Billie Joe Armstrong‘s two signature guitar models are Les Paul Juniors. The first has been in production since 2006 and is based on the ’56 Junior he uses that is named ‘Floyd’ which was used on every Green Day album since 2004’s American Idiot. The second is a TV Yellow double-cutaway model which began production in 2012 and was used on Green Day’s ¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré! album trilogy. Both models have one Billie Joe Armstrong signature pickup, the H-90, a humbucking version of the P-90 pickup. In 2011, Gibson released a limited run of Acoustic signature Gibson Billie Joe Armstrong J-180s.
What makes a good beginner electric guitar? Well, it should be cheap and easy to setup so you can start playing immediately. After comparing almost 13 guitars, we believe that Squier by Fender Bullet Strat is the best electric guitar for beginners. You don't have to take my word for it, but there has been some pretty solid positive reviews about this guitar.
\n\n Harmony branded some of their old acoustic guitars with the Nashville\nname. \n\n There was a Japanese company called Nashville\nMusical Instruments NMI \n\n I have an acoustic guitar with no name on the headstock, and\na label inside that reads nothing but Nashville. I tracked down the information\non it once. It's a cheap guitar from the 80’s, made overseas, imported by a US\ncompany that sells children’s toys now. I can't for the life of me remember the\nname of that company now. I was searching for it, with no luck, when I found\nyour question. \n\n There is also the Nashville Guitar Company NGC based in\nInglewood, TN \n\n
On the forum there are thousands of people at all stages of playing that can offer advice on new beginner guitars. I have to admit that I play pretty much only top-end gear and don't know the latest on all the new budget guitars, but on the community forum there are people learning that can all give you advice based on personal experience, and there's no substitute for that!
The Les Paul guitar line was originally conceived to include two models: the regular model (nicknamed the Goldtop), and the Custom model, which offered upgraded hardware and a more formal black finish. However, advancements in pickup, body, and hardware designs allowed the Les Paul to become a long-term series of electric solid-body guitars that targeted every price-point and market level except for the complete novice guitarist. This beginner guitar market was filled by the Melody Maker model, and although the inexpensive Melody Maker did not bear the Les Paul name, its body consistently followed the design of true Les Pauls throughout each era.
One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.
Electric instruments have a big role to play in the world of music, but there's a catch: they need amplification to do it! For that matter, even acoustic instruments need to be boosted when they're playing big venues. And while an amp alone can handle those tasks, many of the sounds in modern music (the signature distortion of rock and metal, for instance) rely heavily on effects units to shape the basic tone into something even better. If you're new to your instrument, then consider this selection of amplifiers and effects the doorway to your future sound - and your instrument will be the key that opens it up, once you've got your hands on your brand new hardware!
Lotus started with the elite league of Japanese craftsmen and initially made excellent Morris-branded guitars, but trying to keep up with the heavyweights such as Matsumoku Aria Pro II and Fuji-Gen Gakki Ibanez was difficult. Mismanagement and, especially, the inability to market their initial superb-quality guitars soon had Lotus' owners scrambling for cheaper labor, ending in India with poor quality and eventually no takers for their product, as Chinese and Indonesian guitar producers stepped up with instruments of comparable quality at similar prices.
This guitar is a good example of the late 1960s Matsumoku made imports that were flooding the Americas.  This model with these pickups were made for many years, starting around 1966 through the early 70s.  That’s a good run!  Based on my research this particular model probably dates from the late 60s.Most of the time I see these guitars with chrome or tortoiseshell pickguards, and this is the first one I’d seen with a white guard.  Has a cool shape too!  These pickups were exclusive to Matsumoku and generally have a good sound.  I’ve measured about 10 of these pickups, and the reading are often all over the place.  Some of these read out near 9k, and some read out under 5k, so obviously the specs changed over the years.  I think the hotter reading pickups came from the later 60s era.Now that Lyle name was owned by the L.D. Heater Music Company out of Beaverton, Oregon.  They had some cool electric models here and there and seemed to really focus on acoustic guitars back in the day.  Most, but not all of the electric models were made by Matsumoku.Most Matsumoku guitars were made rather well, especially the wood parts.  Bodies and necks were always top notch and their finishes hold up better than the average import guitar.  They did some great, burst finishes!  But one weak point on all these Matsumoku electric guitars were the pickup switches.  They just weren’t made to withstand constant use and almost always fail.  Dano at Happy Guitar Repair knows how to rebuild these switches, and it’s just about the only way to bring them back to life.The all-telling Matsumoku plate is back there and the neck pockets on all their guitars were really solid.  If you’re looking to get into these vintage Japanese guitars, Matsumoku models are always a good place to get your feet wet!Mike Dugan loved this particular model, even though the frets were vintage Japanese tiny, and the pickups read out a little weak, sometimes a guitar just has a little chime and zing, and this one had it.  Enjoy peeps!
My tak is an amazing sound an unforgiving strong clear medium to deep sound great feel it's a limited edition and kicks my buddies 3800 buck Taylor's ass my guitar was a bit pricey at 2800 but well worth it my 6000 price Martin is not as nice as my takemine maybe I got lucky and the guitar just turned out that way who knows it is the most amazing clean very vibrant and holds the notes so long I have played them all only one guitar has this sound and its this one only for deeper sounds I have my Martin and ovation has unique sounds and the Gibson is softer and Taylor sucks sounds like a osterizer blender if you tried my guitar you would be shocked by its sounds I have played the same model and the other ones sounded the same as each other I don't know why the one I own sounded so much different I guess I lucked out. I also have an old Hagstrom acoustic and it sounds phenomenal better than any Taylor I have ever played it sounds very much like a high end Gibson but not as soft. try a ...more
With that in mind, we need to point out something about this piece of content, and others like it that we have written: These recommendations are based on the knowledge and opinion of real musicians. We are not marketers or internet gurus trying to make a buck off Amazon. Now, we do use affiliate programs to support this site and those who run it, but we are not simply throwing pedals up without knowing why we're suggesting them. The point is to provide a proper context for your purchase, which we believe is the best way to make a sale, anyway.

During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.
You’ll find a full slate of dedicated bass stompbox effects as well as many multi-effects pedals and processors. Like their guitar-friendly cousins, bass effects offer most of the same tone shaping capabilities, including chorus, reverbs, delays, phasers, and tremolos. Because of the bass’s unique sound dynamics that reach deep into the lower frequencies, many bass effects are focused around compression and limiters that help keep a lid on destructive subsonic sound waves that can damage gear. Typically, many guitar effects are not optimal when used with a bass.
Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.
Guitar scales free movie. Guitar Scales This lesson covers the basic ways to play chromatic scales on the guitar. Guitar scale reference - Here is a listing of some basic fingerings for many games. GUITAR SCALES guitar chords guitar scales chord progressions Search our collection of guitar scales, with charts and music playback jam contacts chord name reverse scales metronome forums tuner. Guitar Scales: Lookup guitar scales on

Then, one weekend his combo got the biggest gig of its career – opening for Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra. Charlie was hot that night, and Dorsey took notice. In one of those rare coincidences, Dorsey’s guitar player had just quit, and the next day Kaman was offered the job. Which path does the son of a construction foreman pursue? The uncertain, fleeting glory of the entertainment industry, or the unknown possibilities of putting craft in the air?
Chrome trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Description: Black Finish Model. Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Alder - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: C-Shape - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 21, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Black - Made In: Mexico
I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]

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Kent 545 Polaris ll- Yes the 60's are back. Here's a Fab solid body Kent in sunburst. Check the features on this baby. First off the selector switch is super. It's made in Japan, and the good part is, it looks it! This unit has a great 60's feel and tone. Guitar is is in great condition, neck straight, and action just right. It comes with that vintage chipboard case also in wonderful condition. Sold

I don't remember if it was actually an LP special II, but the first guitar I bought with my my own money at about the age of 15 was an absolutely beautiful Epi Les Paul. Black, with a really nice quilt maple top. I fell in love with the way it looked. Well, it turned out that guitar sucked. I mean it really sucked. Bad intonation, bad tuners, bad pickups, bad bridge, everything.I saved up my money sacking groceries for like 6 months and I ended up spending that hard-earned money on a crap guitar. I put it on layaway and my dad would drive me up to the store once a month and every time he would try to talk my into other guitars, Fenders mostly (he is a musician also). Nope. I really liked the way the guitar looked. I was young and stupid.
Morris D-41 copy vintage 1980s Japanese high end hi class Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood tone woods body it has detailed fancy inlay perfling and in in amazing condition. Here we are proud to present to you a Classic dreadnought high quality Guitar made of vintage aged tone woods with impeccable workmanship and top quality materials fit and finish rivals the best of the best. This guitar was made by the premier custom shop builders of Japan in the Terada factory and are well known for making Ibanez's top of the line series guitars like the Artists - musician- the George Benson line as well as many others Some of the great Aria's top of line guitars and a few other makers they have the great woods and skills to make some of the finest instruments made period and this Morris is one of them. Just have a good look and you'll see for yourself. One of the finest D-41 type guitars made She's approaching 40 years old and in superb vintage condition I'm looking for dings still and don't see them it's really in sweet condition WOW it's rare to find such fine examples like this all round nice I suspect this beauty will not last long. She is currently in our JVGuitars shop for a full set up and will receive a JVG-Martin upgrade which consists of new fit Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set a full fret dressing and polishing and a beautiful resonant set of solid ebony bridge pins with brass ring and inlaid Abalone detail as well as a new set of Martin 80/20 phosphorus bronze strings and a full body polish. Just in pics soon to come. To enquirer contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com .
yeah, i used to play the vht straight up sometimes. that amp was tonal sweetness, and had a tank reverb. if i dime it, i can get away with playing alot of stuff on the ac4. but i like having a little chorus for certain things, and i do a couple of songs that i would like to have a rotary pedal for, and although i'm not big on reverb, i don't mind using a touch of delay in place of it. if i did have a wah, i'd use it as a tone knob. oh, and i want a harmonizer. specifically, the eventide pitchfactor.
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-02 is based on the iconic Telecaster electric guitar. It comes with a single-cutaway body that's crafted from paulownia, a China native wood that's known for being light. The pickguard is already set into the body when you get the package, but you'll need to solder the input jack, the volume and tone knobs, the bridge pickup and the selector switch before you start using it.

Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
Interestingly, the 2019 version of this guitar doesn't stray too far from the more expensive Standard model in terms of looks - some even prefer it over more expensive models because of its streamlined appearance. While there are no high grade tonewoods involved, the Les Paul Tribute still uses the same mahogany body and maple top combination. The 24.75" scale length neck also follows after the Standard model, complete with a 22-fret rosewood fretboard and a 1.695" nut width. As the name suggests, this model features a slim taper neck profile that modern players will appreciate. Finally, it is equipped with a 490R humbucker for the neck and a 490T humbucker for the bridge, which reproduces the sound of old Les Pauls from the '60s.
Wah pedals make exactly the noise they’re named after – yep a “Wah” noise! If you say to yourself “Wah, Wah, Wah” slowly, that’s the same sound the pedal makes. Imagine a baby crying in slow motion and you kind of get the idea. The Wah sound was probably best captured on “Foxy Lady” by Jimi Hendrix and is widely used in funk and rock solos thanks to its really cool sounding effect.
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This is one of the most popular guitar brands bought by the beginner and advanced learners in India. This brand is also one of the top-rated electro-acoustic guitars for beginners. This is the Japanese brand of guitar that is available in acoustic, bass, electric, and classical guitars styles. It flourishes a full-size frigate shape with a laminated select dapper top, and mahogany back and sides. It sports a mahogany neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets, withal an Ibanez-branded headstock with pretty good closed chrome die-cast tuners. The price of this brand of guitar starts from 13,000 approximately.
Ovation’s first solidbody bass guitars were the 1261 Magnum I and 1262 Magnum II, introduced in 1977, as well. While not as exotic as the Breadwinner/Deacon, the mahogany Magnums had an elongated offset double cutaway design that basically had nothing to do with Fender. Surprised? The upper horn was a bit more extended than a Breadwinner and the upper edge had a slight waist. The lower bout cutout was not as dramatic as the guitar equivalent. Both basses had bolt-on mahogany necks reinforced by three strips of carbon graphite to eliminate warping, a wide strip in the center of the back and two more underneath the fingerboard. Fingerboards were unbound ebony with 20 frets and dot inlays. Both basses had a cast metal housing with two pickups, a small split double-coil unit at the bridge and a large square four-coil unit at the neck, this latter with little screw-adjusted trim pots for micro adjusting volume. The bridge/tailpiece was a heavy-duty plastic housing with heavy adjustable saddles. In front of the bridge was a lever-triggered mute. The primary difference between the I and II was in the electronics. The Magnum I had a three-way select with two volume and two tone controls. It also had two jacks allowing either mono or stereo output. The Magnum II had the three-way plus a master volume and an active three-band graphic equalizer, mono output only.
Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
Overdriven speakers create one of the most desirable distortion characteristics: crunch. The best way to test for this is to dial in a clean setting and turn the volume way up. Low-wattage speakers break up at lower volumes, but they have a tendency to turn to mush at excessive volume levels; high-wattage speakers may not break up at all. Choose a speaker that sounds lively, defined and harmonically rich at volume and distortion levels you’ll normally play at.
With its playful old school appeal, many consider the Gretsch G5024E as a fun instrument to practice and perform with. Build quality and aesthetics are often cited in reviews, with many reports of the guitar eliciting positive response from friends and audiences. There are also reports from users who are very happy with both its amplified and acoustic sound.

You'd mentioned that the bridge pickup is substantially louder on Telecasters than the neck. I have an American Standard so the relationship between the two might not be identical but I was able to make the volume levels comparable by raising my neck pickup substantially so that only about a half inch of space remained between the string and the pickup. They're now about equal volume and if anything the front pickup sounds better and more defined as a result.
Talk about sweet... gorgeous exotic Hawaiian woods.... The Beautiful curly Koa wood is so rare it is only found in the beautiful Hawaiian Islands...This example is well over 30+ years old and has mellowed to perfection...Very Clean Original condition WoW!....See the pics This one sounds amazing...talk about fun...I got into the Uke after seeing the Beatles anthology interview footage with George Harrison on Maui at his home had several Ukulele's at his home when company came over usually other pro buddies they would all have one to Jam on....so great footage of George etc....and we go to Maui every year now for the last 7 or so..you see the gorgeous Koa Wood everywhere you go almost...but The Curly stuff like this Uke is Very Expensive, This Uke's neck is arrow straight and is also highly curly & figured.... This one is the REAL DEAL folks and it don't get much better...Made in Hawaii in the 60's...in very good-excellent original condition so light finish checking only adds to the wonderful vintage feel of this great player...no disappointments .
Phasers, also called phase shifters, duplicate the original waveform of a guitar’s output, and shift one wave out of phase with the other. They blend both waves together usually applying an oscillating circuit, resulting in the waves moving in and out of phase with each other creating spacey, “whooshing” effects. “Itchycoo Park” by the Small Faces was an early example of phase shifting in a recording. Eddie Van Halen and Queen’s Brian May often used phase effects in the 1970s and ‘80s.

In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet. In 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp that added metal corner protectors to keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]


Like most things involved with creative pursuits like making music, there isn’t a steadfast right or wrong way to do things, but if you encountered any of the problems above you’re definitely doing things wrong (unless you play in a German nihilist industrial noise band, in which case, go nuts). This article will help you avoid those scenarios by describing some of the basic rules and suggestions for placing different effects in the ideal order in your rig’s signal chain and how to achieve the best possible tones when using several stomp boxes together. If you’ve ever wondered how to put together your own pedal board, this info will give you a good start toward obtaining the best sound and most versatility out of your rig.
All beginners and intermediate instruments are expected to have some notable accessories that will aid the paying process, and the LyxPro didn’t disappoint in this regard. It comes with all the necessary tools that will aid your playing right away, and these include; tremolo bar, 2 picks, shoulder straps, and carrying bag for proper storage and comfort.

Some amps have a bright cap on the volume pot. The purpose of this cap is to allow your amp to provide a bright, clear tone at lower settings on the volume pot. The more the pot is increased, the less effect the cap has. When the pot is turned all the way up, it should be completely out of the circuit. Like they do with a bright switch, drive pedals can interact with a bright cap and result in less-than-pleasant drive tones. If your amp has a bright cap and you don’t like the way it responds to some pedals, or you find it excessively edgy at low volumes, consider having a competent amp tech change the bright-cap value or remove it altogether. This can be a worthwhile and easily reversible mod.
Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.

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The two mini Les Pauls are also illustrated in ’60s Bizarre Guitars. These were the J-1 and TG-54, slab-bodied solidbody electrics with bolt-on necks. Both had typical Teisco three-and-three headstocks, with a point or hump in the center not unlike Kay guitars, but slightly more rounded. They had rosewood ‘boards with large white dots, except for two small dots at the octave.
The way that manufacturers state the wattage output of an amplifier can be confusing. Amplifier manufacturers may state that a combo bass amp produces 600 watts at 4 ohms and 300 watts at 8 ohms. If the speaker mounted in the combo amp is an 8 ohm speaker, then the combo by itself will only produce 300 watts. This combo amplifier will only put out 600 watts if an "extension speaker cabinet" is plugged into the combo amp with a speaker cable. Plugging a second 8 ohm cabinet in parallel wiring with the combo amp's internal 8 ohm speaker will lower the amp's impedance (electrical resistance or "load") to 4 ohms; at this point the amp will put out 600 watts. Another factor that can make it difficult for bassists to select a bass amp is that different manufacturers may state their amps wattage in Root Mean Squared (or "RMS") and in "peak power". For example, a bass amp ad may state that it produces 500 watts RMS and 1000 watts "peak power". The RMS figure is much more important than the peak power wattage.
Some guitars have what is called a push-pull knob where pulling the knob will change a setting, or access a different setting. For example, some guitars have one knob when pulled will turn the bridge humbucker pickup as if into a single-coil pickup, which is known as a coil-split. Some guitars like ones from Fender have what is called the Fender S1 switching system where pushing a knob will alter the behavior of the pickup selector.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.

The guitar is an instrument capable of truly heavenly tones but capturing this sound in a recording is never as straight-forward as you'd think. Here at Prime Loops we've been changing strings, tweaking amps and adjusting mics to deliver only the finest tone imaginable to your DAW! We used a 1985 Gibson Les Paul electric and a Martin DC-16RGTE acoustic with Fishman, Marshall and Orange amps, recorded through an AKG C214 microphone, so STUDIO GUITARS guarantees to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end!

"NEW-DEMO" means that we are an authorized dealer of the item and acquired it directly from the manufacturer. We consider the item to be new because it has not been sold to or owned by another customer. NEW-DEMO items, however, have been on display in an active retail music store for some length of time. As a result, these items may have been tried out by other customers. They may be dusty, have fingerprints, stick marks, pick swirl, etc. Please refer to the item's description for more detailed information. All NEW-DEMO items come with a manufacturer's warranty (where applicable), but some may not have original manufacturer's packaging. Please refer to our Appearance and Technical Condition scales below for more information about the item’s appearance and condition. 


Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
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Consider so-called “vintage” or “’50s-style” wiring, in which the tone pot and cap are connected to the middle lug of the volume pot rather than the usual third lug. Given the sheer number of posts the topic has amassed on guitar-geek sites, you’d think it was an earth-shaking option. Yeah, it’s a cool mod that I happen to dig, but really, the sonic benefit is modest: just a bit less loss of brightness when you dial down the volume.
For easy, go-anywhere amplification, start out with a combo guitar amp. These all-in-one units combine the preamp, power amp and speakers into one piece, which makes them ideal for places where you want to set up and tear down in a hurry. Rehearsals and busking are easier with a combo amplifier, and they're great for small venues that don't need the power of a larger amp. The combo is your basic, high-versatility amp, and no guitarist should be without one.
BAJAAO bring to you the best and extensive range Electro Acoustic Guitars also known as the Acoustic Electric Guitar or Semi Electric guitar in layman terms from all over the world. Versatile in design, the electro acoustic guitar is known for its smooth sound and powerful projection. At its core, an acoustic-electric guitar is acoustic in style fitted with a pickup device allowing it to be plugged into an amplifier, a number of effect pedals or played on its own for a more intimate sound. Heard in basically every genre of music, these guitars are indispensable in almost any modern band setting. In acoustic-electric nylon string guitars, piezoelectric pickups and microphones are used because magnetic pickups are not capable of picking up vibrations of non-magnetic materials. The design is distinct from a semi-acoustic guitar, which is an electric guitar but with the addition of sound chambers within the guitar body. Buy the best Electro Acoustic Guitars online with BAJAAO.com with the best and affordable price in India. Make your shopping experience a wonderful one with us.
Ultimately, you want to make the best purchase for the person who will be playing the guitar while staying within your budget. As we recommended in the beginning, it’s good to get an idea of what the player is looking for. Find out what styles they like, and his or her favorite music. Looks are important too! The right guitar in the right color could make all the difference.

The Salamander Grand (Yamaha C5) has by nature so many velocity samples that it already has a great expressive sound. I have normalised the samples and re-attenuated them to suit sf2 format and simplified it by leaving out some pedal noises and other non-critical sounds. Cut-off frequencies have been adjusted for extra expression and using Wavosaur I have removed the gaps at the front of the samples to greatly reduce latency.


The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
In ’74, Ibanez, which was by then leading the copy pack, followed the suggestions of Jeff Hasselberger and changed its designs by squaring off the end of the fingerboard and lowering the neck into the body to look and play more like a Gibson original. Virtually all Japanese manufacturers followed. Since Univox guitars were primarily made by Aria, it is probable that in late ’74 or ’75, Univox guitars also had these features, although the Gimme shown in a 1976 flyer still has the rounded fingerboard, and this was in a 1980 binder, so you can’t be too rigid in evaluating Univox guitars based on these details.
The Ibanez Artcore AS53 is a semi hollow-body guitar created for guitar players from diverse genres as blues, country, rock and jazz. The guitar feels nice and has a compact and comfortable body. The tone is rich, warm and full. If you are looking for that fat hollow body sound, this guitar makes it possible to switch from jazz to every semi-hollow rocking style of music. A combination of quality and affordability.
It’s hard to look beyond the original and classic Gibson J-45 when it comes to recommending this particular shape. Players love the J-45 on account of its sweet, warm tone with beautiful singing high notes and defined mid range. Upon release it quickly acquired the moniker ‘the workhorse’ on account of its durability and guarantee of quality. Nothing that’s happened since has diminished that.
Though it gained immense popularity during the rock ‘n’ roll days of the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar was invented in 1931. The need for the amplified guitar became apparent during the Big Band Era as orchestras increased in size, particularly when guitars had to compete with large brass sections. The first electric guitars used in jazz were hollow archtop acoustic guitar bodies with electromagnetic transducers. By 1932, an electrically amplified guitar was commercially available. Early electric guitar manufacturers include Rickenbacker in 1932, Dobro in 1933, National, Epiphone and Gibson in 1935 and many others by 1936.
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