Yet you’d never find a punk rocker who didn’t want to be just like him. Whereas most punk guitarists found inspiration from the same hard rock and proto-metal players that they pretended to despise, Strummer was influenced by reggae, rockabilly, soul, ska and even early New York rap music when most of the world still hadn’t heard of the Sugarhill Gang.
The world of audio effects is one that can be confusing even for experienced engineers. Especially in modern computer-based recording systems, there's a bewildering array of options, and to add to the confusion, some effects are widely referred to by more than one name. In this article, I'll take you through the most common effects, explaining how they work and where you might want to use them in your music. Meanwhile, SOS 's team of writers has contributed a wealth of expert tips and tricks, which you can find in the boxes scattered through this article.
Seller: musiciansfriend (269,349) 99.5%, Location: Kansas City, Missouri, Ships to: US, Item: 163232174143 Home Guitars Percussion Accessories Alvarez RP266SESB Parlor Acoustic-Electric Guitar Sunburst Sunburst item# 1500000019429 New The Alvarez Regent Series is a high-quality, entry-level guitar line designed to provide superior instruments with many features and specifications you'll find in pro-level Alvarez models. Components such as the bi-level engineered rosewood bridge, scalloped bracing and PPS synthetic bone nut and saddle, work together to get the best tone and response possible. Regent Series has also been designed with the student in mind and has a slightly slimmer neck profile and nut, making it very easy to hold and fret. This guitar has a roadworthy, vintage vibe with a satin finish. This is a great looking guitar and for its size has a very open and warm voice. It is fitted with the Alvarez SYS250 from B-Band, a 3-band EQ with onboard digital backlit tuner. Shipping Orders are generally shipped the following business day after payment is received. For example, if your order is placed AND paid for at 1 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, Musicians Friend will ship it on Monday. We are only shipping eBay orders via standard ground shipping at this time (3-7 business days for delivery once the item leaves our warehouse) Payment Musician's Friend only accepts payments for eBay orders through Paypal. Immediate payment is required upon selecting "Buy It Now". Sales Tax We are required to collect sales tax on all orders shipped to Alabama, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. You will be charged the state and local sales tax rate for any orders shipped to these states. 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Details on how to file this return may be found at your applicable Department of Revenue website. Store Policies If you’re not satisfied, neither are we. If for any reason you’re not completely satisfied with your purchase of a new item, simply return it in its original condition within 45 days of purchase (see exceptions below) and we’ll give you a full refund. It’s that simple. Returned items must be in original, brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Items must also include all original packaging, manuals, warrantees and accessories or your return may be subject to a return handling charge. Your refund will be promptly processed upon successful evaluation of your returned item from our trained category professionals in 2-3 business days. Refunds are made for product value only, excluding shipping and handling charges. If you received Free Shipping on your order, the value of the uncharged shipping cost will be deducted from your refund. Exceptions Additionally, the following items are returnable only if defective OR unopened - strings, reeds, computers, tubes, earbuds, earplugs, recorders, tin whistles, flutophones, "world" wind instruments, harmonicas, raw-frame speakers, drumheads, drumsticks, turntable cartridges, fog fluid, clothing/footwear, body jewelry, sheet music, cleaners, polishes and polishing cloths. Software/soundware, books, CDs, DVDs, and videos may be returned for credit only if they are in their original, sealed packaging. All returned woodwind and brass instruments incur a $10.00 sanitization fee. Returned bows are assessed a $4.00 restocking fee. Returned mouthpieces priced over $300 incur an $8.00 sanitization fee; the fee for mouthpieces under $300 is $4.00. Stringed instruments priced at $1999.00 or more, must be returned within 10 days of shipment. Should you decide to return your shipment, please follow the return steps printed on the back of your invoice and pack your return carefully to prevent damage in shipment. All returns must: 1. Include a Return Authorization Number; (Please contact us via eBay messages for an RA number) 2. Be in the original packaging complete with all collateral materials such as cases, straps, cables, care kits, certificates of authenticity, warranty cards, manuals, and any other materials that originally shipped with the instrument; 3. Be in brand-new condition, showing no signs of wear or use such as belt-buckle or pick scratches, scuffs, dings, or scrapes on the instrument or collateral materials. Condition: New, Brand: Alvarez, MPN: RP266SESB, Features: Features: Mahogany Top / Vintage Sunburst See More
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!
There’s always a temptation not to spend too much money on your first guitar in case you change your mind and stop playing. However, budget guitars can be more difficult to play and you’ll begin to think it’s all too hard, when a better instrument will be easier and encouraging. Cheap guitars can have a high “action” (the distance between the string and the fret board) which makes pressing the string down tough work for novice players. The frets can be poorly set, meaning the strings rattle and buzz. The timber used is just standard factory sheeting. It all adds up to a cheap guitar. At the same time, I have to admit that in the crazy lottery of mass production and manufacturing, sometimes you’ll find a good guitar has been built. Go figure…
The earliest documented performance with an electric guitar was in 1932, by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer. The Kansas-based musician had obtained two instruments from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California, and he publicized his new instruments in an article in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a performance later that month.

Bridge pins prior to 1945 did not have string slots. There is a slight seam seen in the round head (hard to see but it's there). The bridge pin round head diameter from 1931 until mid-1939 was about 0.320". In mid-1939 the round head was reduced to about 0.300", and this size was used until the unslotted pins ended in 1945. The shaft size was slightly increased at this time too. The pre-1939 style pins have a more bulbous head, where the 1939-1945 style's head is more slender. The pin taper is about 5 degrees, and the diameter under the collar is about 0.225". The pins are made of hard celluloid. Several companies have reissued these old style pins.
Purists might question why we’ve lumped loopers in with delays but the simple fact is that both pedals repeat an element of what you’ve already played. Both are also great for helping you come up with new ideas that simply wouldn’t be possible otherwise. Basically, loopers take similar technology and allow you to record entire passages of play, then ‘loop’ them back (i.e. repeat them) whilst you play something new over the top. Lay down a basic chord progression, then solo of the top of it. You don’t even need to bother with pesky drummers or singers! We’re joking, obviously. As a tool for practice, they’re unparalleled, but in creative terms they’ve opened the doors to entire new genres of music. Ed Sheeran, KT Tunstall and plenty of other solo singer-songwriters have employed loopers in their acts to great effect.

Make sure to sit down and strum the notes when trying out a guitar. It should not be hard to push down the strings with your fretting hand, even if you are just starting out. The action should be as low as possible to make learning easy. Make sure to check for loose parts; there should be no rattling noises coming from the inside of the guide or inside of the neck. Also take a business card and run it along the bottom of the bridge to make sure that the bridge isn't coming off. An electronic system is not a big deal when buying an acoustic because it's relatively easy to add an electronic pickup component later on should you decide you need one.
Set-ups include diagnostics, redressing and buffing frets, cleaning fret board, tightening hardware, restring, adjusting nut slots, truss rod adjustment, balancing tremolo, adjusting action, setting intonation, checking electronics, adjusting pick ups, detail and cleaning. Electro/acoustics get balance of output, and archtops have bridge located and taped.
Not to say that other sounds don’t have their place: the total freakout—sometimes very, very cool in itself—of a second-rate tube amp pushed way past its normal operational capablities; the smooth, pliable, ultra-saturated sound of a cascading gain preamp; the cheesy, buzzy fizz of a cheap tranny amp slammed with too much gain and clipping to beat the band… Any of these can yield the godlike tone of the day in the right application, with the right player. But think Page, Hendrix, SRV, Blackmore, Eric Johnson, Clapton, Van Halen, Gary Moore, and it’s cranked vintage amps and touch that are producing the tone. They were often aided by some type of distortion pedal, sure, because that was the only way to switch textures between verses, choruses and solos, or to push the big amps into distortion at less than full volume. But who wouldn’t choose to get their rock overdrive sound from a 50W 1968 Marshall Plexi on ten, or their blues lead sound from a tweed Bassman on 12, if the ears and the noise police would stand for it? For most players in the broad spectrum of rock, even those usually chained to the back of the stage hacking away at a clean rhythm part, these yield the sweetest, most tactile, touch-sensitive and playable tones available. Get that amp cooking to where the riffs get juicy and fluid and effortless, sustain and harmonic feedback hover into view at the tap of a fret, and the preamp and power amp tubes’ race to keep up with the pick attack lends a comforting softness and compression to the feel (a sensation further enhanced by the natural sag of tube rectification, where present). Mmmm. You can almost feel it now. If we could only get that play-it-all-day vibe at tolerable volume levels, any time we liked.

Phasers – Sometimes called “phase shifters,” these pedals take the “copy” of the guitar signal and put the waves out of phase with each other before mixing them back together. Since those sound waves are no longer in sync, they’ll interact in unique ways, creating futuristic whooshing and swooping sounds. Look back to late 1970s and early ’80s rock music, and you’ll see lots of examples of phasers in action.

Schecter's C-6 Plus belongs to their basic line of guitars. It features their own Super Strat body shape which is finished with a glossy charcoal burst finish. The tonewood of choice for this build is basswood, an inexpensively sourced wood, which is what allows such a nice guitar to be priced at this range. There are some aspects of basswood which work great with guitars designed for heavier genres, and on top of that, it is light weight. Don't take this for granted since it'll be hanging on your shoulders and back for long periods of time.


First and most importantly is our set up. Instruments that have been set up properly to insure appropriate string height, nut slot width/depth, intonation and neck relief have been done using the string gauge the player is using. If one changes string gauges, more or less tension is being placed on the instrument depending on whether they go up or down in string gauge. This can affect everything about your set up and require several adjustments.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.

The hollow body electric guitar rose to prominence when Gibson introduced the ES-150 back in 1936. Fully hollow body electric guitars (sometimes referred to as “Jazz Box” guitars) tend to have arched tops and large, deep bodies that allow the sound to fully resonate to produce an incredible full-bodied voice with amazing projection and depth. Jazz players and blues players really love the sound fully hollow guitars deliver. While the classic, larger-bodied fully hollow electric guitars definitely still exist, there are also a substantial amount of thinline fully hollow body electric guitars that guitar players may find to be more comfortable. Guitar brands such as Gibson, Gretsch, Ibanez, D’Angelico, Guild, and Epiphone provide guitar players with a fantastic array of fully hollow body electric guitars.
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