If that were true, you'd have to take into consideration everything that vibrates after the string is stuck (the strap, the plastic of the knobs). You vibrate as well. So in essence, what you're saying is...the contents of your stomach affects the signal going to the amp. Hell, what wood your floors are made of affects the tonal quality. Maybe if you hit it hard enough you can get the ceiling involved.
One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.
Package arrived in a timely manner and in good shape. Guitar is alright, built to look like a high-end model but closer inspection proves otherwise. I was fine with that but then had to remove the rear cover of the amp to reconnect a power wire that had become disconnected during shipping just to get power to the amp. After that I still had no sound through the amplifier. I checked the amp and cable with another guitar and all worked fine. That lead me to replace the guitar battery that came with the unit with a brand new one and the problem still persisted. After destringing the instrument and checking the interior connections I am convinced that the issue is in the pickup under the bridge or in the onboard electronics. Hopefully the replacement will work better but buyers should be cautious when ordering this product. The guitar really is beautiful for the price but certain quality control issues leave me wondering, especially once the Amazon product support expires on it.
Bass amp speaker cabinets are typically more rigidly constructed, with thicker wood and more heavy bracing than those for non-bass amplification. They usually include tuned bass reflex ports or vents cut into the cabinet, for increased efficiency at low frequencies and improved bass sound. Preamplifier sections have equalization controls that are designed for the deeper frequency range of bass instruments, which extend down to 41 Hz or below. Bass amplifiers are more likely to be designed with heat sinks and/or cooling fans than regular guitar amplifiers, due to the high power demands of bass amplification. They are also more commonly equipped with audio compression or limiter circuitry to prevent overloading the power amplifier and to protect the speakers from damage due to unintended clipping in the power amp.
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By the late 1970s, costs of manufacture in Japan had risen to such an extent that it was difficult to make student-grade guitars over there. It was far less expensive to manufacture instruments in Korea. Numerous factories were built, and existing facilities in Korea were expanded. Samick built a factory capable of producing one million instruments a year. Japanese companies invested heavily in Korea so that they would be able to produce their low-end models in Korea and high-end models under the same brand names in Japan. The early Korean-made instruments were not as good as the Japanese ones, but it did not take nearly as long for Korean quality to improve as it did for the Japanese to go from making crude low-end models to sophisticated instruments suitable for professional use. The Koreas had the benefit of all of the Japanese experience especially in the cases of factories with Japanese ownership or management.
The tone from a Bourgeois produced with master grade Cocobolo wood using hot hide glue is superior to any guitar I have played, I can get an incredible reverb sound by applying a light percussion on the body with my forearm, this guitar is expensive but worth it. I believe Bourgeois builds 400 guitars per year, the other major producers production is 400 guitars per week.
I am a lawn tennis and guitar playing trainer. I am a college lawn tennis varsity player and became a coach and a trainer of beginners and advance tennis players. I am also a band player and singer performing musical folk, pop, ballad and jazz pub Shakey's Pizza Parlor and chains. I worked with Yamaha Music Corporation as an account representative.

PRS scale length falls between Fender and Gibson at 25 inches. These are typically set-neck guitars, often with carved tops. This style is a nice alternative for players who are looking for a middle ground between the warmth and resonance of a Les Paul and the tighter feel of a Strat. You’ll also see a lot of guitars that have that PRS look but are built to a different scale length.
Solid Body: This build is rather self-explanatory, meaning there is no sound box (as typically seen in other instruments, especially acoustic guitars) but instead relies on an entire electric pickup system to gather the vibrations of the strings to portray your sound. This typically dominates the preferred ‘guitar type’ category unless you’re aware of what the differences are in terms of sound (telecasters, Ibanez, etc.). The perks of this solid build include the ability to be amplified at very high volumes without feedback worries, giving us more combinations when it comes to shapes\designs, and are very responsive to the use of effects since it’s nearly entirely dependent on amplification. Preferred genres? Rock, punk, metal, classic rock, etc.
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One thing that is worth trying is combining different delays with different reverb effects. You can get some seriously beautiful sounds with a reverb and delay effect that sound good together. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to create reverb and delay combo pedals. It is truly a perfect combination of effects, kind of like peanut butter and jelly.
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.

In 1954 Pat Hare produced heavily distorted power chords for several recordings (including James Cotton's Cotton Crop Blues"), creating "a grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound,"[36] accomplished by turning the volume knob on his amplifier "all the way to the right until the speaker was screaming."[37] Link Wray's 1958 recording "Rumble" inspired young musicians such as Pete Townshend of The Who, Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, Dave Davies of The Kinks, and Neil Young to explore distortion by various means.[38] In 1966, the British company Marshall Amplification began producing the Marshall 1963, a guitar amplifier capable of producing the distorted "crunch" that rock musicians were starting to seek.[39][40]
Midco International, a former musical distributor, sold the Lotus brand as an exclusive trademark of guitars during the 1970s and 1980s. Like many other distributors, Midco commissioned a manufacturer in Asia to build guitars under a unique brand name. However, many of these factories in Asia received requests to build guitars for multiple manufacturers/distributors, meaning the same guitar could essentially end up under multiple trademarks. This isn’t much different from what Harmony, Kay, and other house-brand jobbers from the Chicago area were doing in the 1940s through the 1960s.
Eddie's Guitars specializes in the finest electric guitars available today. We have spent many years seeking out the best builders, brands and models available from yesterday and today. From classics like Fender Custom Shop and Gibson Custom Shop to boutique builders like Collings, PRS, Tom Anderson, Grosh and John Suhr we have every avenue of the sonic world of guitar covered.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.

I'm having a few buddies over to jam this coming Sunday. I don't have a full drum kit setup at my house, so our drummer will be using djembes, bongos, etc. To make things a little more manageable I'm telling folks to bring their electric guitars and NO effects. I have a small arsenal of 15-watt tube amps, so the idea is that we'll all just play into low-wattage tube amps at low volume and see what we come up with.


A continuation of the 7-string, adding another string a perfect fourth lower than the seven strings low B. The eight string guitars additional low F♯ string is just a whole step up from a bass guitars low E string. While luthiers have been building these instruments previously, mass-produced Eight-string electric guitars are a relatively recent innovation. Ibanez was first to offer a production eight-string guitar in March 2007.[46] Many other companies now produce mass-market eight-string models, yet these guitars remain relatively uncommon.

Phasers – Sometimes called “phase shifters,” these pedals take the “copy” of the guitar signal and put the waves out of phase with each other before mixing them back together. Since those sound waves are no longer in sync, they’ll interact in unique ways, creating futuristic whooshing and swooping sounds. Look back to late 1970s and early ’80s rock music, and you’ll see lots of examples of phasers in action.
The previously discussed I-IV-V chord progressions of major triads is a subsequence of the circle progression, which ascends by perfect fourths and descends by perfect fifths: Perfect fifths and perfect fourths are inverse intervals, because one reaches the same pitch class by either ascending by a perfect fourth (five semitones) or descending by a perfect fifth (seven semitones). For example, the jazz standard Autumn Leaves contains the iv7-VII7-VIM7-iiø7-i circle-of-fifths chord-progression;[80] its sevenths occur in the tertian harmonization in sevenths of the minor scale.[81] Other subsequences of the fifths-circle chord-progression are used in music. In particular, the ii-V-I progression is the most important chord progression in jazz music.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.

Bob, 66 is not too late to start playing. I play classical guitar, my preference and I -also play steel string scoustic guitar. I own a Taylor because it lends itself nicely to finger style picking (carried over from my classical guitar. I play with a harpest who did not begin playing until she was 73. She is now 86 and plays someplace almost every day of the week. It's never too late to begin. Go for it I'm 69 and playing more gigs than ever.
Rocksmith displays six horizontal lines at the bottom of the screen that represent the guitar's six strings—E, A, D, G, B, and E—and show you which ones to play. The game color-codes them to try and make it a little easier to comprehend all this visual information at once, but there's no way around it—it takes quite a bit of practice and memorization to get used to this. You really need to practice to the point that you know intuitively which color belongs to which string. Otherwise you'll always be looking down to pick out which string you should be playing, and will never be able to keep up with the song.
The name Epiphone stands above all for very good, less expensive alternatives to the unfortunately always quite expensive Gibson guitars. Gibson tries to offer good alternatives to their Gibson branded Instruments through its subsidiary Epiphone. Les Paul, SG, Explorer and other models. Todays Epiphone program includes electrical, half- and full-resonance guitars, basses, acoustic and electro-acoustic instruments, banjos and mandolins. Epiphone stands on the one hand for innovative ideas in guitar manufacturing and on the other for successful replicas of instrument classics that are affordable for everyone.
I think the best is at DiGiSTORMERS :: Online Music Studio - Home digistormers website and there is an acoustic guitar vsti which sounds like the real one in the products plugins section. I never use anything else. I used to record live guitars, but using this it is not needed anymore. Also mistakes are recorded!!! It is not perfect then, so it sounds more realistic.

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I have been a rock drummer for 40+ years. Due to extreme back surgery I am laid up for a few months so I decided to try a little guitar. I wanted something that both looked and sounded good, but did not want to spend a fortune. My son in law just bought a very similar Martin guitar. He was amazed when he saw and played my Jameson, and completely shocked when he was told that he paid 10 times what I did. The finish looks like glass. Not a single flaw that I could find. The color is deep rich and absolutely beautiful. The sound both acoustic and electric is exceptional. My jam buddies are constantly asking to borrow it. These are guys that on a daily basis play vintage models of Gibson, Fender, Martin. My only observation rather than complaint is that I would have liked a better,
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
Having spent years developing the JDX 48 and Headload, it only made sense that Radial would develop a solution for guitarists who didn’t want to use an amp at all; hence, the JDX Direct-Drive™ was born! The Direct-Drive lets guitarists choose between three different amp voicings: “Combo”, “Stack” and “JDX 4×12”, with further controls to adjust the brightness of the amp. The guitarist simply plugs in their guitar through their pedals, into the JDX Direct-Drive and out to the board with an XLR cable. There are additional outputs for attaching to onstage amps or speakers as well for guitarists who are more comfortable having volume with them on stage. The engineer can then mic the amp and mix the two signals together to get the best tone out of the PA system.
The best acoustic guitar brands in India are available for beginners to buy. When buying a guitar at a beginner level, it is good to go with the acoustic guitar. This is the type of guitar that is easy to learn and play. The strings are available in various materials. The make, shape, style, and material used in the strings are the features to look at when you buy a guitar. Acoustic, Electric, Spanish Guitar, Steel, Bass, and Resonator guitars are available in India. You can also find twelve string guitars to buy at a few locations in India. You will find amongst this list, best guitar brands in India for beginners as well as advanced learners.
The classical guitar repertoire also includes modern contemporary works – sometimes termed "New Music" – such as Elliott Carter's Changes,[17] Cristóbal Halffter's Codex I,[18] Luciano Berio's Sequenza XI,[19] Maurizio Pisati's Sette Studi,[20] Maurice Ohana's Si Le Jour Paraît,[21] Sylvano Bussotti's Rara (eco sierologico),[22] Ernst Krenek's Suite für Guitarre allein, Op. 164,[23] Franco Donatoni's Algo: Due pezzi per chitarra,[24] etc.
So here we are at the end of our journey (well, probably not yours). Maybe you have found the best guitar practice amplifier from this list and cannot wait to buy it or maybe you still want to have your options. BUT my point is that starting with an amplifier for practice is a great idea. Not only will the amp serve a very particular purpose it was made for but you will also save quite a lot of money. For instance, most amplifiers under $100 are great for practice so you can check out our list of the best cheap amplifiers for beginners. And while I know a lot of people don’t like the idea of “cheap” being in the same sentence as their instrument or equipment, the thing is cheaper does not necessarily means bad. Is a $100 amp going to win over an amplifier in the best amplifiers $1000 list? Probably not, but as I already mention the best “objective” amplifier (or what brands and people deem to be the best at the moment) is not always a good option for everyone. That is especially a case with someone who is just starting off their journey into the world of music, amps, guitars and everything of that sort.
Distortion, overdrive, and fuzz can be produced by effects pedals, rackmounts, pre-amplifiers, power amplifiers (a potentially speaker-blowing approach), speakers and (since the 2000s) by digital amplifier modeling devices and audio software.[1][2] These effects are used with electric guitars, electric basses (fuzz bass), electronic keyboards, and more rarely as a special effect with vocals. While distortion is often created intentionally as a musical effect, musicians and sound engineers sometimes take steps to avoid distortion, particularly when using PA systems to amplify vocals or when playing back prerecorded music.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
Hum: other than singlecoil hum, it is almost certainly caused by a ground issue, either a faulty string ground or ground connection, or a ground loop. I highly recommend going to Star Grounding. Shielding is also recommended. See the guitar nuts site for more information on these topics. Single coils are very succeptable to rf frequencies such as emitted by flourescent lights, tv's, computers, motors etc. Also note that high load or other appliances running on the same electrical circuit can cause noises through your amp.
This brings us to the end of the list of best electric guitars in India. Yamaha Pacifica PAC012 Electric Guitar is our top pick because it is a versatile instrument that can play different types of music and it comes from a reputed brand which ensures quality and playability of the guitar. In addition, it has a premium look and feel and some great features.
From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.
It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
Here, in this mini guide to acoustic guitar body types, we’ll aim to show you some of the key differences in size, shape, sound and suitability between the major variations of guitar. We’ll look at the history of some of the better known body types, and make recommendations according to the sound you’re going for and the style in which you play. So whether you’re a wispy finger-picker or a hearty strummer, we’ll explain some of the more intricate details of acoustic guitar body shapes.
Korg SDD3000 Preamp Clone Great project! Since I finished it, it become one of my always on pedal! With a extremely subtle compression... Eclipse Device-2 DOPAMINE OVERDRIVE based on the Klon Centaur circuit. Materials: 01. Xicon 1% metal film resistors. 02. Kemet 5% MLCC (C0G) 03. WIMA Box Film... Refractor Black Octopus Pedalworx More build reports
Others are perfect for getting started. In fact, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is the electric guitar I most often recommend for beginners. This is an instrument that’s modeled on the legendary Gibson Les Paul, with many of the same attributes such as a single-cutaway body, dual humbuckers and tune-o-matic bridge. It is a simple yet versatile setup.

Half a step down from standard, used by bands such as Emmure, TesseracT and Meshuggah in their earlier days, Jeff Loomis (now formerly of Nevermore), Cannibal Corpse mid-career, ERRA, Hypocrisy on End of Disclosure, Adema, American Head Charge, Sonata Arctica in their album Unia, Mushroomhead, Korn in Neidermeyer's Mind demo album, Revocation, Dir En Grey since "Dum Spiro Spero," After The Burial on Forging a Future Self album, Chad Kroeger of Nickelback on the song "This Means War" (Ryan Peake used a six-string), Slayer (on War Zone and Here Comes the Pain from God Hates Us All), and Trivium on Silence in the Snow, The Sin and the Sentence, and all live performances of songs previously written on standard tuned seven string guitars.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]
Why does the material matter less than with an acoustic guitar? Because the body of an electric guitar is much less important in producing and amplifying the sound; all it really has to do is hold the strings so they're long and tight enough to make the kind of sound frequencies we want to hear. Although resonance still plays an important part in giving an electric guitar its tone, solid-body electric guitars generate most of their sound through an entirely different process from acoustic guitars. In fact, even though acoustic and electric guitars look similar, and you play them in a broadly similar way, they are quite different instruments.
Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.
Excellent article. I have found that is a complete waste of time trying to convince guitarist of anything contrary to what they already believe about instruments. The level of passion for the “wood doesn’t matter” camp is truly astounding. We are not testing a new drug or solving cold fusion. The question is simple, does wood make a difference in the tone of an electric guitar? Intuitively, it would seem strange if it didn’t; but, there are many factors that are going to affect the sound produced from a guitar; isolating them is as difficult as creating a study that will convince anyone of an idea they already are clinging to. I think this is a pretty good experiment, better than most I have seen. In the end though, who cares?…really. If someone would like a guitar made out of a Formica counter top…go for it, locking tuners, the pickups and strings of your choice…you’ll be ready to rock. And won’t you be the clever one? As for myself, my opinion, musical instruments have character, a soul if you will. That character comes from the material it is made out of and the craftsman that made it. There is no object more alive than a musical instrument. For arguments sake, lets grant the “wood doesn’t matter” their entire argument. I’d still buy the korina instrument over the countertop. And like most stubborn asses who play guitar, you won’t convince me otherwise.
When the tone pot is set to its maximum resistance (e.g. 250kΩ), all of the frequencies (low and high) have a relatively high path of resistance to ground. As we reduce the resistance of the tone pot to 0Ω, the impedance of the capacitor has more of an impact and we gradually lose more high frequencies to ground through the tone circuit. If we use a higher value capacitor, we lose more high frequencies and get a darker, fatter sound than if we use a lower value.
Maybe the most well known amplifier released under the Peavey name, the 5150 is the result of a collaboration between Peavey and Eddie Van Halen. Debuting in 1992, the 120-watt, all-tube, two-channel head featured a searing lead channel that helped usher in a new wave of high-gain guitar ferocity in the early Nineties. Since Van Halen and Peavey parted ways in 2004, the model name was changed to the Peavey 6505 and has become an industry standard for modern metal bands such as Chimaira, August Burns Red, All That Remains and others.

• Why frets come loose: Wear from string contact, fretboard drying and jarring mid-gig or during transportation can cause frets to pop loose. And if binding loses moisture, that can cause the ends of frets to rise or be exposed. These all create troubles that can wrongly be blamed on the more typical problem of fretwear, but in these cases dressing or replacement isn’t necessarily the answer. If there’s enough fret wire left, a loose fret can be reseated in its slot along the fingerboard, and a skilled luthier can often fill the gaps between the binding and the fret ends.


I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.
To tell you the truth, in the first few years i started playing, after i learned the use of the switch, I was approach by a man that also a guitarist and asked, "YOur guitar sounds good, I believe it so expensive". Well, I bought the guitar only for $150 dollars, But, I toggled the switch to the right pickup on the right time, makes my guitar sounds like an expensive guitar.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
Best Answer:  Half of playability is how your hands interact with the neck. Me, for instance, I've found that BC Rich necks are just too big... I can play it, but it's uncomfortable enough to make it a little akward. On the other hand, ultrathin necks like those you find on many Jacksons (Dinky's, etc) are a little too thin, over time my hands actually hurt from playing them. I discovered that I was playing them too hard, but even beyond that they're just too thin. For me, LTD necks are where its at for me. Rather inexpensive ones, EC-50 and EC-100QM, but once I upgraded the electronics, got a setup, and replaced the pickups, I was happy with them.

In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.
As a beginner most people are not very sure of the sound, style or type of guitar that they would ultimately like to play, but after playing for 6 months or so I’m sure you will know a lot more about guitars and when it comes time to choose your next guitar it will be an easy choice. The key features a beginner needs is a guitar that is well set-up and easy to play, but you don’t really need to spend too much money on getting a better quality of sound. Higher level guitars will only sound better when your playing has progressed to the level that you can play quite well.

My first electric was a Decca, and a friend had one too. Mine was the one pickup style and his had two pickups. This was back in 1972. These were cheap but played very well and I wish I still had mine. There's one on Ebay right now that's just like the one I had, only ten bucks so far. I remember the great sustain and feedback I could get through it playing Hendrix songs!
I ordered this for my 6 year old nephew for Christmas. He wanted one because I had just recently bought my 3rd. I thought a smaller one would be nice for him to start learning. Just opened the box and the amp doesn’t work! At all! Light turns on but nothing else happens! Hooked guitar up to my own amp and it sounds nice so it’d definitely not the guitar or cords fault. Trying to get a replacement but no luck.
For beginners looking to practice their first notes, chords and songs, nothing more than a couple of watts is needed – in fact, most dedicated practice amps won’t offer much more than 10 watts. If you are planning on jamming with a full band or starting to gig in small venues (think bars, clubs and small halls), then anything from 15 to 50 watts will suffice. Bigger gigs, including auditoriums and outdoor festivals, will demand upwards of 100 watts.

The construction of an instrument is naturally a fundamental characteristic that pertains not only to playability, but the ultimate sound of the instrument as well. Durability will be affected by this as well. Guitar construction varies from brand to brand and model to model; instrument makers utilize a wide variety of materials to build the guitar body. Wood is the most common material associated with guitars, but plastic and metal are used as well. Construction should also be given extra consideration with electric guitars, as the electrical components serve as a secondary construction within the instrument.

By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.
Working with Dimebag Darrell Abbot, Rex Brown, Mike Scaccia, Scott Shelby and others, this guitar master has had to work overtime to keep up with these guitarslingers' abuse. These guys make their guitars scream on stage, and it's King's job to make them sing again. "Everbody knows -- other than Scott -- that they're at my mercy when it comes to working on their guitar," he says. "That's why I'm not out on the circuit. I'm pretty picky about which guitar players I work with." (Although Darrel and Mike are no longer with us - may they ignite heaven with their notes - Scott is still tearing it up with Warbeast.) Rabid Flesh Eater, Warbeast, Rigor Mortis, Pantera, this guy has worked on some brutal guitars. "If you're going to buy a Cadillac, put the right parts on it" is one of his mottoes.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.

Founded by the American Orville Gibson in 1902, Gibson is without a doubt the other legendary electric guitar brand. Their most famous model holds the name of the very popular guitarist Les Paul, who collaborated with Ted McCarty in its design back in the 1950's. Unlike the Telecaster and Stratocaster, the Les Paul boasts a mahogany body, a set mahogany neck, a rosewood fingerboard, and a maple top. Among the many Les Paul players we find Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin:
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame
Before you begin, it’s important to understand that a book can’t teach you guitar. They’re great as references and serve as a fine starting point, but soon enough, you need to take what you’ve learned and try to integrate it into a performative craft alongside other musicians. If you find yourself getting stuck, take the exercise you’re on to a jam with like-minded musicians who can help you work practically with the material. At the very least, set a backing track and learn how to time those new skills. So much of playing is about feel, which is a magical combination of timing and groove that only exists in the moment.
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The frets are the little metal pieces that are installed in the instrument's neck. Frets do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various sizes and materials. If you're just starting out, we recommend choosing Medium size frets made of Nickel-Silver. For a more scalloped feel, we recommend Extra Jumbo size frets. For increased durability (wear-and-tear), we recommend Stainless Steel frets. Some customers have reported stainless steel frets to be very slippery and brighter sounding when compared to nickel-silver frets – this could be a good, or a bad thing depending on the player.
This cheap acoustic guitar is highly recommended for beginners on a budget. It continues to stand among the best selling acoustics, and many a young musician has had this as their first ever guitar. It features a familiar combination of spruce top, mahogany body and neck, and rosewood fretboard. The guitar's classic configuration and traditional dreadnought shape works well with almost any type of music, from folk to rock and everything else in between.
Interestingly, the 2019 version of this guitar doesn't stray too far from the more expensive Standard model in terms of looks - some even prefer it over more expensive models because of its streamlined appearance. While there are no high grade tonewoods involved, the Les Paul Tribute still uses the same mahogany body and maple top combination. The 24.75" scale length neck also follows after the Standard model, complete with a 22-fret rosewood fretboard and a 1.695" nut width. As the name suggests, this model features a slim taper neck profile that modern players will appreciate. Finally, it is equipped with a 490R humbucker for the neck and a 490T humbucker for the bridge, which reproduces the sound of old Les Pauls from the '60s.
For beginners looking to practice their first notes, chords and songs, nothing more than a couple of watts is needed – in fact, most dedicated practice amps won’t offer much more than 10 watts. If you are planning on jamming with a full band or starting to gig in small venues (think bars, clubs and small halls), then anything from 15 to 50 watts will suffice. Bigger gigs, including auditoriums and outdoor festivals, will demand upwards of 100 watts.
One of the things that initially surprised me was that coincident dual-mic techniques, where the two mics are placed as close as possible to each other to minimise phase cancellation between them, actually appear to be more commonly used than single-mic techniques. John Leckie explains: "There's an amazing difference in the sound and colouration you get from adjusting the balance of each of the mics, and you can get radically different textures depending on your mix of the two."

But how do you find a guitar master? It's not like he's listed in the phone book under "Guitar Master," although you can buy a Guitar Master Certificate for $10,080 from the Berklee College of Music. (Let me know how that goes.) And when you do find one, how do you know he can handle the job, making the right repair in the shortest amount of time? A guitar master must know how to diagnosis the problem when the only explanation he's offered involves slurring through a mouthful of tears, or an, "Oh, my bad, man, do you think you can fix her by tomorrow?"
As a beginner, you are prone to make mistakes while purchasing your guitar due to lack of experience. Many end up buying very cheap guitars that with time start developing technical issues. Being in this business for a good amount of time, we have noted some of the common challenges faced by all beginners. When you want to buy a guitar as a beginner, there are a number of qualities that should be looked into before deciding which one to buy. These factors include:
Some guitarists consider the notion of modifying an electric guitar from its stock configuration distasteful, while others consider it mandatory. As a custom builder with a decidedly vintage background, I fall somewhere in between. Generally, I’m most in favor of maximizing an instrument’s usability without jeopardizing the ability to return it to original condition.
I love the action of my El Dorado. I have no more “dead strings” because of the string height and because of the wide nut which allows more room between the strings and the frets. It has an action that provides playability which no other guitar gave me, that is, no: Fender, Gibson, Schecter, Epiphone, Squier, B.C. Rich, Urban, Yamaha, Reverend, Peavey, Ibanez, or ESP. There were others I tried but I don’t remember the names. It sounds great when I play Psychedelic Rock, R&B, Rock, Heartland Rock, Folk Rock, and old Country.
“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.
Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.

Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.


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Spruce has historically been the wood of choice for acoustic flat-top guitar soundboards. However, Luthiers and other large guitar manufacturers very often choose more economical and readily available woods rather than top-quality spruce. Redwoods and cedar, for instance, are often used in soundboards by American guitar-makers to great effect. In some cases, two different woods are used together to give the guitar a distinctive appearance and tone.
Upon starting the game and creating a new profile, Rocksmith 2014 asks you to assess your basic skill level so that it can tailor games and lessons to your specific ability. But it can also adapt on the fly based upon how well (or poorly) you handle a particular song, riff, or skill. That's key to Rocksmith's teaching prowess. And the feature immediately becomes clear when you select the Learn a Song mode, which allows the user to play through any one of the dozens of real licensed rocks songs included in the game.
Firs, I'm a tube guy - 68 Vibro Champ, 57 Deluxe, Falcon. Next, I have hand wired boutique pedals. And C, I have owned previous Zoom iterations of this pedal, my favorite is the MS100 BT. With all that said this unit is awesome!! It's all metal and a solid build. The onboard tuner is easy to get to and has more options than I expected. I love that it is stereo out and has an aux in for my iPhone backing tracks. Now the sound - the word is the started from the ground up on modeling amps, cabs and effects. I can tell you the rocks my sox. Whether I'm going through it with my SG or my Les Paul this thing screams. From trippy ambient delays and reverb to 50's rock. The acoustic guitar tones are very convincing. All this for $200 is a steal. I would ... full review

Adding a minor seventh to a major triad creates a dominant seventh (denoted V7). In music theory, the "dominant seventh" described here is called a major-minor seventh, emphasizing the chord's construction rather than its usual function.[27] Dominant sevenths are often the dominant chords in three-chord progressions,[18] in which they increase the tension with the tonic "already inherent in the dominant triad".[28]
Pots generally come in two types: 500k or 250k. K refers to 1000 ohms and is a measure of resistance, which is the amount of resistance the signal from your pickup receives before being passed to your output. As a result, increasing or decreasing the amount of resistance your output receives via your volume pot affects the overall volume of your guitar.
Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.
Solid-state amplifiers incorporating transistors and/or op amps can be made to produce hard clipping. When symmetrical, this adds additional high-amplitude odd harmonics, creating a "dirty" or "gritty" tone.[37] When asymmetrical, it produces both even and odd harmonics. Electronically, this is usually achieved by either amplifying the signal to a point where it is clipped by the DC voltage limitation of the power supply rail, or by clipping the signal with diodes.[citation needed] Many solid-state distortion devices attempt to emulate the sound of overdriven vacuum valves using additional solid-state circuitry. Some amplifiers (notably the Marshall JCM 900) utilize hybrid designs that employ both valve and solid-state components.[citation needed]
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-15 JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit gives you the ultimate shredder guitar. Originally designed by Steve Vai, this style is built for speed. Innovative features like a Monkey Grip Handle and Floyd Rose Tremolo complete the unique design. All the parts needed for a finished guitar are included. This guitar kit is suitable for the aspiring or established luthier and all guitar players. A truss rod adjustment hex wrench, two Floyd Rose tremolo adjustment hex wrenches and solder are included. You will need a phillips head screwdriver and a soldering iron to fully assemble the guitar. A pack of six nickel alloy strings and a right-angle guitar cable are also included.With your purchase, you will receive one DIY JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit pictured and described above.
In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
This budget price range is home to compact, low-powered combo amps, which are mainly designed for beginners and home practice. Despite their low volume and limited features, you can find some exceptional sounds and versatility that will make practice sessions good fun. This category can throw up some poorly made cheap amps, so stick to bigger brand names, such as the Blackstar ID:Core 10 V2, which is a great example of what a $100 guitar amp should offer, including low power, decent tone, good EQ and a variety of amp voices. While you may outgrow one of these affordable amps after a year or so, they are a great way to begin.

Beginners, take note! We’ve changed a few things in this article of beginner-friendly electric guitars, which included removing a few older models such as Squier’s Vintage Modified ’51 and the ESP LTD M100FM. We then added some new and popular models, such as the stripped-down Squier Affinity Jazzmaster HH, the super-cool Dean Vendetta XM, and the compact Jackson JS1X Dinky Minion. Also expanded the guide part of this article.
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
The company initially manufactured only traditional folk instruments,[citation needed] but eventually grew to make a wide variety of stringed instruments, including violins, cellos, banjos, upright basses—and a variety of different types of guitars, including classical guitars, lap steel guitars, semi-acoustic guitars, and solid body electrics. Some of Kay's lower-grade instruments were marketed under the Knox and Kent brand names.
Pickup adjustments are also very important, and I set the height of my pickups by ear. I typically like the bass side of each pickup to be a bit lower than the treble side, so the wound strings don’t overpower the treble strings. Also, strings generate more energy and volume in the area closer to the neck, so I typically set neck pickups lower than bridge pickups.
Up for auction is an approximately 1973 fender champ cabinet, grill, and Weber sig8 speaker. Chassis was removed and rehoused years ago and this cab has been collecting dust. Tolex was removed and the solid pine cabinet has a nice amber shellac finish. Good sounding cab With a great sounding Weber speaker perfect for a restoration or new build. Handle, Grill, and chassis mounting straps will also be included.
When I first tried multisourcing, on a solo project by Club Foot Orchestra guitarist Steve Kirk, I used an air mic, a direct source (Manley tube DI box or speaker emulator output from Kirk's Marshall JMP-1 tube preamp), a close mic on a clean-sounding Fender Princeton amp, and close and distant mics on a cranked-up Marshall cabinet (see Fig. 2). And that was just for the first rhythm track! As you may imagine, mixing was a lot of fun, and after that day there's been no going back to the old SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth. If you dare, you can take it from there. The only limitations are your time, the guitarist's patience, and available tracks. Oh yes-and lots and lots of mics.
Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.
The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.
By 1939, Supros had grown again. The ’38 line was essentially intact with the addition of a number of new resonator acoustics. New was the No. 23 Supro Arcadia Guitar, a sunburst birch-bodied resonator made by Harmony. This had a simple nickel coverplate with two concentric circles of round holes, a slightly-rounded head with an oval Supro metal logo plate. The fingerboard had four dot inlays, the body two f-holes. Cost was $22.50.
A lot of people will tell you that Jackson is not what they used to be. I’m not really going to try to refute or prove this claim, but their guitars are holding up pretty well at this moment. It’s still a brand you can trust to build you a solid guitar. Case in point that JS32 Dinky. It’s my favorite Jackson even though there are much better models in their current lineup.

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I start at zero and work the bridge, stopbar, neck and pickups from there until I all feels and sounds right, takes some time but not too much. I only do this with new guitars and when I total strip one down maybe once a year. Living in the North East and having 4 season you have to adjust all the time, unless you live in a climate controled home and never go out. If you can do all these adjustments yourself and become one with your guitars I think your way ahead of the game.
This guitar is simply phenomenol and the build quality, materials, and attention to detail are just mind blowing! I have a collection of vintage Golden Era Gibsons, Fenders, Gretschs, and Martins, so it takes a very special guitar to impress me. The Kraus OM delivers in every way! Just check out the rosette: Paua shell bordered by curly Koa wood inlayed into a red Spruce top-simply amazing! And the curly koa fretboard binding is a sight to behold! The Honduran Rosewood is becoming exceeding hard to find, and will probably go the way of Brazilian Rosewood as a protected wood soon. The Honduran Rosewood used on this guitar took months to source, and it looks spectacular! The guitar itself took 16 months to build, and the wait was well worth it, and well beyond expectations!
Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.
FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
Solid state amps have many advantages: they are cheaper, lighter, and require less care than a valve amps (which eventually will need new valves, for instance!). Vox, Line 6 and Hiwatt make really good solid state amps that you can gig with without worries. They are not necessarily "worse" amps. The Rolling Stones, Status Quo and many other big acts have used solid-state amps at some point. They're also quite popular with jazz guitarists.
First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
One of my favourite hardware effect units is the Electrix Mo-FX (sadly no longer in production). It is superbly constructed for hands-on performance and it offers full MIDI control over the panel's knobs and buttons. I use this in conjunction with the Sequentix P3 (a hardware step sequencer). Not only can the P3 generate patterns of controllers suitable for varying multiple Mo-FX parameters, but it can generate evolving or shifting patterns, courtesy of its 'accumulators'. In a nutshell, accumulators are designed to prevent your sequences becoming annoyingly repetitive: controller values (actually values directed at any internal sequencer parameter) can be added or subtracted on each pass of the pattern, with rules and limits directing the behaviour as the accumulation progresses. Digging through the Mo-FX manual quickly reveals all the MIDI Continuous Controllers you need. Usefully, you can also trigger the tap-tempo function via MIDI, and this offers a rather wonderful way of generating clock intervals. As you can decide exactly where to place your tap-tempo trigger events, and the P3 sequencer can shift or vary these events according to rules you devise, you can find clock sync intervals unseen on any other device. Paul Nagle
Parallel coils: coil tap connection needs to be broken for this kind of wiring, so three lead pickups cannot be wired this way. The idea is to join start of each coil with finish of the other coil. One on those connections will be hot, the other ground. Parallel coils will sound more like a single coil sound, noticeably quieter and shallower than a series connection.
Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.
The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
Some effects, such as flanger, wah-wah, and delay, are obvious to the ear. But others, such as compression, reverb, and even distortion, are core elements of your tone, so you might not always notice these as “effects.” But used artfully, or sometimes even just correctly, they can take you to tonal utopia. Even if your personal style doesn’t call for mind-altering sound, you can still improve your sound by using effects.
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Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
In the early 1980s Collings decided to move to San Diego, California but never made it further than Austin, Texas.[3][4] He started out sharing work space with fellow luthiers Tom Ellis, a builder of mandolins, and Mike Stevens. A few years later he decided to continue on his own and take the craft more seriously, moving into a one-stall garage shop.
You can think of this article as a directory of sorts. There’s a lot of information presented here, but then again there are a lot of guitars out there in the world. I started this project a few years ago with the idea of creating a page where new and veteran players alike can find information about different guitar brands. I’ve got over thirty years of experience behind me, so maybe my opinions can help you make a better decision if you are looking for a new instrument.

Since this guitar is from Taylor it benefits from the company's quality consistency, which applies to all their instruments regardless of price points. While aesthetics and materials are more affordable, it gets the same level of attention to detail and quality as the more premium models. This gives budget limited players the chance to have a true Taylor acoustic that plays like a "dream", and not a watered down version that plays and feels different.


Your guitar is equipped with a volume knob – but that doesn’t mean you won’t benefit from a volume pedal. Very useful for various applications, the volume pedal can act – as you imagine – as a pure volume for your guitar signal (placed right before the amp) and also as a master volume if placed after your amp. By using a stereo volume pedal you can further expand the tonal possibilities of your setup. Ernie Ball makes a variety of volume pedals with different specifications (in order to match your guitar, amplifier or musical needs). Mooer offers a very compact and stylish pedal, the Expline – while Boss still sells to this day the FV-500-H, a pedal that passed the test of time and still performs amazingly well.
String sage Ernie Ball reckons it’s made some of the world’s strongest strings with the Paradigm set, which promises longer string life while retaining the company’s iconic Slinky tone and feel. Ultra-high strength steel can be found in the wound and plain strings, plus reinforcement at the ball end, enabling them to lock in tune fast and hold up to aggressive styles. There’s even plasma-enhanced wrap wire for increased corrosion resistance, too.
Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.
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These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
In the 2010s, virtually all of the sound reaching the audience in large venues comes from the PA system or sound reinforcement system, the huge speaker systems pointed at the audience. As well, in the 2010s on-stage instrument amplifiers are more likely to be kept at a low volume, because when band members have their onstage amps "cranked" to high volume levels on stage, this makes it harder for the audio engineer to control the sound mix and blend. For example, if a heavy metal bassist had two 8x10" cabinets and several 1x18" subwoofer cabinets and several thousand watts of bass amplifier heads, and these amps are set to a very high volume level, this bass player will be creating very significant onstage bass volume. If the sound engineer wished to turn down the bass in the PA/sound reinforcement system, this bassist's loud onstage volume would make it hard for this engineer to control and/or reduce the volume of bass in the FOH (Front of House) sound mix. Another issue that can develop with bass players who have very high onstage volume is that it can be hard for the audio engineer to produce a clean sound through the PA/sound reinforcement system. For example, if a bassist was driving her bass amp speaker stacks into clipping to create a fuzz bass tone, if the audio engineer wished to have a "clean" bass sound, this could pose a challenge.
In the years following Electric Mud and Muddy's Death in 1983 from heart failure , the record itself started building a cult around it, comprised of acid rock fans, record collectors and curious people. By 1996, the resurgence of popularity in the record matched with its scarcity led it to being reissued in a deluxe edition by Chess with new line notes by Mark Humphrey and Marshall Chess. Despite all the bad press Electric Mud received, Marshall Chess never stopped claiming it was a brilliant, misunderstood record.

Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.

The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.
Fuzz was originally intended to recreate the classic 1960's tone of an overdriven tube amp combined with torn speaker cones. Oldschool guitar players (like Link Wray) (citation needed) would use a screwdriver to poke several holes through the paperboard part of the guitar amp speaker to achieve a similar sound. Since the original designs, more extreme fuzz pedals have been designed and produced, incorporating octave-up effects, oscillation, gating, and greater amounts of distortion.

Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.


The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.
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Bought this to replace my Digitech RP 255 which I had better presets and found a little easier to setup- but I have every confidence this unit will give me sounds I like just as well- I already like the clean sound better, plus it is a much smaller and lighter unit which was one of my main goals. My pedal board has a GR33 guitar synth, a boost and a headphone amp. Those units and power supplies were getting too heavy.


The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.

While electric bass players have used regular guitar amplifiers in large concerts since the 1960s, this is usually just for the higher register; a bass amp is still typically used for the low register, because regular guitar amps are only designed to go down to about 80 Hz. One of the reasons bassists split their signal into a bass amp and an electric guitar amp is because this arrangement enables them to overdrive the higher-register sound from the electric guitar amp, while retaining the deep bass tone from the bass amp. Naturally-produced overdrive on bass obtained by cranking a tube amplifier or solid-state preamplifier typically results in a loss of bass tone, because when pushed into overdrive, a note goes to the upper octave second harmonic.
You have a huge range of effects at your disposal, which can be applied to both vocals (thanks to the XLR inputs) and line level instruments such as your acoustic guitar. You have 2 compressors, a boost, 3 Chorus types, as well as 3 types of delay and reverb effects to suit a wide range of sonic palettes, all of which have been optimised specifically for acoustic guitar. However, it’s the Acoustic Resonance selectors, 80 second phrase looper and anti-feedback feature that the acoustic guitarists will really take advantage of.
Straight away meeting the essential criteria and tonal platform for a good small solid state combo amp for practicing at low volumes with a pocket friendly price tag is Orange Crush 20RT. This dual channel 20 watt guitar amplifier that also comes in a 35 watt version is the upgraded model of the well received Orange Crush 20 for having a built-in spring reverb effect and a chromatic tuner which are the kind of features great for daily use.
It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
The reason being that guitar manufacturers will usually look to keep costs down in the pickup department. This is particularly true for budget models, which will usually be fitted with stock pickups that do the job, but fall short of truly impressing. So guitarists with an affordable, but playable guitar may wish to upgrade their pickups, to make their favorite axe gig-worthy.
Good questions. Firstly, swapping the saddle around has the effect of moving the tapered top edge of the saddle closer to, or farther from (depending on which way it was to start with) the front of the bridge. If you're wanting the string to be as long as possible, for example, you'd need to make sure the saddle is oriented in such a way that the tapered edge is at the tail end (farther from the pickups). If you look at my pictures above, you'll see that my D-string saddle is originally oriented in this way, but in my case I need to SHORTEN the string, so I rotate it and this gives me more forward adjustment. Since you need to do the opposite of me, you'd therefore need to make sure your saddle has the same orientation as what mine had BEFORE I changed it. I really hope that makes sense.
Now, for most players, deciding what should go where on a signal chain simply came through trial and error along with a good dose of common knowledge. And while a player’s signal chain should be his or her own, those of you out there new to creating a solid signal chain can benefit from some of the general 'rule of thumb' type of advice that can get you started in the right direction.
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One cool thing about liking oddball old guitars is they always contain hope…and a challenge. By which I mean, no matter how obscure or exotic, you always live with hope that you’ll someday figure out what the heck they are and thrive on the challenge of trying to do so. At least that’s been my repeated experience over the last quarter century or so of playing guitar detective. That being said, this 1967 Apollo Deluxe was kind of the exception that proved the rule, in that it followed a reverse pattern, sort of backing into discovery.
One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.
Whether you're picking up a guitar for the first in your life or have been rocking the stage for years, there is a left-handed instrument out there that's just right for you. Electric guitar design and construction varies depending on the size of the body and shape of the neck, tonewood, bridge and pickup. Different woods produce different tones. Higher end guitars are usually made of hardwood like alder, maple or mahogany while a plywood or pine option gives exceptional durability perfectly suited to a beginner or student musician. The guitar's body typically comes in solid body, hollow body or semi-hollow body. Harder rock musicians often favor a solid body for louder, more vibrant pickups and feedback, while an acoustic performance would benefit from an acoustic guitar. The neck of a guitar is another consideration. A shorter neck would generally be seen on a smaller guitar; a musician who does not have large hands would appreciate the easier handling of a smaller guitar. The majority of electric guitars have six strings; however there are seven, eight and 12 string options for those who have mastered their left-handed guitar and are looking for ways to boost their performance. Left handed guitarists have made a rich and impressive mark on the history of popular music. No matter if you plan to rock the stage in front of an adoring crowd or just want to riff with your buddies at home, there is a sensational left-handed guitar out there waiting for you.
Thank you Ola and David for this excellent article. The approach is totally scientific: you try to study the impact of one element of a system while keeping the rest of the settings identical (same pickups, same strings, same picking, etc.). The wood used modifies effectively the electrical spectrum composition and therefore the sound we hear. All the difficulty is that the wood is a part of a very complex system (woods combination, building type, pickups, strings, effects, amplification, restitution, etc.) and, without a solid knowledge or skills, it could be difficult to choose the right elements of the system to get what you want…
As jazz-rock fusion emerged in the early 1970s, many players switched to the more rock-oriented solid body guitars. Other jazz guitarists, like Grant Green and Wes Montgomery, turned to applying their skills to pop-oriented styles that fused jazz with soul and R&B, such as soul jazz-styled organ trios. Younger jazz musicians rode the surge of electric popular genres such as blues, rock, and funk to reach new audiences. Guitarists in the fusion realm fused the post-bop harmonic and melodic language of musicians such as John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Ornette Coleman, and Miles Davis with a hard-edged (and usually very loud) rock tone created by guitarists such as Cream's Eric Clapton who had redefined the sound of the guitar for those unfamiliar with the black blues players of Chicago and, before that, the Delta region of the Mississippi upon whom his style was based. With John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Clapton turned up the volume on a sound already pioneered by Buddy Guy, Freddie King, B.B. King and others that was fluid, with heavy finger vibratos, string bending, and speed through powerful Marshall amplifiers.
This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.
Onboard effects had already appeared on various guitars, especially Höfner and Vox models, but these were not truly “active” in the modern sense. Alembic, with support from the Grateful Dead, was exploring active pickup systems, but these were still basically custom-made instruments. Both had a master volume and tone control with three-way select and a “band rejection filter tone switch,” also called a midrange bypass filter. Ovation was among the first to offer linear potentiometers to correlate movement with effect. Controls inside were mounted on a circuitboard with individual trim pots that can be adjusted to control the volume of each pickup.
Gibson Brands, Inc. is considered as an American producer of guitars and other instruments, which is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The brand was earlier known as Gibson Guitar Corp. The company was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902. They are famous for its innovative and superior quality guitars. They sell their guitars under different brand names. These guitars are available at little higher rates. The price range starts from Rs. 49,500/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Gibson.com.
Danelectro's new '59XT guitar was an exciting announcement at NAMM 2018, and we're stoked to have a chance to test out this sharp-looking axe. Control-wise, the guitar keeps it simple, with a three-way pickup selector switch stacked above tone and volume control knobs, but it ups the game with a Wilkinson tremolo and a lipstick pickup. Watch along as Andy tests out the Dano's sound, and look below for more information about how to get one of your very own.
New in ’64 were the TG-64 (named for the year) and a matching series of solid basses. The TG-64 was essentially a Fender Jazzmaster shape with a slightly extended bass horn, the new, hooked four-and-two headstock (usually with a metal plate on the front), and best of all, our old friend the “monkey grip” handle in the lower bass bout, handed down from the old T-60. The pickguard was two-part, with one large piece under the strings and a little extension on the lower bout for knobs and jack. These had three single-coil pickups, usually the chunky, metal-covered kind with a black insert and exposed poles, although some have smaller oval metal covers with exposed poles, all controlled by three on/off rocker switches above the strings. A small sliding switch served as a rhythm mute, or lead boost, depending on your point of view.

Bowers loves combining incredible chops with strong melodies, and his influences read like a “Who’s Who” of guitar heroes. Included are such high-tech players as Steve Morse, John Petrucci, and Steve Howe. While talking with Frank, I learned that he has had two of his Les Pauls customized to accommodate a push-pull tap switch on their tone knobs. In the normal position he has full control of his Seymour Duncan humbuckers; in the pulled-up position he goes to a single coil “spin-a-split” configuration that allows him to get more of a “Tele” tone at zero—or he can dial in a bit more of the other half of the pickup to emulate more of a P-90 sound. The thinner “Tele-ish” tone cuts better, allowing more clarity on his leads and rhythm patches.
This little beauty was built in 1991 Model: D10n- N is for Natural and is beginning to open up in sound quality over the new issues of the D-10 and is a great value we believe this one is better sounding then new and now is it has freshly been upgraded with a bone nut & new Martin Marquis strings installation just today and now it rings sweet &clear tone much like our vintage Yamaha Fg - Takamine f- Martin d, Yairi.. like tones for a fraction of that...wood & finish on this example is almost mint it virtually looks just as new...9.9 JVG condition rating...nearly 20 years old coming into its own town wise and is almost like new...No problems cracks or repairs... · # Solid Spruce Top this example has nice straight grain and is in real nice condition # Mahogany sides/back....again good grain pattern and fit and finish are very nice+++ # Mahogany neck size is medium ++ 1 11/16th" @ the nut with adjustable trussrod...beautiful grain Mahogany with a perfect fit & finish ...neck set original & excellent # Rosewood fingerboard and bridge..both nice east Indian rosewood .. rich appearance to this example # Natural/buffed thin Poly gloss body finish / wow!... very nice too # Black pickguard # Stained mahogany/buffed gloss neck..nice American size neck not thin like many made today...this one feels American med++ size.. like a Gibson or Martin... # Quality Chrome die cast tuning machines = work excellent # Multi lam top binding # Neck binding # Soundhole rosette # Width at nut: 1 11/16th # Scale length: 25.5" # Overall Length: 41" # Lower bout: 15 5/8" # Upper bout: 11 5/8" # List Price in 1991: $499.90 # Colors: Natural Note: All dimensions and specifications are given to the best of our knowledge from actual measurements and/or manufacturer's specifications. Small variances and/or discrepancies may exist. Just in and as it is priced so reasonably for a clean 21 year old vintage acoustic I believe this will not last long at this price... better snap her up while you can! Thanks for your interest any questions email gr8bids@comcast.net pics to come asap .
Pre-delay: No pre-delay? No problem! Some reverb plug-ins, from freeware favourites to tasty convolution types, don't offer pre-delay — a user-configurable gap before the onset of a reverb's early reflections and tail. It's useful to have, though, as it can contribute to the clarity and separation of individual voices and instruments in a mix when large amounts of reverb are used. Using most software DAWs it's straightforward to rig up a pre-delay for a reverb (or any other effect) that doesn't have one. All you do is set up your reverb on an aux track or channel, but place a simple delay plug-in in a slot above it. Set both plug-ins' wet/dry mix parameters to 100 percent wet, and feed them some audio using an aux send on your normal audio tracks. Now the delay plug-in operates as a pre-delay for the reverb: easy! This kind of 'modular' pre-delay actually opens up some interesting possibilities. By using a multi-tap delay, or a simple delay with some feedback, your dry signal can be fed to the reverb several times, making for longer, more complex — or plain weird — reverb tails. Robin Bigwood
Gretsch aggressiveness in the entry level market is at an all time high, churning out a wide selection of affordable alternatives to many of their premium guitar models. Continuing this theme is the Gretsch G5426 Jet Club, which is essentially a more affordable stop-tail piece version of the Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby above. It features the same chambered body and high quality looks but with a basic humbucker and without a Bigsby.
• Stop: A stop tailpiece is a bar, typically made of an alloy, which is held to the body of a guitar by large screws threaded into embedded sleeves. They are most often aluminum, zinc or brass based, with the latter the most costly. Aluminum has a few advantages. When the stop tailpiece was perfected by Gibson over a half-century ago, the originals were made of aluminum. Many players prefer those today for the vintage vibe, but aluminum is also the lightest weight tailpiece alloy, which some believe allows the strings and the guitar’s body to connect — which is another function of the tailpiece — in a more resonant fashion. It’s best to be careful while changing strings with a stop tailpiece, because they sometimes fall out of their sleeves and can scratch the finish.
During the late 1930s and through the 1940s—the heyday of big band jazz and swing music—the guitar was an important rhythm section instrument. Some guitarists, such as Freddie Green of Count Basie’s band, developed a guitar-specific style of accompaniment. Few of the big bands, however, featured amplified guitar solos, which were done instead in the small combo context. The most important jazz guitar soloists of this period included the Manouche virtuoso Django Reinhardt, Oscar Moore who was featured with Nat “King” Cole’s trio, and Charlie Christian of Benny Goodman's band and sextet, who was a major influence despite his early death at 25.
Ovation Guitars, in conjunction with the DW Music Foundation (DWMF) will debut the RS Rockstar™ guitar. This six-string, “RS” model guitar will be donated to each Notes for Notes location along with a DW drumset and an LP cajon to equip each studio with professional level musical instruments. The DWMF will also work with other partnering charities to donate RS Rockstar™ model guitars to music education programs in underserved communities worldwide.
Why would that be “magical thinking”? Unless you play a sine wave with a synth, the timbre of every instrument is made of a set of freuquencies, a dominant frequency plus a ton of harmonics (which is, I take it, the overtones people talk about). Woods, like every other material, resonate at particular frequencies, and consequently might emphasize a particular subset of these frequencies rather than another subset. Hardly magical thinking.

Continuing the example of making comparisons of specifications, there are Guilds in this price range that come with all solid woods, a rosewood fretboard, and with built-in tuners. Also, Epiphone Masterbuilt has solid wood acoustics, even some with cedar tops which are highly sought after by finger style players, plus they have a rosewood fretboard, a built-in tuner, two pickups and deluxe tuning machines. Moreover, both of the above guitars sell for less than the Taylor 200 series model you listed. So which is better?
The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.

The body is very much the same, composed of a chambered basswood topped by an elegantly contoured laminate maple top - complete with the easily identifiable Gretsch style pickguard. The neck specifications also follow the Pro Jet Bigsby, with a shorter than usual 24.6" scale maple neck, 12" radius rosewood fingerboard, and 1.6875" nut width. It has a total of 22 medium jumbo frets with Neo Classic thumbnail inlays serving as fret markers. Because its not a Filter'tron pickup, the sound of this guitar will be subtly different, but apparently good enough for the many users that have rated this guitar highly and even recommend it.
Vibrato should definitely be #1. All of those shred heads are choosing sweeps and tapping. I like sweeps and taps, but the vibrato and bends are the best and most important techniques in guitar because not only you can play good, but you can also add soul to your playing. You don't have to tap or sweep to be a better player than the other who doesn't use taps.

Fender, or the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, as it was properly known, was started in 1946, in Fullerton, California, by Leo Fender. The early designs effectively wrote the book on the solid body guitar manufacture; his approach of simple guitars using quality parts, easily assembled (most specifically the replaceable neck) proved an immediate sucess. Guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, Telecaster, Jaguar and Precision bass have barely changed since their very first inception; Fender simply got it right first time round.
Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland
In addition to the 1/4" input for your guitar, you may want to consider amps with better connectivity features like those with built-in USB output for direct recording, footswitch input, aux input for jamming with tracks, and headphone output. Speaking of headphone out, there are some amps that come with built-in speaker cabinet simulated outputs, this subtly changes the resulting sound much like the amp cabinet would without having to actually use the speaker. There are also a number of newer guitar amplifiers that come with Bluetooth connectivity for streaming audio and for software control.
Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   

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Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
Two types of switches are commonly used for guitar mods. One is a potentiometer with a switch—a push/pull, push/ push, or the Fender S-1—and the other is a common toggle, which is available in different sizes, shapes, and configurations. When adding a switch to a passive circuit, you don’t have to worry about voltage and power ratings—all that matters is that switch will fit your guitar!
The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
Those items considered -- performance notation and computational capacity for emulation of stringed instrument sounds otherwise reinforced by the same speaker systems that amplify synthesized sounds -- the other significant factors in the realism matrix involve economics of VST production, listener preferences and, least we forget, performer or producer preferences.
Editor’s Note: My previous top choice, the Yamaha APX500iii, is now replaced with a newer and better model, the Yamaha APX600. What make’s it better, you ask? Well, there were some complaints regarding the previous model for having a lack of bass response and a “bland” sound when unplugged. Yamaha addresses this issue by changing the guitar’s bracing pattern, thus improving it’s overall sound response, making the APX600 a good choice for an acoustic-electric guitar. I suggest you go check this bad boy out.

There are two main types of pickup you’ll find on a guitar suitable for beginners: a single-coil pickup and a humbucker pickup. Without bogging you down in the details of how they work, the single-coil is the classic original pickup, which typically offers a bright and sparkly sound. As they cut through the mix, single-coils are excellent pickups for lead players. Then comes the faithful humbucker, which – as the name suggests – ‘bucks’ the hum, meaning less background noise. Humbuckers produce full, meaty sounds found across the world of rock and metal, and are great for lead and rhythm guitar. However you can still play fast punk rock powerchords with a single-coil, just like you can play an upbeat country number with a humbucker! You’ll usually find two or three pickups on a guitar, although some models will offer just one. Guitars with two or more pickups will come fitted with a pickup selector switch to quickly change between them.


Ribbon mics exhibit a figure-of-eight pickup pattern. One useful close-mike application for achieving heavy rock sounds involves a ribbon mic (or large-diaphragm condenser set to a figure-of-eight pattern) aimed toward the center of the speaker, with a cardioid dynamic mic angled next to it at roughly 90°, aimed off-center, with the capsules almost touching. Record the mics on separate tracks, and with proper balancing the sound should be powerful and frequency-rich.
6.  I’ve said this before but think it needs to be said again… Customer using truss rod to “fix” action.  Result:  Broken truss rod.  Fix:  Well, the fix costs more than the instrument and the guitar was scrapped.  This one depends on where the break occurred and what kind of rod was used.  If it’s a conventional rod and the break is close to the adjusting nut, Stew-Mac has a tool to re-thread the rod and save it.  If the break is farther down the rod or double action you may have to remove the fret board and that my friend is major surgery.
STEM educators take part in a five-day institute focused on how to manufacture guitar parts for their classroom or for the nationwide network of schools that are implementing the project. Modularized curriculum with assessments will cover the content provided as part of the institute. The primary focus of the institute will be the application of CNC technology as it relates to manufacturing guitar components. The participants leave this institute with the modularized curriculum and a custom guitar body they have designed and fabricated. The additional parts necessary to complete the guitar are also provided.

You’ll notice that once it reaches zero sound gets very muddy very fast. That’s because we have zero resistance between the signal and the cap. To prevent this, some people put a small resistor (10K or so) between the pot and the cap. That way we won’t affect pot operation at higher settings (510K is very close to 500K) but at lower settings it will prevent it from reaching zero as we’re always adding 10K in series.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Natural

The Ibanez Artwood AW54 is easily the best bang-per-buck all-mahogany-body dreadnought in the market, for the price you are getting an acoustic with solid mahogany top, back and sides. I am definitely envious of students who have this as their first guitar, with its impressive specs and genuine vintage appeal. And it's not just for newbies, because experienced players appreciate the articulation and warm tones of this all-solid mahogany body guitar.
Fender, or the Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company, as it was properly known, was started in 1946, in Fullerton, California, by Leo Fender. The early designs effectively wrote the book on the solid body guitar manufacture; his approach of simple guitars using quality parts, easily assembled (most specifically the replaceable neck) proved an immediate sucess. Guitars like the Fender Stratocaster, Telecaster, Jaguar and Precision bass have barely changed since their very first inception; Fender simply got it right first time round.
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."
In addition to acoustic and electric guitars, the company now also makes mandolins and ukuleles. Their mandolins are highly regarded, they “more or less rule in the bluegrass market” in the United States.[5] As of May 2012 the company has about 85 employees and manufactures six to seven acoustic guitars, three electric guitars, two mandolins, and two ukuleles per day.[4]
Mundt Music of Longview, LLC is your one stop guitar shop. Located at 2312 Judson Road, we have everything that you need whether you’re buying your first guitar or adding to your growing collection. Make sure to join us in store on October 10, 2016 at 6:30pm, for our “Taylor Road Show” event. Guests will enjoy an evening of guitar talk and demos with Taylor factory staff and guitar makers from El Cajon, CA. It’s an event that any guitar enthusiast won’t want to miss.
I played electric guitar in a band from the age of 12 through to the age of 36, then gave it up. Now, at the age of 68 I want to get back into playing. I went into a store and tried playing and found that my fingertips really hurt! Are there any electric guitars where the metal strings don’t hurt or do I just need to “grin and bare it” until my fingertips get calloused again?

Daron Malakian (b. 1975) is the lead guitarist for System of a Down. During the System of a Down era, Daron played IC200's and IC300's on stage. During the Toxicity era, Malakian played a variation of the Ibanez Iceman ICX, with custom artwork designed by his father, then a special edition "DMM1" was released by Ibanez. The DMM1 featured more artwork by Malakian's father, Vartan Malakian (b. 1947). After using Gibson guitars for 5 years, Daron switched back to Ibanez and began using an Iceman again.
First and most importantly is our set up. Instruments that have been set up properly to insure appropriate string height, nut slot width/depth, intonation and neck relief have been done using the string gauge the player is using. If one changes string gauges, more or less tension is being placed on the instrument depending on whether they go up or down in string gauge. This can affect everything about your set up and require several adjustments.

There’s always a temptation not to spend too much money on your first guitar in case you change your mind and stop playing. However, budget guitars can be more difficult to play and you’ll begin to think it’s all too hard, when a better instrument will be easier and encouraging. Cheap guitars can have a high “action” (the distance between the string and the fret board) which makes pressing the string down tough work for novice players. The frets can be poorly set, meaning the strings rattle and buzz. The timber used is just standard factory sheeting. It all adds up to a cheap guitar. At the same time, I have to admit that in the crazy lottery of mass production and manufacturing, sometimes you’ll find a good guitar has been built. Go figure…


The Step Ladder is a passive input attenuator using high quality components for excellent reliability. True-bypass mode provides the maximum signal level. The attenuator pot and two toggle switches allow for flexibility in the amount of signal attenuation when not in bypass mode. Treble bleed capacitors in the circuit retain crisp high frequencies even at maximum attenuation. The Step Ladder is ideal for anything from getting a slight boost while playing single-note acoustic guitar leads or for jumping from clean to overdrive in a high-gain electric guitar amp.
Looking at my beautiful but dusty Les Paul sitting in the corner, I walked over to my bookshelf to choose a book to once again work on my electric. Now, I will say that I am NOT shy about purchasing a book or many, many books if I want to learn something so there was quite a selection to choose from. I had a few books that focused on the electric guitar but for the most part they were incomprehensible or started you off with basic chords and strumming, then turn the page and WHAM! it was Eddie Van Halen time. Just no real steady work up in skills and a lot of confusing jargon. Which is probably why I set the electric aside.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.
Guitarists and bassists who want to extend what their instruments are capable of have a huge arsenal of effects pedals and processors they can turn to. From subtle to outrageous, guitar and bass effects pedals and multiprocessors help you capture inspiring sounds off recordings as well as spark your own creativity. Keep reading to get the details on the many types of guitar and bass effects you’ll find at Musician’s Friend. We’ll also get up close with some completely unique stompboxes.
Maybe the pickups that came with your guitar are just cheap and not up to your standards. At that point, an upgrade might be less of a stylistic issue and would done for the purpose of improving the overall sound quality of your instrument. In most cases, upgrading the pickups on your guitar are the single most effective way to improve the overall tone and sound quality.
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends.
When Martin turned to jobbers rather than direct sales, more variation in cases took place. Depending on what part of the country you bought your Martin, the jobber would supply a similar range of cases - chipboard, hardshell, or deluxe hardshell, from the case manufacturer of their choice. So cases on old Martins can vary greatly. This changed in 1972 with the blue thermoplastic case which was included with the sale of all new Martins.

Secondly, I have an Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute that i had PLEKD, which made a big difference to how it plays. However; i have an ongoing issue with it since, the G string always plays muted - i have changed the strings several times since but to no avail, other than that it plays really well in my opinion albeit i am only a learner with little experience. I have gone through the steps in your article but again all to no avail - have you any ideas as to what may be causing the muted tone (that's how i'd describe it anyway) and any thoughts on a possible solution you may have would be welcomed.
No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.
Well... I'm researching this to since I have a Norma Accoustic. From what I have found they were only made between 1965-1970something. Most were made in japan including mine although some were made in Italy. They were made in the same factory as the Sear silvertone's. Most are considered vintage guitars especially the electrics from the 60's. From what I have seen electrics in good condition are worth a good bit of money. I'm still trying to find more info on mine though. Like what woods is it made of. and what was the exact year of manufacture. It says FG-10 on it. It plays great. Has great sound and plays prety easily except mine doesn't seem to like you using the first fret. lol... just trying to add some info here
That would work, of course, but the result would be very different. You’d have minimum cut in the center position, with treble cuts of differing size in either direction, depending on the caps’ values. I’m not sure that would be particularly useful — the activity would be the same in either direction up to the point where the value of the greater cap kicks in. (I suppose one advantage would be that you could leap quickly to two “preset” values by turning the pot to minimum or maximum, as if you’d installed to caps on a DPDT switch, as seen here.) Or course, you’d have to worry about centering the pot, unless you could can find a part with a center detente. The resonant peaks, and therefore the overall tone, differ from standard. HOW exactly they differ is one of the things that I’m going to explore. 🙂
So Rad...It's ok...To think that we were going to get all the campaigns and multiplayer for all the Halo's was amazing, and the game itself when it works is amazing just like it always has been, but I bought my Xbox One just for this game and the fact that it was broken for more than half a year is a shame and honestly unfair to the consumer, I still give it 3 stars since it works decently now but it lost its potential to be an amazing game....Lots of people seem to be having issues with multiplayer and campaign achievements; however, I have not noticed any campaign issues other than one time when I accessed a terminal it would not let me resume my game but after a restart I found I had just hit a checkpoint so no work was lost.
This pickup is a solid choice for those who might want to keep their options open in terms of style or who have a responsibility to multiple genres and music types. Typically you’ll use the JB model for the bridge and the Jazz model for the neck, matching the configuration for notable users such as Seymour Duncan himself, Randy Rhodes and Jeff Beck.
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan
The Matsumoto Musical Instrument Manufacturers Association was the organization responsible for Fresher guitars. Little is known about this association, other than it did not have larger guitar manufacturers Matsumoku or Fujigen Gakki as members. Nakai Gakki was a possible member of the association. Fresher guitars began production in 1973 by the Kyowa Shokai Company, an association member, which was also responsible for the Camel badge. It's interesting to note that Fresher guitars were eventually being produced by Chushin, which leads me to believe that they may have been an Association member along with Kyowa. The beginning production year was considered a low quality benchmark for the company. The Fresher brand continuously improved in quality until 1980.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
The GRX70 showcases how good Ibanez is at producing great value guitars, they sure know how to keeps other guitar manufacturers on their toes. It has all the makings of a mid-tier instrument, complete with dive bomb capable bridge and great looking aesthetics, but packed inside a super affordable entry-level instrument. The basswood body with quilted art grain top is gorgeous, and a trio of pickups gives you tons of tones. A standard tremolo handles divebombing and other whammy acrobatics. This axe is perfect for burgeoning rockers who want a versatile guitar for all occasions. All in all, the Ibanez GRX70 gives you a whole lotta guitar for the money!.

An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.
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