An amplifier stack consists of an amplifier head atop a speaker cabinet—a head on top of one cabinet is commonly called a half stack, a head atop two cabinets a full stack. The cabinet that the head sits on often has an angled top in front, while the lower cabinet of a full stack has a straight front. The first version of the Marshall stack was an amp head on an 8×12 cabinet, meaning a single speaker cabinet containing eight 12" guitar speakers. After six of these cabinets were made, the cabinet arrangement was changed to an amp head on two 4×12 (four 12" speakers) cabinets to make the cabinets more transportable. Some touring metal and rock bands have used a large array of guitar speaker cabinets for their impressive appearance. Some of these arrangements include only the fronts of speaker cabinets mounted on a large frame.[25]
Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.
The United States Department of Justice found emails from 2008 and 2009 in which Gibson employees discussed the "gray market" nature of the ebony wood available from a German wood dealer—who obtained it from a supplier in Madagascar—as well as plans to obtain the wood. It filed a civil proceeding in June 2011,[40][43][44] the first such case under the amended Lacey Act, which requires importing companies to purchase legally harvested wood and follow the environmental laws of the producing countries regardless of corruption or lack of enforcement.[44] Gibson argued in a statement the following day that authorities were "bullying Gibson without filing charges" and denied any wrongdoing.[39][45] Arguing against the federal regulations and claiming that the move threatened jobs, Republicans and Tea Party members spoke out against the raids and supported Juszkiewicz.[46]
Lou Pallo, a longtime member of Les Paul’s performing trio until the virtuoso’s death in 2009, earned a signature Les Paul model in late 2010. Nicknamed “The Man of a Thousand Inversions,” Pallo played a Les Paul Custom in the Les Paul Trio. However, the Les Paul on which he consulted for its design features a Standard headstock and body but Custom fretboard block inlays including at the first fret. The body wood is natural-coloured mahogany while the top is ebony-painted maple and bound in single-ply binding like the production Standard. The guitar features, unusually, a black-covered P-90 single-coil pickup at the neck—the same pickup that was standard on the Les Paul from 1952 to 1956—and a double-coil Dirty Fingers pickup without a cover but with a black pickup frame at the bridge. The familiar “rhythm/treble” poker chip around the toggle switch is also black, and the guitar features no pickguard. (Interviewed for the guitar’s introduction, Pallo himself said he had actually wanted the guitar to feature a cream-coloured pickguard, cream-coloured Dirty Fingers frame, cream-coloured P-90 cover, and cream-coloured poker chip.) The Lou Pallo model also features a small reproduction of Pallo’s signature in the twelfth-fret inlay. Pallo introduced the guitar at New York’s Iridium club, where the Les Paul Trio played for many years. Pallo explained for a video of the event that he rejected Gibson’s original idea to put Pallo’s signature on the headstock, out of respect to his old friend and partner, suggesting the inlay signature in its place. After introducing the guitar to the gathering, Pallo played the jazz standard “Begin the Beguine” on the instrument.
But you should remember that it is still a great value and the best guitar for the money. For this price, I don’t think you will get a better guitar anywhere else. If you are an intermediate or expert level player, this one is not for you. Let’s check out some technical features of the guitar: it comes with bolt-on neck joint, 12”radius of the fingerboard and nickel hardware etc. 
We indicate and report to EMS Worldwide Express mail service that the guitar is sent with a lower declared value than the purchased price and as a gift so that there will be a possible exemption on custom clearance fees, taxes or you may need to pay a little amount but it is necessary, or the custom will open the package and revalue the guitar. Based on our experience, the custom fees in the Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and Asia are very minimal since we declared the guitar as a gift and lower purchased price in order to lessen the custom fees or even possible exemption and we have not received complaints from our valued customers regarding custom fees, taxes and tariffs.
Hook isn’t worried the current challenging economic pressures will jeopardize the guitarist’s iconic status. “The guitar hero will never go away,” he said. “People adore this image of the guitarist almost being like a cowboy. You will always see the odd-looking kid walking down the street holding a guitar — there just might not be as many of them.”
Ibanez are a Japanese musical instrument company. Although Yamaha is a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez exceeds expectations for electric guitars. This brand of guitars stands out in the world of rock guitars. They gained popularity in the 1980s when they introduced their original designs for guitars based on Steve Vai’s JEM Universal. Their designs have since become some of the biggest selling metal guitars. The Ibanez guitars are used by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Satriani. In addition, Ibanez guitars tend to be very affordable, giving you a great guitar for a cheaper price.

They may not always be the first thing you reach for, but the MIDI effects plug-ins that come with most DAW applications like Logic and Cubase often offer something very different from most audio plug-ins. For example, arpeggiators and step sequencers can be great for use in the composition process, and you can use MIDI note to controller data (CC) plug-ins to generate automation data for the parameters of other plug-ins. As they process only MIDI data, and not audio, MIDI plug-ins put very little strain on your computer. Matt Houghton

This is not a cheap Chinese manufactured kit of questionable quality where the parts simply don’t work together (like most of the other kits that you will find on Ebay, Etsy and Amazon). We proudly manufacture these kits in our shop in Portland, Oregon. We are a family-owned company building products and traditions that we expect to last for a long, long time. We produce instrument kits with exacting specifications, high quality production, and domestic, sustainably-cultivated sources of materials whenever possible.

The prime advantage of Epiphone is that you get a guitar built to the same specs as the Gibson Les Paul, at a greatly discounted price. With that being said, an Epiphone is not equal to a Gibson simply because it shares the same design. The craftsmanship is where the two brands differ the most, as USA made Gibson’s utilize higher quality materials than the Epiphone line. Epiphone uses a cheaper mahogany in the construction of its guitars, while the electronic components are lower quality as well.

No matter whether you used method A or B, you can now go about measuring the neck bow. This is done by measuring the string height (the gap between the ruler/string and the top of the fret) at about the 8th fret. There is a lot of debate over how straight a neck should be, and in fact it really is personal choice, but a height roughly the same as the thickness of a B string is a good starting point. Personally, I use a 0.012” feeler gauge to do this, but you could use a B string. Simply slide the feeler gauge/B string into the gap to see if it is too big/small.


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If you can afford to start on an amp in the sub-$200 segment, you will see an instant upgrade in the amount of power as well as additional features. In this category you are looking at very good practice rigs, although as power is still pretty low they may not be suitable for more than small casual performances. This is the first category where you will find both amp heads and tube amps, although the choice of these is very, very limited. One of the best amps you can grab for under $200 is the Marshall Code 25W. This combo provides a solid tone, 25 watts of power and plenty of amp voices and effects to play around with.

For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
The Top Guitars specialized only in Custom Made Electric Guitars and Basses - "We will create an instrument that will delight you with exceptional tone and great playability, optimized to your personal preferences and all with the utmost quality, beauty, and rigorous attention to detail. We are experienced builders of custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks. We craft our exquisite custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks using a variety of time tested, great sounding woods, offering options that you can not buy off the shelf. We can also build for anyone that has a custom design that they would like built to their specifications. We do our best to meet your dreams continually striving for unattainable perfection.Only the best, one-of-a-kind, and built just for you! "
The majority of favoured mic pairs seem to include the trusty SM57, but its most popular partner appears to be the larger-diaphragm MD421 — users include Bob Rock, Bruce Fairbairn, Alan Winstanley, Joe Barresi, Simon Dawson, Stephen Street and The Matrix. Also high on the list is the pairing of the SM57 with a large-diaphragm condenser of some type, and Steve Churchyard, Toni Visconti, Jim Scott, Stephen Street, and John Leckie all name-check the U87 in this role.

The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.


The Dobro All-Electric featured a pickup purchased from the fellow who’d invented it in ’32, Arthur J. Stimson of Seattle, Washington (it was not invented by Dobro’s Vic Smith, as has been reported elsewhere). This was, as far as we know, the first modern electric guitar pickup, with the magnet under the pickup, rather than over the strings, as on Electro/Rickenbacker instruments (or the presumed “transducer” on the ’28 Stromberg-Voisinet). Stimson’s pickup had a large horseshoe pickup in the body with two coils, one for bass and one for treble strings, each with its own bar polepiece. A 1/4″ jack outlet sat on the top down near the standard stamped National trapeze tailpiece, next to a single volume control.
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
Read Full Review This electric guitar from Schecter has an awesomely low price for beginners out there with a genre of music in mind is to play rock and lots of heavy metal. The guitar has similarities in design with the Schecter Omen 6 series which is a higher model to the C-1 SGR, but the C-1 SGR also has the humbuckers for its pick-ups controlled by master volume, single tone control and a 3-way toggle to switch between pick-ups to get near on what the higher model can do.
Sometimes a guitar cab gets mic'd up differently night to night, plus every voice is unique, and every snare drum "speaks" differently (just ask a drummer). All of these minute changes and differences can and will affect the EQ decisions you'll have to make. This is why I'm such a strong believer in ear training and learning how certain parts of the frequency spectrum present themselves outside of their source-specific applications. That being said, these tips can be helpful as a place to start your search, but are not gospel by any means. So without further adieu, let's begin.
Next we look at the features and hardware of the guitar. What brand are the pickups? Is the bridge fixed or is there a tremolo system? Is there a locking nut or anything else to help with tuning stability? Does it come with a case? We also take this opportunity to look at any special features that define the guitar – perhaps a bridge that never goes out of tune, or a control switch that makes the guitar do crazy things.
Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
One of two guitar plug-ins that we’ve carried over from last year, VB-1 is one of the older plug-ins that Steinberg once sold and, along with the fantastic Model-E synth, is still available for download. As you might expect from the picture and the name, it emulates a proper bass guitar – not the easiest instrument to properly reproduce electronically.
1967-1969: about the coolest guitar Danelectro ever produced. Has 13 drone strings that move from the vibration of the usual 6 strings. Three pickups, 2 for the 6 stings and 1 for the drone strings. Crinkle burgundy finish, 3 point body shape. Has a "buzz" bridge which similate the sitar sound. The resonation from the buzz bridge vibrates the top of the body and the drone strings. Clear pickguards protecting the drone strings and Vinnie's name on the lower 6 string clear pickguard. Body is made entirely from Poplar, with a semi-hollow construction.
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
Because of the miniaturization of all things electronic, you can now get full-sounding, authentic guitar sounds from a unit the size of a disposable camera — as long as you listen to it through headphones (meaning that it has no speaker or power amp of its own). These battery-powered wonders come with belt clips for untethered practicing (great for checking your stage moves in the mirror).
Why would that be “magical thinking”? Unless you play a sine wave with a synth, the timbre of every instrument is made of a set of freuquencies, a dominant frequency plus a ton of harmonics (which is, I take it, the overtones people talk about). Woods, like every other material, resonate at particular frequencies, and consequently might emphasize a particular subset of these frequencies rather than another subset. Hardly magical thinking.
The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
This is one of the most popular guitar brands bought by the beginner and advanced learners in India. This brand is also one of the top-rated electro-acoustic guitars for beginners. This is the Japanese brand of guitar that is available in acoustic, bass, electric, and classical guitars styles. It flourishes a full-size frigate shape with a laminated select dapper top, and mahogany back and sides. It sports a mahogany neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets, withal an Ibanez-branded headstock with pretty good closed chrome die-cast tuners. The price of this brand of guitar starts from 13,000 approximately.

In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.


Squier has now seen fit to introduce Fender's revered '72 Thinline to its own range, and it looks the business, with white pearloid scratchplate, finely carved f-hole and Fender- embossed humbuckers. While you'll find the gloss-finished modern C neck across much of Squier's Vintage Modified range, you're unlikely to find tones quite like the Thinline's anywhere else, certainly at this price. Cleans from the neck and middle positions are punchy and persuasive, not dissimilar to fat P-90-ish single coils, but flicking over to the bridge humbucker yields a burly, resonant voice that screams for big open chords and an overdriven valve amp. That's why it's one of the best electric guitars for Indie and alt-rock players.
One of the all-time classic gigging and recording amps, in this new incarnation the Deluxe Reverb is arguably more practical than ever, thanks to the extra versatility offered by being able to utilise the tremolo and reverb on both channels.  Where original Deluxe Reverbs of the period would have had a Normal channel, sans tremolo or reverb, the new '68s have a Custom channel with access to those global effects and a new voicing, courtesy of a "modified Bassman tone stack" that's billed as being more pedal-friendly. Where you would have found a Vibrato channel, there's now a 'Vintage' channel with a more traditional voicing. There's a magic sweet spot between 4.5 and 6 on the volume control (depending on your choice of guitar), where the amp delivers a wonderful, dynamic dirty-clean rhythm sound at stage level that works as a brilliant core guitar sound for all manner of rock 'n' roll, Americana, blues and classic pop applications. Just add picking-hand dynamics and your guitar's volume control; there's so much range here. The onboard reverb and tremolo are wonderful, classic-sounding musical tools that push and inspire you to play in a certain way. Far more than a means of merely amplifying your guitar sound, this is a musical instrument in itself.
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
Something else to understand is that different styles of guitars offer specific pickup and switching designs that define the guitar’s sound. Depending on what type of music you want to learn, some guitars will be good and suit you better than others. That frequent adjustment of the guitar’s electronics during a song will become a big part of your playing style and it’s worth learning from the outset. Read on, and you’ll see what I mean. Oh—and a word of warning. Some “beginners” guitar bundles are for kids. Make sure you’re buying a full-sized instrument.
The Supro aluminum Hawaiian lap steel was similar to Beauchamp/Electro’s “frying pan,” with a round body and guitar-like neck, very similar to the Rick, but with the top carved away to allow a little more access. Given the close nature of the L.A. guitar world, it’s entirely possible that all these aluminum guitars were cast at the same place. The head was three-and-three with a single cutout in the middle. The Supro had dot inlays on the fingerboard, with an alternating two/one pattern and four dots at the octave. A rectangular Supro logo plate sat between the pickup cover and the fingerboard. The pickup – the single-coil version of the Stimson design – was mounted under a raised cover (part of the casting) with a slit to reveal the bar polepieces. It had one volume knob on the treble side and was housed in small form-fit hardshell case. This was closest to Beauchamp’s patented electro guitar design, making the Supro brand a direct descendent of George Beauchamp. An important point to remember is that these cast aluminum guitars were made in Los Angeles.
Here's a cool tip: If you ever needed to compare sizes between two items, say tuner shafts and a drill bit, but don't have a micrometer, try this. Use a crescent wrench! adjust the jaws to fit the first item, and then see how the other piece fits! Also great for taking measurements of something round. Fit the wrench to the object, and then lay the tool on a ruler and measure the gap. It's much more accurate!
Maybe the most well known amplifier released under the Peavey name, the 5150 is the result of a collaboration between Peavey and Eddie Van Halen. Debuting in 1992, the 120-watt, all-tube, two-channel head featured a searing lead channel that helped usher in a new wave of high-gain guitar ferocity in the early Nineties. Since Van Halen and Peavey parted ways in 2004, the model name was changed to the Peavey 6505 and has become an industry standard for modern metal bands such as Chimaira, August Burns Red, All That Remains and others.
I was very surprised by your article on acoustic guitars and the ratings given by you. I have been playing acoustic guitars for most of my 62 years and have owned and played all of them. I cannot believe that you put Seagull guitars at the top of your list! I've played as well as owned a Seagull guitar for some time and I have found it to be constructed out of cheap materials with no regard to detail. The guitar's intonation was horrible... could never get the damn thing in tune beyond the fifth fret,which frustrated me very much. Lastly, the lack of a finish on the product lent itself to getting stains on it. With that being said,I just cannot see how you can even be on that list at all.
Similar to the hollow body, the semi-hollow body has more resonance than a solid body. However, semi-hollow guitars are designed with a solid center wood block that adds stability and sustain, and helps cut down on feedback. Many blues players like the warmth of the semi-hollow and the increased attack and sustain offered by the center block. Semi-hollow guitars can be great for a wide variety of music - from blues and jazz to punk rock.

His tone is incredible and he is capable of an extreme vibrato that is perfect for his style of playing.  It’s obvious he’s not working hard for it.  His choices of strings benefit his economy of motion.  Even though he maintains low action on his Fender Stratocasters and even scallops the frets for acrobatic, tight-rope string walking, his ability is only strengthened by the ease of playing light string gauges.
The 2nd basic beginner guitar chord you should learn is C, or C major. You don’t have to say “major” in the name of the chord. If you just say C chord it’s assumed that it’s a major chord. You only want to strum the top 5 strings (that means the highest sounding 5 strings, not their relationship to the floor) The X in the guitar chord chart means not to play that string, or to mute it.
Whilst we’re on the subject of practice amps, we have to talk about the amazing BOSS Katana-Mini Guitar Amplifier. This little powerhouse of tone makes our best cheap amps that don’t suck list due to its immense sound, portability and inspiring tones within. Coming straight out of the acclaimed BOSS Katana series, the Katana-Mini uses the authentic multi-stage analog gain circuitry which allows you to select from three classic sound settings - Brown, Crunch, and Clean and enjoy a selection of fantastic sonic options. On top of that you have a classic 3 band EQ to dial in your perfect sound as well as an onboard tape-style delay.
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.
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• Brute force game : Offers the same realistic engine that can be found in STRUMMED ACOUSTIC 1 and 2 – ideal for chord accompaniment. It also contains riffs and a new game mode by picking Picking: just play a chord for creating very convincing arpeggio patterns. Reproduction of these new types of patterns should be completely familiar to users of STRUMMED ACOUSTIC.
This article was extremely helpful for me to understand the 5 way (ok, 3 way) switch. I’ve only previously wired a guitar with one double humbucker, and now I’m going to replace the bridge and neck pickups in an Ibanez that has HSH. The 8 contacts were confusing me since my last wiring job didn’t even involve a switch, but after reading this I know exactly what to do.

Can you scientifically prove the role of these influencers? Lab geeks and gadget gurus can measure signal strength, decibels, frequency distribution, gamma radiation, and other ranges. They can graph this data, create new data by creating logarithms, create even more data by creating even more logarithims, but they can’t decide what’s good or bad. Like it or not, you simply can not use a computer to prove that a ’63 Strat sounds “better” than a cheap 1988 import.
In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.
The HOF is one of the single best examples of a convergence of price and quality features that we've ever been able to find. While we can't mention pricing in this article, we'd recommend clicking through and checking the retail price on the HOF, then comparing it to the other reverb pedals in this list. As far as value, the HOF is nearly a perfect 10.
With all of the guitarists gracing our list having been connected to the world of music for several years if not decades, we are quite confident that these successful musicians are in fact deeply rooted to the music, in spite of their obvious fame. Even if you are doing a job simply to please people and to make money, it can be hard to keep up the pretense for thirty odd years, with cameras following you around 24/7!
The culture of staying up late and having some drinks any and every night of the week was what I grew up around. But it was also twinned with a kind of mountain vibe because they were young and happy to have gotten away from the farmlands. So they were really into pop music. So the two things kind of came together, this assumption that you played or sang.
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.

The placement of pickups on the guitar's body has a significant influence on the tone they generate. Pickups located near the bridge sample the strings where they have the least overall motion. The result is accentuated treble sounds or "bite." Pickups located nearer the center of the strings—closer to the neck of the guitar—produce a tone characterized by more midrange and bass sounds.
Another strong point of this guitar is its African mahogany neck that has a close to standard scale length of 25.3", making this instrument very easy to transition to when coming from regular sized guitars. Also noteworthy is its innovative split bone saddle, which allows for better intonation. Finally, the CT4B preamp gives you 3-band EQ, a volume control and a nifty built-in tuner Artists that play Takamine guitars include John Scofield, Bruce Springsteen and Bruno Mars! This is a great buy if you are looking for a premium couch & travel friendly acoustic guitar that does not cost an arm and a leg.

There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.


Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.
Rule 1—There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
It was not until the large-scale emergence of small combo jazz in the post-WWII period that the guitar took off as a versatile instrument, which was used both in the rhythm section and as a featured melodic instrument and solo improviser. In the hands of George Barnes, Kenny Burrell, Herb Ellis, Barney Kessel, Jimmy Raney, and Tal Farlow, who had absorbed the language of bebop, the guitar began to be seen as a “serious” jazz instrument. Improved electric guitars such as Gibson’s ES-175 (released in 1949), gave players a larger variety of tonal options. In the 1940s through the 1960s, players such as Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, and Jim Hall laid the foundation of what is now known as "jazz guitar" playing.
Kings style fused the call and response element of gospel with a blues form and a hint of Jazz throw in for good measure.  He’d sing a line, then answer it by playing a phrase on the guitar. T-Bone’s influence was apparent in his playing too – the expressive style and long single note sustain played a big part in his sound. B.B King also went on to influence the other two ‘Kings’ of blues – Albert King and Freddie King.

In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.


Search out any discussion about tone and tonewoods on the internet and you will quickly find a wide variation of opinions among players and builders alike. However, the majority will almost always list "tonewoods" and/or specific species of Spruce and Cedar as the key to getting the desired tone from a guitar. Indeed, many beginning builders agonize over wood choice combinations as they relate to tone, with more experienced craftspeople offering suggestions that seem to assure the correct … [Read More...]
By the mid 1990s Korean instruments were rising in price as Korean labor rates and other costs went up. Many Korean and Japanese companies set up factories in Indonesia to take advantage of reduced costs there and Fender set up their Mexican factory to take advantage of reduced labor rates in a setting very close to their USA factory. With modern CNC equipment and Korean and Japanese ownership and management, it was possible for Indonesian factories to very quickly turn out good student- and intermediate-grade instruments. In my experience, however, none of the Indonesian products rival the quality of the better Japanese or Korean guitars. The new Mexican Fender guitars give excellent "bang for the buck" and in many cases play and sound better than the later CBS-made American Fenders.
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My first guitar was a fender knockoff. My first professional guitar was a Gibson LP custom. I like the richer tone of the Gibson for ballads, folk and country and the Fender gives you the edge you need for rock, garage and loud stuff. Foot pedals get the sounds you need for just about any style of music with either brand. The fender neck is a bit easier to move over because it is thin and fat-fingered guys like me need a bit of help that way. The Gibson reminds me more of my acoustic guitars. Strings are an important selection for any guitar to be comfortable and get the right sound.
Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.
Because overdrive and distortion add a lot of high frequency harmonics to the signal they will quickly muddy up the sound if a large number of notes are struck simultaneously. i.e. full open chords and full barres don't work with overdrive, they muddy up. What you play are simple forms, generally no more than three notes simultaneously. For example an "A" power chord is (high E to low E)
SOLD OUT: Here is another fine example of a Professional high quality Japan Crafted guitars...this one is "cross-braced" and is a Dreadnought style acoustic like a martin type exhibiting superior solid construction as well as the very high grade Mahogany body Top - Sides & Back which appears to be all-solid. The necks fretboard is a wonderful Indian Rosewood. This example is believed to be a Vintage 1986 Model. Serial # 86021355. The sound is rich and expressive and very tonefull as would be expected from a quality built instrument. The playability "action" is great EZ to play and this guitar stays in tune very well to with its quality Original Takamine sealed Chrome tuners "grover type" This guitar is professional grade and will serve you well. This guitar is not a new guitar and IS a real VINTAGE guitar and has mellowed well and its condition is rated a solid 8.5/10 very good-excellent with some natural wear -dings-scratches etc.. Overall appearance is Gorgeous! and is sure to please. SOLD .
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.
On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.
Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
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The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.
Often the names and appearances of these pedals will give you a clue as to what types of sounds they produce. Otherwise it's a good idea to look at interviews and endorsements to learn which distortion stompboxes your guitar heroes are using. Also, be sure to check out our videos and audio clips to get a sense of each distortion pedal’s capabilities.
Rolling Stones best electric guitarist list should've been nicknamed the best average guitarist list. I didn't give this guy the time of day because I thought the bucket thing was to cover up how badly he sucks. Turns out it's the opposite. He's just weird. It's too bad the average person doesn't have the capacity to enjoy this type of advanced music.
Electri6ity is HUGE, like over 26 gigs, but it's like having Eddie Van Halen in your plugin bin once you figure out how to use it. The learning curve is steep, but there's no way I would ever be able to play guitar as well as I can program it not to mention afford the thousands of dollars worth of high-end guitars that are sampled. It also includes a very nice effects rack that is optimized for the library (although DI versions are included so you're free to run it through Amplitube or whatever you like).
Since affordable guitars are designed for students, manufacturers know that playability is of utmost priority. This is the reason why many of these budget-friendly guitars don't stray from familiar neck and body measurements. This ensures that they feel as close to premium guitars as possible, albeit utilizing more cost effective materials and production methods.
The Dobro Standard Guitar is not shown, but this is described as a “…conventional arch top body” with Dobro electric amplification. Like the first National Spanish, this had f-holes and was made by Regal. The Dobro Mandolin is also described as having a “conventional” body, probably a pear-shaped mando, again, by Regal. These were probably introduced slightly later than the Hawaiian.
The first and easiest adjustment that most electric guitars can benefit from is stuffing soft foam into the cavity behind the pickups in order to stop microphonic squealing. The first time I used this was when I was repairing a Gibson Firebird for Johnny Winter—the foam stopped the pickup’s back plate from vibrating like a microphone diaphragm. I have since learned that reducing the space (the cubic volume) behind a pickup modifies its sound at higher sound levels. Discovering this resonating-chamber effect has altered my approach to routing a body for pickups on new guitars, too.
In the Spring of 1960 the Kent Musical Instrument Company (20 East 15th Street, New York City) was founded as a subsidiary of prominent New York distributors Buegeleisen and Jacobson. It’s first products were microphones, cables and aftermarket guitar accessories like pickguard/pickup assemblies for archtop guitars and soundhole pickups for flattop acoustics. In 1960 the Marco Polo Company (1055 E. First Street, Santa Ana, CA) began importing Japanese guitars (many by Suzuki), including electrics, which it began to advertise in 1961. Kent began promoting Japanese solidbody electric guitars (mainly Guyatones) in April of 1962, although by the Fall of ’62 the Kent Standard series consisted of Teisco models.
Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.

Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]
The electric bass was invented in the 1930s, but the instrument did not sell well until Leo Fender developed the Precision Bass in the 1950s. As such, the type of bass players who first began trying methods to make their instruments louder with amplifiers and speakers were upright bass players. While the upright bass is a large instrument, standing about six feet tall (with its endpin extended), due to its low register, it is not a loud instrument when played acoustically. This is largely a result of the decreased sensitivity of human hearing, which is most sensitive to mid-range tones; equal perceived loudness for a mid-range sound and a low frequency sound requires much more acoustic power in the low-frequency sound. In the 1890s and early 1900s, upright bass players performing in bars and brothels in an era before amplifiers and speakers were available, particularly those who performed in bands with louder instruments such as trumpet, often found it hard to be heard. About the only solution available in the pre-amplifiers era was playing slap bass, a style of slapping the strings against the fingerboard to make a relatively loud percussive sound. Beginning in the 1920s, the first amplifiers and speakers designed for gigging musicians became available.
One of the most popular and widespread pickups in history is the single-coil, played by more legends than we can count – from Jimi Hendrix and Eric Johnson, to Jeff Beck and Yngwie Malmsteen. Renowned for their delightfully bright and clear tone, the single-coil is exactly as the name describes – a single set of magnetic pole-pieces, wrapped in a thin wire coil. Simple in design, but complex in their sound, with exceptional dynamics, sparkling highs, and huge twang. They are great for all styles of music, from classic rock to country. Generally found on all kinds of models from a huge range of brands, single-coils are famously the exclusive pickup on both Fender Stratocasters and Telecasters. The DiMarzio DP419 Area 67 is a good example of a great single-coil pickup and a must for Hendrix fans, although check our dedicated single-coil category for more.
: Nor were Decca guitars made for or marketed to children. They were made at the same factory that made Teisco, Teisco del Rey, Kingston, Heit, Kawai and other brands of guitars. Some of these are quite decent beginner's instruments, and some are just flat out interesting/weird. No, they're not the same quality of a Gibson, Fender or Burns guitar from the same period, but they also cost a fraction of one of those guitars. And coincidentally, Fender guitars nowadays are largely made in Indonesia, China and Korea, places that *wish* they could make things as well as they can in Japan, so chew on that before you slag on Japanese-made guitars.
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This processor is pretty good quality, unfortunately not too many parameters on the effects and you can only use one effect at a time, and some prefixed combo of 2 effects (if i remember correctly 10 different options). If you need it for reverb, or slight delay, tremolo or acoustic simulator its pretty cool, not able to add exact tempo on delay or tremolo though. Sound quality is very good, 24 bit A/D and D/A so no loss there either, and you also have stereo (same effect options on both though) and balanced and unbalanced outputs (if you use unbalanced the signal goes to both outputs so you also have the balanced output if needed). For the money is definitely the best option, imagine that a reverb pedal cost the same money (just reverb)...so if you have a controller it will fit on your gear. I am using it with ... full review
No information beyond this debut is available. It’s also probable the Merson “Tempo” name was applied to other acoustic guitars. Merson instruments from this period do not appear to have been widely distributed, so they are probably a regional phenomenon, although they did get notice in The Music Trades, a major trade publication. Other instruments distributed by Merson in 1948 included Harmony, Kamico, Favilla, Temp and Supro electric guitars and stringed instruments; Covella, Fontanella and Galanti accordions; Tempo Bandmaster, Merson, Merson Ultratone, and Rudy Muck brass instruments; and Kohlert Thibouville, Freres, Penzel-Mueller, Barklee and Merson woodwinds.

The open strings of a guitar can be tuned to microtonal intervals, however microtonal scales cannot easily be played on a conventional guitar because the frets only allow for a chromatic scale of twelve equally spaced pitches, each a semitone apart. (Certain microtonal scales, particularly quarter tones, can be played on a standard guitar solely by adjusting tunings, but the distance between notes on the scale makes it somewhat impractical.) It is possible to play microtonal scales on a fretless guitar, to convert a fretted guitar into a fretless, or to make a custom neck with a specific microtonal fret spacing.


Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.

I have a question you might be able to help me with. I currently have a Yamaha silent guitar both nylon and steel and want to set up a home speaker system for a small room. I use a couple of pedals with my guitar. (reverb & delay) and at present use a Yamaha THR amp for sound. This is great for practice but does not fill the room so to speak. I have a larger acoustic amp but not happy with the sound. Can I use a pair of studio monitor speakers instead and if so would I need anything else e.g. (EQ or amp)I am looking to recreate the best possible sound I can get. At present it is only through my headphones. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated.
String sage Ernie Ball reckons it’s made some of the world’s strongest strings with the Paradigm set, which promises longer string life while retaining the company’s iconic Slinky tone and feel. Ultra-high strength steel can be found in the wound and plain strings, plus reinforcement at the ball end, enabling them to lock in tune fast and hold up to aggressive styles. There’s even plasma-enhanced wrap wire for increased corrosion resistance, too.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
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You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.
If you’re reading this guide, you probably need help purchasing a first acoustic guitar or electric guitar for yourself, a friend or a child. We're here to help you understand the key specifications and features to look out for. We'll explain the differences between acoustic, acoustic-electric and electric guitars. We'll also recommended six of our best beginner guitars and two beginner guitar value packs. 
Salas is also bullish about the guitar’s prospects. “My 10-year-old son is at school in Austin, Texas and him and his friends are rocking out to 1970s funk,” he said. “A new generation is getting into guitar and rock’n’roll. I believe there’s going to be a massive comeback and that means with that style of music the electric guitar is going to make a comeback.”
Along with Taylor, C.F. Martin and Co. sets the mark for top-level American-made acoustic guitars. They’ve been around since 1833, and today they make most of their guitars in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. They use premium materials to get the best look and sound out of their guitars, but they’re also a leader in understanding the environmental impact of over-harvesting tonewoods.
:I need to know how to get parts for my old kent guitar.I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
The MC5 was founded by guitarists Wayne Kramer and Fred “Sonic” Smith, friends since their teen years and veterans of the Detroit garage rock scene. They honed a two-guitar attack that owed much to the heavy rock sounds being popularized at the time by acts like Cream, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Led Zeppelin. But Kramer and Smith laid down their riffs with more reckless abandon and a greater sense of desperate urgency than any of those groups.
In his early days, Jimmy James, as he was then known, played in rhythm sections, backing artists like Little Richard, B.B. King and Ike and Tina Turner. It isn’t until 1966, when he moved to London and formed the Experience, that Jimi Hendrix was able to cut loose and start getting the attention he deserved for his magnificent guitar work. Alarmingly, Hendrix was virtually unknown in the U.S. until he played at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—the legendary performance in which he doused his Fender Stratocaster with lighter fluid and set it on fire.
Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.
What started out as Gibson’s daughter company that was tasked with producing affordable guitars, has grown into a giant. Not so long ago, Epiphone was the brand you turned to if you wanted a legit Les Paul but didn’t have the money for Gibson one.Today, things are vastly different. Gibson stepped up their game across the board, producing some of the absolute best guitar on the market.
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A little bit of history will make this clearer… The original Fender Stratocaster switches were 2-pole 3-way switches (that’s actually what I have on my schematic, I think you’ll see why in a bit) and were intended only to select either the neck, middle or bridge pickup. However these were “make before break” switches where, as the switch is moved across from one position to the next, the next contact is made before the previous contact is broken. People found that if you could get the switch to rest in between those three positions that you’d actually have both neck and middle or middle and bridge pickups connected at the same time and, most importantly, it sounded good! It became a common thing to rest the 3-way switch in between the positions, so common that in the 60’s people were filing notches in the detente mechanism of the 3-way switch. These became the “notch” positions. In the 70’s, Fender adopted this popular mod into their stock switch thus becoming what we now use and call a 5-way switch but is, in fact, a 3-way switch with 5 positions.

Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.

We are very proud to present to you a pleasant surprise I must say from way back when folks this is prime Time beginning of that Golden Era of some of the GREATEST QUALITY Acoustic guitar that FENDER ever had the smarts to Import… that’s right these are Japanese crafted beauty’s . Built back in the day when Japan had the economy riding high while US guitar builders were getting bought out by business folks not guitar builders and US economy was in the tanker just a little brief history reminder… Fender & Gibson were under the gun to cut costs and re-structure if they wanted to stay alive and that they did…. CBS , Norlin…. And others cut back on the high quality woods they once enjoyed and relied upon the reputation the US had for making great guitars basically reputation from the late 50’s – early 60’s To about 68-69 or so…. Then quality went down no doubt…. Right then it was prime time for Japan Luthiers to strike and they did…they stepped up the quality from the funny toy grade guitars we saw here in the states back when I was a kid you could get a decent cute player electric guitar at the Pawn shop in about 1965 for about $69.00 in fact my dad bought my 1st electric guitar there for $69.00 … I loved it—it was a “ KENT” and it sounded very good threw my Silvertone amp….. ..Kent is a offspring of Greco which is a factory behind making many brands buildby Fujigen Gekki…. Ok what this Fender beauty traces back to the great FujiGen Gakki in 1974 according to its serial number… making this beautifully preserved SOLID TOP Vintage Japanese guitars 40 years old a true vintage guitar in its own right. It was during the time when this guitar was built that the Japanese Luthiers set out to make some of the most righteous guitars period… fit – finish - workmanship & materials used are the good stuff folks….. This full size Dreadnought Acoustic guitar is a replica of the Martin designed D-28 known to be one of the finest most prolific designs the US Martin & co ever produced. This Fender F310 is of a High Quality example, The top is Solid Spruce straight grained with some nice figure and wow it has 40 years of patina to its color and finish and overall vintage appeal is Very strong… I was drawn to this example it sounds deep and rich and complex with an excellent volume And its highs ring threw when cording and finger picking , This guitars Back & sides are true to the masterful D-28 desigh …. High quality ROSEWOOD just beautifully grained see the pics for more detail Its absolutely beautiful back – sides are all east Indian Rosewood the fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood by its looksa very high grade non theless, the bridge appears to be Ebony wood….. the Bridge is nice and flat to its top which is also nice and straight, action is very good medium low and adjustable. The top has a couple of minor doinks see the pics not bad at all and certainly nothing remotely enough to detour from its vintage Gorgeous looks , no cracks anywhere found , bindings are very food, overall this guitar is an EXTREMLY CLEAN example aside from the afore mentioned . This guitar is in top Vintage used condition and is easily a 9//10 Fit and finish I suggest this was built but a high level Journeyman and can compete or compare with A nice vintage Yairi or Morris or Gibson or Martin for that matter…. .
I consider Squier and Epiphone to be the two top brands beginners should be looking at for their first guitar. However, there are some key differences when it comes to their flagship instrumets. Where the Epiphones listed above have a pair of humbucking pickups, the Squier Stratocaster has a trio of single coils, and the Telecaster a pair of single coils.
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Two full steps down from normal tuning. Used by bands such as Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss, Sleep, Spiritual Beggars, In Flames (until Clayman), The Black Dahlia Murder, Asking Alexandria on Reckless and Relentless, Bring Me The Horizon, Architects, First Signs of Frost, Dismember, Dethklok, Immolation, High on Fire, Cold, Dream Theater, Arch Enemy (since the Angela Gossow era), Entombed, Amaranthe, Nails, Cataract, and The Smashing Pumpkins.
Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.
In 1932, John Dopyera left Dobro and came back into the National fold, regaining control of the company. We can only speculate that the absence of Beauchamp has something to do with his decision. National and Dobro merged in 1935, becoming the National Dobro Company. However, until the end of the ’30s, when National Dobro finally completed its relocation to Chicago, Dobro instruments continued to be made in L.A. by what had been the separate Dobro Corporation, even though it was a part of National Dobro. Got it? Hmmm…
G&L is the evolution of Fender guitars, no doubt, is Leo Fender expressed by itself, amazing axe, nice sound, in tune, good wood, my ASAT SPECIAL have bird's eye wood on fretboard that looks and feels amazing, the MFD's pickups rocks! nice playability, nice sound, I'll keep mine a lot of a time, it must be on top 10, underrated guitar in my opinion

In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.


In the midst of the controversy, conservative commentators alleged that the raid was a politically motivated act of retaliation by the Obama administration, as Juszkiewicz had frequently donated to Republican politicians, including Marsha Blackburn and Lamar Alexander. Chris Martin IV, the CEO of Gibson competitor C.F. Martin & Co., had donated over $35,000 to the Democratic National Committee and Democratic candidates in the same time period. Though Martin featured several guitars in its catalog made with the same Indian wood as Gibson, the company was not subjected to a raid.[55] Following revelations in the 2013 IRS targeting controversy, the right-leaning magazine FrontPage declared that "there is now little doubt the raid...was politically motivated," and that "the Gibson Guitar case can hardly be dismissed as regulatory overreach. In hindsight, it was an ominous foreshadowing of the explosion of misdeeds we are witnessing today.[56]
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I consider Squier and Epiphone to be the two top brands beginners should be looking at for their first guitar. However, there are some key differences when it comes to their flagship instrumets. Where the Epiphones listed above have a pair of humbucking pickups, the Squier Stratocaster has a trio of single coils, and the Telecaster a pair of single coils.
Maton earned international renown for their superb acoustic and electric guitars and basses, which have been played by scores of famous performers from The Easybeats to The Wiggles.[1] George Harrison owned one of their MS500 models, which were introduced in 1957 and famed British session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan owned and used a Maton ‘Cello’ guitar for many years during the peak of his career, playing it on recordings with Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Johnny Keating and his Big Band and Neil Finn from Crowded House.

Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
I'm looking for a similar guitar. My first electric in 1969, purchased used for $50.I lost it sometime in the 70's, but still have a picture of it. It was a sunburst finish cutaway violin shaped body with Bigsby type tailpiece and a tunable bridge with a flip up mute bar. The headstock is similar to a Gibson but the neck was thinner.I can't remember how it played or sounded.I'm just looking to replace it for nostalgic reasons. I also recently purchased a Kent Les Paul copy I found on e bay while searching for kenr guitars.I have seen the framed ads but I have yet to find that model.
The primary difference in tone between the solid body and hollow body guitar is the high end bite one associates with the solid body guitar. From the biting rhythm of guitarist Nile Rodgers to the supersonic leads of Eric Clapton and David Gilmour, Stratocasters have found favor with so many guitarists because of their versatility and their timeless tone.
With his exceptional talent, it seems that everyone wants to collaborate with Santana. What’s more, when he does join hands with another artist, it seems that his raw and authentic sound always shines through, taking the limelight. That is not to say that his tracks aren’t all different and uniquely great in their own way! There are so many manipulations that he has found and continues to find with the Latin rhythm. People say that the Grammy-winning guitarist can be identified with just one single note – now that’s an achievement!

Even by the mid 1970s costs to manufacture instruments in Japan were rapidly rising. Labor was still cheaper than in the USA (it isn't anymore), but real estate, raw material, fuel, transportation costs and virtually all other manufacturing costs were fully as much if not more in Japan as in the USA. The Japanese were able to compete in the international market due not only to low labor costs at that time but also due to highly efficient manufacturing techniques and the fact that their low-cost workers were skilled and highly motivated.
A Reamp® box is essentially the reverse of a DI box and converts a balanced signal into an unbalanced signal suitable for driving guitar amps. Radial makes three different versions of this device with variations in features and in quality of the transformers. For an introduction to reamping there is the passive ProRMP™, for high quality reamping there is the Reamp JCR™, and at the top of the line is the dual-channel active X-Amp™.
There have been plenty of attempts at different types of semi-hollow guitars from nearly every guitar manufacturer, and some are more successful than others. In my experience, even though Gibson does offer a fairly consistent output, there is still a fair amount of discrepancy from one instrument to the next, and as always I recommend playing a guitar before passing any judgement on it. But try and be discerning in your assessment of the guitar — versatility is king, only capable of being knocked off the throne by an absolutely golden, irreplaceable tone. Trust your ears!
Alonso de Mudarra's book Tres Libros de Música, published in Spain in 1546, contains the earliest known written pieces for a four-course guitarra. This four-course "guitar" was popular in France, Spain, and Italy. In France this instrument gained popularity among aristocrats. A considerable volume of music was published in Paris from the 1550s to the 1570s: Simon Gorlier's Le Troysième Livre... mis en tablature de Guiterne was published in 1551. In 1551 Adrian Le Roy also published his Premier Livre de Tablature de Guiterne, and in the same year he also published Briefve et facile instruction pour apprendre la tablature a bien accorder, conduire, et disposer la main sur la Guiterne. Robert Ballard, Grégoire Brayssing from Augsburg, and Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558) significantly contributed to its repertoire. Morlaye's Le Premier Livre de Chansons, Gaillardes, Pavannes, Bransles, Almandes, Fantasies – which has a four-course instrument illustrated on its title page – was published in partnership with Michel Fedenzat, and among other music, they published six books of tablature by lutenist Albert de Rippe (who was very likely Guillaume's teacher).
“But I was recently talking to a guy at Yamaha who told me the total global revenue from musical equipment sales sold round the world doesn’t add up to one-thousandth of Apple’s AAPL, -1.42%   daily turnover. It’s a small specialist market,” Hook said. “Gibson guitars are expensive and they have been taken over by so many cheap copies. That’s what has caused a lot of harm to such a luxury product.”
Here’s my intuitive explanation to why we are hearing what we are hearing: What makes a guitar sound like a guitar, as opposed to for example a piano or a harp, is the spectrum of overtones that are generated when the strings are plucked. This also makes two guitars sound different from each other, despite having the same make/model of pickups. Any component that is involved in how the vibrations in the string is created (this is kind of what the myth debunking video refers to as “timbre”, but then goes on to equate to amplitude and frequency, as if the tonewood would alter the notes, as opposed to the tone) affects the sound. For example:
I have a problem with the way the neck bows going down from the low to high e strings. I have a Gibson les paul with the recent change in seasons I notice it on all my guitars I can adjust it out but it will some times just do the same thing, I see this on my fender and my Acoustic guitars as well when I adjust this I have a lot of problems with tuning I know this is not exactly what we were talking about but jut a question I wanted to ask I hope I made what I am saying plain enough I am pretty new to all of this. Thank you for all the great info.
All electric guitar strings are made using steel, nickel, or other magnetically conductive metal alloys since they’re essential for transmitting string vibrations to the magnetic pickups. The type of plating or coating applied to the steel alloy has a significant impact on the strings’ sound. Here are some general tonal characteristics of the most common types of strings:
This comment is directed towards the video of the gentleman changing guitar strings. I have an LP Junior, so I don't thread my strings through the guitar body. But I'm curious why he is turning the guitar completely over, flipping the guitar towards himself each time when he could in fact just lean the guitar away from himself, leaving the back of the guitar facing him? I know that seems a bit nit picky, but it would be tremendously more efficient just leaving the guitar on its side with less risk of the string damaging the guitar surface. Any thoughts or am I just missing something?
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
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On regular occasion I have stuff come through to me after the instrument owner has already taken it to another shop that, for whatever reason, could not fix or solve the problem. This time, a supposedly professional and legitimate shop... and after the customer PAID FOR WORK THAT DID NOT YEILD THE DESIRED RESULTS. That just boggles my mind a bit. I would never charge a customer unless they are happy and satisfied with my work.

This is obviously the most important value when it comes to any musical instrument. If the guitar doesn’t sound right, none of the other values will be able to make up for that. Guitarists are notorious for their attention to tone, and many players will form a tight allegiance to the brand they feel provides the perfect sound. The Gibson is sought after for its full bodied overdriven sound in rock circles, while others swear by Fender’s classic offerings. It all comes down to a matter of preference, so you will want to be well acquainted with the sounds of each brand. Look up your favorite guitarists and see what they play. That will likely put you on the right track.
Subsequent years brought new company ownership to the Gibson Guitar Company. During the “Norlin Era“, Gibson Les Paul body designs were greatly altered, most notably, the change to the neck volute. Because the Les Paul had the reputation of having an easily broken neck joint, the volute strengthened the neck where it joined the headstock to avert breakage. To further increase the strength, the neck woods were changed from mahogany to a three-piece maple design. The LP body was changed from a one-piece mahogany with a maple top into multiple slabs of mahogany with multiple pieced maple tops. This is referred to as “multipiece” construction, and sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “pancake” body. The expression “pancake body” actually refers to a body made of a thin layer of maple sandwiched between two slabs of mahogany, with a maple cap. The grain of the maple was placed at 90 degrees to that of the mahogany. The “pancake”-like layers are clearly visible when looking at the edge of the guitar. This process is also known as “crossbanding”, and was done for strength and resistance to cupping/warping. Crossbanding was phased out by 1977.
3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.
New Mooer Red Truck Multi Effect Pedal. Mooer Red Truck. The Mooer Red Truck is one of the most full-featured effects strip on the market. Featuring several effects modules within one unit, this is designed for players who prefer the simplicity of single effects over multi-effects and want a portable solution for rehearsals, gigs, or where carrying a lot of gear is an issue.
I listen to a lot of internet radio, from soul to death metal. I think it's good to listen to a wide variety of music, even if you're not particularly into certain genres. Each genre has its own qualities when it comes to guitar, so spend time just... listening. Listen to how rhythms, chords and solos are used. You may not know how they're doing it just from listening, but you might like the sound of something which you'll then be inspired to go and investigate independently.
For many people, Yamaha isn’t a brand that immediately comes to mind when they hear “electric guitar.” Yamaha’s artist roster isn’t filled with many high profile endorsers nor is the Pacifica carried by the big online retailers. This is a shame and why (in my opinion) the Pacifica is one of the most underrated electric guitars available today. It’s a guitar I wish more people knew about: the PAC112V is very well made, sounds and feels great, and is suitable for a number of styles thanks to its H-S-S pickup configuration and 5-way pickup selector.
The Takamine F-340 was the cause of a letter from Martin Guitars in the early 1980s because Takamine’s acoustic guitars including the logo design were supposedly nearly identical to Martin Models[citation needed]. According to Chris F. Martin IV, CEO of CF Martin and Company in a speech given to the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum members on August 8, 2005, no lawsuit was ever actually filed, and Takamine did change the appearance of their guitars[citation needed].
Speaker simulators are switchable filter sets designed to reproduce the EQ curves of a variety of speaker cabinet configurations (with varying degrees of success). The subsequent coloration is meant to replicate typical speaker sound and behavior, softening the harsh upper-midrange edges associated with amplifier distortion. Speaker simulator boxes are designed with direct  guitar-amp recording in mind, and are intended to remove the speaker cabinet and microphone link from the signal chain.
Should space restrictions or volume levels make these methods impractical, try adding an air-guitar part as an overdub to a conventionally miked guitar track. The principle is similar to vocal doubling, for which the same part is performed twice; you may not be able to do this for an improvised solo, but for rhythm parts or composed lines, it's a snap. In addition, double tracking with a bright acoustic guitar or a smooth-sounding hollow body will add extra richness and some slick, big-budget zing to your mixes.
UPDATE 10/21: The good news first - I'm still absolutely loving the game and steadily improving. I'm only able to play about one to two hours a day, but even though that's all the time I'm able to put in, I'm already to the point of being able to play along with a song. But (here comes the downside), with my improvement audio lag has become a real issue. Before I was so horrible that I couldn't hit the right notes at all, let alone on time, so it didn't make much difference. But now that I've improved, it's a problem. To be fair, they warn you about this in the form of a pamphlet inside the game box, so it wasn't out of nowhere. I was just hoping that since I wasn't using HDMI, the lag wouldn't be too horrible. Wrong.
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
Processing audio before it passes through an amp simulator is a creative alternative to adding effects to its output. As described elsewhere in this article, pitch-shifting can work well in conjunction with amp simulation, but other ways of editing and processing the raw guitar file before it goes through the amp modeller also yield interesting results. Reverse reverb, resonation, vocoding and Auto-Tune can all produce distinctive effects. Try chopping small sections of guitar out, for an interesting stuttering effect that's nothing like tremolo. A piece of guitar that's been reversed before being fed through an amp modeller sounds quite different to what you get by reversing a guitar part that's already been through an amp, and this technique can be very effective. Likewise, recording three or four separate tracks of single guitar notes and routing them simultaneously through the same guitar amp simulator sounds very different from playing chords. Sam Inglis
Semi-hollow guitars can be seen in the hands of many guitarists who have especially signature sounds. For example, John Scofield has been playing the same Ibanez AS-200 since 1981! Larry Carlton helped define the sound of the ’70s as one of the top call session guitarists of all time, and did it with his Gibson ES-335 (in fact, Carlton is known as Mr. 335). John Lennon, Gary Clark Jr., Jack White, Dave Grohl — guitar titans past and present use semi-hollow guitars.
Martin’s B series basses were big flat-tops with 34″-scale mahogany necks. Designed by Dick Boak, these ABGs used the same bodies as Martin’s Jumbo guitars; measuring 16″ wide with a depth of 4 7/8″, they were large enough to produce decent acoustic volume without being ungainly like other maker’s attempts. The top was solid spruce, the fingerboard was ebony, and the body was either solid East Indian Rosewood (B40) or solid flamed maple (B-65). A Fishman bridge-pickup system was available adding an “E” in the model number. Both basses were also available with fretless fingerboards.

I've had my Dorado, model #5986, serial #41 since 1972 and have used it for classical guitar study off and on since getting it as a gift. For what it is, the sound quality and playability are quite good. I'm donating it to a church rummage sale tomorrow (6/3/07) and will remember it fondly. I have an Alvarez Regency, similar to the Dorado, which lacks the sound character.


It does sound intimidating when you read platitudes like "There is no official rule on how to do it, and you should break the rules and experiment because that's what art is, and you'll invent something new." Some people even tell you to figure it out yourself, which is equally absurd. It developed over decades. No one person is going to just sort it out by themselves over night.


A direct user interface can give far more musically rewarding results than dozens of parameters, menus and alpha dials. Often, even a panel of knobs isn't anywhere near as natural to play as, say, a Korg Kaoss Pad. Here's something Kaoss Pad 3 owners can try at home: choose effect DL2 (Smooth Delay) in which the pad controls delay time on the X-axis and depth on the Y-axis. Next route your favourite solo patch through it and set the FX depth to about 12 o'clock. Solo wildly whilst simultaneously stroking the top right-hand corner of the Kaoss Pad with short, circular motions. With practice, you should be able to produce delicate pitch sweeps as the delay shifts in time. As you control depth by vertical motion, practise diagonal upwards sweeps followed by vertical downward ones to smoothly dampen the effect. Hey, it takes years to master the violin, so a few evenings spent waggling your finger over flashing LEDs shouldn't be too arduous. Next try the same technique with lush solo pads: simple yet devastatingly effective! Paul Nagle

The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
If you're a fan of the Grateful Dead, check out the D'Angelico Premier Series DC Grateful Dead Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar. In the acoustic department, the Alvarez Artist Series AD60 dreadnought acoustic guitar comes highly rated, thanks to its hand-selected spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and powerful tone. Singer-songwriters and fans of acoustic-driven music must check out the latest Ed Sheeran Martin guitar, the comfortable, easy-to-play Divide Signature Edition Little Martin acoustic-electric.
Granular Guitars is the second exclusive VST Sound Instrument Set created by sound designer, composer and multi-instrumentalist Simon Stockhausen. Adding to the sound libraries of Padshop and Padshop Pro Granular Guitars spans nearly three gigabytes worth of studio-grade recorded samples, covering various acoustic and electric guitars as well as providing more exotic instruments like psaltery, celtic harp and oud played in traditional styles, plus experimental ways of treating the guitar. With 260 presets, Granular Guitars includes big cinematic soundscapes, beds and pads, beautiful fragile textures, plucked string sounds morphed into alien noises, heavy metal sounds and overdriven guitar screams clashed with divine New Age sounds.
Rule 3 - Experimentation occurs within these groups of effects. While these three major groupings need to follow a strict order, the effects within those groups can be toyed with to invent new sounds. For instance, you can apply a reverb to your echo delay or apply an echo to your reverb. But that general group of time-based effects needs to come at the end of your effects chain, regardless.
Aside from the stereo effect of doubling up the same part and panning it to opposite ends of the stereo spectrum, some guitarists use stereo rigs in conjunction with stereo effects. Traditionally, this involves using two amp cabinets, although single cabs that operate in stereo are available. To achieve a good, even stereo image, it’s best to mic each cab identically, ideally with the same type of mic. Invert the polarity of one of the channels to avoid any out-of-phase issues, and pan them hard left and right. Stereo effects such as reverb, delay and room ambience, can be added to mono guitar signals at the mixing stage.

With this in mind, rather than taking the category chronologically, let’s accept our good fortune in today having all of history’s distortion sounds at our fingertips—so next time out, we’ll look first at those which transform the guitar and amp’s natural tone least, working toward those which balls it up most. In other words, from the least synthetic to the most synthetic-sounding of the genre.
Treadle-based volume pedals are used by electric instrument players (guitar, bass, keyboards) to adjust the volume of their instrument with one foot while their hands are being used to play their instrument. Treadle-style volume pedals are often also used to create swelling effects by removing the attack of a note or chord, as popularised by pedal steel guitar players. This enables electric guitar and pedal steel players to imitate the soft swelling sound that an orchestra string section can produce, in which a note or chord starts very softly and then grows in volume. Treadle-based volume pedals do not usually have batteries or require external power. Volume effects: Electro-Harmonix LPB-1, Fender Volume Pedal, MXR Micro Amp, Ernie Ball Volume Pedal.
You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  
The weapon of choice for today’s modern recording musician, the Axe-Fx is as good as it gets in terms of modeling amps. Used by countless musician both live and in the studio, this machine has proven to deliver for just about every musical style under the sun. Notable users of the Axe Fx include Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Misha Mansoor, and many others famous musicians. The Axe-Fx II features a high resolution speaker simulator with 150+ “Factory” models and room for 512 “User” cab locations.  It contains a vast virtual inventory of hundreds of vintage and modern guitar amps, speaker cabinets, guitar stompbox and studio effects, and more. The options are pretty much endless.
Finally, vintage gear tends to display more variation from unit to unit relative to modern gear. Fifty years ago the technician winding pickups might have been distracted and left the pickup on the winding machine a little longer then normal, resulting in a coil with extra windings of wire and a hotter output. Modern standardization is usually a good thing-you’re less likely to encounter unwanted surprises. On the other hand, the relatively casual standards of the past sometimes resulted in happy accidents.
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!

got my dad's guitar after he passed away. its electric solid wood has a tone knob and volume knob next to the cord plug in and two little black slider buttons. I don't know anything about guitars but it only has one marker on the back its on the silver plate and it just says Japan in all caps. there is no brand name on the headstock or anywhere else on the guitar that I can find and I've looked at over many times.

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In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
This book comes from the former editor of Guitar One magazine who has been playing since he was 14 years old, so he has a reputation of knowing a his way around a guitar neck AND knowing how to write. Let’s face it, when you are trying to learn guitar through reading a book, the author's ability to write and communicate is crucial. Anyway, this book delivers a “workout program” for your fingers, giving you a technique driven approach to learning the guitar and actually improving in record time. The exercises are designed to help with dexterity and accuracy.

I dont know but im looking for a good bass guitar too. Depends on your price range. Personally I realy like Ibanez basses and think they do really good low to mid price range basses. If you are looking at a professional quality basses you should look at Rickenbacker, Musicman (stingray), Fender, Lakland and Shadowsky as they are the main brands for professional basses.


No doubt many of you thought that the very first electric guitar was Les Paul’s legendary “Log.” Well, regardless of who was responsible for its invention and evolution, electric guitarists throughout the world are truly grateful for the ability to amplify their instruments, as are their audiences. This capability to connect to dedicated guitar amps along with the use of distortion and guitar effects has spawned entirely new genres of music. Pickup types and configurations, as well as specialized switching options and tone controls also help generate different sounds. But when you break it down to the basics, there are really only three types of electric guitars in existence to this day, excluding acoustic-electrics - the aforementioned Hollow Body, Semi-Hollow Body, and Solid Body varieties.
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