“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”
Some amps have a bright cap on the volume pot. The purpose of this cap is to allow your amp to provide a bright, clear tone at lower settings on the volume pot. The more the pot is increased, the less effect the cap has. When the pot is turned all the way up, it should be completely out of the circuit. Like they do with a bright switch, drive pedals can interact with a bright cap and result in less-than-pleasant drive tones. If your amp has a bright cap and you don’t like the way it responds to some pedals, or you find it excessively edgy at low volumes, consider having a competent amp tech change the bright-cap value or remove it altogether. This can be a worthwhile and easily reversible mod.
The Squier Bullet Strat Hard Tail Brown Sun Burst is a fantastic option for beginner guitarists out there and those who need an affordable budget friendly option for recording or practising. This guitar makes our cheap electric guitars that don’t suck list thanks to its high-quality basswood body and comfortable “C” shape profile on the neck that is super comfortable to play. This high-quality guitar also includes a set of three standard single-coil strat pickups allowing you to mix up your sound via the 5-way pickup selector. Solid, chrome hardware and a hard tail bridge for added resonance finish off the guitar nicely whilst the budget friendly price tag makes it affordable for everyone. A Fender Stratocaster style guitar at a fraction of the cost.
Martin’s B series basses were big flat-tops with 34″-scale mahogany necks. Designed by Dick Boak, these ABGs used the same bodies as Martin’s Jumbo guitars; measuring 16″ wide with a depth of 4 7/8″, they were large enough to produce decent acoustic volume without being ungainly like other maker’s attempts. The top was solid spruce, the fingerboard was ebony, and the body was either solid East Indian Rosewood (B40) or solid flamed maple (B-65). A Fishman bridge-pickup system was available adding an “E” in the model number. Both basses were also available with fretless fingerboards.

:::I just bought one of these guitars at an auction. In Oregon U.S.A. It is a plank, with sunburst finish, 3 chrome toaster style pickups with one cover missing. The varnish has cracks in it like every other old Vox I have seen that date to the sixties or earlier. It has a white pick guard with 3 chrome knurled knobs and an old style switch that turns (not a flip switch) but is missing the knob that I assume is chrome like the 3 volume knobs. I haven't put strings on the guitar yet so I don't know if they are all volume or 1 volume and 2 tone. The roller/tremolo has VOX stamped in big letters and under that it says PAT.APP.FOR in smaller capitol letters. It has a plastic cover plate on the back that is stamped, Made In England. The neck is 19 fret with a fret just under the nut that has no use, as the string would never touch it and the neck is attached with a metal plate. Tuners are a single strap with gears steel not brass with plastic knobs. Just under the tuners on the back the headstock are the numbers 64523. A green VOX decal along with Shadow JMI Dartford Kent on the front. I was suprised to find this guitar, as I had never seen or heard of it before. I can't wait to play it and see how it stacks up to all the other VOX guitars I have and have played. Wish I could find out more about it but this is as close as I have come, so far.
For example, in the guitar (like other stringed instruments but unlike the piano), open-string notes are not fretted and so require less hand-motion. Thus chords that contain open notes are more easily played and hence more frequently played in popular music, such as folk music. Many of the most popular tunings—standard tuning, open tunings, and new standard tuning—are rich in the open notes used by popular chords. Open tunings allow major triads to be played by barring one fret with only one finger, using the finger like a capo. On guitars without a zeroth fret (after the nut), the intonation of an open note may differ from then note when fretted on other strings; consequently, on some guitars, the sound of an open note may be inferior to that of a fretted note.[37]

At the core of this pedal is the Line 6 HX technology, which emulates the behavior of actual amp and stompbox components. This means that instead of merely copying the sound, it recreates the entire pedal or amplifier in digital format, allowing the models to respond to guitar tone and adjustments much like the real thing. While it originally had 70 effects, firmware updates have raised this number to 104, which is more than enough to keep you busy for months, if not years. Amp, cab and mic models were also increased to 115. Since Line 6 is well known for providing updates, it is reasonable to expect more expansions in the future. It does everything that the Helix LT can, with some extras, most notable of which is the LED scribble strips for labeling each footswitch. The Helix Floor also comes with expanded input/output options to work with mics and other instruments.
In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.

I received a Dorado 12 string as a birthday present in the late 1990s, installed a passive pickup, and played it around the house and at small venues for fifteen years or more. For an all-laminate, smaller body 12 string with a trapeze bridge, it sounded great. The neck was comfortable, too. I had a 1965 Gibson B-25 12 for a few of those years, but the neck was way fatter than the Dorado, which I passed along to a friend in need. I can't say the Dorado sounded better than the Gibson, but it sure out-jangled it. Wish I still had it!
Compared with many of the guitar models on this list that have been around for half a century, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is still a baby. Ibanez introduced its Artcore line of semi and full hollow body electric guitars only in 2002. Nevertheless, the Artcore guitars have amassed a massive fan base because of their tuning stability, rich tone, impressive sustain and overall quality. Plus, they’re also extremely affordable considering their features.
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-220 "Strat-Style" Electric Guitar. Both original, single coil, "Spectrum" Pickups. Great, original Candy Apple, Metallic color. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Laminated maple neck. Separate ON / Off switch for each pickup. Overall Rhythm / Solo tone switch. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. No case included.
All electric guitar strings are made using steel, nickel, or other magnetically conductive metal alloys since they’re essential for transmitting string vibrations to the magnetic pickups. The type of plating or coating applied to the steel alloy has a significant impact on the strings’ sound. Here are some general tonal characteristics of the most common types of strings:
But the avant-garde din of Velvet Underground rave-ups seemed a genteel curtain raiser compared with the full-bore cacophony of Lou’s 1975 solo opus Metal Machine Music. The noise-guitar side of Lou’s legacy set the stage for cutting-edge genres like industrial, art damage, dream pop, grunge and present-day noise exponents, like Wolf Eyes and Yellow Swans.
Neck of the guitar is bolt-on made from maple with a scarf joint for an angled back headstock. Which in turn increases the tension behind the nut eliminating the need for string trees or string retainer bars. Also on the neck are 24 jumbo frets placed on a rosewood fingerboard garnish by sharks fin inlays for the looks and performance of the guitar.
I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.
Are you seeking reliable information and or the evaluation of your vintage guitar's actual real world value today?.... JVGuitars has a simple solution and that is a Joe's Vintage Guitars E-Guitar Appraisal and they are only $45.00 per instrument its fast and its painless and will be conducted by email with no need for damage risk or shipping to and from. Help support JVGuitars service today and go ahead and just order your E-Guitar Appraisal NOW!.. We can send a quick Paypal invoice to you for this E-Appraisal and get started.... ORDER YOUR JVG- E-Guitar Appraisal TODAY! email us your request NOW for your Appraisal at JVGuitars@gmail.com
First of all build quality. CTS's sturdy casings, brass shafts and contact patch, solid connections are second to none, and importantly are precision made by a company who have been doing so for a long long time. Fitting a well made pot will mean you'll likely only need to do it once in that guitar, that's important I feel! There are however a lot of different variations of CTS pot, and that is why I now only swear by the 450 Series, and 'TVT' Series, both are constructed with the same components, I like consistency here! Which is why you'll only find these models of pot in my harnesses. I've seen some lower quality series' of CTS pots that have been wildly inconsistent, which I'll get to next..
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
Equally potent, the B.C. Rich Mockingbird is another model that is prone to stir up your interest. This device features a bolt-on body, besides, at a quick look; this guitar might remind you of the classic “NJ” style headstock. Furthermore, the guitar’s body is made from mahogany, and it comes fitted with a rock Maple Neck and a very well regarded Rosewood fretboard that is said to supply its users with a great tone, extra playability, and outstanding stability.
WoW Talk about nailing the essence of the Original by Gibson.... This is a well crafted Japanese Prime Lawsuit era Classic with the great looks and BIG fat TONE is what this old vintage Japanese script logo Alvarez J200 guitar has to over you today nearly 40 years ago and a true Japanese Vintage work of art really. Beautiful Headstock with Alvarez Script logo in mother of pearl inlay with crown as well is its original truss rod cover is striking.Overall The fit and finish is hard to beat the materials are superior grain looks as is fit and finish and she has stood the test of TIME. Minor Vintage checking seen on its top and only adds realism to its true vintage status no reduction from its appeal its very cool looking as you can see from its pictures even perhaps more beautiful than the 70]s Gibson from this same era this Alvarez is based on the early1960's era known to be the preferred vintage era to own amongst the Gibson aficionados This is a prime example and is overall GREAT with super easy low action we completely cleaned this instrument upon its arrival it was owned by a smoker and needed it but never abused luckily then we dressed the frets and polished the entire guitar and frets as a result it looks this amazing and I have seen every square inch and can tell you this is a very good example from my inspection while working on it. She plays really nice now, with very good volume and a rich vintage 40 year old Vintage Alvarez kind of tone I expect from a good J200... This guitar has that, No brakes no repairs non needed no reason this vintage Japanese Lawsuit J200 should easily play another 40 years with good care she's set up and playing Amazingly.... SUPER FUN to play Act quick our last Alvarez 5052 Script logo went pretty fast... She's here and available and in stock.... email Joe to buy it NOW: JVGuitars@gmail.com .

Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.


Obviously listing something as subjective as musical greatness is tough and inevitably going to cause disagreement, but this is another level. Including John Frusciante and Jack White was a little absurd. Excluding players like Yngvie Malmstein, Dave Mustaine, and Slash was questionable. Excluding Eric Clapton was shocking, offensive, but almost admirable. Very little genre diversity, too. By my count, half of these players are blues or heavily blues-based. The complete absence of heavy metal is glaring. This list is ambitious, but golly, this is pretty darn bad.
Jazz guitarists need to learn about a range of different chords, including major 7th, major 6th, minor 7th, minor/major 7th, dominant 7th, diminished, half-diminished, and augmented chords. As well, they need to learn about chord transformations (e.g., altered chords, such as "alt dominant chords" described above), chord substitutions, and re-harmonization techniques. Some jazz guitarists use their knowledge of jazz scales and chords to provide a walking bass-style accompaniment.
Guitar amplifiers can also modify the instrument's tone by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequencies, using equalizer controls, which function the same way as the bass and treble knobs on a home hi-fi stereo, and by adding electronic effects; distortion (also called "overdrive") and reverb are commonly available as built-in features. The input of modern guitar amplifiers is a 1/4" jack, which is fed a signal from an electro-magnetic pickup (from an electric guitar) or a piezoelectric pickup (usually from an acoustic guitar) using a patch cord, or a wireless transmitter. For electric guitar players, their choice of guitar amp and the settings they use on the amplifier are a key part of their signature tone or sound. Some guitar players are longtime users of a specific amp brand or model. Guitarists may also use external effects pedals to alter the sound of their tone before the signal reaches the amplifier.
Gitar Tricks are listening (see quote in bold) and as a result I have upgraded my Review Rating of this awesome Online Guitar Training Program. My previous review highlighted problems with the Video Loop Feature and the lack of Speed Control I am so happy that Guitar Tricks have released an immensely improved Video Player with faster video loading time, more accurate and reliable A/B looping and added a Video Timeline Preview that displays thumbnail images of the video at various points as you hover over the timeline. Another feature of the new player is the ability to adjust the speed via the Slow Motion feature.
Del Rey, of course, is Spanish for “of the king,” which explains the crown. This was no doubt added to the Teisco name, in part, to suggest quality. However, it was also a way to add the de rigeur Spanish cachet necessary for “Spanish” guitars of the time. It was convention that “Spanish” guitars carried Spanish names, except for the well-known brand names – Gibson, Fender, Martin or Kay; thus the plethora of imported guitars named Greco, Ibanez, Goya and Espa�a. Of course, none of these were made in Spain, but rather in Japan, Japan, Sweden and Finland, respectively!
You honestly could get a single multi-effects unit that will already have thousands of the most popular stompboxes built in, plug it into your PA or headphones, turn on one of the many built-in amp modelers, and you’re good to go. This is actually a solution that many touring musicians have gravitated towards, as it is so much easier to just carry around a single multi-effects unit compared to a pedalboard with several different pedals and a separate amp.
Here we have a Taylor guitar for under $500. Taylor is known for their high quality, and expensive guitars. It’s great that they are offering a lower priced model so more players can enjoy their great sounding guitars. The Big Baby is a 15/16 dreadnought sized guitar which is slightly smaller than a full sized. Perfect for those that want that dreadnought sound but want a little smaller body. The top is sitka spruce and the back and sides are sapele. Owners are saying that the guitar has a very warm and full bodied tone, and that it does not sound like a cheap guitar. This is no surprise given that it is made by Taylor. This is another great choice for those with smaller hands, as Taylor’s are known for their great necks and amazing playability. See more info including more pictures here.
Gibson announced a new interactive computerized Les Paul that produces more sounds, named the Dark Fire. It was released on December 15, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body and controlled by the “Master Control Knob” (MCK). The MCK allows players to change the pickups and coils, adjust each tone and tunings automatically and simultaneously, even during a song being played. Like the Robot, the Dark Fire features the ability to tune the guitar; however, in an improvement over the Robot, the player can tune it up to 500 times per battery charge, allowing the tuning pegs to adjust themselves to different tuning styles. Using the “Chameleon Tone Technology” Gibson claims this guitar will produce every imaginable guitar sound. In addition to the improved and advanced tuning features, the guitar has three types of pickups which include Burstbucker (humbucker), a P-90 single-coil and a bridge-mounted piezo acoustic, all of which contribute to organic blends of original sounds.
All I can say is 5+ STARS, holy smokes and WOW!!!! ALL that for $140 SHIPPED!!!! AMAZING DEAL!!! The guitar plays GREAT! The color is very beautiful! The sound is quite impressive for the little money spent!!! The little AMP is adorable and works perfectly. All the accessories are great and are the perfect 'icing on the cake'!!! You will need a better gig bag than the one the guitar is shipped with, the gig bag that comes with it is thin and good to keep the dust off but not much more. So, buy a nice gig bag that will fit and your guitarist will be travel ready! I highly recommend this guitar ensemble to everyone! For $140 SHIPPED, you truly won't be disappointed!
Electri6ity is frequently compared to Musiclab’s real electric guitar line as they came out around the same time, and while Musiclab delivers better quality in most aspects, you only have one guitar per VST - where Electri6ity has eight. However,  while Electri6ity will give you twice as many guitars for the price, Musiclab continues to update their Real line, now blowing Electri6ity out of the water.
We’d recommend starting off with building a clone, or modifying a cheap pedal that you already own – This is why we see so many of the famed Boss DS 1 mods. A lot of the cheap “starter” pedals have a wide array of modifications that can be done. However, if you do not have an old effect pedal laying around, look into getting a pedal clone kit. I recently built a ProCo RAT Distortion Pedal Clone by General Guitar Gadgets, and these kits can really help you succeed in understanding how guitar pedals are built.
Stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression  Play (help·info), traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio. Its major-key sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is conventional in popular music. In this progression, the minor triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key (Am)'s corresponding chord progression.

As can be seen from our reviews above, it clear that the best guitars are those that meet the needs of the player—whether beginner or intermediate player—the best electric guitar should be able to provide quality sound, last for a considerable time, easy to play and always reliable when needed. Although every single guitar listed here are of top quality, there are different guitar for every budget, style and genre of play.
I have been using it since 3 years. It is not even costly. Its good looking and I think its even better than gibson. It even very easy to tune for it has a very good sound quality. More over it has a beautiful look like a guitar. Even a beginner should be advised to buy this guitar for it cost a minimum of 3000 rs. So as it is less costly and more quality it's the best for me. I even like lakewood but its cost is just my dream.
This is one of the most popular guitar brands bought by the beginner and advanced learners in India. This brand is also one of the top-rated electro-acoustic guitars for beginners. This is the Japanese brand of guitar that is available in acoustic, bass, electric, and classical guitars styles. It flourishes a full-size frigate shape with a laminated select dapper top, and mahogany back and sides. It sports a mahogany neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets, withal an Ibanez-branded headstock with pretty good closed chrome die-cast tuners. The price of this brand of guitar starts from 13,000 approximately.
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.
This Charvel is the signature model for Guthrie Govan, widely regarded as one of the finest guitarists around. Its caramelized ash body model is also up there with the finest bolt-ons we’ve ever played. The neck is extremely tight-fitting and held in place with four screws, each recessed into the contoured heel. Like any HSH set up you have huge choice on exactly how you wire it - this is no different. While the outer positions select the full humbuckers, position two voices bridge (slug single coil only) and the middle single coil; position three gives us bridge and neck (both slug single coils); position four offers the screw single coil of the neck pickup with the middle pickup. A ‘secret’ two-way mini toggle that simulates a coil-split via an old-school passive filter (a 0.1 microfarad capacitor). In many ways this feels more like high performance rifle, not a guitar. It gives off a tuned-to-perfection vibe that’s like an instrument you’ve owned for a while, gigged, modified and tweaked. Which in reality is exactly what it is only Charvel and Guthrie Govan have done it for us. But don’t dismiss this as a virtuoso rock shredder axe. Yes, if your technique is up to it, you won’t have a problem there and using just the bridge pickup you’ll probably have all you need: big and ballsy, a hint of a cocked wah-like high end it’s certainly in the JB area. But it’s offset by a pokey PAF-like neck voice, tube-y and soupy but far from one dimensional. If that was it, we’d be smiling. But there’s plenty more... Guthrie Govan’s vision for an all round workhouse that’ll stand up to the rigours of professional touring is superbly realised in this signature. Every detail is wonderfully considered. It’s not a cheap date, but it’s an astonishing guitar: a player’s tool of the highest calibre.
A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studios who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.

These acrobatic guitarists used humbucking pickups and the more aggressive Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge to create the hard rock edge that began to be defined in the late 70’s and 80’s more technical playing styles.  These instruments now include much higher output and even active electronic pickups, and their recessed cavities to allow the tremolo bridges to make the distinctive “dive bomb” effects that Van Halen made famous in his solo “Eruption.”  Other distinct features include thinner necks and larger frets with flatter fret boards that many technical players prefer for their flashier techniques.
The electrified hollow body arch top was created so the guitar could compete with the volume of horns in the big bands of the 1930s. And they’ve evolved considerably since then, growing from fat jazz boxes with necks that meet the body at the 12th fret to nimble, thin-lined instruments with cutaways like the Gibson ES-125 and Epiphone Casino, which are experiencing a renaissance today. From the single blade pickup in Christian’s guitar, modern hollow bodies now sport all types of pickups as standard equipment: humbuckers, single-coils, piezo-electric and so on.
There were precedents for the palm-muted, ultra-percussive chug James Hetfield gave Metallica (Judas Priest, Motörhead), but he made it the gold standard of Eighties metal. He's never been a monochromatic headbanger, though, delving early on into the delicate picking of "Fade to Black" and later embracing the more nuanced hard rock of the Black Album. "I wonder if James Hetfield knows how to play the drums," Dave Grohl once said. "Because basically he's taking care of the percussion and melody of Metallica's songs with his guitar. And it's great."
In the years following Electric Mud and Muddy's Death in 1983 from heart failure , the record itself started building a cult around it, comprised of acid rock fans, record collectors and curious people. By 1996, the resurgence of popularity in the record matched with its scarcity led it to being reissued in a deluxe edition by Chess with new line notes by Mark Humphrey and Marshall Chess. Despite all the bad press Electric Mud received, Marshall Chess never stopped claiming it was a brilliant, misunderstood record.
In about 1975, Ernie Briefel and Merson parted company with Unicord/Gulf + Western, becoming Music Technology Incorporated (MTI), on Long Island, taking the Giannini brand with it. Later, in the early ’80s, MTI would import Westone guitars made by the great Matsumoku company, which it would sell until St. Louis Music began its partnership with Matsumoku and, in 1984, transitioned its Electra brand to Electra-Westone and then ultimately Westone, which lasted until 1990, when SLM’s guitars all became Alvarez.
The Blues Junior's compact dimensions, light weight and pedal-friendly credentials have made it one of the most popular gigging combos in the world, but for 2018, Fender has updated it to the new Mark IV specification, which features various tweaks, including Celestion’s excellent A-Type loudspeaker. Controls include gain, bass treble and middle, reverb level and master volume, with a small push-button ‘Fat’ switch. In use, the Junior unleashes a stunning range of Fender tones, from spanky, sparkling cleans, to fat and smooth midrange crunch that’s spot on for blues and classic rock. The Fat switch adds a generous midrange boost and can be remote-controlled from a footswitch for greater versatility, while the improved reverb circuit is very impressive, with no noise and a smooth, warm delay that feels more integral to the overall amp tone, harking back to the best blackface reverbs of the 1960s. No matter what guitar you use, the Blues Junior flatters single coils and humbuckers alike, not to mention drive pedals with plenty of volume. The sounds are top-drawer, comparing well against many so-called boutique amps costing four times the price. Factor in the compact dimensions and light weight, and it’s easy to see why the Blues Junior remains a firm favourite.
It’s easy to hear that Acoustic Revolutions is inspired by the Goo Goo Dolls, Counting Crows, Dave Matthews, but the loops are so perfectly dry and easy to mix that you can create a very modern sound. Volume II itself actually pushes the loops into that modern sound by pulling inspiration from popular indie-folk bands that dominated the first half of the 2010s.
Usually, electric guitars have six metallic strings – although there are certain variants used in specific musical styles with seven or even a dozen strings (six pairs). This kind of guitar is used in all kinds of musical styles, from jazz, to metal, pop... and of course Rock'n'Roll music. Actually, the origins of the electric guitar can be traced back to the 1930s Swing-era Jazz movement, when guitarists started experimenting with steel pickups adapted to their hollow-bodied instruments, as a way to get a louder, more substantial sound than what would be possible from a regular guitar. The first commercial electric guitars came up in the mid 1940s, and by then a solid-body was already in use – thus introducing the much familiar look that's now typically associated with electric guitars.
Fuzz bass effects are sometimes created for bass by using fuzzbox effects designed for electric guitars. Fuzzboxes boost and clip the signal sufficiently to turn a standard sine wave input into what is effectively a square wave output, giving a much more distorted and synthetic sound than a standard distortion or overdrive. Paul McCartney of The Beatles used fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" in the 1966 album "Rubber Soul"
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A simple, inexpensive amplifier may have only two tone controls, a passive bass and treble control. In some better quality amps, one or more midrange controls are provided. On the most expensive amps, there may be shelving equalizers for bass and treble, a number of mid-range controls (e.g., low mid, mid and high mid), and a graphic equalizer or parametric equalizer. The amplifier's master volume control restricts the amount of signal permitted through to the driver stage and the power amplifier. When using a power attenuator with a tube amplifier, the master volume no longer acts as the master volume control. Instead, the power attenuator's attenuation control controls the power delivered to the speaker, and the amplifier's master volume control determines the amount of power-tube distortion. Power-supply based power reduction is controlled by a knob on the tube power amp, variously labeled "wattage", "power", "scale", "power scale", or "power dampening".
Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements.
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
The shadows are his home and keeping Gotham's citizens safe is his sustenance. Darkness envelops his every move and his legend lives in the whispers of each passerby. Known by many names — the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, Batman — this man lives to protect. But by pitting himself against the criminals of a city, he has only made his laundry list of powerful enemies grow. One after another, a new and nefarious threat has risen up and one after another Batman succeeded in bringing them down. But what happens when those menacing masterminds join forces? Who will rescue Gotham when a deadly roster of depraved lunatics gangs up on the shadowed warrior? Who will save us all? The finale to the legendary Arkham series explodes onto your screen in the most adrenaline-pumping storyline yet. The Scarecrow has returned to Gotham City and he has united a terrifying team of super villains, including Penguin, Two-Face and Harley Quinn. For the first time in the franchise, you get to step behind the wheel of the iconic Batmobile as you harness the power of Batman and scramble to outwit the wicked gang after your blood. Tear through the streets and soar across the skyline in heart-pounding gameplay that will suck you in and force you to ask yourself if you have what it takes to save Gotham. Do you have it within you to be the hero the city needs? Or will the villains of Gotham overtake the Dark Knight once and for all?
By far the most convenient way to DI guitar is to use a digital preamplifier that combines amp modelling, speaker modelling and effects all in one unit. More flexible still is something like a Roland VG88. This requires the guitar to be fitted with a GK2 compatible hex pickup, but in return enables the system to model pickups and guitars as well as the rest of the signal chain. All these modelling systems sound different to each other and many guitarists say they don't 'feel' the same to play as going via a real amplifier, but, in many situations, the sound you record using them is very much like the sound you hear on records. As you hear exactly the sound you're recording over the monitors while you're playing, you know just how the end result will turn out, so there's little to be said about working this way other than to rely on your ears. Nevertheless, it is worth pointing out that some of the more unlikely combinations of amplifier models and speaker cabinet models can produce unexpectedly interesting results, so don't just rely on the factory patches, most of which I've found not to do justice to the products anyway. The morphing feature used in the Digitech Genesis 3 processor is also very creative, as it allows you to combine the characteristics of two completely different amp/speaker models, sometimes with surprising results.
* Advertised Price Per Month: The advertised price per month is the estimated monthly payment required to be made on your WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account for a single item order, or if at any time your account has multiple items on it, then please see the payment chart for payment terms. The advertised price per month will not apply. See Full Cost of Ownership.
More theory: tone knobs are basically adjustable resistors with certain values. The higher the value of your potentionmeter (hence “pots”), the more treble you allow to pass. This is why Fender guitars with their bright single coil pickups have 250K pots, while Gibsons with humbuckers have 300K to 500K pots. Some guitarists emply 1000K pots for maximum treble, and some make pots that when maxed out, make it seem to the circuit that it is not present, allowing all frequencies to pass through.
Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
Focus on the new chords you have learned and get physically used to changing between these and other chords you've learned in previous sessions. This is where you can use a metronome or backing drums to develop your rhythm and timing around these chord fingerings. Try and strum a simple sequence using these chords. Create a simple 3-4 chord song. This is about putting the theory you have learned into context.

The process for recording sound from a guitar amp might seem simple; you have your amp and a mic to capture it, stick mic in front of amp, press “record,” and play. Done! The truth is, though, that even when using the same guitar and amp with the same settings captured by the same mic, the results can vary greatly depending on where you place that mic. Add the variables of different mics and multiple mic placements on one speaker cab, and your sonic possibilities expand exponentially. The elephant lumbering into the room at this point in the game is the fact that more and more people are recording direct to interface using digital amp simulators, or DI’ing and applying an amp plug-in in the digital-audio workstation (DAW). These facilities have improved tremendously in recent years, but the majority of professional guitarists and professional studios still mic actual amps to record the most dynamic guitar-based music being made today, so we’ll stick with honing these old-school skills.
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.
By 1964, most of Orbison’s early rock and roll contemporaries were either dead, strung-out on drugs, in jail or making crappy movies, but Orbison’s musical career still hadn’t reached its peak. In between the ballads, he recorded singles like “Mean Woman Blues” (check his wild guitar solo) and “Oh, Pretty Woman” that showed upstarts like the Beatles, the Animals and the Rolling Stones that Americans still could rock harder than any Brit.
The MOD Reverb Tanks are high quality upgrade units. Some of the major differences between the MODs and other reverb tanks are that the transducers are wired directly to their respective RCA jacks as opposed to current production tanks where transducers are connected by a detachable plug to their respective RCA jacks. This makes the tanks less receptive to any outside interference. The original Hammond, Accutronics and Gibbs tanks from the 1960s were also wired directly to their respective RCA jacks. In addition very close attention has been paid to the spacing and size of the lamination of the Transducers resulting in a more vintage like tone.
Time to turn our attention back to the guitars themselves. The following are some of the better low-cost electric guitars available on the market today; refer to an anatomy of electric guitars to see definitions of guitar pieces and places. When you're deciding, go to a store and try them out for heft, comfort, stability, sound quality, and appearance. Shop around, comparing, for instance, online prices against local store prices. This is an investment, so choose wisely.

If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.
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The key feature that makes the GT-1000 stand out from the crowd is the inclusion of the ingenious AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology which ensures your effects respond correctly with the likes of tube amps and don’t muddy your sound. You can read more about the AIRD technology here, but in a nutshell, it ensures the dynamics of your unique amp are preserved. With other multi effects, you might find have to turn your amp emulations off if you want your effects to respond correctly to YOUR amp, but with the GT-1000 you won’t have to do that as you can select which type of amp you’re playing with and the pedal will respond correctly.
For instance, during 1970s and early 1980s, Japanese manufacturer Tokai Gakki produced superb replicas of 1957–59 vintage Les Pauls, and replicas themselves were gradually highly regarded. In the 1980s, to respond to the high demand for vintage models, Gibson itself began to offer a line of “Custom Shop models”, almost accurate reproductions of early Les Paul crafted by the Gibson Guitar Custom Shops.
At least five sunburst hollowbodies were offered in ’61, the PE-7, PE-8, PE-13, PE-14 and PE-51. These appear to have glued-in necks, by the way, with the open-book head, circular sticker logo and rectangular metal-covered pickups. The PE-7 was a non-cutaway thinline with dots, a single neck pickup, elevated pickguard, a fancy lyre trapeze tailpiece and volume and tone controls mounted on the lower bout. ’60s Bizarre Guitars shows a ca. ’61 PE-8 with a single black-plastic-covered pickup with Teisco printed on the top, small strip inlays, wooden pickguard, a fancy harp tailpiece and volume and tone mounted on the lower bout. The following year this model would have two pickups, so whether this is typical or not is unknown. The PE-13 and PE-14 were single-rounded-cutaway archtops, the difference being in finish, the former being blonde and the latter sunburst. Both these were full-bodied jazz guitars, with the small block inlays, twin pickups, chicken beak selectors, elevated ‘guards and two volumes and two tones mounted on the lower bout. Some of these carried fancy Gibson Johnny Smith trapeze tails. The PE-51 was a twin pickup, single-rounded-cutaway thinline archtop, with a chicken beak selector, ordinary trapeze tail and one volume and tone on the lower bout.

Furtadosonline proudly presents our wide range of bass guitars for every playing style and musical need. Whatever the type of music you play, you\'ll find the right bass guitar from all your favorite brands Gibson, ESP, Warwick, Squier,Yamaha, Epiphone, Musicman, Cort and many more. Feel free to Choose an electric bass, an acoustic bass, an upright bass, a fretless bass, a left-handed bass, a 5-string bass, and even a 6 string bass, we have it all. Don\'t forget to browse through our portal for essential bass gear like bass amps, bass effects, bass heads and bass speaker cabinets. If you\'re shopping for bass guitar accessories look no further, bass strings, hardshell case or a gig bag for your bass. Feel free to take advantage of our wide range and great seasonal discounts. It is absolutley safe to purchase from us online and we can assure you total satisfaction backed by the Furtados Service Guarantee.
This is an American Fender Telecaster electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jangly indie sounds or clean country sounds but can be very rocky with more distortion added. This guitar is also a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.
After music fans heard his impressive blues rock playing on John Mayall’s ‘Beano’ album, they began to spray paint “Clapton is God” on London, England infrastructure. It’s safe to say that Clapton left quite an impression on people. His playing with Cream, Derek and the Dominos, and Blind Faith as well as in his solo work only helped to strengthen Clapton’s legend.
Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
The body is very much the same, composed of a chambered basswood topped by an elegantly contoured laminate maple top - complete with the easily identifiable Gretsch style pickguard. The neck specifications also follow the Pro Jet Bigsby, with a shorter than usual 24.6" scale maple neck, 12" radius rosewood fingerboard, and 1.6875" nut width. It has a total of 22 medium jumbo frets with Neo Classic thumbnail inlays serving as fret markers. Because its not a Filter'tron pickup, the sound of this guitar will be subtly different, but apparently good enough for the many users that have rated this guitar highly and even recommend it.
When Leo and the boys at the big “F” ranch developed the Tele, they put a big slab of steel under the bridge-pickup coil. This reflected the magnetic field up and toward the strings. In the words of Seymour Duncan’s Evan Skopp, this gives it more “crack”—which, if you’re addicted to twang, is a good thing. The better news is that you can attach a plate (sometimes called an elevator plate, because of how it elevates the magnetic field toward the strings) to any single coil whose pole-piece magnets are exposed at the back.

The Dobros and Nationals were joined by the first Supro guitar versions in late 1935, even though their announcement didn’t appear until a few months later in the March, 1936, The Music Trades. These first Supro guitars included an aluminum Hawaiian lap steel, both electric Spanish archtop 6-string and tenor guitars, and an electric mandolin. They mark the official beginning of the Supro story.


For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
In 2004, the Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, a guitar that Gibson has used ever since as the “standard” non limited edition Slash Les Paul (this guitar is in the Gibson range all year round).[33] This guitar features a plain maple top with a Dark Tobacco Sunburst finish, and has a piezo pickup with a switch located near the tone and volume knobs .[32] In 2008, Epiphone issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard Plus Top, which was modeled after the Gibson Custom Shop model.[32] It has a solid mahogany body, flame maple top, and a Dark Tobacco Burst finish.[34]
Playing Electric Slide is great. I use the neck pick up mostly or the bridge pick up with the tone turned down as not to blow out peoples ear drums, but you can adjust to the tone you prefer. Most people adjust the strings a little further from the neck. I prefer not so I can bend and play normal too. Great slide players. Jimmy Page, Joe Bonnamassa, Joe Perry hope this was helpful

You should be aware of some drawbacks to using the 'free' sites over the licensed sites (or purchasing a book of official TAB). First, the versions of the songs at the free sites were created by folks who enjoy music and did their best to document how to play the song. It may not be correct. Second, even though these sites don't charge for access to the TAB, most are in the business of making money. You'll have to put up with advertisements, often including flashing banners and pop-up ads. Finally, the original artists do not get paid for these transcriptions. If you like what you find, you should follow-up by purchasing the official music from an licensed reseller.
Chords are an essential component of playing the guitar. When you first start out, it’s best to make a habit of learning one or two new chords a week, and with each chord you learn, practice playing it with the previous chords you’ve learned. Not only does this help you commit the chords to memory, it helps you learn how to move from chord to chord smoothly, so you can start applying your new chord vocabulary to playing actual songs. After all, isn’t that why we all start playing in the first place?
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The first guitar amplifiers were relatively low-fidelity, and would often produce distortion when their volume (gain) was increased beyond their design limit or if they sustained minor damage.[3] Around 1945, Western-swing guitarist Junior Barnard began experimenting with a rudimentary humbucker pick-up and a small amplifier to obtain his signature "low-down and dirty" bluesy sound. Many electric blues guitarists, including Chicago bluesmen such as Elmore James and Buddy Guy, experimented in order to get a guitar sound that paralleled the rawness of blues singers such as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf,[4] replacing often their originals with the powerful Valco "Chicagoan" pick-ups, originally created for lap-steel, to obtain a louder and fatter tone. In early rock music, Goree Carter's "Rock Awhile" (1949) featured an over-driven electric guitar style similar to that of Chuck Berry several years later,[5] as well as Joe Hill Louis' "Boogie in the Park" (1950).[6][7]
A common complaint with the Bullet Strat among our panelists was that the single-coil middle and neck pickups buzzed too much. This is the nature of single-coil pickups. The nice thing about the HSS Bullet Strat is that you do have one humbucker, and setting the pickup selector to combine the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups will also cancel the buzz. Also, the use of a single-coil pickup in the neck position makes it difficult to get the mellow, jazzy tones that you’ll get from guitars that have a humbucker in the neck position, but we figure few beginners are looking for that sound.
In the Guitar Setup course, the third DVD is devoted to acoustic guitar setup. Acoustics are very, very different than electric guitars, when you get right down into the mechanics of them, and as such they truly do need a section of their own in any guitar setup guide. You’ll learn how to setup the action and intonation properly on your acoustic, as well as many other tips and tricks that will help you keep it in top working order.
PRS S2 Vela comes as one of the more extraordinary models in this company’s lineup. This is made apparent by the body shape that stands out from their usual designs. When I had some one-on-one time with this axe, it left a good impression. One thing that really stuck with me was just how light it was. That usually means a thinner tone, but not with this PRS. It plays great, and is pretty smooth.
The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
Travis adapted the syncopated rhythms of Ragtime Piano music to the guitar – (the term syncopation refers to deliberately playing off the regular beat). Travis would pick the strings alternating the bass note on the low E and A strings. This style of finger picking was given the name ‘Travis picking’ and went on to influence Chet Atkins and Scott Moore’s ‘Rockabilly’ sound.
Curiously, Les Paul also contributed to recording... along with building his own recording studio at his home, he built his own disc cutting system, and did multitrack recording on acetate discs... recording on a disc, then overdubbing himself and that original disc playing onto another disc, and so on. He later worked with Ampex on multitrack tape machines, and released the first multitrack electric guitar recording on Capitol records in 1949... however, Sydney Bechet had released a multi-track recording using Paul's techniques back in 1941. 
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.
As a long time player conveying the skill, craft and passion of this art, which is as much as a science, players of ANY and every instrument can unanimously agree that there are no “best” players. Some have great moments that were captured and regurgitated in the media time and a get which put them in a permanent vista. This is greatness? Hardly. I’ve seen A LOT of players, some included in the article and the majority chanted by the readers on this board screw things up beyond repair–some during the opening of their first song of the performance. OUCH that hurts…but it happens. Some completely lost track with what they were doing during a show casing of their solo work…oops. Yep it happens, like sometimes happens to singers who forget their lines–it doesn’t matter that they have written the song they were performing. Yea, we hear about this stuff every now and then, however at the end of the day, this doesn’t matter. The truth is, people hear only what they want to hear and will by their very disposition, ignore the negatives and embrace the positives of their work–alas this is why this supportive listeners are called FANS.

Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
Yamaha F-310 Acoustic Dreadnought guitar in very good-excellent used condition no cracks or issues it looks great and the neck angle is excellent as well so as a result this guitar plays well with good fingerboard action with plenty of room on the saddle to lower action even more in future years if ever needed. Frets look good at 90-% with no ruts on fingerboard noted, truss rod is working fine, nut is 1-11/16ths. Yamaha specs (all of the F310 are made like this). It has 20 frets and a slim taper neck,The top is spruce, laminated, with natural finish. The sides and back are made of Meranti Indonesian Mahogany type wood , fingerboard and bridge are made Indian Rosewood, and the neck is of Nato. It's a full dreadnought guitar style, and just looks great.this one is in exceptional used condition better than average. Sound is good with nice volume and its tone is getting mature,,nice tone. No Cracks no issues no repairs and looks to have a bone nut and saddle this helps it have such a mature natural tone, Its sounds better than other F310’s Ive played I like this guitar and its price is right. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
Launch price: $799 / £826 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Pau ferro (rosewood reviewed) | Frets: 21 | Pickups: American Vintage '58 Single-Coil Tele, American Vintage '52 Single-Coil Tele | Controls: Volume (with S-1 Switch), tone | Hardware: 3-saddle American Vintage strings-through-body bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Faded Sonic Blue, 3-Color Sunburst

In his early days, Jimmy James, as he was then known, played in rhythm sections, backing artists like Little Richard, B.B. King and Ike and Tina Turner. It isn’t until 1966, when he moved to London and formed the Experience, that Jimi Hendrix was able to cut loose and start getting the attention he deserved for his magnificent guitar work. Alarmingly, Hendrix was virtually unknown in the U.S. until he played at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—the legendary performance in which he doused his Fender Stratocaster with lighter fluid and set it on fire.


When you start to look for that great beginner's electric guitar, focus on an instrument with good-quality wood and reasonable workmanship. That's the most commonly accepted method of choosing a low-cost electric guitar for a beginner. Guitar manufacturers tend to cut corners with cheaper guitars by using, for instance, cheaper pickups and hardware. But for the guitarist who gets more serious about playing, these are all upgradeable parts that can be swapped out for higher-quality parts. So begin with a good-quality wooden frame and upgrade as time and money allow.
The CD-60CE is a Factory Special Run acoustic-electric guitar made by Fender. This inexpensive model comes with a Honeyburst gloss finish and a solid construction that gives a warm and rich sound. This guitar is made of laminated mahogany all-around. The top features scalloped X-bracing patterns for a wider range of frequencies and a distinctive sound.

The tuner goes first. This one is pretty easy. It doesn’t want to hear an effected signal; it wants to see the direct input from the guitar. Another reason for putting the tuner first is that if you’re using any true-bypass pedals, the TU-3 will give them a buffered signal, which will protect your tone from loss of signal in the cables when other pedals are off. This is another one of the reasons there as so many TU tuners in pedalboards worldwide, even ones using nothing else but boutique true-bypass stompers.
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The 5968 written on the label is a model number, not a serial number. It seems that the labels were void of serial numbers rather than model numbers (the opposite of what I had originally suspected). The Dorado I'm working on is constructed of rosewood while the Model 5969 is Mahogany. The 5969 is identicle in size to the 5968 but had nickel plated tuners and a satin finish. From my quick look around the auction business, it appears that the Mahogany back and sides model brings about $150 less than the Rosewood model.
One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.
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Paul has been great to work with, he's flexible, and knowledgeable on what works best for our son. Plus our lessons are in the comfort of our home! He always communicates with us on how our son is doing and if he needs to practice more, so he can show improvement on learning notes. Paul also purchased a bass guitar so he can work with our son on learning the bass as well. I also asked if he can help us shop and pick out a reasonable amp and he agreed to help out and suggested a few places to shop at. Working with Paul has made this experience easy as I was worried of finding a good fit for our son. I would recommend Paul to anyone and you can't beat his rate!
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Sparkle works best in the background and will be more suited to non-guitar players that want quality sounding guitar rhythms, but not have them be the focus or overly complicated.  Most guitarists will find it too rigid and write it off, where non-guitarist will want to spend a decent amount of time mastering the expression options. The GUI is geared to key players, but it’s simply fantastic looking, clean, and easy to use even if you can’t play keys that well.

"Of course using effects pedals isn't cheating. I personally would define cheating as using corrective technology of some sort to falsify an artist's performance/musical ability, and I don't think that's what using pedals do. They're used for creative purposes, to manipulate sounds for artistic effect and suit personal tastes/whatever suits the mood of a song. They expand the range of timbres you can get from only using one instrument.


There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.
If you have an envelope follower, envelope filter, auto-wah or other dynamic touch-sensitive effect, this should go at the very front in most cases, as these effects are almost exclusively dependent upon the dynamics of your playing. Placing most other types of effects in front of them will compress the signal, thereby reducing dynamics and minimizing their performance.
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Pick-Ups – The pickup is preset underneath the strings, on the body of the electric guitar and it works as a magnetic field. When the metal strings are plucked they vibrate and generate a current that is transmitted by the pickup to the guitar cable and to the amplifier. These may is just a single pickup in a guitar or 3 to 4 pickups depending on the guitar.
This guitar is based on Loar's U. S. Pat. 2,020,557 (filed 1934, awarded 1935), in which electric amplification is combined with an acoustic guitar body. The design offered a player the option of switching between electric and acoustic amplification, or combining both, with metal posts through the bridge that transfers vibrations from the strings to the bar-armature. With the posts raised, the bridge comes in contact with the soundboard for exclusively acoustic amplification; with the posts lowered to contact the metal bar-armature, both acoustic and electric amplification is engaged, and with the posts lowered completely, the bridge is lifted off of the soundboard and supported only by the bar-armature for exclusively electric amplification. The back of the guitar, made from arched spruce, with two f-shaped soundholes, incorporates another of Loar's ideas, covered more extensively in U. S. Pat. 2,046,331 (filed in 1934 but awarded in 1936), to use the back of the instrument as a second soundboard by transferring bridge pressure from the top.
Most of the time, a chord diagram will not show you the finger numbers. They will leave that up to you, because different people sometimes play chords differently. Some people cannot play an A chord like this, because their fingers are too big, and this fingering is very cramped for them. Instead, they play an A with a mini-barre, using the same finger for more frets. For example, I could bar my 1st finger across the 4th, and 3rd strings at the second fret, then place my 2nd finger on the 2nd string, second fret (see image on the left). This gives me more room between the frets, and also frees up my 3rd and fourth fingers to pick out melody and bass notes. It’s just a preference, you can play the chord how you prefer.

For years, Seymour Duncan has provided guitarists with first-rate, handmade pickups and parts that are anything but stock. All of our products are designed and customized to suit the needs of specific musical styles and the musicians thereof. If you’ve got a guitar that doesn’t have a good-quality set of pickups and seems to lack that “extra something” in the tone department, investing in a set of pickups is your first stop.

The Blackheart Killer Ant is for beginners that want a better quality, overdriven guitar tone, but do not want to pay the prices that tube amps usually cost. Unlike the Hot Rod Pro Junior III, the Killer Ant is not loud enough for live performance, but it makes a solid practice amp. The Killer Ant is for beginners that want to start playing on an amp with a really good tone and are willing to pay a little more money for that. It’s a solid choice, even with the limited amount of built in features.


To answer this question, all you need to do is close your eyes and focus on what is currently going on around you. Just about every sound you hear, whether you are at home or on a busy street, is packed with some dose of reverb. In nature, sound reflects off of multiple objects and surfaces across various distances. Both our ears and our brains are used to reverb by default. That is one of the reasons why even an artificial reverb effect tends to make a track more enjoyable.

Understandably, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2's main selling point is its versatility, and this is reflected in the reviews. Sound quality also got a lot of thumbs up, with many describing the amp as full sounding, thanks to its stereo speaker configuration. For something this versatile, the amp's ease of use also gets commended quite often, with some finding it easy to dial in different sounds. Finally, a good number of users find the amp's overall build quality to be solid and reliable.

Yamaha is famous Japanese Company known for producing an extensive range of musical instruments. It has caught the attention of the beginners and intermediate guitar players due to its budget-friendly product prices. Thus, it is the excellent choice for those who are going to have a first experience of buying any guitar. They can indeed get a good deal without costing a fortune. It is also suitable for Acoustic players. Yamaha continuously produces high-quality instruments that are unconquerable when it comes to the material or even sound quality.


If you’re using a bunch of high gain pedals, or a lot of pedals chained together, chances are you’ll get a little bit of hum or unwanted buzzing coming from your amp. This is especially noticeable if you’re using high gain amps and guitars. If your amp is buzzing when you’re not playing anything, you might benefit from a noise gate pedal as they cut out all that unwanted noise but preserve your tone.
A basic tone control consists of a capacitor and a potentiometer (the tone control itself).  The illustration below if the basic wiring for a tone control.  The view is as you would see it from the bottom of the potentiometer, wired for a right-handed guitar.  The oval "blobs" on the potentiometer casing are solder connections.  The ground wire should be soldered to the potentiometer casing for this tone control to work - and it helps shield out unwanted noise (really noticeable if not done this way and you use metal knobs).
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
The device can be mounted on and removed quickly from almost any flat-backed acoustic guitar, using a system of magnetic rails. The ToneWood-Amp is designed for guitars with either a magnetic or piezo pickup (bridge or soundhole), but the team behind the device say they're also putting together a “Technician-Free” pickup bundle for those guitars without a pickup.

Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
Gibson lost the trademark for Les Paul in Finland. According to the court, “Les Paul” has become a common noun for guitars of a certain type. The lawsuit began when Gibson suedMusamaailma, which produces Tokai guitars, for trademark violation. However, several witnesses testified that the term “Les Paul” denotes character in a guitar rather than a particular guitar model. The court also found it aggravating that Gibson had used Les Paul in the plural form and that the importer of Gibson guitars had used Les Paul as a common noun. The court decision will become effective, as Gibson is not going to appeal.[48]
Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.
This acoustic guitar model has been over the time well renowned as the best selling in the UK. This is owed to its high value and sound quality, accompanied by its trendy design and ease of use. It has a shortened scale length that makes it easy to play, even for beginner guitarists. It mostly comes in a warm natural color and is for the right handed guitarists. It is quite affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 8900. You can click below to find more product details on the official link.
At the end of the day, this is obviously far from a perfect example, but this is an extremely hard-to-find factory left-handed 1958 Gretsch Duo-Jet, and provides a very rare opportunity for the vintage guitar collector, lefty or righty! I have seen far fewer left handed 50s Gretsch guitars as compared to Fender, Gibson, and even Martin over the years. Lefty 50s Gretsch guitars are insanely rare, especially in the Duo Jet model!
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.

The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.

Up next comes another compact model and our second Yamaha recommendation. This time around, we are looking at their Yamaha FSX830C model. Unlike all of the guitars we have mentioned so far, this one isn't a dreadnought. Instead, we are looking at a standard concert shape with a cutaway. Now, you do have the choice of eleven finishes and body types, and since the options are nearly endless we've narrowed down to our favorite configuration, but definitely look at the others, there's some neat options in there.

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You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.
Think Eddie Van Halen in Eruption. Phaser effects create a swirling tone by splitting the signal and then moving each part in and out of phase with each other. Like chorus, it can sound dated, but it is great for adding a little bit of craziness to any riff or solo. Some pedals such as the famous MXR Phase 90 only have one control for the speed of the effect, while more modern designs also have controls for the depth and level of the phasing.

1. Blackstar ID:15 TVP ($229): This is one of the best combo amps on the market and with good reason: it comes with a variety of options to not only get you playing in no time. It also allows you to record very easily with a built-in USB option. You can select from six different power responses modeled after popular tube amp sounds (via Blackstar’s True Valve Power system) and even when turned down, the amp doesn’t lose its bite. The built-in multi-effects allow you to experiment with the world of effects and the Insider Software allows you to edit up to 128 user storable patches to further your sonic crafting.
The following year, the company hired designer Lloyd Loar to create newer instruments.[11] Loar designed the flagship L-5 archtop guitar and the Gibson F-5 mandolin that was introduced in 1922, before leaving the company in 1924.[12] In 1936, Gibson introduced their first "Electric Spanish" model, the ES-150, followed by other electric instruments like steel guitars, banjos and mandolins.
Brian Moore - Known for their innovative custom electronics and distinctive designs, Brian Moore Guitars continue to produce guitars that go beyond the conventional. Aside from their custom-built instruments, they now carry a host of artist signature models. One of their more popular products is the iGuitar, which feature acoustic MIDI, piezo, 13 pin Synth and more.
SOLD OUT : A real find this one is... not your average vintage Takamine you will soon see its also in amazing original superior condition .. this premium example was hand built by the finest Japanese Luthiers at Takamine Gakki. This prime example is the finest Exotic Brazilian Rosewood we have had in yet and we have had some duzies for sure this true Law Suit era Takamine F375S acoustic guitars we have ever had! wow.. and exact copy of the Genius original Martin design of the D-28 exotic....WoW.. the frets look almost new, Martin bone nut and saddle the "s" stands for solid construction and the Solid Sitka Spruce top is super nice amber with age now over the past 37 years and taken care of this California native guitar exhibits its premium exotic woods very proudly just have a look all round everywhere you look...from the amazing Brazilian rosewood sides & the back is A Gorgeous 3-piece back with intricate inlay work to the premium solid mahogany neck..fit & finish is simply put gorgeous. The neck is nice & straight with a perfect Martin like medium V profile 1-11/16ths @ the nut - the action is very good 3-16th @ 12th fret you can adjust either way to taiste no problem and with the bone nut and saddle this guitar has wonderful tone right up there with the Martin or Yairi this guitar is AAA professional grade vintage and is in 100% condition it is not new or mint with minimal dings its condition is JVG Rated as 9.5 / 10 - excellent vintage = beautiful and exotic... please see the pictures for the cosmetics..these Takamine are built as good or better than the Martin it copies the back is quad braced and the reinforced crossbracing of the top should make this finely built instrument last several lifetimes.. Your looking at the best of the best in Japanese vintage exotic & solid construction in astoundingly nice condition...you simply must play and hear this guitar we love it and so will you.. I can't amagain a cleaner example of this vintage you will not be sorry... exotic Brazilian Rosewood tone woods are the best of the best. No need to spend $3000 or even $5000 or more for such an exotic vintage 40 + year old Martin d28....Find it here Email: gr8bids@comcast.net ..
The GK Studio mixes traditional flamenco construction techniques, a comfortable body shape and modern Fishman electronics, resulting in an easy to play nylon-string guitar that can be plugged in for stage use. My main concern about this guitar is its slightly thinner body depth, neck and nutwidth(1.96"), but these are calculated tweaks that should make this classical guitar play and feel more akin to conventional steel-string acoustics.
Solid state systems grew in popularity in the 80s and 90s, as the digitization of audio signals posed a more reliable and less expensive alternative to tube amplification. In recent years, however, many guitarists have been willing to fork over a little extra scratch to get their hands and their ears on the sounds of the past, on the warm tones that the computers can't seem to capture.
I purchased my Dove in 1989 in a mom and pop kind of music store in North GA , actually Cumming GA. I have played it ever since and I have owned many other guitars in my 52 Years in the music business but it has always been my come back acoustic for the sound and playability of the neck slim D stile ,but the sound quality is very much as good as any lots more expensive guitars,the way it holds the overtone of the note long after you play the note in the body is just unbelievable ,my hat's off to which either company wants to claim they built it I am just glad they did!! Damn fine Guitar.Thanks,Victor

: I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
4-conductor humbuckers are fun to wire because they offer many combinations to play with. Some pickups have another bare wire which is there for shielding and should always be grounded. Manufacturers have their own color code, so make sure you find the right color code before connecting anything. Below is color code diagram for common pickup manufacturers.
The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
Electric guitars vary greatly in sound, look and playability. Different designs, quality of craftsmanship, electronics and choice of woods make them sound, look and feel different from one another. It's the luthiers' goal to combine the best of these elements to create the next masterpiece. Our task is seeking and offering the finest tonewoods available to make that goal a reality.

An overdubbing session is ideal for air-guitar miking because there is no leakage from other instruments. I usually prefer to maintain total isolation between the two sources, placing the guitarist and amp in separate rooms. But for some production styles, the acoustic air mic can also do double duty as a distant room mic for the amp, with the ratio of pick sound to ambience determined by mic placement and amp volume. I've recorded some very hefty-sounding rock 'n' roll power chording this way, as well as a variety of vintage-style solos and rhythm parts. At the board, a low shelving or low-midrange EQ cut, combined with a subtle high-end boost around 4 to 6 kHz, will usually help these tracks jump out of the mix.


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Generally, guitarists with an array of pedals like to put their drive pedals first. This includes your overdrive, distortion, fuzz, or boost pedals. Some guitarists have more than one of these, and they usually go at the beginning of your chain. The reason for putting them first in your pedalboard order is because you will be distorting or boosting the purest version of your guitar tone. Putting a delay pedal before distortion means that the echoes from the delay pedal would themselves become distorted, resulting in an unnatural and messy sound. If you’re using an overdrive and a boost, it’s wise to put the boost first – that sends a stronger signal into the overdrive to get the most out of it.

Hi Dan! Thanks for the kind words! As somewhat of a newbie, you may find a semi-hollow-body guitar more flexible and versatile, especially if you are still finding trying to figure out what genre you are going to focus on. If you are set on the hollow-body go for, but ,if you are on the fence, the versatility of the guitar is something to consider. Those are my thoughts. Good luck!

Gitar Tricks are listening (see quote in bold) and as a result I have upgraded my Review Rating of this awesome Online Guitar Training Program. My previous review highlighted problems with the Video Loop Feature and the lack of Speed Control I am so happy that Guitar Tricks have released an immensely improved Video Player with faster video loading time, more accurate and reliable A/B looping and added a Video Timeline Preview that displays thumbnail images of the video at various points as you hover over the timeline. Another feature of the new player is the ability to adjust the speed via the Slow Motion feature.
You have so many effects on this that you’ll find it difficult to get bored, all of which have been modelled on some of the most iconic sounds in effects pedal history including Boss, Line 6, Electro Harmonix, Z Vex and more. You have a huge amount of distortions, delays, reverbs, modulations, pitch/synth/filters, compressors/limiters, EQs, wahs, and even a looper to sculpt your sound with, all of which have been meticulously modelled to include the subtlest qualities and sound abnormalities that made these effects and their respective pedals so revered.

Fuzz was originally intended to recreate the classic 1960's tone of an overdriven tube amp combined with torn speaker cones. Oldschool guitar players (like Link Wray) (citation needed) would use a screwdriver to poke several holes through the paperboard part of the guitar amp speaker to achieve a similar sound. Since the original designs, more extreme fuzz pedals have been designed and produced, incorporating octave-up effects, oscillation, gating, and greater amounts of distortion.
Tom Petty's lead guitarist for more than 40 years, Mike Campbell never clutters up a song with notes when two or three bull's-eyes will suffice. "It's a challenge to make your statement in a short amount of time," he has said, "but I prefer that challenge as opposed to just stretching out." Listen to the skeletal hook that holds "Breakdown" together or the laconic, tone-bending solo in "You Got Lucky" to hear Campbell's ingenious use of negative space. "Michael is not one to show off," Petty once said. "What he says is essential."
Every working guitarists knows that if he doesn't have a good guitar doctor, his dreams of being a master shredder who destroys the crowd with rakes from his pick as he slides it up the string are dead. From a broken headstock to a cracked neck, a guitar technician is a master of skills. He's an electrician, a plumber, a physician and a surgeon. But if a guitarist wants to shoot fireballs out of his guitar, he'll need more than just a technician; he'll need a guitar master.
My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
Guitar pickups are quite heavily affected by the impedance of whatever they're plugged into. If it's a low impedance input, you'll end up with a muddier, flatter sound going into your amp sims. Ideally you want a high impedance input, and if the 6i6 isn't doing it a cheap-ish D.I. box will be the thing to go for. Behringer's got some that get the job done.
Beavis Audio Research – started in 2005 as a hobbyist site to share information on DIY guitar electronics. From the initial few pages of questionable designs, it has grown to a popular place for DIY freaks to visit and learn. Along the way, beavis has evolved into a small company. They strive to advance the DIY ethic and provide resources, tools, kits and products to the worldwide community of gearhounds.

PRS guitars are among the best on the market. Their style, tone and design are unique, giving them a pretty good chance against much more established brands. PRS Custom 24 has been my go-to choice, and will remain so in foreseeable future. If you are looking for good old American craftsmanship combined with a killer tone, PRS is definitely worth checking out.

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We now know why series wiring attenuates the highs, but why is it louder? Why do you end up with such a beefy, meaty tone? Let’s assume each pickup on your Strat puts out 100 x of power. When wiring two pickups in parallel, each pickup loses 3/4 of its output when combined with the other. This drops each pickup’s output to 25 x, instead of 100 x. Together, you get a total of 50 x (25 x + 25 x). This power drop is why any dual-pickup combination on your Strat doesn’t sound as loud as a single pickup.


Here we have something quite beautiful and very sweet sounding that I picked up directly from the very talented luthier himself while in Hawaii ...I liked this one because it has some very beautiful intricate inlay hand work see the gorgeous inlaied rosette and fingerboard not overstated just classicly tasteful WoW.. this is a Gorgeous all SOLID WOOD Hawaiian figured Koa Tenor Ukelele. I love the tone of this beauty and so will you its classic Uke tone is rich and full and plays like butta... Top wood : Solid Koa Back & Sides Material Solid Koa Neck Material : Solid AAA flamed grade Mahogany, Headplate wood: Solid Koa Strings : Italian Aquila Strings Fingerboard wood : Solid Rosewood Bridge wood : Solid Rosewood Nut Material : Real Buffalo Bone Finish : Polished Satin nitrocellulose instrument lacquer Scale Length : 17" Overall Length : 26 1/2 "( 673 mm ) Fingerboard Width At Nut : 35 mm Fingerboard Width At 12th Fret: 43.8 mm # Of Frets Total : 20 Hand picked for its great solid construction and impecable workmanship fit & finish are top notch, excellent volume & tone -playability and beauty. You will be hard pressed for find one this sweet for twice the price... Just $329. Direct comes with a top shelf hard shell case / included .

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In fact, guitarists are on a whole different planet when it comes to defining cool. When you play guitar, you can get away with all kinds of acts normal people could never attempt. Face it: An ordinary dude could not walk down the street wearing a leopard-skin jacket, high-heel cowboy boots, flowing silk scarves and dozens of silver bangles without getting beaten up within minutes.
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