There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.
There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.
I am not completely sure this tuner info is completely accurate. Sorry about that... Remember as a general rule Grovers were used on style 21 and above, and Klusons were used on style 18 and lower. There are some exceptions (like during 1940 to 1945, and pre-1930s). On pre-war Grover tuners, there are basically two types used on Martins: G-93 (round button 'butterbean') and G-98 (scalloped buttons, aka "Sta-Tite"). Both came in 6:1 and 12:1 tuning ratios, with 12:1 coming about in 1938 (and replacing the 6:1 ratio). The post-1938 12:1 ratio Grovers can be always be identified since they combine the thin seamed tuner buttons with the long pointed baseplate, and the tuner gear is screw mounted. The 1938 and prior Grover G98 tuners have a thin seamed button combined with the a square tipped baseplate, and always had the 6:1 ratio. They also had the riveted tuner gear. Ater WW2 the G98 was reintroduced with pointy baseplates and a screw mounted gear, and this was copied by Waverly, Grover, Schaller, etc after the war. Also Martin used original Waverly tuners (open back, rounded base tips, butterbean buttons) after WW2 on 00 and 000 and some D guitars style 18 (and some 28) in the late 1940s and 1950s.
I have 8 guitars and 5 Gretsches and I'm currently playing this one the most. It's very bright, which if you play a Martin you might not like. Like super duper bright. No really, brighter than that. But I like it. Unplugged it's good but not very loud, so it's a nice practice guitar, but you're going to want to plug in at the coffee shop or larger.

Strandberg: Extremely unique and of great quality, the guitars made by Strandberg belong to a league of their own. They have extremely unique neck profile called EndurNeck to facilitate comfortable playing, the EGS tremolo is way more stable and easy to tune than other double locking trems. The guitars made by them are ergonomically designed to minimise fatigue among players. Their custom-shop specialises in making made-to measure guitars which are built specifically for each consumer so as to perfectly match his or her playing style. Their custom shop also provides option for Cycfi XR pickups whose sound can be programmed by editing their frequency curve.
Furtadosonline proudly presents our wide range of bass guitars for every playing style and musical need. Whatever the type of music you play, you\'ll find the right bass guitar from all your favorite brands Gibson, ESP, Warwick, Squier,Yamaha, Epiphone, Musicman, Cort and many more. Feel free to Choose an electric bass, an acoustic bass, an upright bass, a fretless bass, a left-handed bass, a 5-string bass, and even a 6 string bass, we have it all. Don\'t forget to browse through our portal for essential bass gear like bass amps, bass effects, bass heads and bass speaker cabinets. If you\'re shopping for bass guitar accessories look no further, bass strings, hardshell case or a gig bag for your bass. Feel free to take advantage of our wide range and great seasonal discounts. It is absolutley safe to purchase from us online and we can assure you total satisfaction backed by the Furtados Service Guarantee.

Not nearly as popular as single-coils and humbuckers, piezo pickups can be found on electric guitars as well. These crystalline sensors are usually embedded in the saddle of an electric guitar. Piezo sensors operate on mechanical vibration as opposed to magnets to convert sound from vibrating strings into an electric current. Piezo pickups can be used to trigger synthesizer or digital sounds much like an electronic keyboard. Most often, piezo pickups on an electric guitar are used to simulate an acoustic guitar tone. Piezo-equipped guitars often also include magnetic pickups to expand their tonal versatility.
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Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
bought at a tiny store in holland, back then they said to me the guiter was already 20 years old. he was looking a new, and bought it for 1000,- dutch guildens. thats maybe...445,- euro now. thats nothing compared to the prices they ask for a vox guitar they make TODAY! thay are building guitars again and ask pricies beginning by: 2000,- euro's. I wanna know when my guitar was bild, he has a chrome plate at the back with made by japan on it too.
The Korg Kaoss Pad is a small touchpad MIDI controller, sampler, and effects processor for audio and musical instruments, made by Korg. The Kaoss Pad's touchpad can be used to control its internal effects engine, which can be applied to a line-in signal or to samples recorded from the line-in. Effects types include pitch shifting, distortion, filtering, wah-wah, tremolo, flanging, delay, reverberation, auto-panning, gating, phasing, and ring modulation. The Kaoss Pad can also be used as a MIDI controller.

Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.


A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.

The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.


 Great, low priced, vintage Japanese project guitar. May be Decca, Teisco or similar. Has "P90" style, Japanese pickup installed which is not original to the guitar. Solid Mahogany body and neck with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard. Body is perfectly flat and is a thin 1.25" thick. Back of neck profile is very "flat". Top of original bridge is missing and has a wooden one laying in it's place. The pickup is wired directly to the output jack as there are no pots. 3 of the original tuning machines have had their gears changed. All work fine. The headstock logo is missing. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
The SG Standard is Gibson’s all-time best-selling guitar. It was conceived in 1961 and originally released as the new Les Paul. It featured distinct horn-shaped cutaways, and the neck joint was moved three frets, which made the guitar lighter and allowed easier upper fret access. In addition to these changes, the body was slimmer than the Les Paul Standard and the neck profile was more slender. However, with Mr. Paul preferring the sturdier design elements of his original model and due to contractual complications, his name was ultimately removed. Where Les Paul saw a mutation of his original design, others saw genius—from ’63 on, the Les Paul name was removed and the SG, or “Solid Guitar,” was born.

In 1968, Jimi Hendrix talked about his love for a Houston blues luminary who wasn't known outside the region: "There's one cat I'm still trying to get across to people. He is really good, one of the best guitarists in the world." Albert Collins, who died of lung cancer in 1993, played with his thumb and forefinger instead of a pick to put a muscular snap into his piercing, trebly solos. His fluid, inventive playing influenced Hendrix, sometimes overtly: Jimi liked Collins' sustain in the song "Collins Shuffle" so much that he used it on "Voodoo Chile."
not even close. No offense but John Mayer is trash absolute trash. Jack White is decent but not a guitar god at all. This is my list, and I'm going to leave out every guitar player that came before the Beatles, not saying Chuck Berry or B.B. King couldn't shred, but I'm trying to relate to the modern idea of Rock and Roll. I'm also judging on a lot more than just ability to "shred". And to the one goon…Jimmy Page SHINED live, that was Led Zeppelins appeal, you felt like you were at the biggest show on Earth…you probably just watched a few videos on youtube from the end of the band's career when he was a herion addict.
As a lover of fuzz pedals myself I have both kinds and find uses for them, they sound different and excellent. Other famous fuzz users are Eric Johnson, David Gilmour, Joe Bonamassa, and Stevie Ray Vaughan to name a few. When shopping for a fuzz, try to play as many as you can next to each other, even of the same model. Due to the transistor values the same model pedal can sound and feel very different from pedal to pedal.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.
When you think about playing lead guitar, you think a lot about learning scales, learning guitar techniques like bending, sliding, vibrato, double stops, and other playing techniques that help give your guitar solos personality. One thing a lot of guitar players overlook, particularly in the beginning, is tone. A guitarist’s tone can be everything. Tone can act as a signature for guitar players. In this really neat Guitar Control video lesson, Robert shows you three electric guitar tone tips that can bring your guitar sound to life and make it instantly recognizable.

If any item fails to meet your expectations at any time, please return it for a refund or exchange. From tuners to endpins, everything we sell at Stewart-MacDonald is backed by our rock-solid guarantee of satisfaction. This is how we do business, ever since selling our first 5-Star Banjo Head in 1968. We proudly continue this tradition by offering quality products and standing behind them.


This great book of interviews is, in my opinion, one of only a handful of truly essential record-production books, and is packed with down-to-earth recording advice, as well as discussions of the art of production. In addition to the interviews I've referred to in this article, the book also features such greats as Glen Ballard, Arif Mardin, Brian Wilson, Phil Ramone, Mitchell Froom, George Martin and Geoff Emerick, and one of the strengths of Massey's approach is that he often asks them similar questions, which makes for interesting comparisons.

Squier model Telecasters are sold by Squier, a Fender-owned import brand. These can bear the Telecaster name, since Squier is owned by Fender. Squier guitars, especially the Telecasters, have gained popularity[citation needed] and a good reputation amongst guitar players,since it has expanded its production of guitar models.For example a 1989 Korean Squier Telecaster made in the Samick factory could be considered tonally superior[citation needed] to a modern American produced guitar besides necks being more comfortable in general.Template:Citation neede Squier has a wide range of different Telecaster type guitars available, from the entry-level Affinity Series to the better quality Standard and Classic Vibe Series. However, Standards are often used by beginners. Also available are the Artist Series and Vintage Modified Series. Among other famous musicians, Sheryl Crow has occasionally used a Squier Telecaster for recordings and live performances.[4][dead link]

No, you’re right. The more I think about it, the more I see the attraction. Plus, I was wrong in my previous comment when I said the sides would sound the same up to the limit of the smaller cap. Because I think they’re be audible resonance differences between the two values. It’s the same reason why the scheme I’m discussing differs from a standard tone control. And I sound vague, it’s ’cause I am! One reason I’m eager to explore this …


When it comes to multi-effects pedals, the Zoom G3X delivers big-time. Voted the top multi-effect pedal in our research by a large margin, the G3X hits high marks for quality, value for the money, portability, and most of all ease of use. Aside from giving you a multitude of effects, this unit is also an amplifier simulator, tuner, fully functional looper, doubles as a USB audio interface, and has a built-in expression pedal. Zoom has stiff competition in the multi-fx “battle of the brands,” and we were surprised to see their G3X come out on top against solid offerings from Boss, Digitech, Line 6, TC Electronic, and more. When you watch some videos or demo this unit yourself, it’s hard to not get excited about it.

Taylor’s proprietary pickup system, the Expression System, consists of ahumbucking induction pickup mounted in the neck and a pair of dynamic soundboard transducers wired to an on board preamplifier designed by Rupert Neve.[10] The entry-level 100 and 200 series use an externally similar system known as ES-T, which utilizes a single under-saddle pickup and no soundboard transducers. The first generation system was powered by a pair of AA batteries. Starting in 2007 the electronics use a 9-volt battery similarly to common piezoelectric and microphonic pickup systems in other guitars.


Wow! I have been playing guitar for forty years and this is the best guitar I have ever played for fingerpicking. The sound is marvelous, both using an amplifier or not. The quality of construction is beautiful. And, it is easy to play as well. You know when you play an instrument that is just right, and this guitar is one of them. And it is priced for anyone's budget.
Mention the subject of American acoustic guitars and one of the first names that will undoubtedly pop into your head will be C.F. Martin. Not that there aren’t many other estimable names, but Martin, by virtue of its longevity � since 1833 � and incredible quality remains the standard by which almost all steel-stringed acoustics are judged. A pretty impressive achievement.
The Ibanez GRX20ZBKN is part of the GIO series developed for players who want Ibanez quality in a more affordable package. The guitar is suitable for all types of music, but often a favorite of rock, metal and shred lovers. It features an alder body and a maple neck which feels sleek and fast. Great for moving quickly up and down the neck for those fast riffs and licks. A solid good looking low budget guitar for the beginner and intermediate.
Playing Electric Slide is great. I use the neck pick up mostly or the bridge pick up with the tone turned down as not to blow out peoples ear drums, but you can adjust to the tone you prefer. Most people adjust the strings a little further from the neck. I prefer not so I can bend and play normal too. Great slide players. Jimmy Page, Joe Bonnamassa, Joe Perry hope this was helpful

Pacifica series of Yamaha electric guitars are the ones you have probably heard of once, mistaken for a Strat a couple of times, but never really considered. Needless to say, that was a mistake. One quick look at Yamaha Pacifica PAC510V OVS reveals why. Before even getting into details it doesn't take much to recognize the apparent quality all around.
In 1979, there was a benefit for Amnesty International called “The Secret Policeman’s Ball”. Pete Townshend played acoustic versions of “Pinball Wizard”, “Drowned”, and (in a duet with classical guitarist John Williams) an astonishing version of “Won’t Get Fooled Again”. Unfortunately the soundtrack for that show has never been available in the CD and digital download era, but you can often spot these performances on YouTube. Highly recommended.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.
On top of that, the Champion 20 offers built-in effects, including reverb, chorus, flanging, delay, auto wah, vibrato, and tremolo. All of these effects can be chosen using a single knob, with an additional FX Level knob to control the mix of the unprocessed sound with the effect. These effects can’t match the flexibility and adjustability of separate effects pedals—for example, with the exceptions of reverb+delay and reverb+chorus, effects can’t be combined—but they can at the very least give beginners an idea of how these effects work. Many guitarists may find the Champion 20’s built-in effects to be all they need.

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ASSEMBLE Now you can put it all together! By this time you'll be so excited you'll forget about the electronics and start to string in up before you get the electronics in but it's ok, we'll get there. Start with bolting on the neck in the same fasion that you did when you test fitted everything. Then follow that with the tuners, bridge and pickups. Don't forget to run the wiring for the pickups when you put them in.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
The Thunderhead had two humbuckers, gold hardware, a master volume with two tone controls, a pickup blender knob, and a phase reversal switch. Some had DeArmond pickups with metal covers, a large black insert with nonadjustable poles, plus six tiny adjustable pole screws along one edge. The ebony fingerboard was bound with diamond inlays and had the characteristic “mustache” on the end of the fingerboard. The tops and backs featured figured maple laminates. Colors options included a wine red, sunburst natural, and green (on Thunderhead only). The Thunderhead K-1360 had a trapeze tail, the K-1460 a vibrato. The Tornado (K-1160 with trapeze, K-1260 with vibrato) was a downscale version with plain top, chrome hardware, two volume and two tone controls (no phase), and the Schaller pickups.
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The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
The common design of a standalone stompbox is simple and, thus, hasn’t changed much: The guitar lead plugs into an input while a second lead carries the output to the amplifier. In between, a multitude of knobs, switches, and pedals modify the signal. To connect two or more boxes requires “jumper” leads, which chain the boxes together to complete a circuit of circuits, each one powered by a 9V battery. Typically, stompboxes are activated by “stomping” on an on/off bypass switch. This simple design enables tinkering: The exterior casing can be easily removed, exposing the interior for modification. To do so requires only a basic grasp of electronics, solder tools (or a solder-less breadboard circuit), and patience. Lots of patience.
Except if, like George Gruhn, you know better. The 71-year-old Nashville dealer has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift. Walking through NAMM with Gruhn is like shadowing Bill Belichick at the NFL Scouting Combine. There is great love for the product and great skepticism. What others might see as a boom — the seemingly endless line of manufacturers showcasing instruments — Gruhn sees as two trains on a collision course.
The Effect: Bass guitars are the core of every band. Along with drums, they make the rhythm section. Because of this, bass players are seen as ‘background members’ in a band. With that said, bass guitar offers much more range than that. Following the footsteps of legends such as Lemmy Kilmister and others, we can see that bass guitar can be the star of the show. All you really need is a good distortion pedal. Finding one may prove to be trickier than it seems. Your average guitar dist pedal may work, but chances are you will get better results with something like Tech 21 RIP Red Ripper. This is adedicated dist box for bass guitar, which covers the low end segment of bass tone and gives you some advanced tone shaping options. A proper bass dist box can really make all the difference if you are looking for proper sound.
A variety of labels are used for level attenuation potentiometers (knobs) in a guitar amplifier and other guitar equipment. Electric guitars and basses have a volume control on the instrument that attenuates the signal from selected pickups. There may be two volume controls on an electric guitar or bass, wired in parallel to mix the signal levels from the neck and bridge pickups. Rolling back the guitar's volume control also changes the pickup's equalization or frequency response, which can provide pre-distortion equalization.
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,399 | Body: Ash | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x V-Mod Single-Coil Telecaster | Controls: Volume with treble-bleed, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: 3-saddle, strings-through-body Tele bridge with compensated brass saddles, 6-screw mounting with removable modern 'Ashtray' bridge cover | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Mystic Seafoam, 2-Color Sunburst, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Butterscotch Blonde, Candy Apple Red, Crimson Red Transparent, Natural, Olympic White, Sonic Gray

Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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