This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!

Not to mention the difference tones created when two pure tones (sine waves) are produced at the same time (which, important to mention - pure tones only exist in theory, every sound we hear is comprised of overtones...) - then the additional difference tones created by the interaction BETWEEN difference tones - it's basically a fractal relationship. Anybody who has spent a significant amount of time studying the physics of sound knows that the interactions that occur between sounds are so complex and immense that it's almost silly to assume that just because "wood isn't magnetic" that the natural resonance of the wood wouldn't in turn accentuate certain overtones over the fundamental tone coming off the string. You can't say that the note "has already left the string," when the note takes place over time - even a staccato note has an attack, sustain, decay, and release envelope much in the way that a synthesizer does (this is where the idea for artificial dynamics envelopes came from anyway).
Epiphone does a great job of making instruments for all levels of guitar players, especially those looking for affordable acoustic and electric instruments. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, and therefore can make official copies of Gibson guitars like the Les Paul, SG and Hummingbird. Many are good enough for pro players to use in the studio or onstage.
The only known American distributor of Lyle guitars is the L.D. Heater Music Company. A small warehouse based in Beaverton, Oregon, L.D. Heater was owned by Norlin, the parent company of Gibson, and known more for their exclusive production rights to Alembic instruments. As protection from potential lawsuits, Lyle guitars were part of the contract that stated under which brand names Gibson-licensed guitars could be produced and distributed.
From the jazz-tempered Artcore series to the metal-shredding Iron Labels and all of their rocking classic models, Ibanez electric guitars are definitely not confined to any one genre. You can play whatever music you like with the right Ibanez axe, whether you go for one of their off-the-shelf designs or the signature style designated by your favorite guitar hero.
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.
Understanding how to read electronics schematics is the key to being a successful DIY pedal builder. A schematic will show you what components are needed for the build, as well as how these parts are hooked together to create (in this case) an effect pedal circuit. At first glance, a schematic may look like a bunch of hieroglyphics, compiled of various symbols, numbers, and letters (see below). Don’t fret! – After a bit of practice, you should develop a basic understanding of how a schematic works, and you will be putting together DIY effect pedals in no time!

O WOW!...I love...Fallout 4 is a great game like the rest of the fallout series but if your a fan of the series u will be kinda of down that the choices u make don't affect the outcome of the game because they made more of a story they wanted to tell but don't lose hope still a good game and they might make a sequel to new Vegas and there just might be a Multiplayer for new Vegas 2....The world is so large and the gameplay non linear (which is good and bad), I find if I walk away from the game for a while, I have to spend a lot of time figuring out where I was and where I stashed things when I come back to it later.

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Finally, vintage gear tends to display more variation from unit to unit relative to modern gear. Fifty years ago the technician winding pickups might have been distracted and left the pickup on the winding machine a little longer then normal, resulting in a coil with extra windings of wire and a hotter output. Modern standardization is usually a good thing-you’re less likely to encounter unwanted surprises. On the other hand, the relatively casual standards of the past sometimes resulted in happy accidents.

The lower strings of a guitar (E, A & D) will often have a nickel winding over their steel core. Nickel also makes an appearance in the frets of most guitars, which are commonly made from nickel-silver. Despite the name, this alloy doesn’t actually contain any silver, but is named for its silver appearance. It’s actually an alloy of copper, nickel, and zinc. These nickel-silver frets aren’t as hard-wearing as steel, so some guitar manufacturers use stainless steel instead to give the frets more longevity.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.
music is an expression with a variety of feelings involved.there is no such individual as the greatest guitarist.there are however a great number of highly talented,highly skilled and original guitar players.they encompass many genres of style ,technique,they should not be compared with each other.rather they should be appreciated for their individuality and that magnetism that makes them all unique.

Uh, Roland. I don’t know when was the last time I read about the best amplifiers and one of Roland’s models was not there. That’s not due to their ability to market their instruments to everyone (well, they are good at that too, probably) BUT the main reason why they are always a talk of the town (of a very musical and amplifier obsessed town) is their quality of production. With a lot of expensive amps, they are also graceful enough to give us the MERE MORTALS ability to bath in the glory of what is Roland tone. This CUBE‌-10GX amp is a 10-watt little combo amp with one 8 inch speaker that is ideal for home practice or anyone who needs an inexpensive model that will not ruin their performance. With built-in effects, heavy-duty cabinet design, and a compact construction the CUBE‌-10GX amp might be your best choice for a practice amp that also works as a traveling amp.


The remaining ’62 Teisco laps had a sort of paddle shape to the body, with sides wider than the fingerboard all the way up to the asymmetrical head with the circle Swan logo. The EG-A and EG-S had short scales and black fingerboards with the diamond markers, while the EG-U and EG-L had longer scales with fingerboards angled toward the bass side at the pickup. The EG-U had a light fingerboard with split-parallelogram markers, whereas the EG-L had a dark ‘board with dots. All were six-strings with one black-covered pickup and a little plate with volume and tone controls. Tuners mounted from behind the head as on a Spanish guitar.
Granite, when quarried in its natural state, also has a crystalline atomic structure which is ideal for sonic transference and has a compression strength of 19,000 psi, and a tension strength of 700 psi—the material these blocks are made of is the fourth densest on earth next to Diamond, Carbon and Quartz that has ideal resonant qualities which will decrease signal loss from your guitar to your amplifier by at least 30%. Utilizing this optimum material allows you to achieve maximum attack, clarity, sustain, note articulation, note separation, harmonics and punch. While the lows get tight and articulate, the harmonics scream effortlessly! Palm mutes, tapping, sweeps, you name it, all sounds so much better.
The modern full size classical guitar has a scale length[46] of around 650 mm (26 in), with an overall instrument length of 965–1,016 mm (38.0–40.0 in). The scale length has remained quite consistent since it was chosen by the originator of the instrument, Antonio de Torres. This length may have been chosen because it's twice the length of a violin string. As the guitar is tuned to one octave below that of the violin, the same size gut could be used for the first strings of both instruments.
My father's Yamaha was bought in the 90's, and was the first guitar steel-string I ever played as a kid. (If you were curious its equivalent to today's model would be the LS6 ARE). To this day I still find myself going back to it. It's little quirks makes it really special, even though I have martins and taylors and even gibsons. There's little nicks and chips in the paint in some places, which really shows it's history. It's also stood the test of time. It still plays great after almost 30 years of being lugged around from place to place, dropped, hit against walls, etc. It's just simply great. - zabathy1
In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.
A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.
A very good option in the budget pedal market. Comes with a great number of effects to combine for solid sounds. Virtually all the factory pre-sets are worthless and are sort of demonstrations of what the pedal can do. But you have plenty of user saves and setting up good tones is straight forward and simple. The tuner in this and my handheld one never agree. Someone is lying!

One and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by modern rock and heavy metal bands. Utilized by bands like A Day to Remember, Slayer (on "Cast Down", "Seven Faces" and "Payback" from God Hates Us All, as well as few songs on Christ Illusion, World Painted Blood and Repentless), Slipknot, Intronaut, Down, Machine Head (tuned 40 cents sharp), Demon Hunter, Chevelle, Origin, Asking Alexandria on their third and fourth albums, From Death To Destiny and The Black respectively, RED (on "Faceless"), Parkway Drive, Skillet (on much of Comatose), Veil of Maya, Bring Me the Horizon (up until Count Your Blessings), Sevendust, Soilwork, Chimaira (on a few songs from The Infection), Eye Empire, Crown the Empire, The Devil Wears Prada, Drowning Pool, The Veer Union, Comfort in the End, Attack Attack!, Mark Tremonti (on much of Full Circle and All I Was, and the songs "Coming Home" and "Home" from Blackbird and AB III, respectively), Nickelback on the song "Side of a Bullet", Disturbed on Immortalized and occasionally Black Stone Cherry, Limp Bizkit, The Kills, and Sucioperro.


Jack Douglas also points out a beneficial side-effect, in his experience, of recordings made using the phase EQ approach: "When you build a mix — I don't care if it's four tracks, eight tracks, or 96 — the real nightmare is when you put something up and the only way you can hear it is by blasting it. There's nothing worse than putting up something you're excited about, and it's gone. If you [record guitars] like this, I guarantee that as soon as you put the sound in the mix it will be there. Not only that, it won't wipe out everything else in the mix, because it will have such a separate and distinct character."

I am a guitar player, teacher and composer. I started playing piano at the age of seven. Five years later I had my first guitar performance with a local band. My style was inspired by guitarists like Nuno Bettencourt, Joe Satriani, Jerry Cantrell, Marty Friedman, Zakk Wylde, Steve Vai and Dimebag Darrell. During my career I had many bands and music project, going through different styles of original music and sometimes cover bands. In 2012 co-founded the band Vulgar Bulgar (Pantera tribute band). In 2013 started teaching guitar at Rockschool.bg. Currently freelance guitar teacher, session musician and solo performing artist.


I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.

Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.

It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’
The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.
While Paul's Rick bass surged like an undertow, George Harrison's double-bound 360/12 (the second one made by the company) defined a new tone at the other end of the audio spectrum. Its ringing sound embellished "You Can't Do That," "Eight Days a Week," and "A Hard Day's Night," to name just three 12-string cuts from the 1964-65 period. Thus the Beatles created unprecedented, international interest in Rickenbackers, which many fans actually believed came from Britain...  (Before 1964 all Rickenbacker guitars had been made at the original Electro String factory in Los Angeles. That year Hall moved it over a six month period to Santa Ana, in nearby Orange County. )
The pitch shifter effect can also be used to detune or “capo” a guitar without the need to actually retune the instrument.  These detuning type pedals have become prominent in the age of dropped tunings and seven string guitars.  The Digitech Whammy Pedal is the most widely known pitch shifter for guitarists and has been used by players like Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine fame.
To silence your guitar, go into the full-mute position discussed in Part I: let at least two of your fingers rest gently on the guitar strings, and don’t push down on any fret. Alternatively, bring the palm of your strumming hand down on the strings as if you were going to start palm muting. Practice playing power chords and quickly muting them either way.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Satin Oil, Transparent Black Sunburst
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.
The whole point of having a DIY guitar kit is to build a guitar that you like, so make sure that you get one with you're preferred shape and profile. Kits with classic guitar body shapes are the safest choice, as evidenced by their continued popularity in the market. But don't limit yourself with just the familiar, spend time looking at other designs to see if you're missing out on something cooler, something that better matches your personality.
The Ovation Guitar Company, a holding ofKaman Music Corporation, which itself is owned byFender Musical Instruments Corporation, is a guitarmanufacturing company based in New Hartford, Connecticut. Ovation primarily manufactures steel-string acoustic guitars. They have been credited with “by far the most significant developments in the design and construction of acoustic guitars” from the 1960s through the 1980s.[
One glance at this bad boy reveals just how accurate it is to the 1959 version. We are talking exact same tubeless truss rod assembly, aniline dye, exact same finish... everything. In terms of hardware, they went with a set of Klauson Deluxe tuners and period specific Tune-o-Matic bridge. The custom humbuckers were coiled and voiced to perfectly match the original PAF design from the late '50s which was done using Alnico III magnets and 42 AWG wire. The performance of this guitar is an experience that is rarely found out there.

A classic Western guitar from the Far East, this Vintage Global guitar was made in Japan sometime in the 1960s and imported for Sears and Montgomery Ward department stores. It's got a swell pick guard with a honeysuckle blossom and a hummingbird and an ominously undecorated fretboard that has absolutely no dots or markings whatsoever. Other features of the Vintage Global guitar include a snazzy sunburst finish, classic imitation wood inlay decorative sound hole decal, and cheap white plastic tuning knobs. This classical acoustic guitar has absolutely nothing in the way of "warm tones" or any other term typically used to describe finely crafted stringed instruments. Instead, it has a distinctive sharp and rumbly quality that is great for recording or live applications where a "lo-fi" sound is desired. This Global guitar has decent action and is easy to play. Speaking from experience, it really cuts through the other tracks in recording and adds a humble trashy sound while staying in tune and functioning like a normal, decent quality guitar. The Vintage Global guitar showed signs of moderate use and had a number of nicks and scratches around the edges. The hummingbird pick guard had some scratches / wear in the black glossy surface near the very top corner, but otherwise was in excellent condition. The neck was straight and the guitar had no cracks or other serious bodily damage. Body measures 17 /2 inches x 14 inches x 3 1/2 inches. Neck measures 16 1/4 inches in length from nut to end (minus headstock) and is 2 3/8 inches at widest point. This Global Hummingbird Guitar sold and is probably making beautiful music on the other side of the country, but lots or really cool-looking vintage Global guitars can be found on eBay.

While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
In a way, the Ovation story (to use Robert Frost’s famous metaphor) is one of roads not taken. Of course, as the philosopher, Hegel, so neatly noted long ago, the paths tend to join up again, and the resulting synthesis works out fine in the end. It certainly worked that way for Charlie Kaman, whose choice of paths ultimately led to the synthesis (in more ways than one!) of Ovation guitars.
The HX removes the amp modelling and condenses the rock-solid build, intuitive user interface and neat form-factor of the Helix series into a svelte multi-effects box that will fit on a Pedaltrain JR with room to spare. As on the larger units, editing is highly intuitive. Lightly touching a footswitch opens the edit menu for that patch, with the large rotary and left-right buttons used to switch patch and parameters. More complex functionality like editing signal flow isn’t far away from the user - a couple of clicks through the menu gets you there, and makes creating banks of your own a breeze. In terms of sounds, the same high-quality effects from the flagship units are present and correct, with a number of additional effects that have been developed in the meantime. The drives on offer are excellent, and into a small tube amp we also found the boosts allowed us to drive the amp into saturation, or up the ante for soloing. With a real drive in front, the unit was able to keep up, and the interaction between external drive, HX and amp was close to indistinguishable from stacking two real drive pedals.

Gibson’s offerings also differ from Fender in that they largely employ scale lengths of 24.75, resulting in a warmer, more rounded out sound that has come to characterize the brand’s output (3). Playability is also affected by the shorter scale length size, with reduced tension making string bending a bit easier. Gibson’s generally utilize mahogany in their construction, which contributes to a darker tone with increased sustain and warmth.
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.
Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.
The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.
I'd never heard of this brand but was recently in a store in North Carolina looking for a nylon string guitar. The salesman asked me if I was "open minded" and if I'd be receptive to trying a brand that I probably had never heard of. He handed me a really pretty instrument with a very different looking headstock. I immediately figured he was showing me a very expensive instrument. I asked how much it cost, but he didn't answer. He simply replied "Try it, then let me know what you think." I had no idea how much this guitar would cost, and honestly I hate guessing games, but the guitar was really beautiful. I played several classical guitars there that day. A Yamaha, a Cordoba and an Alvarez, but the Merida was unquestionably the best sounding (and looking).
Looking at my beautiful but dusty Les Paul sitting in the corner, I walked over to my bookshelf to choose a book to once again work on my electric. Now, I will say that I am NOT shy about purchasing a book or many, many books if I want to learn something so there was quite a selection to choose from. I had a few books that focused on the electric guitar but for the most part they were incomprehensible or started you off with basic chords and strumming, then turn the page and WHAM! it was Eddie Van Halen time. Just no real steady work up in skills and a lot of confusing jargon. Which is probably why I set the electric aside.

I have played all sorts of guitars, Guild, Gibson, Epi, Lowden, Fender etc etc. Walden for a beginner/intermediate are far beyond anything you can get for the same money. Exceptional sounding and great build quality, and because no-one has heard of them you can pick them up for half the price or any of the "named" brands if you get a good used one. I have had my hands on 3 in recent years, I got them for less than £100 each - one for £50 and it held its own with anything else I had that cost nearly £1k new. I would recommend them absolutely.


If you’re using temporal effects such as delay and reverb, these generally work best at the end of the chain. Putting a delay at the end allows the effect to give a more natural echo to everything that comes before it; the echo itself will not be altered by other effects. The same applies for reverb. Most guitarists leave reverb as the very last effect, occasionally using the amp’s in-built reverb over a pedal. Amps that have onboard reverb usually use a spring unit which produces a shimmery twang that works well for many types of music. However, if you’re looking for a roomier type of reverb that emulates a giant concert hall, a pedal based reverb is probably what you’re looking for. Either way, putting reverb at the end of the chain provides a spacious, natural tone that simulates a cavernous echo.
Taylor went with their own Expression electronics for the BT2. This system features volume and tone controls as well as a built-in tuner. You generally don't get too much maneuvering space in terms of tone shaping, however, the default setting of the Expression preamp is perfectly capable of reproducing this Taylor's native tone, and there's generally never any desire to leave that realm either.

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In the 1970s and 1980s, with jazz-rock fusion guitar playing, jazz guitarists incorporated rock guitar soloing approaches, such as riff-based soloing and usage of pentatonic and blues scale patterns. Some guitarists used Jimi Hendrix-influenced distortion and wah-wah effects to get a sustained, heavy tone, or even used rapid-fire guitar shredding techniques, such as tapping and tremolo bar bending. Guitarist Al Di Meola, who started his career with Return to Forever in 1974, was one of the first guitarists to perform in a "shred" style, a technique later used in rock and heavy metal playing. Di Meola used alternate-picking to perform very rapid sequences of notes in his solos.
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
As jazz-rock fusion emerged in the early 1970s, many players switched to the more rock-oriented solid body guitars. Other jazz guitarists, like Grant Green and Wes Montgomery, turned to applying their skills to pop-oriented styles that fused jazz with soul and R&B, such as soul jazz-styled organ trios. Younger jazz musicians rode the surge of electric popular genres such as blues, rock, and funk to reach new audiences. Guitarists in the fusion realm fused the post-bop harmonic and melodic language of musicians such as John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Ornette Coleman, and Miles Davis with a hard-edged (and usually very loud) rock tone created by guitarists such as Cream's Eric Clapton who had redefined the sound of the guitar for those unfamiliar with the black blues players of Chicago and, before that, the Delta region of the Mississippi upon whom his style was based. With John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, Clapton turned up the volume on a sound already pioneered by Buddy Guy, Freddie King, B.B. King and others that was fluid, with heavy finger vibratos, string bending, and speed through powerful Marshall amplifiers.
peavey marshall bass tc electronic ampeg svt bass guitar laney ashdown mag ashdown cab carlsbro ashdown abm bass amp head marshall fender bass amp behringer peaveybassamp ashdown bass 4x10 bass cab sale sales roland bass amp speakers for bass amp combo peavey for sale guitar bass practice carlsbro amp fender ashdown head amplifier ampeg bass carlsbro bass bass guitar amplifier

After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
Another consideration, and something you’ll read a lot about, is the pickups, which give the guitar its voice. There are two kinds of pickup in this price range: the single-coil (which gives a bright, sparkly sound) and the humbucker (which is fuller, meatier and perfect for rock and metal). Both are as common as each other in this budget range, and a guitar with a mix of both will offer you the best versatility.
Depending on the type of music you're playing, you may actually want your compressor pedal at the end of your chain. For example, if you're playing country music, a compressor pedal at the end of the chain squashes everything, regardless of the effects you're using. With rock music, on the other hand, it typically works better right after the filter pedals.
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan

ESP is yet another brand that acquires a notable stance in the history of guitars. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, the company was known for producing high-quality, custom-shop instruments with incredible original designs. Even now, the trend goes on. Today, ESP guitars are among the preferred guitars for most professional musicians around the world. Particularly, the metal and hard rock players mark this brand as their favorite.


Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
The most famous Gibson guitar is the Les Paul, which has been a mainstay in the music world for decades. The Gibson Les Paul is a high-end, made-in-the USA instrument, and it comes in a few different variations. Like Fender, Gibson has remained fairly consistent with their styles and designs. In addition to the Les Paul, other famous Gibson electric guitars include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird. Their classic acoustics include the Hummingbird.
I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.
Gibson filed a lawsuit November 18, 2010 in Federal court, the Central District of California, against WowWee USA and their Paper Jamz battery operated guitar toys charging trademark infringement.[27][28] The lawsuit claimed the Paper Jamz toy guitars copied the looks of some of Gibson’s famous guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson Flying V, the Gibson Explorer, and the Gibson SG. On December 21, 2010 Gibson was granted a request for an injunction against WowWee and retailers in the United States which were selling Paper Jamz guitars: WalMart, Amazon (company), Big Lots stores, Kmart Corporation, Target Corporation, Toys “R” Us, Walgreens, Brookstone, Best Buy, eBay, Toywiz.com, and Home Shopping Network (HSN)[29][30][31] The case was dismissed with prejudice (dismissed permanently) January 11, 2011 by Federal Judge R. Gary Klausner.[32][33]
I didn’t use any guitar effects. I just used a straight into the amp, and I put the amp up pretty hot, though. The tweeds go up to 12 usually, and this one I had on 10 on the bridge pickup on the Strat. I was using a glass slide. Here’s the slide I was using. It’s like an old medicine bottle. I put some felt in there to make it a little bit of a tighter grip on my finger, but it’s the same slide that Dwayne Allman used.

During World War II, instrument manufacturing at Gibson slowed due to shortages of wood and metal, and Gibson began manufacturing wood and metal parts for the military. Between 1942-1945, Gibson employed women to manufacture guitars. "Women produced nearly 25,000 guitars during World War II yet Gibson denied ever building instruments over this period," according to a 2013 history of the company. Gibson folklore has also claimed its guitars were made by "seasoned craftsmen" who were "too old for war."[13][14]
While pretty much every noise musician uses the guitar as a weapon of mass destruction, Mark Morgan of scuzz-worshippers Sightings uses his guitar for sheer negation. Playing in 50 shades of gray on found and borrowed pedals, the leader of this longtime Brooklyn noise band is quicker to sound like a vacuum humming, toilet flushing, or scrambled cable porn feed than Eric Clapton or even Thurston Moore; a unique sound that has all the emotion of punk, with none of its recognizable sounds. As he told the blog Thee Outernet: “Probably the biggest influences on my playing style is sheer f—king laziness and to a slightly lesser degree, a certain level of retardation in grasping basic guitar technique.”
When it comes to classic British amp manufacturers, Orange is certainly one of the most legendary. And while many of their amps are pretty inaccessible unless you have many many zeroes in your bank account, they do offer a few superb inexpensive options – one of the best being the Micro Terror half stack you see here. Sold as a set, this tiny titan of an amp has all the brand’s classic style and sound in a package that’s just a fraction of the size. You might think that, with such limited functionality, it’s a bit of a one trick pony – and it is, except it does that one trick better than anyone else. Of course, if you’re looking for a more aggressive hard rock sound, you could always opt for the Micro Dark version for the same price.
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
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"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)
Chorus pedals really made their mark in the 80’s with the likes of the Boss CE-1 and CE-2, the Electro Harmonix Small Clone and the TC Electronics Stereo Chorus. I found a nice definition of chorusing on Wikipedia: “Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or “vibrato” to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.” A chorus is a modulation effect but the modulation we hear is produced by delaying the wet signal a very short duration causing the doubling effect we hear. So it is actually a time based effect.
Before it gets shipped to you, each Monoprice guitar undergoes a setup, tuning, and inspection process by Master Luthier Roger Gresco here in Southern California. The setup ensures that the neck is straight, the action is right, and that it will stay in tune. Additionally, it comes with everything you need to get started, including strings (installed), a heavy-duty zippered black gig bag with shoulder strap, and a truss-rod wrench.
High frequency tweeters, typically horn-loaded, are included in some bass instrument speaker cabinets. Vox's 1960s-era "Super Beatle" amplifier was an early enclosure that used horn tweeters. During the late 1960s Acoustic's 260 Series guitar amp used a treble horn in the dual 15" loudspeaker 261 guitar enclosure, and Kustom's nearly 5-foot-tall (1.5 m) 2J + 1H guitar enclosure used two 15" speakers and a 15" diameter treble horn. Horn-equipped cabinets were not available for bass players until much later.
Vox entered the "lunchbox" amp market in 2009 when it introduced the Night Train (NT15H) head. This compact, all valve amp is a 15W head with two 12AX7 preamp tubes, a pair of push-pull EL-84 valves in its power section, and a solid state rectifier. It uses a cathodyne splitter, and its power section is cathode biased. The amp is solidly constructed on a black steel chassis with a bright mirror chrome finish, diamond-perforated steel tube cage, giving it a physical appearance reminiscent of a lunchbox (some comparisons to a toaster have been made as well). The NT15H also set the cosmetic and operational template for two additional releases, also all valve heads, that book-ended its output power: the 2W Lil Night Train (NT2H) in 2010, which uses two 12AX7 preamp tubes and a 12AU7 dual triode as its power section, and the 50W Night Train 50 (NT50H) in 2011, a two channel head with four 12AX7 preamp tubes and a pair of EL-34 valves in its power section. All models feature the ability to choose between the familiar "chimey" Vox voice and a high gain voice that bypasses the EQ section, via the Bright/Thick switch. Note though that each Night Train model's feature set also provides some unique capability apart from its siblings. For example, the NT15H output power can be switched between 15W pentode and 7.5W triode modes. The NT2H provides a headphone/line out jack with on-board speaker emulation (for practice or direct recording use). Lastly, the NT50H offers two channels by adding a second,optionally foot-switchable, higher gain "Girth" channel, a "Tone Cut" control and a "Tight" switch in its master section, plus a bypassable, JFET-driven effects loop. All models were designed for use with most any 8 ohm or 16 ohm cabinet, although Vox also offers a matching cabinet (NT15H/V112NT, NT2H/V110NT, NT50H/V212NT) for each model.
Epiphone makes some great guitars for beginners, and they get the top spot on my list. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, one of the biggest names in the guitar world. As a subsidiary, Epiphone is allowed to make budget versions of classic Gibson guitars. This means newbies have a shot at starting out on a legendary Gibson design such as the Les Paul or SG.

: I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.
Overdrive – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is being played through an amp breaking up. Overdrives are more subtle than distortion effects. To achieve the original overdrive effect, a valve or vacuum tube amplifier would be “overdriven” by increasing the gain to the limits of the tubes. At this point, the vacuum tube can’t handle the voltage, starts “breaking up”, and adding extra overtones to the signal giving the sound distortion.
From a fledgling studio that sold second hand music equipment back in the late 60s, Orange grabs the top spot in this list with their highly rated guitar amplifiers. Orange amps are easy to spot with their picturesque design, but what's interesting is how successful they continue to be, while veering away from amp modeling technology. By limiting the features of their amps, they made it easier for users to appreciate their brand of quality and tone, which translates to high ratings. Obviously, the influence of popular artists helps their cause, this includes Jimmy Page, Noel and Liam Gallagher, Billy Gibbons, Chino Moreno and many more. In addition to their distinct combo amplifiers, Orange amps is well known for their lunchbox size tube amps.
Vengeance and Gates’ ascent to the top of the metal guitar heap did not always seem inevitable. Avenged Sevenfold began life as a somewhat traditional Orange County–style metalcore act, as evidenced on their 2001 debut, Sounding the Seventh Trumpet, for which Vengeance served as the primary guitarist. But the band has been reinventing and refining its sound ever since. By A7X’s third effort, 2005’s City of Evil, they had morphed into a swaggering, thrashy unit with an adventurous edge that showed itself in everything from the grand, instrumentally dense songs to the band’s theatrical image.
There are two main types of pickups: single coil and humbuckers (also called double coil). Single coil pickups are comprised of a single wire coil and represent the simplest form of pickup technology. Single coils produce a bright, punchy sound, with the drawback that they tend to produce a lot of noise in form of a hum. (One way to combat this is the P90 pickup, which uses a single coil that is wider than the traditional single coil, increasing the amount of area of the strings that the pickup can hear. The result is a bigger, duller sound than the traditional single coil.) The other main type of pickup is the dual coil or humbucker, which is said to “buck the hum” common in single coil pickups. The design is essentially two single coil pickups grouped together, which creates a more powerful, richer tone that is free of extra noise. While it may seem like the humbuckers are the no-brainer option, plenty of players prefer single coils due to their brighter, punchier tone.
If you're looking for a one-stop music shop with an amazing selection of guitars, drums, keyboards, recording, live sound, DJ equipment and more, Guitar Center Twin Cities is it. Whether you're a beginner or a gigging pro, our team members have the expertise and musical talent to get on your level and help you make great choices. Located adjacent to the Rosedale Shopping Center by the Best Buy in Roseville.First and foremost at Guitar Center Kansas City, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales and repairs to lessons and rentals, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Midwest music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
Ibanez are a Japanese guitar brand founded in Nagoya, Japan in 1957. They began by building copies of Fender and Gibson models, but – a couple of lawsuits later – they started creating their own models, which are now icons in their own right. Their line currently includes their famous Roadstar (RG), the thin-bodied S series, and several artist signature models, including guitars for Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, and Mick Thomson.
As much a sculptor as a guitarist, Pajo’s work in post-rock progenitors Slint was a frightening, seemingly rootless display of guitartistry that glided between extremes. Songs formed and dissolved without notice, turned inside out and back again, always at wildly unpredictable volumes. Pajo’s uncanny knack for both creating and shrinking spaces on tape would eventually become the blueprint for later luminaries like Tortoise, with whom he also played.

Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.


Yet, there’s still a lot to like about the JS140. First, the use of solid basswood for the body of the guitar is a plus, despite the fact that basswood is plentiful and affordable. While it’s typically used in economy guitars (like this one) its tone is quite good, providing a thick low end with a punchy mid range. As tonewoods go, it’s a decent compromise.

Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.


Right-handed players use the fingers of the right hand to pluck the strings, with the thumb plucking from the top of a string downwards (downstroke) and the other fingers plucking from the bottom of string upwards (upstroke). The little finger in classical technique as it evolved in the 20th century is used only to ride along with the ring finger without striking the strings and to thus physiologically facilitate the ring finger's motion.
So, what string gauge is standard for electric guitars? Most new guitars come strung with super-light or light-gauge strings. For beginning guitarists, that’s probably a good place to start. As you develop fretting and picking skills and your fingers gain calluses and strength, you may want to gradually move up to heavier strings, depending on the music you play and the tone you seek. Many guitar manufacturers make specific recommendations about what strings to use. Some produce their own strings or have them custom-manufactured to their specifications.
But the biggest difference between the American Special Strat and the Highway One model is in the pickup configuration. This guitar comes equipped with three Texas Special single-coils, which are overwound Alnico V pickups known for their tight bass, clear highs and pronounced mids. Famously, they’re also found on the Stevie Ray Vaughan signature Strat. And significantly, these pickups retail for about $200 for a set of three.
i bought one in 1966, my first guitar, i paid 38.99 for it at a gibson dept. store in ft. worth, tx. it was mij under the same name and was marketed in canada as regent guitars and in the u.s. later as kent guitars. it is in the same catagory (some say better) as teisco its competator, some say there was some interfacing between the 2 companies. i really enjoyed it and wish i still had it, it played great and sounded great. i found this while surfing 4 another!!!

I wonder if this list shouldn’t be renamed as Best Electric Guitar Brands, since there does seem to be a strong focus on electric guitars in this list. Yamaha does make a very good line of acoustic guitars, and Ibanez and Epiphone also manufacture acoustic guitars, and the Gibson Hummingbird would make any top 10 list of acoustic, but it’s the only one on this list that seems world class for an acoustic manufacturere(other manufacturers on the list may also make acoustics, but I’m not familiar with them) I doubt if they would be considered the best guitars or the most highly respected brands.
The original Overdrive pedals were created to mimic the sound of tube amps being cranked to 10. This will cause the tubes to be pushed to their limits, producing a crunchy and aggressive tone. The sound of overdriven tubes are certainly iconic as it gave birth to the sound of Rock ‘n’ Roll. However, the problem with bringing your volume up to 10 to overdrive your tubes is that it gets really, really loud--safety hazard loud.
From the 1860s on, fan bracing became standard in Europe. Martin and other American builders including Washburn and others since forgotten (Schmidt & Maul, Stumcke, Tilton) used X-bracing instead.[3] The sound of X-bracing may be considered less delicate with gut strings, but it prepared the American guitar for steel strings, which emerged in the first quarter of the 20th century.
Let’s learn the basic layout of Tabs. When you take a look at a Tab that you want to learn you will most likely see some standard notation on top and the Tab on the bottom. The six strings of the guitar are represented by the six horizontal lines of the Tab. The top line represents the high E string of the guitar and the bottom line represents the low E string of the guitar. This can seem a bit counterintuitive to some people so just remember that the top line is the thinnest string and you will be good to go.
These are the most versatile 5 position switches around. They have 4 poles, each pole has one common and 5 switched terminal which makes a total of 24 terminals. With that many connections you can wire pretty much any pickup combination you can imagine. Poles are mounted on two wafers, two poles each. Common terminals are usually the outer two terminals on each wafer. Image below shows multipole switch, two poles on the front wafer are outlined with different colors.
Real quick, I'm assuming you're talking production quitars here, not boutique or full on custom rigs. In that arena, one stands above all others... Gibson. While I was working at strings and things I was shocked at the way guitars were coming in from the factories... Completely not at all set up, some appears to have barely bothers to install strings. It was up to us to set them up to a kennel we felt appropriate, and I'm talking good guitars here, including the brands I play. And then came Gibson. Out of the box they are set up as prefect as can be without being personalized their final fit and finish is unparalleled, I'm sure their final inspection are all former Marine drill instructors and in need of therapy and on top of the physical aspects, at the bitter end they get handed to a guitar player, and some damn good ones by the way, to see if they make muster in playability and tone. It was rare to have one come out of its shipping box that wasn't nearly perfectly tuned. Hats off gents they just don't do it like that anymore ya know. Anyhow, the best one is gonna wind up being the one you like the best at least until you get old like me and start to appreciate somebody find things the right way instead of the fast/more profitable/ whatever else way. A little pride in your work late forever, especially in a disposable society such as this one...
If you are not shopping online, then get to the nearest local instrument store and try out different guitars by playing them while switching between different positions in standing and sitting down. Plug them in and turn them on. Stand in front of a mirror with them on hand. Try holding it up like George Harrison, and downwards like Slash. Its different tires for different cars—so there are no hard and fast rules, but your eyes, hands, and ears will tell you what suits you best.
There's no reason not to try an effect if you want to. Sure, some kind of effect might mask some bad habits (reverb and delay might sort off mess your timing), but distortion for example is almost like playing another instrument, and if you're into punk/rock, the sooner you try it the better. You will have to figure out ways to mute the strings and reduce string noises, which is part of the technique.
No doubt many of you thought that the very first electric guitar was Les Paul’s legendary “Log.” Well, regardless of who was responsible for its invention and evolution, electric guitarists throughout the world are truly grateful for the ability to amplify their instruments, as are their audiences. This capability to connect to dedicated guitar amps along with the use of distortion and guitar effects has spawned entirely new genres of music. Pickup types and configurations, as well as specialized switching options and tone controls also help generate different sounds. But when you break it down to the basics, there are really only three types of electric guitars in existence to this day, excluding acoustic-electrics - the aforementioned Hollow Body, Semi-Hollow Body, and Solid Body varieties.
Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
Read Full Review This electric guitar offered by Epiphone is absolutely on the budget when it comes to and looking for a markdown price decent sounding Les Paul style electric guitar. The guitar can be bought individually to pair it with an amplifier of choice or as part of the Epiphone Les Paul Special II guitar package that comes complete with a strap, guitar cable, plectrums, gig bag and a small 10 watts Electar amplifier to already begin playing right out of the box.
Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.
Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
An effects unit is also called an "effect box", "effects device", "effects processor" or simply "effects". In audio engineer parlance, a signal without effects is "dry" and an effect-processed signal is "wet". The abbreviation "F/X" or "FX" is sometimes used. A pedal-style unit may be called a "stomp box", "stompbox", "effects pedal" or "pedal". A musician bringing many pedals to a live show or recording session often mounts the pedals on a guitar pedalboard, to reduce set-up and tear-down time and, for pedalboards with lids, protect the pedals during transportation. When a musician has multiple effects in a rack mounted road case, this case may be called an "effects rack" or "rig". When rackmounted effects are mounted in a roadcase, this also speeds up a musician's set-up and tear-down time, because all of the effects can be connected together inside the rack case and all of the units can be plugged into a powerbar.
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By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more


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The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
Okay, choose from the best electric guitar brands to suit your needs and look great too with this helpful guide for guitarists of all levels! Would you rather get the proven model, or trust a relatively unknown brand? This is especially true for those who are looking to buy their first instrument. With that in mind, we have compiled a list of top 10 electric guitar brands which you can trust. We will talk about each, and explain why they are the best guitar brands. On top of that, we will mention some models which we have had the chance to handle in the past.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
Some bass amplifier combos have a "whizzer cone" attached to the low frequency woofer's centre. The whizzer cone is about the same size as a dust cap, although it resembles a miniature speaker cone. The whizzer cone handles the upper frequencies that are too high for the woofer. Roland's 60 watt and 120 watt bass combos contain both a woofer and a whizzer cone.
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Okay, getting down to brass tax - how do the effects and amp models sound? In a word, great! It’s not secret that Boss makes some fantastic pedals, many that have reached legendary status over the years. It’s nice knowing that you’re getting a multi-effects pedal from a brand that has really dominated the guitar and bass effects field. Boss uses some technology terms like COSM modeling and MDP (Multi-Dimensional Processing) which sound fancy but might not mean much to many guitarists. Truth is, given that this is a digital unit, some things sound really great, and some sound not so great. The overdrives are hit and miss. This user review hits the nail on the head:
The Ring Resonator Deluxe is like having two all analog pedals in one. It contains the octave-up fuzz effect of the original Ring Resonator with added LED, push-push output pot and mini-toggle switch. With the push-push output pot down, the octave-up effect is removed and fuzz-only is achieved. In the fuzz-only mode of operation the toggle switch allows you to switch between dark fuzz and bright fuzz tones.
The HeadRush Pedalboard's quad-core processor-powered DSP platform enables a faster and more guitarist-friendly user interface, reverb/delay tail spill-over between presets, the ability to load custom/third-party impulse responses, a looper with 20 minutes of record time, and more. The unit's most notable feature, however, is the seven-inch touchscreen, used to edit patches and to create new ones. In form, the Pedalboard most closely resembles Line 6’s Helix in that it has a treadle and 12 footswitches with LED ‘scribble strips’ showing each switch’s function and a colour-coded LED for each. There are several modes available for calling up sounds, easily changed by a couple of footswitch presses. In Stomp mode, the two footswitches to the left scroll through and select Rigs, while the central eight footswitches call up stompboxes within a selected Rig. Then in Rig mode, the left switches scroll through the Rig banks, while the eight select rigs. Sound-wise, there's no 'fizz' here, even on higher-gain patches, and the closer you get to a clean amp sound, the more convincing it is. If amps matter to you more than effects, the HeadRush is well worth looking into.
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Wah – This type of pedal was a Jimi Hendrix favorite, and you’ve probably heard the original “Cry Baby” in a lot of music. It was the first wah pedal to find success, and paved the way for others to follow. The Cry Baby is an example of manual wah, controlled by a rocker pedal that adjusts the level of treble response dynamically as you move it. Some modern wah pedals, by contrast, are “auto-wah effects,” which do the same thing but use presets for control instead of live input from your foot.

Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.


This is why I’m nervous when I see a free guitar plugin that actually wants to replace a guitar, which Cute Emily Guitar attempts to do. Now, Cute Emily is the most guitar-sounding of the bunch, but it also has the least amount of controls. This gives you a relatively singular sound and while I commend Big Cat efforts, I stopped using this free electric guitar plugin faster than I did the others.

Yamaha FG700S: Yamaha makes a lot of guitars that affordable for beginners with decent sound. FG700S is my best-loved. It is a general or versatile guitar, this is very great for beginners who are not very clear what music style they want to learn firstly. The guitar body top is solid Sitka spruce. The solid wood top makes better sound than laminate top. You can check out the price and features of FG700S here.
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
Time controls the length of time between any two repetitions of your signal. It is most often measured in milliseconds (ms). Most delay pedals don’t have a delay-time readout that would enable you to determine exact delay times in milliseconds, so you typically just adjust the Time knob to get an approximate time based on the unit’s available range. For instance, the Boss DD-7 (street $179) has a Mode knob that selects between four time ranges—up to 50 ms, 51–200 ms, 201–800 ms, and 801–3200 ms—and the Time knob then adjusts the setting within the selected range.
We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.

The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.

By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.


Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.
With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.
Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.
Subsequent years brought new company ownership to the Gibson Guitar Company. During the “Norlin Era“, Gibson Les Paul body designs were greatly altered, most notably, the change to the neck volute. Because the Les Paul had the reputation of having an easily broken neck joint, the volute strengthened the neck where it joined the headstock to avert breakage. To further increase the strength, the neck woods were changed from mahogany to a three-piece maple design. The LP body was changed from a one-piece mahogany with a maple top into multiple slabs of mahogany with multiple pieced maple tops. This is referred to as “multipiece” construction, and sometimes incorrectly referred to as a “pancake” body. The expression “pancake body” actually refers to a body made of a thin layer of maple sandwiched between two slabs of mahogany, with a maple cap. The grain of the maple was placed at 90 degrees to that of the mahogany. The “pancake”-like layers are clearly visible when looking at the edge of the guitar. This process is also known as “crossbanding”, and was done for strength and resistance to cupping/warping. Crossbanding was phased out by 1977.
It has a solid poplar body with a maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, and based on the early reviews of the Epiphone Les Paul SL, the fit, finish and general playability are all pretty good. It’s loaded up with Epiphone’s reliable tune-o-matic bridge, a volume and tone knob, as well as a three-way selector switch to toggle your pickups and dial in tone. The hardware does feel admittedly cheap, but the general consensus is that this guitar ships well-made, well-setup and more than appropriate for a first-time player.
Martin’s first era of flirtation with electrics ended with its GTs, and, in terms of American production, wouldn’t resume until a decade later. However, in 1970 Martin joined the growing list of American manufacturers to begin importing guitars made in Japan, introducing its Sigma series. In around 1973, Martin, like competitors Guild and Gibson, began importing a line of Sigma solidbody electrics made in Japan by Tokai.
8. Fender Champion 40-watt 1x12 ($179.99): If you are looking for a great introduction into the world of Fender tone, you need to look no further than the Fender Champion 40. This solid state amp with Fender classic styling allows you access to a variety of on-board effects like Vibratone, tremolo, delay and many more. The two amp channels allow you to switch between Fender Blackface clean or a variety of different amp voicings, accessing the sounds of other Fender amp greats. The ability to add a footswitch pedal allows you to switch channels and effects with great ease at the tap of a button. There’s a reason why Fender is the go-to company for many of those in the music community.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: Black - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Lo-Pro Edge - Hardware: 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: DiMarzio - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: White
Trim:  Heel cap: ebony. Fingerboard: ebony bound in white celluloid with scalloped lower end; 24 frets under A and D, 21 nickel-silver frets under G and C; single abalone dots behind 5th, 7th, 9th, 10th (slightly larger), and 15th frets; double mother-of-pearl dots behind 12th fret. Nut: bone. Bridge: mahogany capped with ebony; nickel-silver-plated steel screws to adjust bridge height and pickup contact. Tuners: six nickel-plated steel, worm-gear machine tuners by Grover with convex head surfaces and decoratively cut plate outline. Endpin: black bakelite; extends through tailpiece. Pick guard: imitation tortoise shell plastic raised on wood brace affixed to top with two steel dome-headed screws. Lacquer: dark orange-brown sunburst.
By the turn of the century, new-metal grinders and post-grunge plodders had given loud guitars a bad reputation. Then Jack White hit the reset button. With each savage riff, he reconnected hard rock and roots music and showed that a blues-based band could escape what he calls "note-pushing Stratocaster white-blues bullshit." And he didn't let his analog leanings prevent him from ingenious use of a DigiTech Whammy pedal – the secret behind the faux-bass thunder of "Seven Nation Army" and the screaming leads of songs like "Ball and Biscuit."
This is where the roads came back together. Kaman continued to play guitar during his building of the helicopter business. He kept his guitars hanging on the wall, instead of in the case, so he could grab one if he felt like playing. As a result he ended up with lots of cracked backs, including one on a favorite Martin. Charles traveled down to Nazareth to get the guitar repaired and Fred Martin gave him a factory tour.
As a musician for 50 years and a custom builder for 30 years I definitely believe that wood choice has an effect on the tone and sound characteristics of an electric guitar. In my younger years as a cabinet maker, I was helping install a large church pipe organ (Cassavan I believe). The installer from Montreal and I had some discussions about wood and specifically wood properties best for certain applications. He told me that they used poplar for the spacers between the organ pipes because as a good tone wood, sound did not bleed from one pipe to another which is very important with pipe organs. They are the oldest and I believe the largest pipe organ manufacturer in the world and have done a lot of trial and error in this area according to the installer as to what wood works best. I happen to agree with them and agree that poplar is an excellent tone wood and works very well in guitars. Jackson guitars use poplar in there guitar bodies and is a great sounding tone wood. I use it a lot in my custom guitar because of the nice tone it produces.
We saved the most affordable amplifier for the last. This Donner electric guitar amp might have only 10-watts, but it does not lack other features. The controls include Gain, boost Select Switch, Volume, Treble, Middle, Bass and are pretty intuitive. The tone is clean and damn big for such a small model. Other than that this model also has 3-Band EQ, 1/8″ Auxiliary Input Jack for Jam-Along with Media Player and, of course, the handy-dandy Headphone Output Jack for Silent Practice (unless you want to be evicted from your apartment for practicing days on end). Best practice amps are not best just because you can practice in your basement and never move the thing. They are pretty functional and easy to carry around. That’s why Donner put durable, hard material on the edges of the amp and a pad of rubber makes it more sturdy. With that your amp will be pretty much indestructible.
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
Processors, on the other hand, comprise an entirely different water heating appliance filled with piscean vertebrates, as they tend not to need any of the dry sound, other than in a few specialist applications. As a rule, processors such as EQ and compression are connected only via track, bus or master insert points — at least until you have the necessary experience to understand why you might want to break the rules once in a while. Having got that off my chest, let's look at some specific effects (we'll look more closely at processors another time).
He was barely known for decades after his 1938 death. But the 29 songs Robert Johnson recorded in 1936 and 1937 became holy writ to rock guitarists from Clapton to Dylan. They were dazzled by the way he made a guitar sound like an ensemble – slide and rhythm parts yelping in dialogue, riffs emerging from the mist. Dylan remembered playing King of the Delta Blues Singers, the 1961 LP that rescued Johnson from obscurity: "The vibrations from the loudspeaker made my hair stand up. The stabbing sounds… could almost break a window."

Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
If you feel that you must attempt a setup on your own, and you have a suitably worthless guitar to work with, then there are a few pieces of advice that you should know. When adjusting the truss rod on any guitar (this changes the bend or warp in the guitar neck) you want to move in small, one quarter or less turns. Over-tightening the truss rod will lead to a back-bend which can permanently destroy your guitar’s neck. Loosen the rod to bring it from this kind of a bend to flat. From there, you will want a slight amount of sag in the guitar neck to allow the strings room to vibrate. Intonation on an electric guitar is achieved by making sure that the pitch of the note when a string is struck open matches the pitch of the note as struck at the twelfth fret of that string (one octave higher). If the note at the twelfth fret is higher, the string should be slightly loosened at the bridge (achieved by moving the saddle towards the neck). The opposite is true for flat sounding notes at the twelfth fret. It is best to use a high quality tuner when intonating an electric guitar.
This thing has taken quite a rap from what I've seen. People griping about it not being as good as the previous model. I don't know much about the other model, I didn't have one. So, I'm unbiased. I've had tons of peddles, singles and multi fx. I absolutely love this! I've been playing for over 20 years on stage. I'm a worship leader at a big Church. This is great for replacing my single peddles. I thought it was very comparable in sound. I use it through an American Peavey classic 30 with an English Celestian speaker. It rocks, period. I think the sound quality is great. I don't need tons of options. I hate too many. I like have the excellent fewer options. They are great! I love how easy it is, I had it figured out right away. I've used both. On stage and studio. This is ... full review

If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
Guitar amplifier modeling: Amplifier modeling is a digital effect that replicates the sound of various amplifiers, most often vintage analog "tube" amps and famous brands of speaker cabinets (e.g., the Ampeg SVT 8x10" bass cabinet). Sophisticated modeling effects can simulate different types of speaker cabinets (e.g., the sound of an 8x10" cabinet) and miking techniques. A rotary speaker simulator mimics the doppler and chorus effect sound of a vintage Leslie speaker system by replicating its volume and pitch modulations, overdrive capacity and phase shifts.[95]
In January 1986, Gibson changed ownership and began manufacturing a range of varied Les Paul models to suit different user needs. The 1980s also saw the end to several design characteristics that were classic to the Les Paul, including the volute and maple neck. However, due to consumer demand, the Gibson Les Paul guitar is available today in an array of choices, ranging from guitars equipped with modern digital electronics to classic re-issue models built to match the look and specifications of the guitar’s earliest production runs from 1952 to 1960.

   I am now building several models which I offer as my signature work. I've always had a special affinity for archtop guitars, but as you'll see in this website, I will go wherever the creative impulse takes me. The instruments I am building now are a distillation of the best design ideas I've found in classic instruments, re-imagined and evolved into higher form and function, as fine tools for discerning artists. 
There is no way to indicate strumming patterns or the duration of notes. Take our examples above. If you know these two songs, you can quickly figure out how to play these passages. But imagine that you don't know them. How long do you hold the C chord at the beginning of Silent Night? How long do you play the notes for Day Tripper? The only indication in Silent Night is the inclusion of lyrics. For Day Tripper, the distance between the numbers gives you minimal information about note duration, but you could never reproduce the riff if you didn't hear someone else play it.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.

SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .

Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.


Also worth an honourable mention is the iconic Gibson Hummingbird, a square-shoulder dreadnought named after the bird which Gibson best felt described its unique qualities. The Hummingbird is one of those unique things in that it’s an acoustic guitar which eschewed the industry-standard natural wood finish of around 98% of its peers in favour of a cheery sunburst finish more commonly seen on Gibson’s now famous electric guitars like the Les Paul and ES-335.
A combo amplifier is a unit in which both the amp and speaker is integrated. You plug a guitar into one of these, turn it on and you are ready to play. The obvious benefit of a combo is that you have everything you need in one standalone unit, while the sound tends to be optimized by the manufacturer to be the best it can be – there’s no worrying about matching it with a good speaker. Combo amps also tend to be cheaper than heads and, as such, are excellent for beginners. While some are very capable of small to medium-sized performance, the drawback is that combos are limited in power compared to a head. They also tend to be much heavier, which can be a pain when regularly transporting it.
Reverb's Free Online Price Guide: This specialty vintage guitar site is one of the largest, most carefully maintained used vintage guitar and bass shops on the internet. It sells hundreds of used guitars and basses of all makes and models. It offers a free online Price Guide where you simply type in the model of instrument you have, and Reverb will analyze its vast database of transactions and give you a large result filled with prices. This gives you a real-time look at the market and where your particular kind of instrument fits in. It is a living, breathing blue book, and (the best part) it is free.

Flanger – Before digital recording was the standard, a common trick used by artists was to touch one of a tape recorder’s reels to slow it down, then let it go so it would catch up with the main track. The result was a sound that could be subtly thicker or downright unrecognizable, and it’s the effect that flangers are designed to reproduce. You can hear Jimmy Page’s use of a flanger on Nobody’s Fault But Mine and Kashmir, by Led Zeppelin.
Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. This type of guitar was manufactured beginning in 1931 by Electro String Instrument Corporation under the direction of Adolph Rickenbacher and George Beauchamp. Their first design was built by Harry Watson, a craftsman who worked for Electro String. This new guitar which the company called "Rickenbackers" was the first of its kind.
The Super Chromonica 270 Deluxe is an updated improvement on the Super Chromonica, featuring tighter reedplate fixtures, thicker reedplates, round holes in its chrome-plated mouthpiece, a smoother slide mechanism which can be remounted for left-handed use, and a round-edged comb for more comfortable holding.[36] The Deluxe is also available with a gold-plated mouthpiece and coverplates, known as the Super Chromonica Gold.[37]
These 1950s models featured the thicker, more sustaining tone of Gibson’s humbucker pickups with the original units known as “Patent Applied For” (PAF) pickups. These PAFs were designed by Seth Lover while working for Gibson in 1955 (U.S. Patent 2,896,491), and debuted on Les Pauls in 1957. This innovation became a standard pick up design for Gibson, and subsequently, many other guitar companies followed suit, outfitting their electrics with copycat versions of the humbucking pickup altered to avoid infringing Gibson’s patent. Gretsch had their Filtertron pickups, and when Fender entered the humbucker market in 1972, it was with the radically different Fender Wide Range pickup. “Standard” humbuckers from other guitar manufacturers and third party replacement pickups from the likes of DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan were only offered after Gibson’s patent had expired.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
We are looking at plenty of audio boom here, secured by the mahogany hollow body. The rest of the mix also includes a strong mahogany neck with an attached rosewood fingerboard, a pack of 22 frets and classic white dot markers. Audio versatility is pretty high here, and the guitar is capable of tackling everything from light jazz tones to alternative rock groove.
Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.
These guitars appear to have lasted through 1989 or so. In 1990 the Stinger line shrank dramatically. Three guitars and two basses were listed in the Guitar World 1990-91 Guitar Buyer’s Guide. The three guitars in ’90 were the SSX, SPX and SSL. These were basically Strats (gone were the arched tops). The SSX now had three single-coils and fixed bridge/tailpiece. The SPX offered two humbuckers with a coil tap switch. The SSL had one humbucker and one single-coil, with a tap on the ‘bucker, and a traditional vibrato.

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Yamaha is considered as among largest music instruments selling company in India, which provides a wide variety of guitars. S series, Yamaha RGX, RGZ electronic series, SG series (SG 5,SG 7) etc are the best models of guitar. Now they become the world’s largest manufacturer of a full line of musical instruments. They earned good name by providing super quality guitar at an affordable price. Available price is Rs. 8,000/- onwards (approx).
Immediately you can see that this unit is on the larger side, measuring 25 inches (63.5 cm) across, and weighing about 11 lbs (5 kg). If you’re concerned about portability, we noticed one of the most purchased items together with the HD500X is this case, which comes highly recommended and will keep your multi-effects pedal safe during transit and storage. The Line 6 POD HD500X itself has superb build quality. It has a very nice metal chassis, and heavy duty construction. The build quality probably doesn't get much better than this in a multi-fx unit (we say it is a step above the Zoom G3X). We won’t spend a ton of time talking about the inputs/outputs and controls available on the Line 6 POD HD500X, since you can very easily discern that from photos of it. We will say that of all the multi-effects pedals on our top 5 list, this is the most robust. The inputs/outputs cover above and beyond what you probably need. You’ve got your basic inputs and outputs, USB 2.0 so you can use it as a USB interface and for DAW integration, MIDI in/out/thru, FX send and return, AUX input, balanced XLR outputs, integrated mic preamp, and more. In short, however you want to integrate the HD500X into your bedroom, music studio, or live setup, there’s a very good chance you’re covered.
If you are using the bs-16i or similar app try changing the Rx. Channel for say the first 8 channels all to 1. You will then have 8 easily accessible sounds to play at the touch of the Solo/Mute button. You can then mix for instance piano and pads together. Alternatively you could leave the channels 1 to 16 and use channel select to choose your favorite sounds.  To play two sounds together just put them on the same channel. This is handy for pianos where you can add the level of resonance you prefer. When layering sounds with piano choose the non resonance piano versions (available in all the SoundFonts) to avoid lack of polyphony problems.
Some people just need to play loud. It’s all they know and it’s all they want to know. If that’s the case, you might want to invest in some acoustic foam, and begin to soundproof your practice space. This will not only keep the sound level to a minimum for people in the other rooms, it will also represent the first step in transforming your space into a legitimate in-home studio.
Fender also supply a variety of signature models, each with specifications similar to those used by a well-known performer. Custom Artist guitars are the Custom Shop versions of the Artist Series line, which significantly differ from the standard production models in terms of quality and construction, making these instruments much more expensive. As well as the other Custom Shop instruments, the Custom Artist guitars are available either as Team Built or Master Built items, some being exact replications of the specific artist’s original instrument, better known as “Tribute” series (featuring various degrees of “relicing”, such as Closet Classic, New Old Stock, Relic and Super Relic treatments, depending the model). Artists with models available in the signature range include:
The positions (that is where on the fretboard the first finger of the left hand is placed) are also not systematically indicated, but when they are (mostly in the case of the execution of barrés) these are indicated with Roman numerals from the first position I (index finger of the left hand placed on the 1st fret: F-B flat-E flat-A flat-C-F) to the twelfth position XII (the index finger of the left hand placed on the 12th fret: E-A-D-G-B-E; the 12th fret is placed where the body begins) or even higher up to position XIX (the classical guitar most often having 19 frets, with the 19th fret being most often split and not being usable to fret the 3rd and 4th strings).
When you’re talking Gibson, mahogany is frequently going to factor into the brew. And that’s a wonderful thing. This is the classic ingredient of the multi-wood body, and one of the most common neck woods also, but is very often used on its own in single-wood bodies. On its own in an SG, Les Paul Special, or Les Paul Junior, mahogany’s voice is characteristically warm and somewhat soft, but extremely well balanced, with good grind and bite. It has the potential for good depth, with full (though not super-tight) lows, velvety highs, and a slightly compressed response. Overall, think round, open, warm.
Looking at the front (or top rather) panel of the Boss ME-80 is where it gets interesting. Don’t let the sheer number of knobs intimidate you. Shaping your tone with the ME-80 is a very tactile experience, just like you would if you had a pedalboard full of pedals. The ME-80 is made for the guitarist that doesn’t necessarily want to lug around (or spend money on) a large pedal collection, but still loves the feeling of turning knobs and instantly hearing results. The interface is actually pretty easy to understand. Every major section is surrounded by a white border, and to design a sound (a.k.a. patch) you just move through the sections and set the effects to your heart’s content. We should mention that the Boss ME-80 has 59 different effects and nine guitar preamps which you can use. The first section labeled PREAMP is where you set your amplifier model, and should feel familiar if you’ve ever messed with a guitar amp. Next you have an EQ section, REVERB, COMP, OD/DS, MOD, and DELAY. You can look at the front panel for yourself in a closeup photo to see the various effects available within each of these groupings. The 8 black footswitches along the bottom are what you use to switch effects on and off, as well as move through banks and presets. They’re not your traditional stompbox footswitch, but they feel pretty nice. As is the norm with the larger multi-effects floor units, the ME-80 incorporates an expression pedal, which is assignable to different effects via the knob next to it. Very easy to use, very intuitive.
I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!
Editorial comment – I advise folks when considering fretwork to consider not choosing a size or leveling operation resulting in less than .040” height if they want to play a style with frequent fret hand slurring, i.e. rock, blues, shred etc.  Low fret height is less capable of sustaining a reasonable fret leveling in the future, making it that much closer to refret time.  You don’t have to choose a very tall size if that is uncomfortable for you, but only choose a low height if that is really what you want and are accustomed to.

Hi Timothy, sorry it took a while for me to respond. Yes, from your first statement it sounds like you’ve correctly understood the operation of ‘normal’ guitar pickup selector switches (i.e. standard 3 and 5 position), the wiper contacts overlap as they move across each other. Unfortunately I’ve never seen anything that matches your 4 pick-up idea, if I were you I’d start looking at the 5-position mega switches which have lots of possibilities but can get pretty complicated. Good luck!
Jump up ^ Hicks, Michael (2000). Sixties Rock: Garage, Psychedelic, and Other Satisfactions. University of Illinois Press. p. 18. ISBN 0-252-06915-3. While most of the documentation on early fuzz boxes has been discarded or lost, the earliest such devices appear to have been introduced in 1962. The best known from that year was the Maestro Fuzztone FZ-1...
Footswitches allow for handsfree control of your multi-effects pedal, so having more of them is good, as long as you're OK with the added bulk and weight that they require. Some processors have a stompbox mode feature that lets you utilize footswitches much like a traditional pedalboard, but most of the time the switches serve as preset selectors, along with other secondary uses.
All Vintage V6’s offer an extraordinarily high level of specification including the revered Wilkinson WVC original specification vibrato featuring authentic bent steel saddles for that classic sparkle and tone; precision machined pivot points for total ‘return to pitch’ accuracy and a stagger-drilled sustain block to prevent string hang-up. An adjustable, ‘vintage bend’ push-in arm completes this definitive vibrato system..
Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.
And then of course, what’s really important, the tone, feels like it’s coming from a much more expensive guitar. Indeed, only real enthusiasts are likely to be able to easily tell the difference in sound between a Gibson Dove and the Epiphone Dove pro. If you don’t want to spend too much, then you must not overlook this guitar. If you like Epiphones as pretty as this one, you may wish to look into the Epiphone Hummingbird Pro, epiphone ej200sce or the Epiphone pr4e acousticelectric guitar player package.
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I like...So fun...I am a big fan of the call of duty games - this one is a step above my son loves it and I do to but he is a lot better at it than I am - it is a challange for someone new to playstation...Well first starters died about ten times just beginning in campaign and yea even though I have it on regular mode it still is a challenge for me signs of I'm getting to old for this lol but there snippers on story mode when you concentrate it slows down all the enemies but give it a shot your self I like it
Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.
Some of the earliest electric guitars, amps-in-cases, pickups under the bridge, fiberglass guitars, built-in electronic vibratos. Sound curious enough for you? The subject of Supro guitars and amplifiers represents a profitable avenue for exploration by collectors and enthusiasts interested in the many curious and significant byways off the guitar superhighway, which can be enjoyed without having an oil sheik’s bankroll. While National resonator guitars have received superb attention by Bob Brozman, little has been written about this mysterious corner of the Valco universe. Well, with a little help from our friends (in particular, catalogs and invaluable information supplied by Mike Newton, Jim Dulfer, and Michael Lee Allen), let’s set the record straight.
Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.
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The company initially manufactured only traditional folk instruments,[citation needed] but eventually grew to make a wide variety of stringed instruments, including violins, cellos, banjos, upright basses—and a variety of different types of guitars, including classical guitars, lap steel guitars, semi-acoustic guitars, and solid body electrics. Some of Kay's lower-grade instruments were marketed under the Knox and Kent brand names.

Despite what appears now to a somewhat dated design (all the quasi-organic shapes inspired by Alembic at the time are tough to love with the passage of time), Martin’s 18 Series electrics are actually quite comfortable and yield a versatile number of useful sounds. The neck profile is quite round, not unlike many acoustics, but very easy to play. The frets are small and squarish, which makes them a bit awkward for blues-style bending.
Beginners want to hear the changes in their sound and get the blues, funk, and rock genres on their guitar. The DigiTech Element XP comprises essential features that enable a beginner guitarist to get more out of their guitar while still maintaining quality. These units also have durable metal foot-switches and an inclusive power supply. Other features include:
Epiphone's Les Paul series were originally designed to allow the budget crowd to experience this awesome guitar without investing thousands of dollars. That's something that hasn't changed to this day. The Epiphone Special II is among the most basic Les Paul designs on offer, making it perfect for beginners. We've chosen this particular guitar because of its neutral configuration which will keep up with you even after you've built plenty of skill.
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
Twelve and fourteen fret steel string models from the mid 1920's to 1944 are the most collectible of all Martin instruments. They have excellent craftsmenship, sound, and playability, and these model are of great interest to collectors and players. Some musicians prefer the sound and feel of 12 fret models, and these are close in value to 14 fret models of the same size and period. The larger size 14 fret 000 and "D" sizes from the 1930's are considered by most collectors and musicians to represent the golden era of the flat top Martin. Note war-time models (1941 to 1944) aren't quite as desirable as the 1930's models. Lack of materials, manpower, and general social uncertainty during the war contributed to this.
@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
While a straight DI approach can work for clean sounds, simply plugging a guitar into an overdrive pedal and then routing the output of the pedal into your recording system will sound unnaturally thin and raspy because there are no speakers to take away the unwanted high end, but that hasn't stopped some people using it as a 'trademark' sound! For a more conventional sound, a speaker simulator is needed to filter out the unwanted higher harmonics. A passive speaker simulator, such as the original Palmer Junction box can be placed directly after an overdrive pedal or a regular guitar amp preamp output, but it will need to be recorded using a mic input rather than a line input (passive filtering always results in a reduction in level). Active equivalents (usually battery or phantom powered) are also available, which may offer a greater range of tonalities.
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
Introduced in the late '90s, the PRS SE line was the company's entry into the already tough entry level market competition. With it, one can own a PRS guitar at a much lower price point, with the main difference being the country of origin, which for the case of the SE is Korea. The SE Standard line takes affordability a step further by having the production done in Indonesia, while still maintaining high quality standards.
The 2008 Les Paul Standard is outfitted with locking tuners from Grover, which deliver ease of use through a standard tuner and positive locking mechanism that securely locks each string in place. Simply insert each string through the string hole, turn the dial on the bottom of the tuner to lock the string, and begin tuning. Each string can be tuned to pitch in less than one complete revolution of the post. These Grover machine heads feature completely sealed components with an improved 18:1 tuning ratio.
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.

You have to admire a YouTube channel and accompanying website that’s taken one guy on his own over fifteen years to build and offers hundreds of different lessons at all the various levels. The great thing about Justin is he gives off a cool, enthusiastic vibe all the time whether he’s teaching a basic chord for beginners or taking seasoned players through a complex solo.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 6 frets (sometimes pearl, sometimes ivoroid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
as an old school country picker i prefer the fender tele for the crisp twangy sound and also the feel of the fingerboard. I find a strat to be poorly designed with the volume control badly in the way to say nothing about the clumsy tremelo arm. I have modified some strats and made them playable for my slyle.A humbucker in the neck position on a tele is rite sharp for the blues.As for gibson they make a fine instrument,just not my style.
You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
The best way of working out which contact is which is to use a multimeter and see for yourself which contacts are connected to each other in the 5 switch positions. On the Fender-type and some import-type switches you’re given a good clue because you can actually see the mechanism or see through the switch casing. Watch this as you move the switch through the 5 positions – you can see which contact is always in circuit (the wiper) and which ones are in circuit in each position (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). This method of visualising the switch also helps when it comes to fitting the switch to your pickguard and getting it the right way around! Now, where does the wire from the bridge pickup go again…
Anything for which they are wired and/or programmed.  One great example is my first real guitar, a Carvin V220.  It had two humbuckers in a sorta heavy angular gibson explorer body.  Each pickup had volume and tone with a 3 way selector for either or both pickups to be on.  In addition, you could toggle switches to split coils on the humbucker to do a good approximation of a single coil pickup.  Further, you could toggle in/out of phase to get a Peter Green tone or other effects.   Tom anderson guitars have great configurations.  I have gone to lighter strats in recent years and usually replace the pickups with handwounds and customize my 5way switch depending on the guitar.   I love true single coils except that I prefer a humbucker in the bridge. 
Thank you for supporting Ibanez Collectors Forum. Please help your favorite Ibanez guitar site as we endeavor to bring you the latest information about Ibanez custom vintage electric and acoustic guitars. Here you can discuss ibanez, guitars, ibanez guitars, basses, acoustics, acoustic, mandolins, electric guitar, electric bass, amplifiers, effect pedals, tuners, picks, pickups.
First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)

While the modifications described above have all been passive (i.e. they don't require an external power source), active electronics considerably increase the number of possible wiring options. These can range from simple preamps that offer a volume boost and buffer the instrument's signal (to prevent loss of higher frequencies in longer cable runs), to multi-band equalisers and more.[30][31] Enterprising guitarists have even built entire effects processors into guitars, such as the Korg Kaoss Pad.[32]

I’m going to be doing a pickup upgrade in the next few months on a Strat-style HSS. I have an idea, maybe a crazy idea, about how I’d like to wire it but so far I have been unable to find any indication that it is even possible. This site seems like the best place to get an answer. The single coils in my guitar will be replaced with another set of single coils (Seymour Duncan SLS-1 lipsticks). The humbucker I plan on installing (DiMarzio Tone Zone) is capable of being coil-split, which I want to take advantage of BUT I would rather not install a push/pull pot. My wiring idea… Toggle Position: 1) Full Humbucker, 2) North coil only of humbucker for single coil performance, 3) middle coil only, 4) middle and neck, and 5) neck only. Is this even possible using the 5-position toggle switch I already have, or is there no way to do it besides using a push/pull pot or installing an additional mini-toggle?

Honestly, a couple of years back I never looked at Fender for acoustic guitars because everyone was always talking about Taylors, Gibsons, Martins, Takamines, Paul Reed Smiths etc. Despite being a very good electric guitar company not to mention the inventor of the no. 1 guitar in the world, the strat, everyone always looked Fender, alongside with Ibanez and Washburn (good electric guitar brands) as bad acoustic manufacturers. I was one of them too. For me, Washburn and Ibanez might be a good budget acoustic guitar manufacturer but they don't deserve to be high in this 'top acoustic guitar brands' list. But for Fender, these past few months my mindset about them changed. I never realized how authentic and good sounding fender acoustics were way back then but I'm happy now that I changed my mind about them. I love them now. It's not about having vintage acoustics, or having high end prices. Fender don't set their prices as high as taylor, martin or gibson but they must not be judged ...more

I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.


Guitar chords are usually represented by the name of the root note, and the scale it is based on, such as A Major, written as simply A. An A chord built on a minor scale is called A Minor, and written as Am. An A chord built with a 7th is called A7, and so on... Diagrams are used to show how the chord is actually to be played on the guitar, with finger positions mapped out. For a complete overview about chord structure, check this guitar chords formula chart.
Adding effects at the mixing stage gives the engineer greater creative flexibility, but if the guitarist needs to hear the effects to play, then you may get a better artistic performance by recording them with the take. All I'd say on this point is that editing is much more difficult if the sound is recorded with delay or reverb, so an alternative is not to record these effects initially, but still add them to the monitor mix for the player's benefit during performance. Effects like chorus and wah-wah can be recorded straight off, if required, as they don't affect the ease with which a part can be edited. Ultimately, the performance is what really counts, so compromise in favour of the player's artistic needs rather than your technical needs where a choice has to be made.

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So much has changed since our last refresh – where do we begin! First we answered some common questions that you might have. Then we reviewed our top ten chart and individual categories, and removed several older models including the Gibson Les Paul Faded T 2017, Epiphone’s G-310 SG, and the ESP MH-50. We added many others including one of the greatest guitars ever made, the Ernie Ball Music Man John Petrucci Majesty Monarchy, the premium Fender Eric Clapton Stratocaster, the Yamaha RevStar RS420 and Mark Holcomb’s signature PRS MHHB2 SE.
If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.

Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.

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SCALE LENGTH What is a "Scale Lenght?" The scale lenght is the lenght the string travels between the nut at the top of the fretboard and the bridge at the mid section of the base of the guitar. To determine the scale length of your guitar you would measure from the front part of the nut where it meets the fretboard to the center of the 12th fret on the neck and multiplying that by 2. Add about 3/16" to that on the low e string and taper that to about 1/16" added to the high e string. This is called compensation and that is why you see that tapered line on a bridge. Go to Stewart MacDonnaldfor more info. They also have a Fret Calculator that helps you determine your particular scale length in addition to a page dedicated to helping you out with tons of free info for your guitar building projects.The fret is the metal of nickle wire that is raised up off the fretboard. I would suggest buying a neck that has been pre made from a manufacturer that fits the design concept that you want to go with. I bought mine from Guitar Parts USA for about $70. You can pay anywhere from $50 to $300 for a neck at online retailers, but surf around and make sure you are satisfied with what you get. Guitarpartsusa will tell you to buy an expensive neck if you are building an expensive guitar, not a $70 neck. But for mine the $70 neck works just fine. Once you get the neck in and you determine what the scale length is you can lay it all out on paper. I recomend buying all your hardware, pickups and knobs before you draw your final template. This will allow to place everything where you want it and know what size holes to drill for the electronics and how big the cavites will need to be for them and the pickups.
The origins of the modern guitar are not known with certainty. Some believe it is indigenous to Europe, while others think it is an imported instrument.[32] Guitar-like instruments appear in ancient carvings and statues recovered from Egyptian, Sumerian, and Babylonian civilizations. This means that the contemporary Iranian instruments such as the tanbur and setar are distantly related to the European guitar, as they all derive ultimately from the same ancient origins, but by very different historical routes and influences.
Some areas of the top’s lacquer finish have been peeled away from the long-ago removal of a few stickers and black electrical tape (the previous owner admitted to decorating the guitar with the black stripes in a tiger-theme). The guitar plays well, with a good neck angle and decent original frets. The guitar was just set up this past month by the pros at the renowned Guitar Factory in Orlando(http://www.guitarfactory.us/). It now plays great and needs nothing – they do great work! Pickups read 4.12 (neck) and 4.20 (bridge), and pots and switches work well. And, very important to note on vintage Gretsch guitars, there is NO binding rot. Also includes the Original Hard Shell Case.
It was shortly after the debut of the first Supros that National Dobro entered a period of major transition. By 1935, at least, the company had decided to abandon the sunny beaches of L.A. for the freezing winters of Chicago, then the principal home of America’s instrument makers, and not coincidentally, America’s giant mass merchandisers Montgomery Ward and Sears. Both Wards and Sears had been offering National and Dobro resonator guitars since the late ’20s. Being in Chicago had the obvious advantages of proximity to the resources surrounding the business and being next door to the world’s two largest retailers of the day. The move to the Midwest began early 1936 and took almost a year and a half. Throughout most of ’36, the majority of production continued in L.A.

Joe is a musician, engineer, and producer in NYC. Over the years, as a small studio operator and freelance engineer, he's made recordings of all types from music & album production to v/o & post. He's also taught all aspects of recording and music technology at several NY audio schools, and has been writing articles for Recording magaz... Read More
Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar The Gibson Les Paul Studio electric guitar has been around since 1983. For 2018 Gibson upgraded one of its most well-loved models, fitting it with cryogenically treated frets for greater fret durability, adding fingerboard binding and giving it a Slim Taper neck profile. The core Les Paul tones and quality hardware and electronics are still there, of course.
Amazing unit! I loved using my POD XT Live for years and wanted to upgrade. This unit totally exceeded my expectations. Sounds amazing and it's incredibly flexible for routing processing and effects chains. They built the hardware better and it's got a better set of pedal buttons too. Absolutely recommend! (Plus, they announced at NAMM that there will be more model packs, so that's great too!)

• Guitar : ELECTRIC SUNBURST captures the sound of a classic guitar, chosen with its rich, warm and versatile sound. The continuous signal path has been retained throughout, including high-quality cables, vintage tube preamps and high-resolution transducers to ensure that every nuance of this legendary instrument was accurately fixed. Since the string holder and neck were recorded separately, you can fully control the balance of the mix. Moreover, a condenser microphone was installed above the strings to capture subtle sound nuances and add punch and realism.
The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge: Double Locking - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Alnico Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Pearl White, Pearl Black
I got this one because my 18-year-old Takamine G-series has some serious fret wear, and a slightly warped neck, even with the truss rod maxed out, and will cost more to repair/refurbish than this one cost outright. Hence, the action is quite high, and it's hard to play bar chords higher than the 3rd fret, and there's some noticeable buzz and rattle unless I hold my mouth just right...
You can assemble your own system from disparate components, hardware and software, and spend a lot of time and confusion getting them all to work together. But the easiest and ultimately most cost-effective route is to purchase one of the least-expensive Apple Macintosh computers, all of which come with Apple's free GarageBand software installed. This will provide you with a wealth of tools for amp emulation and effects in an integrated environment for multi-track recording and editing (and it includes a wealth of drum machine, synthesizers, and sampled instrument libraries as well.) If you outgrow Apple GarageBand, you can suppliment it by purchasing Apple MainStage for $30 and/or Apple Logic Pro for $200.
Effects units are available in a variety of formats or form factors. Stompboxes are primarily used units in live performance and (in some cases) studio recordings. Rackmount devices saw a heavy usage during the later 20th century, due to their advanced processing power and desirable tones. However, by the 21st century, with the advant of digital Plug-Ins and more powerful Stompboxes for live usage, the need and practicality of rackmounted effects units went down, and as such, prices of rack effects have diminished due to lower usage.[5] An effects unit can consist of analog or digital circuitry or a combination of the two. During a live performance, the effect is plugged into the electrical "signal" path of the instrument. In the studio, the instrument or other sound-source's auxiliary output is patched into the effect.[6][7] Form factors are part of a studio or musician's outboard gear.[8]

In 2013 Vox released updated "G2" versions of the 15 watt and 50 watt heads, and added a combo version of the NT15H-G2 called the NT15C1. Compared to the original NT15H, the NT15H-G2 adds a foot-switchable Girth channel (which first appeared on the original NT50H) with an additional 12AX7 in the preamp section, a "Dark" switch, a digital reverb, and an effects loop. However, Vox did not retain the pentode/triode output section modes from the "G1" version that allowed for full or half power operation as well as a broader tonal palette. The NT50H-G2 differs from the original NT50H with the additions of an XLR D.I. out and a digital reverb, and the deletions of one 12AX7 preamp tube and the "Tight" switch. It also appears the FX loop is no longer bypassable. Gone is the bright chrome look of the "G1" models as both heads received new cosmetics in the form of a black mirror finish on the tube cage and a new suitcase-type handle. Vox also released "G2" versions of their matching cabs: the V112NT-G2 (one Celestion G12M Greenback speaker), and the V212NT-G2 (two Celestion G12H 70th anniversary model speakers), each also sporting the suitcase-type handle. The new NT15C1 combo combines an NT15H-G2 chassis with a single 16Ω 12” Celestion G12M Greenback speaker in a black tolex cabinet with a suitcase-type handle.


1953 "magic" spruce? Luthier Dana Bourgeois did an interview with C. F. Martin III in 1984. The interview was in preparation for an article by Eric Schoenberg and Bob Green on the history of the OM model and was published in the March 1985 issue of Guitar Player. Bourgeois was asked to sit in on the interview, and in the last two paragraphs of his recollections especially interesting: "One footnote that I do remember distinctly is that Mr. Martin said that in '52 or '53 the Martin Co. bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce in the form of government surplus of building material. Though he preferred Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-40s because all of the large stands had been decimated. Mr. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Red Adirondack Spruce than Sitka was. He could not, however, find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka." This nugget of information caught my attention because for many years I Of course, aside from the color of the tops, the anecdote does not in itself prove anything. But it at least suggests how the story might have gotten started.
All of the guitars on this list except for the Blueridge BR-160 are equipped with an electronics system that make them stage- and studio-ready. You can simply plug and play when you need to perform in front of an audience in a crowded or big venue where there’s a lot of ambient noise. If you don’t need amplification – for example if you’re just practicing at home – these guitars sound great unplugged as well.
Every amp will have a preamp and a power amp. These are often referred to as the preamp stage and power stage. The preamp picks up the signal from the guitar and boosts it so other parts of the preamp can manipulate it (this is where EQ and gain kick in). The power amp then takes that modified signal and boosts it to a level where the speakers can push it out. You will run into these terms most often with tube amps, as different tubes are installed in each of these stages.

OCTAVACIÓN (FAT20) Cada una de las silletas está provista de un tornillo de bloqueo para impedir todo movimiento. Para ajustar la octavación, afloje el tornillo de bloqueo de la silleta con una llave Allen de 2 mm. (D) Para ajustar la octavación, introduzca una llave Allen de 2,5 mm en el tornillo de la silleta situado en la parte posterior del trémolo.
Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.
Though pitch-shifting is an effect, it is easier to control when used via an insert point. However, if you need to use the effect on several tracks in varying amounts, you can use it via a send/return loop, providing the shifter is set to 100 percent wet. That way, you can adjust the effects depth for individual mix channels by using the send control feeding the pitch-shifter.
 Everybody needs to start somewhere. However, where you start often decides where you end up. For example, if you buy a bad guitar when you start playing, you are a lot more likely to stop playing, and if it happens, you wouldn't be buying any more guitars. We believe guitar manufacturers have a sort of duty to make and supply reliable guitars for beginners. Guitars at beginners' level are as important as high-end guitars for pro. This is where Smash comes in.
Gain is the strength of the electronic signal carrying your sound. A standalone gain booster is essentially just a preamp, and can be an effective way to overdrive the preamp section of your amp, creating easier musical-sounding breakup and increasing the amp's power. A gain booster in a stomp box lets you instantly boost your sound level for solos without altering your fundamental tone.
The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.

The twelve-string guitar is a simple variation of the normal six string design. Twelve-string guitars have six regular strings and a second set of thinner strings. Each string of the second set corresponds to the note of its regular string counterpart. The strings form pairs and therefore you play a twelve-string guitar in the same manner as you would a standard six-string.


It doesn't even seem to matter which kind of Guitar amp you have or when plugged into any PA system. This guitar is a keeper. it comes with Godin Nickel Strings which is why unplugged it may sound too tinny to some ears, but after changing to Elixer Acoustic Strings, it sounds much better unplugged and really shows off plugged in. It now can give my Acoustic six strings a real run for my attention. At gigs and open mics, people come up and ask,,,what the Heck is this Bruce? Looks and sounds amazing. My only wish is that it had the same Pick-up system as on my A6 Ultra, two separate Pick Ups and Controls and two 1/4 in outputs.

Hybrid picking is a technique that makes use of both the pick and the remaining pick hand fingers. On the surface, it’s more versatile than playing with just with a pick. Digging deeper, you’ll learn hybrid picking has the same, yet different mojo than fingerpicking as well. At the end of the day, this technique is a very powerful one that will enable you to play things that would be otherwise impossible. Be it oddly accented phrases to wide interval licks to more intricate chordal ideas, hybrid picking opens up in credible options.

If it helps, Schaller have very accurate drawings of all their hardware on their website. You can also get very good drawings of all Gotoh parts as well, but theirs are harder to find (hidden in the parent company's site and I can't recall the full details). It is worth having a look at those, and pay attention to the way the tuning posts are shaped. That radiused section turned into the post is important , it really helps lock the strings firmly.
A typical modern guitar tube amp has both a preamp stage and a master power amp output stage. The preamp section will be supplied with a set of smaller tubes (frequently 12AX7 or the lower-gain/lower noise 12AU7), and the power amp section has a set of large tubes (EL34, EL84, 6L6, etc.). The preamp controls input gain and typically provides treble, midrange and bass tone controls.
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review

R.E.M.'s guitarist was a less-is-more master who never needed much more than swarming melodies and spangled riffs. From the laser-guided arpeggios on "Radio Free Europe" to the supersize power chords of "The One I Love," his sound was both gorgeous and matter-of-factly aggressive – a DIY style that helped Eighties underground rockers push beyond punk rock. "They created 50,000 guitar bands after them," noted Billy Corgan, "America was inundated with jangly R.E.M. type bands."
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