The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
Distortion and overdrive are forms of audio signal processing used to alter the sound of amplified electric musical instruments, usually by increasing their gain, producing a "fuzzy", "growling", or "gritty" tone. Distortion is most commonly used with the electric guitar, but may also be used with other electric instruments such as bass guitar, electric piano, and Hammond organ. Guitarists playing electric blues originally obtained an overdriven sound by turning up their vacuum tube-powered guitar amplifiers to high volumes, which caused the signal to distort. While overdriven tube amps are still used to obtain overdrive in the 2010s, especially in genres like blues and rockabilly, a number of other ways to produce distortion have been developed since the 1960s, such as distortion effect pedals. The growling tone of distorted electric guitar is a key part of many genres, including blues and many rock music genres, notably hard rock, punk rock, hardcore punk, acid rock, and heavy metal music.
The hollow body — the original electric guitar design — is completely hollow on the inside, like an acoustic guitar. Hollow-bodied guitars like the Gibson ES-150 saw use in jazz ensembles by players such as Eddie Durham and Charlie Christian, but were also adopted for country, folk and, eventually, rock and roll. If you’re looking for warm, mellow tones, the hollow body is your best bet. That isn’t to say it can’t give you some sweet, raunchy distortion. A proper hollow-body setup can pull off a great classic blues or rock sound, but they are more prone to feedback than solid body guitars.
I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.

Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.


1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's another excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. There's just limited amount of wear on tips of headstock with a amlost perfect back. Two great sounding DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. Guitar has a 4 bolt neck which was the better neck from Harmony. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition excellent for this great 50 year old beauty. SOLD
Carvin is well-known for their fantastic guitars and amazing amplifiers, but that’s not all. There is one aspect in particular that makes Carvin guitars just a little bit more unique. They only sell their instruments by special order. Going to a random guitar shop to try a Carvin is just plain impossible. The only way you can test one is by going to one of their few stores in California. The base models cover just about any style you can imagine. From acoustic guitars to electric basses, they’ll cover your needs. When it comes to styles, they have those heavy metal jagged edges to smooth curves. They are highly customizable and it’s a certainty that they’ll have what you want. If you’re extremely picky or just know exactly what you want, Carvin will help you get your dream guitar. You can choose the tonewood, materials, different colours and finishes, basically anything and everything is available.

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.

Some guitars have a fixed bridge (3.4). Others have a spring-loaded hinged bridge called a vibrato bar, tremolo bar, or whammy bar, which lets players bend notes or chords up or down in pitch or perform a vibrato embellishment. A plastic pickguard on some guitars protects the body from scratches or covers the control cavity, which holds most of the wiring. The degree to which the choice of woods and other materials in the solid-guitar body (3) affects the sonic character of the amplified signal is disputed. Many believe it is highly significant, while others think the difference between woods is subtle. In acoustic and archtop guitars, wood choices more clearly affect tone.
My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!

The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.
In late 2012 I decided that I had all the modern guitars I needed. I’m not gigging much, just writing and recording. There were a couple of vintage guitars I was interested in. A Vox teardrop, especially the Mark IX, and the Fender Coronado. The Voxs turned out to be too expensive for me, especially the Mark IX, which was a 9-string beast meant to sound similar to a 12-string. Those are very rare and priced out of my range. The Coronado, I might be able to afford one day, but I’m not as interested as I was. The new reissues sell for about $700, but they’re different from the originals in several important ways.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
This one SOLD pictured has been SOLD OUT: This is one of my favorite vintage Alvarez guitars and is always truly a very good surprise just how great these sound / impressive and I have collected more than several over the years of this very model vintage era lawsuit guitar in AMAZING Condition. Here we have a wonderful and very clean example of a Vintage Japanese Acoustic its a late 1970's great Alvarez 5056 with the most intricately detailed inlay work everywhere on the body.... the front & back in Abalone & the fingerboard is rich - dark and wavy grained it looks to be Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood and has the Gorgeous Tree of Life in mother of pearl & abalone inlayed into the rich rosewood fingerboard WoW!,even the bridge has Mother of pearl inlaid, (you should have a real good look to come to your own conclusions if its something you like ) and the frets are in very good original condition... action is very good nice & low adjustable either way with no buzzing anywhere on the fretboard real nice playing example here folks.. The finish has a natural golden patina as seen to it and this guitar is strikingly beautiful. No cracks, no repairs, very good - excellent vintage used condition and is JVG rated at 9/10 WoW!... She's very EZ on the eyes to say the least and a premium performer this vintage piece has had over 33+ years to age and mellow and was a one owner California guitar in above better than average condition... no splits or cracks or separations or repairs ever... I believe this to be the cleanest best playing vintage 5056's we have ever had in JVG or seen for that matter. This one is a real pleasure to play! HERE IS A LINK TO CUT & PASTE TO SEE MANY MORE PICS OF THIS INSTRUMENT: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/Alvarez5059TreeofLifeVintage?authkey=Gv1sRgCNLn6LnEg8bmCQ#slideshow/5613001158042817730 .
The more difficult nut to crack in emulating the full drive train of a modern guitar is the instrument itself. That breaks down into two categories -- acoustic and amplified. VSTs and the gear that emulate the performance logic and physics of a guitar can get close to an acceptable reproduction of acoustic instruments but that last mile will be a hard gap to close. That's because the resonate bodies of most instruments -- especially stringed instruments -- are shaped differently than speakers. The materials, the inertial matrix, they're just not the same. The resonance of a stringed instrument originates at a single point of impact with the string, much as a speaker's sound originates at a sort-of single magnetic point, but inertia carries the vibration of a bowed or plucked string through a 3D body to produce 3D acoustics that cannot be exactly matched with a forward facing speaker -- or by speakers facing front and back. Close, but no exact match. We might argue that speakers can render sounds closer than a human ear can detect, but nuanced vibrations picked up in the bones and fluids of the human body could arguably betray a difference.
this is a norma guitar. i think from the late 1960's to maybe 1970estate find. has scratches in some placeshas two on and off button in white they push in real easy. theres a rhythm, and solo button theres two knobs bellow.theres only 3 strings on it. theres three missing part off the r is missing on the norma. i have no equipment to test it to see how it sounds it seems ok when i play with what strings i have on it.please check out all the pictures for better detail selling as is no returns... more
Hawaiian lap steels are not in the American Teisco Del Rey catalog, however, five laps remained in the ’66 Japanese Teisco catalog. Still available was the Harp-8, an 8-string console with two pickups and some sort of electronics controlled by four floor pedals. Still around were the H-39, the H-905 and the self-amplified TRH-1. Also available was the H-850, a single-pickup 6-string very similar to the H-905.
Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.

These are the most-used "building block" effects, and in combination, there are an infinite number of sounds you can make. The best thing to do is spend some time and analyze the sounds of your favorite songs and players. Once you have figured out that sound, head to your local store and give them a try. Then come back to Reverb to find a great deal! What were some first pedals that you found yourself loving when you got them?
He was barely known for decades after his 1938 death. But the 29 songs Robert Johnson recorded in 1936 and 1937 became holy writ to rock guitarists from Clapton to Dylan. They were dazzled by the way he made a guitar sound like an ensemble – slide and rhythm parts yelping in dialogue, riffs emerging from the mist. Dylan remembered playing King of the Delta Blues Singers, the 1961 LP that rescued Johnson from obscurity: "The vibrations from the loudspeaker made my hair stand up. The stabbing sounds… could almost break a window."

{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars: hohner","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"schecter","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio's Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb's String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman's The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze's Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne's Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett's The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein's MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen's De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann's Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt's Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág's Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the "Requiem", "Concerto Grosso N°2" and "Symphony N°1".

My band has two guitar players. One often plays acoustic while the other one plays an electric guitar. There has always been a problem balancing the volume and the frequences. While both guitars play on a clean sound it sounds fine but when electric guitar changes to distorted, overdriven or crunched sound then even at a low volume the acoustic guitar is almost unheard. Is it a common problem or particulary our local one. Any solution?
Acoustic guitars were always subjected to various limitations. Since the body of the guitar is its own source of sound amplification, we had to find other ways to get the sound out there. One of the most popular ways was to put a microphone in front of the instrument. This is a method that is still heavily used today, although it's cumbersome and inconvenient in a lot of applications.
Revamp the entire company staff from the C.E.O. down to the lowest level managers. Give workers raises. Treat them like human beings. Be nicer and friendlier. Reduce stress levels and not have such a toxic atmosphere. Make the daily numbers actually feasible and actually attainable without having to work 15 hrs. to achieve them. Have accountability on all levels - checks and balances- from C.E.O. down to lower management. Recognize the workers are human, and not robots!
I have established a broad network of invaluable contacts in the vintage guitar business. Please let me know what you are looking for, and I'll do my best to find it! Also, I am paying the highest prices for clean lefty vintage guitars. Let me know what you have; I'll be happy to work out a deal you will be happy with. I do want to mention that I buy righty guitars on ocassion as well, especially those that can be easily converted to lefty, including Fender Strats and ES-335/345 guitars.
I've spent years playing only my Gibson Les Paul. Right out of the box the Hummingbird blew me away. It came tuned perfectly to E flat. Tuned it up to E and continue to be blown away. It's warm and mellow where it should be, and bright and crisp as well where it should be. I've found it very easy to switch from my butter smooth LP to this acoustic, and it's beautiful sound has inspired me to get writing again. Then...I plugged it into my Epi Blues Custom 30W tube amp on the clean channel, and fell in love with the guitar all over again. Brilliant, full, radiant, crisp, warm and so much more. I don't use a pick, and this thing still rocks. I couldn't say enough good things about it! Far better quality than I'd ever expect for $300.
Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
Having lived in an apartment when learning guitar, it was painful. Using headphones works, but most days you just want to hear it from an amp like it was meant to be. Your only real solution is to try out some of those tiny lunchbox amps and see if they can fill that void. Another option is to start saving for a house, or find a friend who has one to jam out in.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.

Zen guitar is not about scales and memorizing chords. Instead, it is a masterpiece of why to play guitar, helping you get through the times where learning guitar gets frustrating, and believe me, it will at some point get frustrating. But if you can get through that and push on, you’ll be rewarded with mastery of an instrument that will give you personal fulfillment and a lifetime hobby that brings achievement and satisfaction.

When Electric Mud was released, it was a huge success, selling 150,000 in the first six weeks. It was also the best selling Muddy Waters record at Chess ever, entering Billboard's Top 200 Chart. It was a triumph of a record that updated his sound and put him elbow to elbow with the bands that had influenced him. The record broke down restrictions of genres with its inventiveness and ability to re-arrange songs and have them come out as something radically different. Unfortunately, narrow-minded blues purists across the board denounced it as atrocious, offensive and a big "sell out." There's a direct similarity between this and what happened to Bob Dylan a few years earlier when he decided to go electric, making his folk-purist fans angry that he was "selling out" to rock and roll. Since Muddy is primarily a blues artist, overviews of his career would be written by a number of blues historians who would automatically dismiss this record for years to come.


hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
When Eric Clapton plugged his 1960 Les Paul into a Marshall Bluesbreaker in the mid 60’s (the set-up used to record Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton, the “Beano album”) he created a new rock tone that immediately became a standard.[15] Clapton played a 1960 Standard as a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and in the early days of Cream. The guitar was said to have been stolen while Clapton was preparing for the first Cream tour in 1966, following the recording of Fresh Cream, and was long considered an iconic instrument by Clapton’s fans and Les Paul guitar admirers. Gibson announced production of the Clapton 1960 Standard, also nicknamed the “Beano Burst”, in 2010. Gibson says the instrument “accurately represents what Eric Clapton personally feels his 1960 Les Paul should be”, with Clapton consulting on the design of the guitar. Production is limited to 55 hand-aged instruments signed by Clapton (who was allowed to keep the first five of these instruments), another 95 hand-aged instruments, and 350 Vintage Original Spec instruments, but all five hundred instruments feature period-correct hardware, two Gibson reproduction PAF humbucking pickups, and subtly figured “antiquity burst” maple tops.
This processor is pretty good quality, unfortunately not too many parameters on the effects and you can only use one effect at a time, and some prefixed combo of 2 effects (if i remember correctly 10 different options). If you need it for reverb, or slight delay, tremolo or acoustic simulator its pretty cool, not able to add exact tempo on delay or tremolo though. Sound quality is very good, 24 bit A/D and D/A so no loss there either, and you also have stereo (same effect options on both though) and balanced and unbalanced outputs (if you use unbalanced the signal goes to both outputs so you also have the balanced output if needed). For the money is definitely the best option, imagine that a reverb pedal cost the same money (just reverb)...so if you have a controller it will fit on your gear. I am using it with ... full review
One thing is for sure: the advantage of a multi effects pedal is getting a lot of effects in one convenient package, which you can use to learn what guitar effects you actually use on a regular basis. Depending on the type of music you play, your style, and your skill level, chances are you don’t have a need for every effect type under the sun. Pro guitarists’ pedalboards are tailored to the tone and sound they need to achieve. Perhaps fuzz, delay, and compression are crucial, but not a flanger or chorus. Point is, if you don’t yet know this about yourself, a multi-effects pedal is the most perfect and cost effective way to start. Over time, if and when your love for effects deepens, as your budget allows you can start buying individual pedals that are better versions of what’s on your multi-fx unit. The overdrive in your Zoom G3X might be good enough to hold you over, but eventually you might want to get an actual Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy electro acoustic guitars at the lowest prices in India.
We now know why series wiring attenuates the highs, but why is it louder? Why do you end up with such a beefy, meaty tone? Let’s assume each pickup on your Strat puts out 100 x of power. When wiring two pickups in parallel, each pickup loses 3/4 of its output when combined with the other. This drops each pickup’s output to 25 x, instead of 100 x. Together, you get a total of 50 x (25 x + 25 x). This power drop is why any dual-pickup combination on your Strat doesn’t sound as loud as a single pickup.

The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
Martin began with a 000-size guitar, which had 12 frets clear of the body. They rejected the 27" scale idea, as this would have been impractical since the high string tension on a guitar would have made the instrument hard to play. Instead they used a 25.4" scale length. To accommodate Bechtel's request for 15 frets clear of the body, they squared the body's shoulders to add 1 5/16" to the clear part of the fingerboard. This allowed 14 frets clear of the body. Since they felt aesthetically the bridge should remain halfway between the center of the soundhole and the endblock, there really was no way to make the guitar have 15 frets clear. The bottom bout was reshaped slightly to match the new shape of the upper bout (note when the 000 went to 14 frets in 1934 it retained this initial OM body shape).
Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.
{ "name": "Candy Apple Red", "skuUrl": "/Fender/California-Redondo-Player-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red-1500000152032.gc", "status": "instock", "statusText": "In stock", "skuItemType": "New", "inventoryText": "In Stock & Ready To Ship", "inventoryKey": "in_stock", "availableDate": "09-22-2018", "price": 399.99, "isOnSale": false, "msrp": 400.01, "salePrice": 399.99, "easyPayOptions":"0,0,100002,6 Months Promotional Financing,01/01/2019,Special 6-month financing^ + $19 back in rewards Valid through,399.99,true,/pages/Gear-Card-Rewards.gc", "formatedIntegerValue": "399", "decimalValue": "99", "listPrice": 399.99, "isPriceDrop": false, "priceDropPrice": "", "savingsAmount": 0.02, "discountPercentage": 0, "promos":["coverageEligible","freeShipping","return"], "warranty": true, "sku": "site51500000152032", "shipToStore": true, "displaySku": "K47863000002000", "displayId": "1500000152032   POS #: 113861041", "serialized": false, "shipsFree":true, "condition": "New", "commerceType": "New", "priceVisibility": "1", "scene7SetID": "MMGS7/K47863000002000_MEDIA_SET", "invMsgVendorDropShip":"false", "invMsgOverSized":"false", "invMsgBackOrdered":"false", "invMsgPreOrder":"false", "invMsgPromiseDate":"", "invMsgAvailability":"", "invMsgDetail":"", "invMsgAddOnText":"", "currencySymbol": "$", "styleImgUrl": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/California-Redondo-Player-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Candy-Apple-Red/K47863000002000-00-140x140.jpg", "styleImgAlt": "California Redondo Player Acoustic-Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red", "freeGiftWarning":false, "freeGiftWarningTips":"", "kitCarouselItems": [], "availableInStoreOnly": false, "isShipsInternational": false, "checksum":"352089750023", "restrictionType":"", "restrictionError":"" ,"storeInfo":[ { "storeName" : "La Mesa", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Ysidro", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Marcos", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } ] }
In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.

Still available in Japan in ’66, but not promoted in the U.S. by Teisco Del Rey, were the Teisco TG-64 “monkey grip” guitar, its companion TB-64 bass, plus the similar non-grip NB-1 and NB-4 basses. The three-pickup TG-64 had a striped metal guard and the four-and-two hooked headstock with a metal plate on the front. The TB-64 probably still sported a plastic guard and three pickups. However, in the Japanese catalog from ’66, the TB-64 appears to be a 6-string bass, with an elongated variant of the hooked headstock with a rounded tip and a four-and-two tuner arrangement.


pedal bass fender stratocaster electric amp left handed guitar fender telecaster gibson les paul telecaster ibanez epiphone martin guitar fuzz prs taylor guitar gretsch electro acoustic guitar les paul gibson sg marshall stratocaster fender precision bass tokai rickenbacker free fender bass fender jazz bass resonator guitar 12 string guitar fender amp fender jaguar
Welcome to Part 1 of a new Gibson series that will dissect a different breed of effect each week, to tell you—the player—what each does, and how it does it. Effects pedals can be divided into a range of categories of types, but there are undeniably some gray areas between these, since different designs will achieve their sonic ends via different means. The distinctions get blurrier when we throw digital technology into the brew. An analog and a digital chorus, for example, are very different circuits, approached—from the design perspective—from very different standpoints, although the sonic results may sound roughly similar (in the good ones, though, the subtleties are usually quite distinctive).

Students and expert alike describe this guitar as a fun instrument, and goes further by commenting that it has exceeded their expectations. From its fast action playability to the quality of the finish, the Epiphone SGSpecial continues to rake in compliments. Several people even said that it comes surprisingly close to the feel and sound of a Gibson SG.
We as a team are always extremely inquisitive and wondered about something, which can be anything, happening around us. One day we planned to share these things which are enough to spice up soul of internet freaks and we made Coolexample.in. Here on Coolexample.in, we pick, research and display some really cool examples which hit us somewhere in our daily lives. The website let the visitors to explore chunk of daily stuff they may need to know about. You will get a bunch of trending information from around the globe. Every latest buzz, from footpath to limelight, we have it all, in Article, Charticle And Listicle way with the categories- Taza Khabar, Hottest In Cinema, Top Tenz, Education, Jobs & Career, Tech In Trend, Sports. So, if you’re a viralmaniac, quench your thirst here!
By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.
Barney Kessel was known for playing his Gibson hollow body jazz guitar and used it almost exclusively on his own recordings. But when it came to rock, pop, r&b and blues recording sessions with the most popular performers of the early '60s such as Elvis Presley, Sam Cooke, Connie Francis, T-Bone Walker, Ike & Tina Turner, Phil Spector, Dinah Washington and Bobby Darin, Kessel turned to his Kay Barney Kessel Artist guitar.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: guitar value packages","pageName":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages: electric guitar value packages: epiphone","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"epiphone","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages: electric guitar value packages","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages: electric guitar value packages","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages: electric guitar value packages","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: guitar value packages: electric guitar value packages","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category2"}

This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:
Of course, as with most signature guitars, it’s the looks that really steal the show. You do of course get the beautiful diving bird inlays that PRS are known for, and then the top has this beautifully clean look to it that just screams quality. The sound is still gorgeous though, with a really nice crisp feel to it that lends itself to more technical fingerwork that you’d expect of Lifeson.
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
Those aspiring to kill the next-door neighbour’s lawn by the malevolent force of their playing alone would do well to speak to their local dealer about Schecter’s Demon-6. Updated with fresh set of Schecter active humbuckers and a super-smooth wenge fretboard for 2018, the Demon-6 is a mean- looking S-style that’s built for shredding  - and it’s also available as a seven-string for a little extra. It’s one of the most powerful and playable instruments on the market at this price. Its thin-C profile neck, cut from maple with a satin finish, is super-quick. Shredders will love that a light touch is rewarded on the fretboard - that wenge feels slick ’n’ slinky. The bridge’s construction fits the two most important tenets in bridge design: it’s no-fuss and industrial-strength. The Demon-6 feels indestructible. It might make you feel likewise; at least, its active pickups (powered by a nine-volt battery that’s easily accessed via a clip on the rear of the instrument) will ward off most predators if you crank the gain high enough. Tonally, that’s the Demon-6’s wheelhouse. The bridge ’bucker has plenty of grunt but an abundance of top-end that metal soloists will love. Overall, the Demon-6 is a metal guitar, designed to summon something much more sinister, and it delivers in spades.

In preparation for making these electric guitar pickups, I carefully studied the qualities of both vintage and modern guitar tone. All of my pickups feature grounded shielding to reduce noise from external electric fields and are potted under vacuum to eliminate microphonic feedback. The result of years of building and testing is a family of pickups for guitar, bass, lap steel and other instruments that will help you achieve the tone you desire. All V V G pickups are hand-made in the USA. Several of the new designs offer the user the capability to shape the tone by changing the magnet assembly and reversing the effective winding direction. We're here to help you find your tone!
Excellent explanation! One thing that no one has touched on, yet is the physics of the high frequency components (mentioned above). When you clamp a string at both ends and pluck it it will have a fundamental frequency of waving back and forth based on a) it's length b) it's thickness and c) how tightly it's stretched. All wavering strings, though will have additional waverings. These are referred to as overtones. The first overtone will be a doubling of the frequency and the next a trippleing and so forth. Each of these overtone frequencies contribute to the rich, complex sound of the instrument. Here's a good explanation with pictures. Note the location of the frequency nodes in relation to the placement of the pickups.
From a fledgling studio that sold second hand music equipment back in the late 60s, Orange grabs the top spot in this list with their highly rated guitar amplifiers. Orange amps are easy to spot with their picturesque design, but what's interesting is how successful they continue to be, while veering away from amp modeling technology. By limiting the features of their amps, they made it easier for users to appreciate their brand of quality and tone, which translates to high ratings. Obviously, the influence of popular artists helps their cause, this includes Jimmy Page, Noel and Liam Gallagher, Billy Gibbons, Chino Moreno and many more. In addition to their distinct combo amplifiers, Orange amps is well known for their lunchbox size tube amps.
Mr Swike appears to know what he is talking about, and has undertaken a body of work that is unfortunately for sale while only being 70% complete. Some of the instructions are incomplete (like showing what North polarity looks like on Stew-Macs polarity tester, but not South), and at least one (the Varistor mod) wildly inadvisable. Why not get the book done, checked out by objective professional parties, and then released as a complete reference book?

When I received this Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Electric Guitar, Vintage Sunburst I discovered there are cracks in the wooden body, under the paint. I can tell that the wood was cracked before it was painted because the paint flows into the crack in one instance on the back, is visible up over the "shoulder" close to the strap peg and can be seen under the paint on the front. In another instance the paint bridges a crack on back below the cutout shoulder and can be seen under the paint in the right light front and back. Is this normal? (There was no sign of shipping damage on either the outer carton or on the inner product box). Regarding playing, the bass strings buzz on the frets when fretted (not my fingers) which probably can be corrected by adjusting the bridge. I was under the impression that Epiphone guitars were ready to use right out of the box. I have contacted Epiphone/Gibson company to advise on the cracks and the buzzing bass strings. I am concerned that the cracks may get worse, and if this is this normal for a guitar in this low price range made in china. I got a reply from Gibson Customer Service which said "We would need to see pictures, but it would be highly unusual if there actually were cracks in the wood. The set up on an instrument can shift during shipping and handling, so a new instrument may need to be set-up." I will probably return this instrument and buy one in person from a music store where I can see and try the product before buying it.


Most players don’t use more than one modulation effect at once, so it doesn’t matter all that much if you place the phaser before the chorus or the flanger in front of the phaser. However, the one exception is tremolo, which should be placed behind other modulation pedals, as this placement will produce the most dramatic and desirable rhythmic on/off effects. Placing a tremolo pedal in an effects loop is also closer to the signal path of an amp with built-in tremolo, but my personal preference is to plug a tremolo pedal into an amp’s front end and save the effects loop for other effects.
Let’s start off with a real classic for a classic player! This Fenders vintage modified style Strat hss has captured the happy way of the 50’s, available in Surf Green, Daphne Blue and Fiesta Red and it’s a guitar that just makes your life a litter bit more worth living. The design is very much like the 1950’s electric guitars, from the soft V-shaped neck, maple fretboard and 8-hole pickguard down to the smaller things, like the knobs and the switch tip- everything just brings us back!
Nothing compares to a Martin. The craftsmanship and attention to detail is impeccable, and the sound: the sound. The sound is like heaven. If you're used to an electric, a Taylor may feel more comfortable, but nothing compares to the timbre of a Martin acoustic. In the right hands, the bass and treble are perfectly actuated. None of that "tinny" Taylor quality which - while useful in certain applications and seems "easier to play" - cannot hold a candle to the the deep, rich, nuanced tone of a Martin acoustic. Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Woody Guthrie, Eric Clapton... Need I say more? I own a D-35, and I wouldn't be caught dead without a Martin guitar in my arsenal. Complete, unequivocal perfection.
Otherwise, while the manufacturer is considerably shy when releasing specs regarding this product, customer reviews can give us a good idea of how well it performs under real-life circumstances. In brief, it performs well, particularly so for country music and slow rock, especially when paired with a couple more 12” speakers on top of the ones that are already integrated into its chassis.    
Because driving the power valves this hard also means maximum volume, which can be difficult to manage in a small recording or rehearsal space, many solutions have emerged that in some way divert some of this power valve output from the speakers, and allow the player to generate power valve distortion without excessive volume. These include built-in or separate power attenuators and power-supply-based power attenuation, such as a VVR, or Variable Voltage Regulator to drop the voltage on the valves' plates, to increase distortion whilst lowering volume. Guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen have been known to use variacs before VVR technology was invented.[specify] Lower-power valve amps (such as a quarter-watt or less)[citation needed], speaker isolation cabinets, and low-efficiency guitar speakers are also used to tame the volume.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Gibson guitars are the produce of the Gibson Guitar Corporation which produces guitars and other musical instruments which sell under a variety of brand names. Gibson Guitar Corporation was founded in the year 1890 by Orville Gibson in USA. It is a mass producer of the Guitars and is the most widely used guitars in the world. Gibson guitars are exported all over the world and are considered as one of the best guitar brands in the world. Gibson Guitars actually are the giant guitar company which also owns other brands of guitars. Some of the popular brands which are owned by Gibson are Baldwin, Epiphone, Kramer, Maestro, Slingerlands etc.
If you are interested in a more a price friendly model, it is recommendable that you give this model produced by Davison Guitars a good look. According to its manufacturer, the unit comes shipped with a handful of useful accessories such as a practice amp, a case, a strap cord and a very practical DVD that is said to help beginners play the instrument in no time.

It depends on what purpose the noise suppressor will fulfill. You may need more than one placement depending on your purpose. If you position it behind the tuner, it will remove any unwanted noise from the guitar signal before it gets modified with the pedals (this is the most common placement). Guitarists also use the noise suppressor or noise gate pedals after an overdrive to cut the riff sharply.
A plucked string has many modes of vibration which all occur simultaneously; most of these correspond to overtones or harmonics of the fundamental frequency of the vibrating string. Near the center of the string, the fundamental frequency has the largest amplitude; a pickup at 1/4 of the length of the string will be at the point of maximum amplitude of the second harmonic and at a null point for the fourth harmonic. This position gives a strong, full, mellow tone. A pickup at 1/8 of the length of the string (closer to the bridge) will be at the point of maximum amplitude of the third harmonic, and will also get a lot of the fourth and fifth harmonics. This gives a much brighter tone. The change in tone caused by plucking the string close to the neck versus close to the bridge is based on the same idea: bringing out the harmonics in the string in different proportions. See link to a related article, below.
In 1950, Leo Fender introduced the single-pickup Esquire, and a few months later released a dual-pickup version called the Broadcaster that, due to trademark issues, was later renamed the Telecaster. The Tele® would go on to become the world's first successfully mass-produced solidbody electric guitar. Simple yet elegant, it has been a show-stopper and session magnet since its debut. It’s the go-to guitar for twangy chicken pickin’ solos, which is why the iconic axe has appeared on the majority of country records over the past six-plus decades.
String gauge refers to the thickness of the guitar string. This thickness in thousandths of an inch. The larger the gauge, the heavier the string. When describing gauges, guitarists typically omit the decimal, and speak only of the number (they will say an "eight" when referring to a string gauge of .008). There are both advantages and disadvantages to using lighter/heavier gauge strings.
airline guitar Airline Guitars amp amps bass guitar danelectro eastwood guitar Eastwood Guitars electric guitar electric guitars fender george harrison gibson gibson guitars guitar guitar amp guitar amps guitarists guitar lessons guitar review guitars Guitar Theory guitar tips harmony guitars japanese guitars japanese made guitars jimi hendrix kay guitars les paul lessons mosrite NAMM Updates rare guitar rare guitars silvertone teisco the beatles tips tone tremelo valco vintage amp Vintage Amps vintage guitar Vintage Guitars
In the Guitar Setup & Maintenance course, Greg Voros devotes an entire DVD to electric guitars. Rather than talk in the abstract about setting up all electric guitars, he’s picked two very popular ones to use for demonstration purposes. He’ll teach you how to adjust the action, the bridge, and the pickup heights, as well as how to adjust the neck for precise relief, in order to get the best action possible on your electric guitar.
Though because of this flexibility, it can be hard to figure which of the many types of electric guitar is going to be a good fit for your needs. Thankfully, if you’ve arrived at this article you’re going to get all of the information that you need to make an informed decision on which body styles are going to be worth considering for your genre of choice.
Replacing pickup rings and restoring covers. These rings are usually plastic and cannot be restored but covers are normally metal on Les Paul styles. You may not want to rub steel wool across your covers so follow the method of cleaning painted bridges to avoid unwanted scratches. Also, replace your pickup rings properly with rings that are the same length and/or color and make sure the screw holes do not need to be resized.
The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.

In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.


Peerless hollowbody guitars are excellent at this price range. Both of these brands manufacture from factories in South Korea. PRS SE is made by World Instruments Co. and they have consistently high standards - all brands made in this factory will be exceptional. Peerless is a company which used to manufacture high end guitars for other brands such as Gretsch and Gibson, and then launched their own brand. They are exceptionally good guitars.

Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.


One glance at this bad boy reveals just how accurate it is to the 1959 version. We are talking exact same tubeless truss rod assembly, aniline dye, exact same finish... everything. In terms of hardware, they went with a set of Klauson Deluxe tuners and period specific Tune-o-Matic bridge. The custom humbuckers were coiled and voiced to perfectly match the original PAF design from the late '50s which was done using Alnico III magnets and 42 AWG wire. The performance of this guitar is an experience that is rarely found out there.
To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.

Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.


I’ve used Eagle for a long time, but I just recently started using Circuit Maker, and I like it so far. I’ll probably end up using both since I do most of my work on a Mac, and Eagle still works fine on that. I had to set up a dedicated Windows machine for Circuit Maker. Circuit Maker has a 3D view of the finished PCB which is a very helpful tool if you are dealing with odd board sizes and very constrained layouts.
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.
• How frets influence action: This is generally a matter of taste, technique and wear. Some players who find they are encountering resistance when they bend strings may need larger frets. If notes sound buzzy or imprecise, the culprit may be too-low frets. On the other hand, frets that are too high can prevent proper intonation. But raising a guitar’s action may be a cheaper solution to correcting the latter problem than a fret replacement.

This site aims to be a reference point for guitar players and guitar collectors. There's information, history, photographs and sound clips of many famous, and not so famous guitars and basses by makes such as Danelectro, Epiphone, Fender, Gibson, Guild, Gretsch, Hagstrom, Harmony, Hofner, Rickenbacker and Vox. There is a section on effects pedals too!
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: first act","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"first act","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.

Berry snapped one up immediately in 1958 and has played the ES-335 or its slightly fancier relatives the ES-345 and ES-355 since then. A few years later the model was embraced by Freddie King. Alvin Lee made history with an ES-345 at Woodstock, speeding through “I’m Going Home,” and Larry Carlton’s incredibly lyrical ES-335 can be heard on great Steely Dan albums including The Royal Scam and near-countless other sessions. Whether equipped with humbuckers or P-90s, semi-hollow body guitars sound sweetly beautiful, but can also grind. Ultimately, however, they remain a middle ground between the electric solid body and the hollow body models.
Kay/Valco went out of business soon afterwards, and in 1969 its assets were auctioned off. Syl Weindling and Barry Hornstein of W.M.I. (the main importer of Teisco Del Rey products) purchased the Kay brand name during this time. As a result of this, the names "Teisco" and "Kay" were used on Teisco Del Rey guitars for a while in the early 70's. In 1980 the Kay Guitar Company was purchased by Tony Blair and is currently active selling Kay brand and Santa Rosa brand guitars, Chicago Blues harmonicas and accessories and of course the Kay Vintage Reissue line of professional guitars and basses.
Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.

The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard sports a mahogany back with an artisan-grade AAA figured maple top and a mahogany neck with Ultra-Modern weight relief. This chambering technique is provides a solid core through the center of the guitar, retaining the classic Les Paul sound and making the guitar less prone to feedback. The Ultra Modern weight-relieved body also makes playing long sets a breeze. The neck has an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck profile for increased playability and comfort.


With that in mind, the quality of said effect is satisfactory, to say the least. You maybe won’t see the same level of refinement as you would in some stand-alone models, however its reverb comes across as fairly organic. On top of that, you are presented with several decent options. All of that aside, the real value of this Zoom comes from its ability to combine up to 6 effects at any given time.

Leo Fender started Fender Guitars in 1946, and his first innovation was the production of solid body guitars. Up until then, electric guitars were made with hollow bodies, meaning that they were somewhat fragile and somewhat complicated in design. Leo Fender’s guitars offered a more straightforward design; the were bodies made from one solid block of wood and the bridges were simply attached to the body, removing the need for extra calibration of elevated bridges.
Every year we bring a new opening act on tour with us, and every year I have the harsh task of going on stage after some of the finest players in the business. This summer’s tour was no exception. With Montgomery Gentry in the support slot of the Toby Keith Biggest and Baddest tour, I had my work cut out for me. Two of the best axe slingers the music scene has to offer—Frank Bowers and Bo “two-timechampion” Garrett—have some of the greatest chops and sounds on the circuit today.

 South Korea has been one of the largest OEM guitar factories in the world since 1980's. Nonetheless, the words "Made in Korea" still invoke visions of low cost alternatives to high-end manufacturers. At Swing, our mission is to lay these stereotypes to rest, and show the world that we can produce true professional grade instruments, made by professionals, for professionals. (Of course, company is not a patriotic organization. This is a matter of manufacturer's pride and self-satisfaction that can be called "Professionalism".)
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
Next to the great sounds and looks, the most noticeable thing about Seagull guitars is the incredibly reasonable prices. With Seagull, you get a quality guitar made from superior woods and materials for a lot less than it seems like it ought to cost. The Performer CW Flame Maple is definitely one of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000 out there.

Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,419 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood/maple (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x V-Mod Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge and middle tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized vibrato, Fender standard staggered tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Antique Olive, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Natural, Olympic White, Sienna Sunburst, Sonic Gray
Semi-hollow, slim, and designed with a comfortable ‘C’ shape exterior, the D’Angelico EX-DC Standard is a high-price electric guitar with professional grade features. Creating a more natural tone that delivers an organic quality to its sound, the Standard guitar uses Kent Armstrong Vintage humbuckers for a focused sound free of excess reverberation. The Super-Rotomatic tuners maintain their tuning accuracy for a longer time, due in part to the turning radius within the design. Strings remain at a comfortable tension due to the unique Stairstep tailpiece, creating both a strong resonant sound and assured sturdiness. A semi-hollow body designed with maple on the top and back, other features include a 3-way toggle that provides two modes of volume as well as two separate tones. Meant for use throughout various genres of music, the EX-DC Standard is an electric guitar to please the masses.

Most reverb pedals fall into the ambient effect category, similar to delay and echo in the way it manipulates your signal. It's likened to the delay effect because it's technically a timing effect which, in the world of signal processing, can be described as "sound after sound." In other words, the original sound is produced and another sound follows.


There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.
I was a little concerned buying a guitar on Amazon. I had not even played a sample on the Gretsch acoustic. I've played Martins, Fenders, Washburns, etc. but never heard of the 'Gretsch'! It arrived within a few days of ordering with the case I ordered too. I had it delivered to my office so that it wouldn't be sitting on my porch until I got home. I opened the box to examine the guitar and co-workers asked me to play something. As I was tuning the white Gretsch I broke a string, so playing it for my friends was not going to happen. When I got home I re-stung the guitar and as I was tuning it I was not very impressed. I like the look but come on we purchase a guitar to play! After it was tuned I began to play a few chords and licks.
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends.
I own several guitars ranging from 700 dollars to 2000 dollars so I knew not to get my expectations up when purchasing a 100 dollar. I bought this as a gift for someone to learn on but when it arrived, I could not believe the quality of guitar this is. The tuning keys are high quality, the neck and fret board are high quality. It holds its tune as good as my Ovation and Ibanez acoustics as well as my 2000 dollar PRS guitar. Very easy to press the strings. Surely I thought this would be the difference maker from my more expensive guitars but it's actually easier to play. The pickup is a little more brighter sounding than on more expensive guitars but it's nothing you can't fix with your settings.
Welcome to KayBassGuitar.com.  We're a the online Kay Vintage Reissue web site of Rock N Roll Vintage Inc., a Chicago based internationally known vintage guitar dealer.  Kay currently offers the "Street Series" and a "USA Recording Studio" lines.  Kay plans to offer reissues of 12 popular models including the Barney Kessel and the Jazz guitar and bass lines.   The Street Series are authentic reproductions of Classic Kay guitars and basses.   The Recording studio series will offer models with exceptional hand built custom shop quality.  We offer the complete line of Kay Vintage Reissue Basses and Guitars.   These Kay reissue guitars and basses look amazing and play even better.  Currently the Kay K161V Thin Twin and K775V Jazz II guitars and K162V Pro and K5970V Jazz Special basses are available.
Because each of these requires duplicating your signal once or several times, you want to do it after you've added all of the other dynamic, filter-based, and gain effects. There is no sense in trying to get a distortion or equalizer pedal to react to a series of recombined signals when you can take care of that before hand. You'll get much higher quality and accurate modulation out of it this way.
The Effect: Expression pedals are nowhere near as popular as some other guitar effects. However, they have the power to make or break your guitar tone, depending on how far you are willing to go. At their very core, expression pedals are nothing more than a potentiometer in a pedal form. They can be as simple as that, which is represented beautifully by the Mission Engineering Inc EP­1, but there definitely are more advanced designs available. The purpose of an expression unit in your signal chain is to give you more control over equipment which supports this kind of accessory. We’re talking rack mounted effects, digital processors, guitar effects pedals and more. In some cases they are downright necessary, but in most they offer a whole new level of control over the effect in question. Despite their inherent simplicity, finding a good one still take some effort, lots of research and planning.
Compared to other plastic exterior multi-effects, the RP360 XP feels solid and durable. And this is reflected in many reviews, which mention the pedal's reliability as one of its good traits. Versatility and value for money also came up a number of times, both from pedalboard owners that have downsized, and beginners who are just trying out multi-effects.
These two articles show us how me can manipulate coil winding direction, electrical phase, and magnetic polarity to achieve hum-cancellation between two coils. Having this knowledge allows us to create hum-cancelling combinations of coils over and above than just using humbuckers. A good example is using a RWRP pickup in the middle position of a Strat.
A friend owns a music store and looked up the "Norma" brand. It said- Norma guitars were manufactured in Japan between 1966 and 1972 by the Japanese to compete with the Gibson HummingBird. The look is almost identical (Check out the Gibson Hummingbird played by Jonathan "BuggieMan" Long from Baton Rouge La. His looks exactly like my Norma. I too was curious for thirty years about my good sounding guitar. Looks aint everything!

This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
The conservative way to tell if a Martin is built for steel strings is the bridge. If it's a style 18 or higher and has a belly bridge (and does not have 'banjo' tuners like early OM models), it's pretty much built for steel strings (can't use this indicator on style 17 and lower as these models never used a belly brige until the 1950s). Why? Since Martin didn't implement the belly bridge until late 1929, it's a very conservative indicator that the guitar is built for steel. The belly bridge was the last thing they did to make steel strings usable on their guitars (though certainly many models with rectangle bridges can handle steel strings too.) They started to implement the belly bridge in 1929, and all style 18 models and higher had the belly bridge by 1930. Therefore using the belly bridge as a steel string indicator is a very safe idea (assuming the bridge is original and it's not an OM). Now can steel strings be used on pre-1930 models with a pyramid or rectangle bridge? Maybe, but it's just not as definative and caution should be heeded ("silk and steel" strings would be a good and safe compromise). Note early OM models with banjo style tuners generally should be strung up 'lightly'.
Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: agile","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"martin","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
The FX325A is one of the most popular Yamaha acoustic electric guitars especially due to its quality sound and affordable price. This model is suited for both beginners and experienced musicians. With a spruce top and Nato back and sides, this full-size dreadnought is both rich-sounding and durable, able to offer years of enriching musical experiences.
Providing all of the necessary features expected in a quality electric guitar at a budget-friendly price, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is perfect for those just beginning their musical journey or the seasoned guitarist looking for an everyday guitar for practice. The 650R humbucker pickups combined with the open coil design deliver strong and sustained tones. As seen on all Epiphone guitars, the Special II has over 500K potentiometer for both tone and volume, and a toggle selector with a 3-way pickup to focus in on the clarity of the sound and decreased excess humming. The body and neck are made with mahogany, while the fretboard has dot inlays within the rosewood design. String changing is also made easier due to the stopbar tailpiece, which helps to add more sustain in sound when combined with the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge. With all of these features at such a reasonable price point, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a strong contender included on this list.
One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.
It usually has 8 terminals – two poles with 4 terminals each. Each pole has one common terminal and 3 switched. The first thing you want to figure out is which terminal is common. Note that terminal on the left is connected to the lever all the time – that’s our common terminal. The other three terminals are connected to the lever only in certain switch positions. Represented as a schematic, each pole would look like this.

Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
Wife wants to play guitar again after a long hiatus. My full sized Takamine with fat strings is too big and heavy for her. Got her this 3/4 Yamaha and I fell in love with it. I may have to get another one for her because I've been hogging it. It has a great voice for a 3/4. The action is nice, the built in tuner is a real treat. Never had one before but it is unbelievably convenient. I don't plug it in often but I had to check out that sound too. The electronics sound decent. Can't crank it up too loud or it starts to feedback, but I'm actually sitting right on top of my small but punchy VOX amp so I can't really say how it would work for playing out. The reviews convinced me to buy this one. The best review only had one major complaint; the tuning pegs. I agree they could be better, but I don't think they are awful. I have to tweak the tuning just a little once or twice a day before I play, but it isn't like it goes out of tune when I'm playing, even when I'm beating on it hard. I think it is well worth the price and was surprised by the volume it produces. Much better than expected. If you don't find the tuning pegs worthy, I think the instrument is good enough to spend money on for an upgrade, but I don't plan to. It is solid, light weight, comfortable, nice sounding, well designed, feature rich and handy. I'm keeping it in the corner by the bed and I pick it up every chance I get. I haven't played guitar much the past few years so having a guitar at my fingertips all the time is helping me get my callouses back quickly. No matter what you play, if you lose your callouses, rebuilding them is always painful for a few weeks, but this instrument is pretty easy to play. I've gone through the process several times over the years with my Takamine. This is far less painful. Perhaps that means it will take longer, but at least I can still use my fingers to type long reviews in the meantime. No avoiding the pain regardless of what you play, but there is pain, and there is agony. This guitar hits a sweet spot somewhere in between. It's just right for young or old, big or small. (FWIW, I heard an interview with Clapton where he confessed he doesn't play much when he's not working and when he has to prepare for a tour, even he has to go through the callous building process). Well, I'm way off topic now. Again, great little guitar. Go for it.
The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
John Mayer and Frusciante are very talented guitarists, but to include them at the expense of legends like Clapton, Duane Allman, Neil Young, The Edge, Brian May, George Harrison…that's unforgivable. I'll admit that Jack White needs more time to prove himself too, but of all the recent guitarists listed, he is the one with the most vision and confidence in his ideas. He is his generation's Jimmy Page.

Seagull acoustic guitars are among the best values you are going find. They’re made in Canada, and there’s an attention to detail and craftsmanship here you may not expect in guitars at these price points. The Seagull Artist series is the top of the lineup. You’ll find unique tonewoods and high-quality construction techniques at an affordable price.
Guitar Tricks is a step-by-step learning system that’s designed to make learning guitar easy. The Guitar Fundamentals level 1 training curriculum has been totally reworked, improved and only recently re-released. Nothing else is as beginner-friendly as Guitar Tricks. In addition to working your way through the fundamental lessons of the Core Learning system you can explore great songs arranged with beginners in mind.

The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.

Compared with many of the guitar models on this list that have been around for half a century, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is still a baby. Ibanez introduced its Artcore line of semi and full hollow body electric guitars only in 2002. Nevertheless, the Artcore guitars have amassed a massive fan base because of their tuning stability, rich tone, impressive sustain and overall quality. Plus, they’re also extremely affordable considering their features.
A now affordable alternative to the Tri-Axis and other Mesa Boogie Amps, the Studio Preamp contained all of the versatility one would expect from a Boogie. This 2-space machine is based on the classic Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+ amplifier, but in the popular rack-mountable form of the late 1980s. It features 5 preamp tubes and a blackface circuit, so it’s perfect for those chasing after a Fender-esque clean or 90’s mid-gain lead tone. And like most Mesa’s, you’ll get a convenient EQ for those final tweaks.
Electronics kit building kind of fell out of favor during the computer age as the home based technology enthusiasts moved to assembling PC’s, and software development. But home brew electronics has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years in what is now called the maker community. Internet electronics stores such as Adafruit and Element 14 are enabling 21st century geeks to build anything from simple circuits to complex embedded computing projects. These sites provide documentation, tutorials, video channels, and of course, a store, where you can purchase the tools and components required to internet enable your toaster, or feed your cat from the couch.
Since joining Charley's team, Russell has worked on hundreds of guitars. Music shops across Dallas and Fort Worth call him with questions. He's even corrected other guitar masters' mistakes, and he's also repaired some of the music industry's finest guitarslingers, including the guitarist from Cold Play and countless prominent local musicians. "It's part of the joy is knowing that I'm helping put players in a position where they can get on stage and feel confident knowing their guitar is working at its peak." He's also probably the only guitar master on this list asked to restore a broken guitar back to its original broken state. But it wasn't just any broken guitar. It was Elvis Presley's Martin D-28. "Elvis had broken it." This guy is truly more than a guitar master; he's a magician performing musical magic at Charley's five days a week.

The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.


I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.

Most new electric guitars tend to ship pre-strung with "super light" guitar strings. Depending on your technique, and the style of music you play, that string gauge may or may not be too light for you. The following is a list of the standard string gauges included with each set of electric guitar strings. Note though that different manufacturers include slightly different string gauges in their sets of strings.
A Delay or Echo pedal creates a copy of an incoming sound and slightly time-delays it, creating either a "slap" (single repetition) or an echo (multiple repetitions) effect. Delay pedals may use either analog or digital technology. Analog delays often are less flexible and not as "perfect" sounding as digital delays, but some guitarists argue that analog effects produce "warmer" tones. Early delay devices actually used magnetic tape to produce the time delay effect. U2's guitarist, The Edge, is known for his extensive use of delay effects. Some common Delay pedals are:
Though some sophisticated processors combine pitch detection with pitch-shifting, to generate musically correct harmonies in user-defined keys, simple pitch-shifters always change the pitch by the same number of cents or semitones. In musical terms, that means that only the octaves, parallel fourths and fifths are very useful. Other intervals tend to sound discordant, as they don't follow the intervals dictated by typical musical scales.
Not everyone's ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I'm not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it's probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.
Their LP models have a "mahogany" body, and the binding is very thin so I think the maple top is just vaneer. I also noticed the headstocks were not the usual LP angle. In my opinion, Epiphone wins hand down. The Strat types don't look much better in my opinion, again, sharp fret ends and awful looking headstock and logo. If you see any of their relic jobs, you'll notice that they range from passable from a distance to hideous from any range.
Who created the first distorted electric guitar sound in history? I’ll tell you: the first adventurous player to plug a hollowbody guitar into a tube amplifier way back in the 1930s, that’s who. We might have forgotten his name, or maybe there was no one there to witness the event, but you can bet he lifted up that guitar, checked out his new amp, saw that the loudness control went to 10, and cranked it up to hear just what it could do.
Equally potent, the B.C. Rich Mockingbird is another model that is prone to stir up your interest. This device features a bolt-on body, besides, at a quick look; this guitar might remind you of the classic “NJ” style headstock. Furthermore, the guitar’s body is made from mahogany, and it comes fitted with a rock Maple Neck and a very well regarded Rosewood fretboard that is said to supply its users with a great tone, extra playability, and outstanding stability.
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…

Also worth an honourable mention is the iconic Gibson Hummingbird, a square-shoulder dreadnought named after the bird which Gibson best felt described its unique qualities. The Hummingbird is one of those unique things in that it’s an acoustic guitar which eschewed the industry-standard natural wood finish of around 98% of its peers in favour of a cheery sunburst finish more commonly seen on Gibson’s now famous electric guitars like the Les Paul and ES-335.
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet. In 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp that added metal corner protectors to keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…
The Ibanez Gio GRGM21 Mikro in Black Night proves that guitars don’t have to be super expensive to sound great. This is a fantastic cheap electric guitar that doesn’t suck, often picked up by beginner guitarists who are into metal and hard rock and those who like a shorter scale guitar. Featuring an iconic shape, a specially designed GRG neck made of maple, rosewood fretboard and 2 x Infinity R humbucker pickups that can be used separately or in unison via the 3-way pickup selector, you have a comfortable and great sounding powerhouse of a guitar at your disposal. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that sounds amazing when you throw some distortion at it! Available in different finishes here.
Unbelievable value for money with quality that is second to none The Joey series of electric guitars have been specifically designed for smaller hands, with 3/4 sized bodies and smaller 21.5" fret scale. They are a great sounding, fun guitar and come complete with a built-in tuner to make sounding good even easier. Awesome value as a part of Ashton's
In the early 1980s, some performers began using two-way or three-way cabinets that used 15" woofers, a vented midrange driver and a horn/driver, with an audio crossover directing the signal to the appropriate driver. Folded horn bass guitar rigs have remained rare due to their size and weight. As well, since the 1990s, most clubs have PA systems with subwoofers that can handle the low range of the bass guitar. Extended range designs with tweeters were more the exception than the rule until the 1990s. The more common use of tweeters in traditional bass guitar amplifiers in the 1990s helped bassists to use effects and perform more soloistic playing styles, which emphasize the higher range of the instrument.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: AEG - Top Wood: Cedar - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 21 - # of Strings: 6 - String Type: Bronze - Scale Length: 25.4" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Rosette: Abalone - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast Tuners - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP1 - String Instrument Finish: Low Gloss natural
Every electric guitar has a series of electronics that give the guitar its unique sound. Fender guitars signature sound comes from their five-way switches and single coil pickups where as Gibson Les Pauls comes from their three way selectors, multiple tone knobs, and humbucker pickups. Many other aspects of electric guitars affect the tonal qualities of the instrument, but the electronics cannot be overlooked. In this article, I will talk about different electronics in electric guitars as well as some common repairs. For more information about electric guitar pickups, see the electric guitar pickup page.

The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.


That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).
I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.
The main benefit with tube amps is the tone. They offer what is often described as a pure, natural, creamy or fluid guitar tone, which is incredibly responsive to the player’s dynamics. When pushed hard enough, they overload and produce natural overdrive (which is how overdrive first came to be). While their tone is hard to beat for all styles of music, tube amps tend to be expensive, harder to maintain and heavier than other amps. For more on tube amps, check out our dedicated tube amp page.

Sparkle works best in the background and will be more suited to non-guitar players that want quality sounding guitar rhythms, but not have them be the focus or overly complicated.  Most guitarists will find it too rigid and write it off, where non-guitarist will want to spend a decent amount of time mastering the expression options. The GUI is geared to key players, but it’s simply fantastic looking, clean, and easy to use even if you can’t play keys that well.
The Legacy’s vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ‘50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo’s private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ‘50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was – and wasn’t. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming that down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon’s persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World.
I see some people using an A/B box straight from their guitar and then I suppose into two separate chains for 2 separate amps...is this a preferred method? I use my mormorley ab at the end and share my chain with both amps. Vox AC4-Marshall DSL...I have been contemplating running two separate chains...I'm fairly new to effects so I've just been toying around. Currently this my chain Guitar-Fulltone OCD-MetalPedals Dirty B*tch-Mesa Throttle Box- MXR 6 band EQ- EHX Small Clone-EHX Small Stone- Catalinbread Montavillian Echo- Visual Sounds Delay- TC Electronic Trinity 2 Reverb- Morley A/B/Y to Amps

In 1977, Gibson introduced the serial numbering system in use until 2006.[71] An eight-digit number on the back shows the date when the instrument was produced, where it was produced, and its order of production that day (e.g., first instrument stamped that day, second, etc.).[72] As of 2006, the company used seven serial number systems,[71] making it difficult to identify guitars by their serial number alone.[71][72] and as of 1999 the company has used six distinct serial numbering systems.[72] An exception is the year 1994, Gibson's centennial year; many 1994 serial numbers start with "94", followed by a six-digit production number[citation needed]. The Gibson website provides a book to help with serial number deciphering.[72]
In 1977, Gibson sued Hoshino Gakki/Elger Guitars for copying the Les Paul.[21] In 2000, Gibson sued Fernandes Guitars in a Tokyo court for allegedly copying Gibson designs. Gibson did not prevail.[22] Gibson also sued PRS Guitars in 2005, to stop them from making their Singlecut model. The lawsuit against PRS was initially successful.[23] However, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the lower court decision and ordered the dismissal of Gibson's suit against PRS.[24]
Nice ible. I JUST got a Squier Tele Custom ii (2) in the mail Friday after selling a keytar on ebay for $355. I bought it because it got great reviews for having 2 Duncan (designed, made in asia?) P90's and the price was right for a 1st guitar. the only thing i do not like is the ugly tele headstock. I bought a '68 Harmony Marquis last year for my 1st 1st guitar, not really knowing at the time how unrewarding/difficult it would be to learn on a P.O.S like that. So, even tho the pups are probably the last thing I would replace on it, it was cool to read a bit by someone else with a "less expensive" tele. Look up the Custom ii online, it has a great looking pickguard and the pup selector is up on the top horn like a les paul. Thanks for the tips!
I couldn’t find a professional review of the Les Paul Express. The last time we checked, it had earned an average of just 3.8 stars out of 5 in 17 user reviews on Amazon, but most of the complaints I found on Amazon and elsewhere were from people who got samples that weren’t set up well at the factory. This wasn’t true of our sample, but it was true of the other Epiphone sample we received—and it was true of many of the cheap Epiphones I played in stores.
Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker
Do you have an old guitar that requires knowing how to repair a damaged guitar body? Read on and learn some neat tricks for repairing body damage on a guitar. Body damage on a guitar ruins the acoustics. Body damage on a guitar body really make it useless in the playing arena. If you are looking to bust out that old guitar but need some handy advice on how to repair some old damage, MadeMan has the fixes for you. This article will give you the fixes for larger damage and the annoying little nicks and teach you the way to repair them.

"NEW-DEMO" means that we are an authorized dealer of the item and acquired it directly from the manufacturer. We consider the item to be new because it has not been sold to or owned by another customer. NEW-DEMO items, however, have been on display in an active retail music store for some length of time. As a result, these items may have been tried out by other customers. They may be dusty, have fingerprints, stick marks, pick swirl, etc. Please refer to the item's description for more detailed information. All NEW-DEMO items come with a manufacturer's warranty (where applicable), but some may not have original manufacturer's packaging. Please refer to our Appearance and Technical Condition scales below for more information about the item’s appearance and condition. 
“But I was recently talking to a guy at Yamaha who told me the total global revenue from musical equipment sales sold round the world doesn’t add up to one-thousandth of Apple’s AAPL, -1.42%   daily turnover. It’s a small specialist market,” Hook said. “Gibson guitars are expensive and they have been taken over by so many cheap copies. That’s what has caused a lot of harm to such a luxury product.”
The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.
Every guitarist who bends or vibratoes a string to make it sing owes a debt to B.B. King. With influences as diverse as T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, the late guitarist turned the blues world upside down in 1952 with “3 O’Clock Blues.” Almost overnight, the harmonica was supplanted as the primary solo instrument in blues, as guitarists scrambled to imitate B.B.’s soloing style, especially in Chicago.
1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!

For guitarists who must have original-era Strat® sound, look and feel, the Classic Series '60s Stratocaster Lacquer epitomizes the instrument during its second decade, when musicians used it to conjure and create electrifying sounds never before imagined or experienced. With authentic features including a nitrocellulose lacquer finish in classic Fiesta Red, everything about it takes you back to a wildly creative time when rock music came into its own—from surf to psychedelia and more—and players started to discover in earnest just what a phenomenal instrument the Stratocaster really was.
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.

I have a Samick Avion AV7 that I've been having trouble with a buzzing low E string when strumming with the first four frets. The bow is .013" and I set the 12th fret E string height to 2.5mm which helped, but not cured. I used a depth gauge to measure my frets, most measure at .043-.045" but the last two frets (21,22) measure at .052". At this point, would it be best to loosen the truss rod a 1/4 turn, or should I address the high frets, or could it be something else altogether? Thanks for the information.
However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.

We've already shown you one of Epiphone's Les Pauls. However, that guitar and this model we're looking at here are simply not comparable. Les Paul Standard features a much better set of pickups as well as hardware. Each of the four available finishes on this thing is superb and includes a number of subtle details which really add to the beauty. Most importantly, Epiphone's Les Paul Standard will give you a true taste of what a legit Gibson Les Paul tastes like without breaking the bank.
What I am saying that we should look at the first three or four on each persons list and discard the rest. Then we’ll have a better estimate. Of course we always forget some fabulous guitarists and often some that deserve number two even number one on the list. Thats what statistics is good for. HOwever that said statistics is often a pillow for people. Faith and loyalty to true values is what brings success and fucks statistics. THings untoched statistics works but its the respect of god that changes things.
The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]
Some guitars are equipped with active pickups that require batteries as an energy source and incorporate a preamp for sound-shaping. Active electronics may also include filters and equalization circuits for added sound control. Guitars with active electronics generally have a higher output than magnetic pickups and produce cleaner, clearer sound. Most guitar pickups are passive.
In March when the Cut interviewed Fabi Reyna, the editor-in-chief and founder of She Shreds, a magazine for female-identifying guitar players, she commented on men insisting she listen to the guitar heroes we’re all allegedly mourning. “I was talking to a dude at a big company recently and he asked me if I’d heard of this band, which was, of course, a band of all dudes,” she said. “I was like, ‘Sorry, I don’t know much about male guitar history, and I don’t really care to. Don’t tell me or ask me about these bands because I just don’t know them.’”
I wonder if this list shouldn’t be renamed as Best Electric Guitar Brands, since there does seem to be a strong focus on electric guitars in this list. Yamaha does make a very good line of acoustic guitars, and Ibanez and Epiphone also manufacture acoustic guitars, and the Gibson Hummingbird would make any top 10 list of acoustic, but it’s the only one on this list that seems world class for an acoustic manufacturere(other manufacturers on the list may also make acoustics, but I’m not familiar with them) I doubt if they would be considered the best guitars or the most highly respected brands.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.

The guitar, however, appears to be in better shape than the guitar maker. While in the past decade, sales of the electric guitar have fallen from 1.5 million to 1 million, according to the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) a total of 2.6 million guitars, including both acoustic and electric guitars, were sold in the U.S. last year, 300,000 more than in 2009.
In the early 1980s Collings decided to move to San Diego, California but never made it further than Austin, Texas.[3][4] He started out sharing work space with fellow luthiers Tom Ellis, a builder of mandolins, and Mike Stevens. A few years later he decided to continue on his own and take the craft more seriously, moving into a one-stall garage shop.
On the other hand, if you do decide to stick with it, having a good guitar means you won't have to worry about upgrading in the foreseeable future when your skill levels rise above the problems associated with cheap options.  Realistically, no matter who you are or are buying for, you shouldn't get the cheapest option.  At least go middle-tier unless we're talking about a 5 or 6 year old's first guitar.
I want to focus on acoustic guitar but some electric is alright. Mainly I want to build up a repertoire of songs that MOST people will know if heard and be able to sing a long. Currently I know very few songs such as this but I have been playing off and on for years. Any really popular (old or newish is fine) songs that are not impossible to play would be great. Thanks!
Beyond those generalities, replicating a standard formula for the be-all-end-all tone isn’t possible. Why? Because some people will genuinely pass on a ’59 Les Paul and Marshall stack combination—they might prefer what sounds like a vibraphone under water. Sometimes, a certain “it” factor just grabs musicians and won’t let them go. Waara explains that even in a business as technologically advanced and specialized as Line 6’s tone research, “There’s no escaping that we emotionally say ’Man, that just sounds cool.’ ” Frequently, part of that “cool” factor is imprinted on our brains as a result of a component that we often overlook.
If you are serious about studying guitar and taking your playing to the next level, you must possess not just a command of chords and scales but an understanding of improvisation and how to express depth and feeling. This certificate program, taught by Berklee’s world-renowned guitar faculty, enables you to develop your guitar technique and hone your skills in any style, from rock, jazz, and country to metal, blues, and beyond. Upon completion, you’ll be able to recreate parts played by your guitar heroes—but more importantly, you’ll be better able to realize your own unique sound.
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!

Choruses (Chori?) come in mono, stereo, and true stereo versions, and a good one will provide lots of control across the depth and speed of the modulation desired. In the case of a mono unit, the aggregate tone produced by the circuit is flattened and passed through a single jack, where as a stereo (sic) unit will pass wet and dry signals through different jacks. A true stereo chorus unit will produce a true stereo signal, where the effect is mixed properly into left and right channels.
{ "thumbImageID": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst/J46217000004000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Professional Stratocaster Maple Fingerboard Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Sienna Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000030466", "price": "1,499.99", "regularPrice": "1,499.99", "msrpPrice": "1,500.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst-1500000030466.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst/J46217000004000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Sienna-Sunburst/J46217000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Antique Olive", "sku": "sku:site51500000030469", "price": "1,399.99", "regularPrice": "1,399.99", "msrpPrice": "1,400.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive-1500000030469.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive/J46217000006000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Stratocaster-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Guitar-Antique-Olive/J46217000006000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Juszkiewicz, 64, is known for being temperamental, ultracompetitive and difficult to work for. A former Gibson staffer recalls a company retreat in Las Vegas punctuated by a trip to a shooting range, where executives shot up a Fender Stratocaster. In recent years, Juszkiewicz has made two major pushes, both seemingly aimed at expanding a company when a product itself — the guitar — has shown a limited ability to grow its market.
Hi Teo, both amps are great for beginners. I have both personally, so I know that the Vox is great for classic British tones and some heavy Rock n Roll distortion, however, if you want a more heavy metal sound the Orange would suit that better as the overdrive is very powerful. It comes down to personal preference really so I suggest you try both out! -Lee
Either today or tomorrow my SSS Mexican Stratocaster will be arriving at my local Guitar Center and I'm not sure if I should pay to get it setup. The guy that worked there, Jon, suggested I get my guitar setup as soon as I go and pick it up since its 50% off for a first time setup. He said the technician would adjust the guitar strings, double check the action or height of the strings or something. It sounds like something I wouldn't really need but then again I'm just a beginner - maybe some of you more experienced guitarists can let me know if Jon was trying to do me a solid or if he was just trying to make a sale. He also said they'd help me get my guitar in tune which was pretty cool.
It was not until the large-scale emergence of small combo jazz in the post-WWII period that the guitar took off as a versatile instrument, which was used both in the rhythm section and as a featured melodic instrument and solo improviser. In the hands of George Barnes, Kenny Burrell, Herb Ellis, Barney Kessel, Jimmy Raney, and Tal Farlow, who had absorbed the language of bebop, the guitar began to be seen as a “serious” jazz instrument. Improved electric guitars such as Gibson’s ES-175 (released in 1949), gave players a larger variety of tonal options. In the 1940s through the 1960s, players such as Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, and Jim Hall laid the foundation of what is now known as "jazz guitar" playing.
Gretsch re-emerges with this awesome rex acoustic-like electric guitar that defines quality and perfection in terms of style and elegance. Te Jim Dandy Flat Top G9500 is one of the Gretsch best electric guitars which effectively brings back the quality and sound that characterize one of their most famous guitars throughout the 30’s, 40’s and the 50’s era.
A Squier strat is a killer starter instrument (it has the looks, playability, and classic style beginners are looking for). But the guitar itself is only part of the journey when learning an instrument. Especially with electric guitar, you’ll need things such as a small practice amp, a strap, a case, some picks and more. Thankfully, companies such as Fender now cater to the first-time buyers with all-inclusive packs that house a pretty solid guitar along with some great beginner gear to get you jamming. The Strat in this pack gives you three single coil pickups for that crisp, bright, clear sound, a five-way selector switch for all the classic Strat options, as well as a fulcrum-based tremolo to add nice depth to your playing. But the pack includes a lot more than just the guitar.
You need to know what colour code your pickup wires are. If the 4-wire pickup is a Seymour Duncan then the link above should work for you, if it’s another brand of pickup then you’ll have to figure out how to correct for the appropriate colour wires e.g. DiMarzio pickups use a different colour code on their wires to Seymour Duncan and they’re all fairly easy to find on the web.

Here’s the thing about acoustic guitars: those that use solid wood command a higher price than those that use laminates for their soundboard. Acoustic guitars that have a solid top are more sturdy and sound better as the wood matures. This is why solid wood models are usually more expensive, and also why they come highly recommended if you want to make a really good investment.
I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.
A lot of folks really like Squier guitars. In most cases, I'm not one of them. Fender’s economy guitars (Squiers) are cheap, coming in under $400 (often $200 or less), which can be an attractive option for a first-time buyer. However the price difference between a Squier Strat and a real deal Fender Strat isn’t big enough to make up for the quality hit you take when you buy a Squier.
Modern electric guitars most commonly have two or three magnetic pickups. Identical pickups produce different tones depending on location between the neck and bridge. Bridge pickups produce a bright or trebly timbre, and neck pickups are warmer[when defined as?] or more bassy. The type of pickup also affects tone. Dual-coil pickups sound warm, thick, perhaps even muddy[citation needed]; single-coil pickups sound clear, bright, perhaps even biting[citation needed].
×