong case that no machine can express the human soulfulness of music. It is easy to conclude that, the more of the musical task that is assigned to a machine, the less soul is expressed in the music. Well, great big rock-n-roll wall of sound that all over your acoustic guitar soul. That stack of Fender amps I can hear five miles from the stadium where David Gilmore is strumming a guitar is as much an instrument as was the Shepard's lute - and a much more popular instrument now, for audiences attuned to the daily roar of tires crushing air against pavement.
Salas is also bullish about the guitar’s prospects. “My 10-year-old son is at school in Austin, Texas and him and his friends are rocking out to 1970s funk,” he said. “A new generation is getting into guitar and rock’n’roll. I believe there’s going to be a massive comeback and that means with that style of music the electric guitar is going to make a comeback.”
The Little Lady is very similar to the 38C, but on a pearwood comb and with different cover plate art. It is technically a playable harmonica, but it is generally regarded as a knick-knack piece that can be used as personal jewelry. It is also available as a keychain. The Little Lady holds the distinction of being the first musical instrument to be played in outer space.[30][31]
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, unforgettable journey, slideshow, TV, radio. Featuring muted electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.

Microprocessor technology allows the use of digital onboard effects in guitar amps to create numerous different sounds and tones that simulate the sound of a range of tube amplifiers and different sized speaker cabinets, all using the same amplifier and speaker. These are known as modeling amplifiers, and can be programmed with simulated characteristic tones of different existing amplifier models (and speaker cabinets—even microphone type or placement), or dialed in to the user's taste. Many amps of this type are also programmable by way of USB connection to a home computer or laptop.[15] Line 6 is generally credited with bringing modeling amplification to the market.[18][19] Modeling amplifiers and stompbox pedals, rackmount units, and software that models specific amplifiers, speakers cabinets, and microphones can provide a large number of sounds and tones. Players can get a reasonable facsimile of the sound of tube amplifiers, vintage combo amplifiers, and huge 8x10” speaker stacks without bringing all that heavy equipment to the studio or stage.
Rock music evolved from Blues, the music of the streets. Most musos’ of the 50s and 60s were poor and guitar amps made to a budget. Some but not all technical principles of amp designs were well thought out. Fender and Marshall were the dominant and most copied brands. The powerful amps had 4 output valves in parallel push-pull and gave approx 60 - 100Watts.
I Shopped for a long time looking for a suitable nylon for both around the house and live performing. I ordered this Yamaha sight unseen and couldn't be happier with it. Fit and Finish is top notch. Price for value is incredible. playability is remarkably nice. Sound is great. I love the 14th fret to the body configuration vs my other nylons. The dual volume controls on the preamp give me a chance to glisten the high end in a band situation when my lines call for it. Honestly, i am a big fan of the Fishman electronics in my other acoustics, but this yamaha system leaves little to be desired. I did call yamaha support tto order a fitted soundhole cover and it took them a couple of days to get to me, but eventually called me until i
We specialise in 1960s and 1970s parts and literature, relating to American and European guitars and basses. Specifically Gibson, Guild and Vox. The parts for sale on this site are sorted by brand and type, or you can search for keywords in the box above. We have a lot of parts unlisted on this site - if you do not see the part you need, please ask.

Paul Landers, of Neue Deutsche Härte band Rammstein has a signature guitar based on his custom-built guitar. It features a mahogany body with a maple cap finished in satin black with silver binding only around the front of the body. The neck is also made of mahogany and features an Obeche fingerboard with no inlays or binding. Hardware includes a hardtail tune-o-matic bridge and Grover locking keystone tuners. The guitar also feature chrome-covered EMG pickups; an 81 in the bridge, and a 60 in the neck. It also only has a single volume control and a 3-way pickup toggle switch.
The best guitar I've found so far is my Westone Thunder 1a, from Matsumoku factory in Japan, 1982, which I got 2nd hand for £255. This has phase switching. coil split and an integrated preamp and EQ. It's got a 3 piece laminate neck with the centre strip at a right angle to the outer strips. It's got a brass bridge, nut, and knobs. It's 34 years old and the neck is as straight as an arrow. This guitar comes closest to having everything I could want in a guitar.

Guitar brands such as Antoria shared some Ibanez guitar designs. The Antoria guitar brand was managed by JT Coppock Leeds Ltd England. CSL was a brand name managed by Charles Summerfield Ltd England. Maurice Summerfield of the Charles Summerfield Ltd company contributed some design ideas to Hoshino Gakki and also imported Ibanez and CSL guitars into the UK with Hoshino Gakki cooperation from 1964-1987.[3] The Maxxas brand name came about because Hoshino Gakki thought that the guitar did not fit in with the Ibanez model range and was therefore named Maxxas by Rich Lasner from Hoshino USA [4].
Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   
Yamaha electric guitar is very durable.  However, some of its parts can be damaged by normal wear and tear.  One of the most common parts that can be easily damaged is the output jack.  The output jack of Yamaha guitar is frequently used.  Cables are being plugged into it.  After playing a tune, you will definitely unplug the cable so you can keep the guitar in its case.
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.
Les Paul created an early solid-body electric guitar in his spare time after work at the Epiphone factory in the early 1940's famously known as "The Log". It is believed that this was the first solidbody 'Spanish guitar' every built. He went on to develop the idea further until he took it to managers at Gibson sometime in 1945 or 1946 who immediately...
In August 2014 Vox released two Night Train limited editions, both of which were cosmetic updates to the NT2H set and the NT15C1 combo respectively, that recall a more traditional Vox aesthetic. For the Lil' Night Train NT2H-GD-SET, Vox supplied the NT2H head with a matte gold coloured tube cage and black control knobs, and then covered its V110NT cab with a retro-traditional “Brown Diamond“ grille cloth and basket weave covering (since there was no "G2" version of the Lil Night Train, this limited edition NT2H seems to mark the end of the line for this model as Vox makes no further reference to it). For the NT15C1-CL (Classic) combo amp Vox applied a similar treatment with the installation of a gold logo badge and trim on the front of the NT15C1 combo as well as adding the “Brown Diamond“ grille cloth.
Some effects, and the boxes that produced them, altered musical periods beyond recognition. The valve-driven Watkins Copicat, for example, will forever be associated with the sound of the late 1950s British music “beat” scene. Developed by Charlie Watkins in 1958, this odd machine supported a tape-recording mechanism that would record and play back any sound with varying lengths of delay in-between the replay heads. The device was critical to the rockabilly sound of the late 1950s, the “beat-group” sound of The Shadows, and the Liverpool Merseybeat scene of early 1960s (as well as the Birminghambeat, or Brumbeat scene). The sensation of hearing a guitar warble and wail to its own output encouraged guitarists to experiment with different styles of attack and vigor. For example, the noise that begins and ends the original 1962 recording of “Telstar” by the Tornados was made using the Copicat by creating a loop of echo and reverb effects. This produced what can best be described as some sort of space-echo/attack-helicopter noise.
My visit to NAMM showed me that we’d definitely find at least a couple of good beginner’s amps for less than $100, so we decided to make that our price ceiling for this test. That’s enough to buy an amp loud enough to play with a small combo, compact enough to fit easily into a small bedroom, and light enough for kids to carry. Beginners don’t need more than that. And when you consider that most people who take up a musical instrument don’t stick with it long, it’s wise to limit the expenditure until one really needs a larger or more fully featured amp.
These are great choices, but if you want a great guitar for the price go used and get either esp ltd ec400vf or the ec401vf. They come w seymour duncan 59 neck and jb bridge or dimarzio pickups. Grover tuners jumbo frets set neck mahogany neck and body. You can find em used for $300-400 and need absolutely nothing but to be plugged in. The ec256 is a great option but for the same price get the 401 used. I have a 65 jaguar a newer mustang 2 epi's 1 paul 1 SG and when I picked up the ec401vf for $300 it was the best value to quality ratio I have ever had in a guitar. You won't be disappointed. The ec400 series were also made in s korea and the earlier 401s were made there also. The newer ones are made in China and Indonesia but the quality is still incredible. I got a s korea model ec401vf w seymour setup. It smokes my epi l.p. tradional pro and was $250 cheaper. By far best deal it there.
Check out, for instance, this rare bird. A 1966 Wurlitzer Gemini, made at the Hollman-Woodell guitar factory in Neodesha, Kansas. Part of Wurlitzer’s THE WILD ONES series (which included the more pedestrian-looking, but still pretty rad Cougar and Wildcat models), these were made to compete with the best of the domestic market. High end tuners (Klutsons), a wonderful chunky bound neck (like a Fender V shape, but a bit thicker), and a great look highlight the Gemini.
Years of hard-earned success and fame have not changed his down-to-earth attitude. Even though he has become one of the world’s richest rock stars, he hasn’t married a supermodel or become a pompous art collector. Instead, he’s remained true to his working-class roots, spending his spare time building incredibly cool kustom cars and cruising the streets with his car club buddies, the Beatniks of Koolsville.
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