Sorry it has sold: Here we have a rather nice rare vintage 1970 Yairi & Son Classical acoustic guitar It's Label reads... Hand Crafted in Japan by Yairi & Son Model # 300 Serial # 177 Pretty darn low serial number 1970 remember she's 45 years old! Condition overall is very good - excellent used / vintage Not new or mint of course... Regarding its build quality She exhibits beautiful workmanship and superior materials Aged woods of over 30+ years old in 1970 when it was built! Tone-Woods now are in the 75 year range on this example looks like a Vintage masterpiece with its patina and look and feel I love these oldies funny thing is It still shines like glass to, amazing really when you think about it. This guitar has very good deep base tone and excellent volume and plays easily and comfortably the neck is nice and big 2" at the nut nice and wide feel to it. The neck is made of a high grade mahogany see pics, back and sides are also beautiful mahogany, with black or very dark brown bindings for a very classic look, the on the business end she has a wonderful quality solid spruce top with lots of bear claw figuring a really nice sound box it projects very well in deed... As you look at its back side in its entirety top to bottom it's hard to find a blemish I'm sure there are a few minors but it's really looking very clean and with a surprisingly shiny original finish... The front the headstock is pretty clean as well!...notice a bone nut has been fit, frets show little to no wear what so ever more than 90% remaining fret life, the fingerboard shows a little play action remember it's a 1970! ... The top as several chips and drinks and I have addressed them a touch up lacquer pen and just dabbed the tiny chip to prevent further chipping there it as a result after I polished it up turned out pretty darn good looking too, This guitar came to us as a partial trade with its bridge pulled nearly off by a ding dong previous owner that put regular gauge dred heavy gauge strings on it for long term and it lifted off in time, I removed all that cleaned up the woods & prepped it for a new vintage period correct Jacaranda rosewood classical bridge and glued it with hide glue clamping it up for 2 weeks & set her up with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Dean Markley strings... This beauty comes with its original hard shell case black Tolex with a plush Marigold lining one bad latch but still functions well good hinges and handle so it's still ok. This is rock solid now as the Yairi & Son label says use only nylon strings. If you just use what Yairi suggested this would have never happened not Yairi's fault just the wild eyed idea gone wrong. Anyways she's back in action and sounding better than ever so if you like these old Yairi & Son classical guitars this may be a good consideration for you.... Let me know if you likeeee. Email Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
A friend owns a music store and looked up the "Norma" brand. It said- Norma guitars were manufactured in Japan between 1966 and 1972 by the Japanese to compete with the Gibson HummingBird. The look is almost identical (Check out the Gibson Hummingbird played by Jonathan "BuggieMan" Long from Baton Rouge La. His looks exactly like my Norma. I too was curious for thirty years about my good sounding guitar. Looks aint everything!
Their innovation continued by developing a bowl shape guitar body - the result, at least to my ears and that of many other guitarists, is that the resulting tone of their acoustic-electric guitars is similar to those using traditional tonewoods in their construction. Unlike more radical brands like RainSong, they still use traditional woods for the tops of their guitars.

One thing is for sure: the advantage of a multi effects pedal is getting a lot of effects in one convenient package, which you can use to learn what guitar effects you actually use on a regular basis. Depending on the type of music you play, your style, and your skill level, chances are you don’t have a need for every effect type under the sun. Pro guitarists’ pedalboards are tailored to the tone and sound they need to achieve. Perhaps fuzz, delay, and compression are crucial, but not a flanger or chorus. Point is, if you don’t yet know this about yourself, a multi-effects pedal is the most perfect and cost effective way to start. Over time, if and when your love for effects deepens, as your budget allows you can start buying individual pedals that are better versions of what’s on your multi-fx unit. The overdrive in your Zoom G3X might be good enough to hold you over, but eventually you might want to get an actual Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer.


In major-thirds (M3) tuning, the chromatic scale is arranged on three consecutive strings in four consecutive frets.[83][84] This four-fret arrangement facilitates the left-hand technique for classical (Spanish) guitar:[84] For each hand position of four frets, the hand is stationary and the fingers move, each finger being responsible for exactly one fret.[85] Consequently, three hand-positions (covering frets 1–4, 5–8, and 9–12) partition the fingerboard of classical guitar,[86] which has exactly 12 frets.[note 1]
Every working guitarists knows that if he doesn't have a good guitar doctor, his dreams of being a master shredder who destroys the crowd with rakes from his pick as he slides it up the string are dead. From a broken headstock to a cracked neck, a guitar technician is a master of skills. He's an electrician, a plumber, a physician and a surgeon. But if a guitarist wants to shoot fireballs out of his guitar, he'll need more than just a technician; he'll need a guitar master.
Item Weight 9.6 ounces Product Dimensions 2.5 x 2.8 x 4.2 inches True Bypass Footswitch Zinc Alloy Outer Cover Transparent top knob and 2 cool small black knobs Psychedelic music uses the imagination to filter how we understand this strange ad beautiful world we live in: through melody and noise, with echoes and ambience, with peace and love. The TAPE EKO is a smart echo pedal that embodies the soul of the classic tape echo sound. It provides three delay modes: Mode I, Mode II, and reverse mode. Mode I gives you all the advantages of a digital delay. Compared with other tape echo effects, this mode produces a brighter, cleaner tone with less noise, all without sacrificing warmth or dynamics. Mode II differs from Mode I in terms of dynamics.
These days it’s hard to determine where Squier’s end and Fenders begin. Squier by Fender Classic Vibe 60’s SStratocaster is a perfect example of what we meant. It’s a well built guitar that brings admirable craftsmanship and a tone that is equally as good. To me, the difference between this model and a Mexican Strat was too small, which made me somewhat uncomfortable.
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.

With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.
The final stages of on-board sound-shaping circuitry are the volume control (potentiometer) and tone control (a low-pass filter which "rolls off" the treble frequencies). Where there are individual volume controls for different pickups, and where pickup signals can be combined, they would affect the timbre of the final sound by adjusting the balance between pickups from a straight 50:50.
You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
Before I get started, one quick note of caution. Because you need to play 'through' Cubase in order to hear the effects, you'll need a low-latency system — which means a fast computer, and a good audio interface, with quality ASIO or Core Audio drivers. Even if an interface has a 'zero‑latency' monitoring feature, that won't do you any good, as it will simply route the input signal to the output, without going through Cubase or any of its plug‑ins, which kind of defeats the purpose… Preferably, you should also have an interface with a high‑impedance input (suitable for guitar and bass). Many modern interfaces have an 'instrument input' which will do the job, but if not, you'll need to use a guitar‑friendly preamp, compressor, or similarly 'neutral' effect to feed a line input (or use a DI box).

Mikko, spot on. Even light wood has density, and there comes a point in solid body electric guitars where how dense any piece of wood is only makes a difference acoustically. The point you made about how a guitar feels when you're playing it is sound, though. Its weight and acoustic resonance will affect how you respond to it and how you attack it (same for neck thickness and profile), and that will account for the preference we have for one guitar over another of the same model.

I've been asked why it took so long to make this record. Well, it didn't really take too long to make this record. It took six months to make it. What I'd been doing before that was hopefully a journey I can continue. I guess what we play is still indie or alternative, I don't know all the different terms these days -- I've kind of lost track about what label I'm supposed to be these days. But it's still the kind of music I started playing when I was a kid, really. I'm fronting a band I could have fronted at fifteen or sixteen, so that's quite cool.
Unlike most new wave guitarists at the dawn of the Eighties, Honeyman-Scott had impeccable fashion sense. He always maintained a timeless detached rocker look, and his aviator shades, medium-length shag haircut, suit jacket and jeans attire never really went out of style, unlike the geometric haircuts and DayGlo suits that many of his contemporaries wore. He always played the coolest guitars onstage as well, from classic Gibson Les Pauls and Firebirds to custom-made Hamers and Zemaitis metal-front guitars.
Just starting your electric guitar journey? The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar is specially designed to cater to the needs of beginner guitarists. With the Epiphone named attached to this instrument, you know you're getting top quality. The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar comes with Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups which give a lot of warmth to this guitar's sound. The neck and body are made of mahogany which gives the best sound quality. The slim design makes for fast learning.

I sold my Yamaha Pacifica 12 and have been trying to find out more about the Italia Rimini 12, the Schecter TSH-12 Classic(which is the new version and I only saw 2 -both sold) and the Eastwood Sidejack 12. I have the money, but finding anything but the Eastwood online, is rather difficult. I still would like to try them out before buying, if I could.
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
Along with the options mentioned, be sure to check out overdrive pedals like the Ibanez Tube Screamer or the Boss Super OverDrive SD-1. As for distortion pedals, be on the lookout for the TC Electric Dark Matter Distortion Pedal or the MXR M75 Super Badass Pedal. Whether you're going for a heavy Sabbath-like snarl, the cutting buzzsaw tone of Johnny Ramone or Cobain's feedback-drenched squeals, the distortion and overdrive effects pedal for you is waiting in this catalog.
The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
There are several aspects that make the acoustic guitar different from the electric one. The most notable difference is the fact that the acoustic types do not need a source of electricity or rather they do not have to be plugged in for them to be heard. They are relatively large and are built with a hollow chamber for the magnification of the guitar’s resonance thus giving out sound that originates from the plucked strings. It also has a bridge that is essential for the transmission of vibration of the strings to the body. They are self contained, needing minimal preparation to play. In other words, they are the guitars to be bought by all those looking for simplicity.
A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.

The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
Some bass amplifier combos have a "whizzer cone" attached to the low frequency woofer's centre. The whizzer cone is about the same size as a dust cap, although it resembles a miniature speaker cone. The whizzer cone handles the upper frequencies that are too high for the woofer. Roland's 60 watt and 120 watt bass combos contain both a woofer and a whizzer cone.
You may wondering how these chord shapes has been constructed. For now, you just need to know that a chord is based on the notes of a simple scale, which has 7 notes, and you finish on the original note, one octave up, for a total of 8 notes. A basic Major chord is made up of the 1st note in the scale of whatever key you are playing in, also called the root note, the 3th note, and the 5th note. We’ll get into that later, when we talk more about scales.
Here we have a Taylor guitar for under $500. Taylor is known for their high quality, and expensive guitars. It’s great that they are offering a lower priced model so more players can enjoy their great sounding guitars. The Big Baby is a 15/16 dreadnought sized guitar which is slightly smaller than a full sized. Perfect for those that want that dreadnought sound but want a little smaller body. The top is sitka spruce and the back and sides are sapele. Owners are saying that the guitar has a very warm and full bodied tone, and that it does not sound like a cheap guitar. This is no surprise given that it is made by Taylor. This is another great choice for those with smaller hands, as Taylor’s are known for their great necks and amazing playability. See more info including more pictures here.
When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.

We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.


In the early 1980s Collings decided to move to San Diego, California but never made it further than Austin, Texas.[3][4] He started out sharing work space with fellow luthiers Tom Ellis, a builder of mandolins, and Mike Stevens. A few years later he decided to continue on his own and take the craft more seriously, moving into a one-stall garage shop.
Despite what appears now to a somewhat dated design (all the quasi-organic shapes inspired by Alembic at the time are tough to love with the passage of time), Martin’s 18 Series electrics are actually quite comfortable and yield a versatile number of useful sounds. The neck profile is quite round, not unlike many acoustics, but very easy to play. The frets are small and squarish, which makes them a bit awkward for blues-style bending.
The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.

Slow Gear – A dynamic effect created by BOSS that swells in volume as if you were riding the volume knob on your guitar. The effect is similar to the envelope of a violin with its ability to remove the “attack” or initial transient of the signal and produce gradual volume swells. The compact pedal version of this effect is discontinued but it is found in both the ME-80 and GT-100 multi effects pedals.

The massive slabs of rock-candy noise that J Mascis heaved from his Fender Jazzmaster in Dinosaur Jr. contained multitudes: Black Sabbath savagery, melodic Neil Young soul, punk-rock pig slop. As his recent solo set, Several Shades of Why, showed, he can get shamelessly pretty with an acoustic, too. "I remember seeing Dinosaur play this soft, plaintive song – and then it was just completely detonated by this ravaging solo that J did," says Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore. "The whole room was incinerated."
Like we said; if you’re just starting out in the world of electric guitar, a looper pedal is a great way to learn how to play in time and play with other musicians. As you can jam along with yourself, lay down a rhythm track and play lead over the top, you get to learn what works best. It’s also a great song writing tool as you can jam with yourself and create some killer tracks. You may not use it live but you’ll definitely use it!

went to great lengths to get here for a basic set up on a vintage les paul. after 3 months of long waiting guitar was no better off, it was different, but just as bad and completely unplayable. he may have spent 30 seconds tweaking the truss rod, but didn't do the necessary or requested fret leveling to resolve all the dead areas up high. unbelievable after 3 months to have a guitar unplayable after traveling such lengths to get here & back.
Ovation Instruments is a Division of Kaman Corporation, a major supplier to the United States government of military helicopters, rescue equipment, electronic components and other aerospace products. There are eight divisions of Kaman, participating in such diverse industries as commercial transportation, nuclear sciences, space medicine, education and social sciences, oceanography and, most recently, recreation.
Here is s very nice 1976 Takamine F375s from the laswsuit era with the Headstock shape and logo style font replica of a Martin D-35 Exotic Brazilian rosewood guitar from 1962, An amazing likeness in looks obviously and she sounds sooooo sweet the 40+ years since she was built back in 1976 at the time of this build it has been said that Takamine had used aged woods of at least 20 years aging prior to its construction... this guitar has been extremely well cared for and it has barely a few scratches that will be sort of hard to find, the structural integrity of this guitar is excellent its neck set is excellent as is its action is low and as a result this guitar plays amazingly with no buzz smooth action and a pleasure to play. Frets have been lightly dressed and are nice too. Neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut with a medium profile it feels like an old Martin to just perfect. It has been set up with a Martin bone nut & saddles set as well as new Martin 80/20 strings set she sings loud and sweet a pleasure to play with rich encouraging tone. This guitar is straight as can be with no cracks or separation on its body or neck with the only exception being its Solid Sitka Spruce top has 2 fine hairline cracks in the top and they do not go threw to the back side and are insignificant and have been properly sealed and buffed and you can not see them until the closest inspection, they are not progressing and have been stabilized professionally years ago. Other that the hairlines you cant see its near mint otherwise overall condition give this a very good to -excellent vintage used condition rating and a great choice fot the lover of these great exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitars, Japan does offer these Exotic Jacaranda Brazilian rosewood bodied guitars today but note they do not come with the OLD school Martin Headstocks or the old style Script logo they have the modern headstock Takamine design and logo oh ya a $4500-6000 price tag as well. You will find that this beautiful Rare guitar is a Bargain priced gem and should be played tonight as it is Ready to tour or Record tonight! .
Lastly, we have guitars which combine the two systems and have both the piezoelectric pickup as well as a microphone in the sound box. Both of these sources are fed into a preamp, which often allows you to choose the source of the sound. Not only that, but you can also blend the two together to average out the benefits of both types while minimizing the negatives.
Based on Mesa's flagship Mark V, the Mark Five: 25 head is small, perfectly formed and typical of Mesa's superlative design and attention to detail. Two independent channels, each with three very different voice presets, combine with Mesa's iconic five-band graphic EQ for a choice of 12 sounds. You can footswitch between the channels, with the graphic on or off for quasi four-channel operation and preset 25 or 10 watts per channel. One of the best features lives on the back panel: a CabClone speaker-emulated direct output, with a speaker defeat for silent recording or practice, using the built-in headphone socket. Despite the Mark Five: 25's long feature list, it's very easy to use and its tones are sensational. The rhythm channel covers the shimmering clean tones of the modern Boogie and the fatter 'blackface'-inspired midrange of the fabled Mark I, while the Mark V crunch voice is so deep and three-dimensional you could record an entire album with it. The lead channel is equally inspiring, with a perfect rendition of the Mark IIC's overdrive tone (arguably the most coveted Boogie sound), along with more modern distortion effects that sound unbelievably good when tweaked with the graphic. The Mark Five: 25 is one of the best small Boogies we've ever heard, which means it's one of the best small amps there is.
Guitar lessons work best if you're putting your skills together to learn how to play songs. That's why Guitar Tricks has a ton of great song tutorials for when you've mastered the Core Learning System, or if you want to try something new. These easy guitar songs are great, especially if you're a beginner that recently picked up an electric guitar. 

Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
The way Kristin Hersh rubs major and minor notes next to each other in her intricately plotted songs is truly haunting; a ghostly approach that didn’t even require selling her soul at the Crossroads. Blending plucky arpeggios and bluesy slides with punishing strumming, Hersh’s playing has actually gotten more aggressive as she’s eased into her 40s with 50 Foot Wave.
Dave Friedman (Rack System, Ltd.): “Pedal order is a very subjective thing, and I’ve had people do it all backwards because that’s the way they like it. Generally speaking, compressors come before overdrives, modulation things are kind of in the middle, and delays are at the end. The wah is kind of a personal preference. Sometimes it’s in front early in the chain, and sometimes it’s after overdrives.
While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.

In the image above, the first higher peak we see is E4 (i.e. the low E-string on a guitar in standard tuning), the second peak is E5 (i.e. an octave higher) and the following high peaks are B5, E6, G#6, B6, D7, and so on. Remember that the test rigs only have two strings, both tuned to E, and plucked open. So what you are hearing is a mish-mash of tons of overtones that shape the character of the “tone” that you hear.
Recently Vox has emerged as a leader in the digital amp modelling market[citation needed] with the release of its Valvetronix line of digital amplifier modellers. Utilising Korg's REMS modelling software, the Valvetronix are driven via a low-power tube preamp stage and a solid state power amp. The latest line, the AD15VT / AD30VT / AD50VT / AD100VT, has received awards and praise[citation needed] for its recreation of eleven classic guitar amplifiers. The company did not reveal which non-Vox amplifiers were modelled in the product manual. The eleven amplifier types as named on the dial are:
A Zoom G3X review is not complete without talking about the inclusion of a tuner and looper with built-in rhythm patterns. Just like all of this pedal’s functions, calling up the tuner is very easy; you just hold down the middle footswitch for a couple seconds. As we covered in our best looper pedal guide, a looper is an indispensable practice tool, and the fact that you get a pretty nice one in this unit is a huge plus in our book. The G3X gives you 40 seconds of loop time, which is ample time to record something interesting. You get 41 very basic drum patterns, and while they don’t sound amazing, it’s nice that they sync with the looper. Have a look at this 3 minute demo video of a performance using the looper and other Zoom G3X effects:
Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...

Together with Marshall and Vox, Hiwatt is considered to be one of the main contributors to what we commonly refer to as the “British sound.” The company’s history is older than the name, with owner Dave Reeves building his first custom unit in 1963. This earned a great deal of praise on the local scene for its reliability and virtually established the company’s character.  

Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
In the late 1950s, various guitars in the Kay line were assigned new model numbers; according to the 1959 catalog, the Thin Twin became K5910 and the Electronic Bass became K5965.[18] Both instruments remained in Kay's catalog offerings with only minor cosmetic variations until 1966, when Kay revamped its entire guitar line to only feature budget instruments. Kay also manufactured versions of the Thin Twin guitar under the Silvertone (Sears) and Old Kraftsman (Spiegel) brands.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Various
• Fast Fingers: If speed’s the goal, most shred-heads prefer light gauge strings. They’re easy to bend and promote fast playing by offering less resistance to the fretting and picking hands. Since guitar strings are measured in thousandths of an inch, the typical recommended gauge for players planning to burn in standard tuning are .009s, available in every guitar shop.

Little Martin: Designed around a modified O-14 fret body, the Little Martin series is built at a smaller 23″ scale length. With the exception of the LX1 and LX1E, which both have solid Sitka spruce tops, Little Martin series guitars are constructed with HPL top, back, and sides. Recent models incorporate a greater amount of synthetic materials, such as Stratabondnecks and Micarta (as opposed to rosewood or morado) fretboards and bridges. The guitars employ Modified X-Series “X” bracing, reinforced by a bowtie plate made of graphite. Little Martin series guitars do not havepickguards or fretboard inlays.
The 600 series pairs maple back and sides with a spruce top that has gone through Taylor’s torrefaction process, which accelerates the wood’s aging process through heat. We couldn’t find a single fault with this guitar’s build quality and the 612ce is an unbelievably comfortable guitar to play. The tone is still that of a maple guitar, but a more refined one than we’re used to. Likewise with the torrefied spruce: it’s immediately familiar, but with enough difference to cause a cocked ear. Strumming out chords and standard singer-songwriter fare was pleasing, and it put in a good shift with some country-style flat-picking, but it is fingerstyle playing that this guitar lives and breathes. By any token these models from the 600 series are stunning guitars. They have a laudable ecological footprint, they look superb and they have rich, unexpected tonal qualities. 
Martin factory action was traditionally higher than that used by makers like Taylor. Bob Taylor made his bones by offering acoustic guitars that felt and played like electric guitars. Martins had thicker necks, and higher action often called “Bluegrass action.” If you pick very hard, or do a lot of heavy hammer ons, lower action can be more of a problem if you want clean or pure notes.
The bridge pickup is a Modern Player Humbucker, which gives this Telecaster a little more “punch” than the traditional model. And like the Stratocaster, Fender's Tele design is also know to be one of the most versatile guitar in existence, capable of anything from hard rock to country and lite jazz tones. The pickup configuration of the modern player makes this a substantially heavier Telecaster, in terms of tone and resonance.
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.

A closer look at a 1981 Gibson Victory MV-II electric guitar. The Gibson Victory MV, or 'Multi-Voice' guitars had very wide tonal palettes; with coil-tapped humbuckers they could produce typical Gibson tones, but were also designed to 'out-Fender' Fender. Two models were launched in the summer of 1981. Whilst the MVX, was designed to do everything a Stratocaster could do, the MVII was 'primarily for the discerning country player' - placing it squarely against the Telecaster.


A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
Even when the bass track(s) are well-recorded, and sound good, you may want to enhance the bass tone for mixdown with your favorite bass-friendly plug-in processors. Besides the obvious EQs and compressors, there are many distortion processors and amp sims out there suitable for bass. Sometimes a simple tube-warming effect is all you need to add a little subtle fatness, like the many plug-ins that simulate slight tube drive or tape saturation. I always liked the Tech 21 SansAmp on bass, and Pro Tools includes a well-modeled plug-in version of that unit. Most of the popular guitar amp modelers also include options that can add some nice grit & girth to clean bass tracks, including Softube’s Bass Amp Room and Logic’s built-in B.A.D.—Bass Amp Designer—which, like most bass amp sims, includes models of classic bass amps like the Ampeg SVT and Fliptop, along with modern bass amp & cabinet emulations. Any of these can add that finishing touch to a good bass part, and there are many freeware options as well, for those on a tight budget.

Reliability is one of these. There are many different parts to an electric guitar. In addition to the body and neck being put together solidly, there are the components to consider. The pickups, controls, circuitry and output jack all need to be well made and connected securely, while the bridge and tuners should function correctly, with nothing too loose or too stiff.


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With the Seagull S6 Classic, you get an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a solid design and an impressive sound that will delight, regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amplifier or PA. This model features a cedar top that has been tested for pressure resistance, so you know you have a tough guitar on your hands to use for many years.
Terry Kath and Stevie Ray Vaughan for me over anyone on that list but Jimi. I’ve seen Page, Clapton, Billy Gibbons, Brian May, David Gilmour, Steve Howe, Eddie Van Halen, Buddy Guy, Keith Richards, Pete Townshend, Mick Ronson, Kerry Livgren, Joe Walsh, Don Felder and Carlos Santana among others. Totally subjective as is all art and I have weird taste.
The above might sound like a trivial thing to mention, but achieving a loyal following of knowledgeable fans is not something that any brand can boast with. Judging by the rave reviews this product received it’s easy to understand why, and the 45 mm aperture drivers it operates with are proprietary to Audio-Technica, so you won’t get them anywhere else. Most headphones struggle with bass given their law diameter aperture, but the ATH-M50x renders sound accurately throughout the range.



A perfect jammer or learner guitar, the Yamaha Pacifica is a super inexpensive electric guitar option. While you really shouldn’t use this electric to tour or play live, you can still hook it up to an amp and shred to your heart’s content. With a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, this guitar actually has a great look to it while also providing for a comfortable neck and fast action. Expect to pay under $200 for this super-affordable, super-shreddable guitar.
Semi-hollow, slim, and designed with a comfortable ‘C’ shape exterior, the D’Angelico EX-DC Standard is a high-price electric guitar with professional grade features. Creating a more natural tone that delivers an organic quality to its sound, the Standard guitar uses Kent Armstrong Vintage humbuckers for a focused sound free of excess reverberation. The Super-Rotomatic tuners maintain their tuning accuracy for a longer time, due in part to the turning radius within the design. Strings remain at a comfortable tension due to the unique Stairstep tailpiece, creating both a strong resonant sound and assured sturdiness. A semi-hollow body designed with maple on the top and back, other features include a 3-way toggle that provides two modes of volume as well as two separate tones. Meant for use throughout various genres of music, the EX-DC Standard is an electric guitar to please the masses.
Ibanez started off as a Japanese music company particularly focused towards producing copies of favorite guitars in America. Today, they have surpassed most firms by offering best quality products on their own. Being specifically directed towards the hard rock and metal players, Ibanez ensures to have something for players belonging to every genre.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
This effect gives a guitar that ska/reggae sound. It works by varying the cutoff frequency of a low-pass or bandpass filter (the same filter that's in a Wah-Wah effect, hence the Envelope Filter is also called an Auto-Wah) using an envelope follower which watches the signal for amplitude changes. So it wahs your attack, and then gives less and less wah as the signal attenuates. So the sound has a crunchier attack and the tone is very sensitive to varying dynamics.
For a very good price, you get a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and a rosewood fingerboard with matching bridge - for elegant finger picking. The bracing on the inside of the body is scalloped for even better tone, which works very nicely indeed. There’s also a System 66 preamp system with 3-band EQ and a builtin tuner for precision. It’s all good quality, mid-range equipment making this a really great value proposition.
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain, modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle, and time-based units (delay, echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the guitar’s sound. Some performers use a noise gate or noise suppression pedal at the beginning or end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum.
Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.
8e FRETTE HAUTEUR La hauteur des cordes est réglée lors de la fabrication des guitares et des basses Ibanez. Néanmoins, plusieurs facteurs peuvent provoquer la variation de hauteur des cordes d'un instrument. Les guitares sont sensibles aux variations de température et d'humidité. Une hauteur de cordes trop importante peut rendre l'instrument difficile à...
A bass stack may use a single speaker cabinet (e.g., the huge 8x10" cabinets widely used by hard rock and metal bassists). The 8x10" cabinet is often provided as "backline" equipment at music festivals; this way, all the bassists from the different bands can use the same amplifier and speaker cabinet. This reduces the transition time between bands, because the roadies do not have to remove the previous band's bass stack and bring in the subsequent band's stack. Using one 8x10" as backline gear for an entire music festival also makes the transition easier for the audio engineer, because she can have an XLR cable plugged into the amp head's DI unit output (to get the bass amp's signal so that it can be mixed into the sound reinforcement system mix) and have a mic set up in front of the cabinet, to capture the amp and speaker cabinet's distinctive tone. The 8x10" cabinet is widely used by heavy metal music, hardcore punk and psychobilly bassists, as these genres use a loud onstage volume. Some metal bassists, such the bass player for death metal band Cannibal Corpse, use two 8x10" cabinets for large concerts in stadiums or outdoor festivals.
I am a lawn tennis and guitar playing trainer. I am a college lawn tennis varsity player and became a coach and a trainer of beginners and advance tennis players. I am also a band player and singer performing musical folk, pop, ballad and jazz pub Shakey's Pizza Parlor and chains. I worked with Yamaha Music Corporation as an account representative.
Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
Great article and very enlightening comments too. One thing I’d like to add is that it seems to me that a considerably large expense is necessarily involved in going the ampless route i.e. Axe FX + midi controller at the least, in an Axe Fx setup. Granted, amp setups can be just as expensive or more expensive, but cheaper amp options are available.
The reason why you would want to have one of these on your pedalboard is simple. An EQ pedal allows you to adjust a variety of frequency bands and shape your tone based on your own requirements. As you evolve your skill and knowledge, you will soon realize that you can’t play without a pedal of this type. When it comes to some notable models, Empress ParaEQ comes to mind as the best choice.
The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.
Next was Eunice's ‘electric guitar’. It was beautiful and hardly used. However a common problem with guitars of this era were the horrible pickguards made from celluloid that would off-gas while in storage and then wreak havoc over the guitar’s other parts. Upon closer inspection the guitar was actually dripping wet from the many years of storage in the hard case.
Silvertones were guitars sold by Sears but manufactured by five main companies: Danelectro, Harmony, National-Dobro (Supro/Valco), Kay, and Teisco. These companies were called "jobbers" because they were contracted (jobbed out) to make guitars for Sears. They also produced guitars under their own brand names. In almost all cases the guitars manufactured for Sears were identical to models sold directly by the manufacturers with only a logo or color change.
I have had very little time to play with the settings and effects, but so far it's pretty awesome! The only downsides I can find are that there is about 5ms of scilence when changing effects, but you might be able to play around that. Also, I haven't found a way to make the expression pedal affect only one effect in the chain instead of changing the overall volume, but this might just be me not understanding simple instructions.

When you hit a string it will vibrate. It will continue to vibrate until the energy put into it is expended. Where does that energy go? Well, it is expended through movement. That movement is what the pickup "sees" and translates into sound. In a world where 100 % of the initial energy imparted by the strum to the string was expended through movement, wood doesn't matter.

Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…


Electric guitars were originally designed by acoustic guitar makers and instrument manufacturers. Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow-bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. The first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp, the general manager of the National Guitar Corporation, with Paul Barth, who was vice president.[3] The maple body prototype for the one-piece cast aluminium "frying pan" was built by Harry Watson, factory superintendent of the National Guitar Corporation.[3] Commercial production began in late summer of 1932 by the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (Electro-Patent-Instrument Company), in Los Angeles,[4][5] a partnership of Beauchamp, Adolph Rickenbacker (originally Rickenbacher), and Paul Barth.[6] In 1934, the company was renamed the Rickenbacker Electro Stringed Instrument Company. In that year Beauchamp applied for a United States patent for an Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument and the patent was later issued in 1937.[7][8][9][10]

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