Gut strings were the original strings for the classical stylist.  They were literally made from the guts of farm animals, mostly sheep.  The intestines and the process used to make these strings became more expensive than nylon and thus have fallen out of favor.  Even though you may hear the term “cat gut” strings, this style of string was never made from the innards of our cute, cuddly, feline friends… just the beasts we like tend to use as a food source.
Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.
If you're a Zakk Wylde fan, take a look at his signature Les Paul or the exclusive Graveyard Disciple with its authentic Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. For the metalheads among us, there's the Brendon Small Thunderhorse Explorer, a mahogany axe based on the one Brendon plays in concert with Dethklok. To satisfy Beatlemaniacs, Epiphone also has a Casino guitar inspired by John Lennon’s famous six string.

Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold


The core metal used for strings is an important variable to consider.  Not only does the string core affect tone, but it affects the tension strength as well.  The heavier the string gauge, the stronger the core metal needed.  You don’t want premature string breakage, especially during a gig.  Your options absolutely depend on the tone you desire, but they also depend on the string gauge you prefer for the genre of music you play.
Anytime a single coil-sized humbucker is split, a tiny coil is the one seeing the strings, so the volume is going to drop. You can split to the other coil, or set the switch to wire the pickup in parallel, which will keep it hum cancelling. However, splitting to the other coil in a neck position Cool Rails probably won’t be a big difference in sound since the coils are pretty close together and pretty small.

You might have previously dropped your jaw at another stunning performance taken from the same session in 2015 wherein Swift delivered a breathtaking piano rendition of "Out Of The Woods," and honestly, I can't help but feel that this is Swift in her natural element (probably thanks to her country music roots) and I want more of just her, her magnificent voice, and an instrument.
Besides instrument inputs and speaker outputs (typically via 1/4" jacks), an amp may have other inputs and outputs. These can include an auxiliary input jack (sometimes with its own level control, for a drum machine), "send" and "return" jacks to create an effects loop, a “line out” jack and an extension speaker jack. Practice amps sometimes have a 1/4" headphone jack, or stereo RCA or mini jacks for connecting a CD player, portable media player or other sound source. Some guitar amps have an XLR input so that a microphone can be plugged in for singing. Guitar amps that include a mic input are in effect small, portable PA systems. Some amps, typically bass amps, have an XLR connector to provide a balanced output from the preamp section to go into a PA system or recording input.

Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 

Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39
You asked, and you shall receive, Sonicbids blog readers. Per multiple requests, here's my guide to, "When the hell do I start turning these knobs, and where do they go?" But before we begin, I offer you the fine print: These references are general ideas for where to begin to look for sonic issues with particular sounds, instruments, and voices. I'm not going to tell you "always notch this 9 dB here and add 3 dB here with a wide boost and, voila, perfect sound!" because it's unfortunately just not that simple. So before you message me, "Aaron, I notched out so much 250 Hz out of my snare, I snapped the knob off the console, and it still sounds muddy!" just know that not all sound sources are created equal.
The legendary ES-335 is a widely used element in practically every genre imaginable. Often equipped with double humbuckers, the ES-335’s semi-hollow body delivers a warm, woody sound. And when players like Larry Carlton or B.B. King get their hands on one, the sound can be likened closer to silk or butter. Despite being closely associated with blues artists like King, the ES-335 isn’t just a blues guitar. You can find them in the hands of just about anyone in any genre—from rocker Dave Grohl to Latino sensation Trini Lopez.
There are several good reasons why you might want to wire your Strat pickups in series. If you want more volume and midrange out of your pickups, the parallel/series switching may be the perfect option. As I mentioned, parallel wiring of two pickups is what you are used to hearing from a Strat. Parallel wiring adds transparency and clarity to the tone.
Noise gate: Noise gates attenuate hum, hiss, and static in the signal by greatly diminishing the volume when the signal falls below a set threshold. Noise gates are often used by electric guitarist who play with vintage amps, which can have unwanted hum in the tone, and by guitarists from heavy metal who use high distortion levels, which add noise to the signal even when no notes are being played. Noise gates mute the signal when it falls below a certain threshold. This means that during bars of rest for the guitarist in a song, the hum or noise from the amp or distortion pedal will not be heard by the audience. Noise gates are expanders—meaning that, unlike compressors, they increase the dynamic range of an audio signal to make quiet sounds even quieter.[60] If used with extreme settings and combined with reverb, they can create unusual sounds, such as the gated drum effect used in 1980s pop songs, a style popularized by the Phil Collins song In the Air Tonight.[62][63]
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Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.

Many bass players believe that tube amplifiers produce a "warmer" or more "natural" sound than solid state amplifiers when lightly or moderately driven, and more pleasing distortion characteristics when overdriven. Some performers also believe that tube amps have a greater level of perceived loudness for a given amount of amplifier power. Even though tube amplifiers produce more heat than solid state amplifiers, few manufacturers of tube amplifiers include cooling fans in the amplifiers' chassis. Usually adequate cooling is provided by passive convection. Adequate airflow is needed to prevent excessive heat from shortening the tubes' lifespan or producing tonal inconsistencies.[13] Tube amplifiers require more maintenance than solid state transistor amplifiers, such as replacing vacuum tubes or rectifying the tubes.


With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.
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You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!
For solidbodies there is usually a one- or two-letter prefix indicating the body style or general model. This is followed by a dash and a number which usually indicates the number of pickups (e.g., J-1), although on occasion the number indicates the year of introduction (e.g., TG-54). Guitars bearing a vibrato usually appended an “L” after the pickup number (e.g., MJ-2L).

Beginning about 1975, Hoshino began introducing original guitar and bass models to the market. At first, their original designs were subtle variations on the copy models. For example, the "Custom Agent" (model 2405) was basically a Les Paul with a fancy scroll headstock, a fancy pick guard, and, yes, fancy inlays on the neck and body. The Professional model 2671 was a Les Paul with a "vined" neck and a fancy headstock. But soon, the overall shapes of the guitars changed, and models known as the "Weir" (after Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead), "Artist" and "Musician" were introduced. By 1978, Hoshino had ceased production of all of its copy models and was truly producing 100% original designs. These guitars are not just beautiful, but are some of the best crafted guitars of all time, by any manufacturer, and represent the pinacle of guitar-making skill and quality.
Yamaha is famous around the world for its incredible, quality, instruments. Its electric guitars are no exception. The Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC112V Electric Guitar, Old Violin Sunburst is another example of Yamaha's on point production. This guitar has a solid alder body, a maple bolt neck, rosewood fingerboard, and a five-position switch with coil tap. Plus there's the tremolo - a vintage tremolo with block saddles.
Guitar pedals and other effects, including an early version of the wah-wah pedal used by Jimi Hendrix and the Tone Bender fuzzbox pedal, a Vox variation on the famous original Gary Hurst Tone Bender (used by Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin and Jeff Beck of the Yardbirds as well as The Beatles, Spencer Davis and others), were also marketed by Vox and later on manufactured in Italy.

The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?
Here’s my intuitive explanation to why we are hearing what we are hearing: What makes a guitar sound like a guitar, as opposed to for example a piano or a harp, is the spectrum of overtones that are generated when the strings are plucked. This also makes two guitars sound different from each other, despite having the same make/model of pickups. Any component that is involved in how the vibrations in the string is created (this is kind of what the myth debunking video refers to as “timbre”, but then goes on to equate to amplitude and frequency, as if the tonewood would alter the notes, as opposed to the tone) affects the sound. For example:
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.

Overdrive distortion is the most well known of all distortions. Although there aren't many electronic differences between a distortion an overdrive, the main audible one is that a distortion does exactly as the name suggests; distorts and clips the signal no matter what volume is going through it, the amount of distortion usually remains relatively the same. This is where an overdrive differs. Most overdrives are built to emulate the sound of a tube amp overdriving and therefore give the player control of the clipping through dynamics. This simply means that the effect gives a clean sound for quieter volumes and a more clipped or distorted sound for louder volumes.
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Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.


To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.
Now that you’ve learned how to purchase a guitar, how to play guitar chords, and the basics of playing a guitar, you’ll just need to maintain practice! Use the ChordBuddy device as long as you need to, removing tabs as you progress. You’ll be ready to perform for your family and friends in no time at all. When you see how easy it is to finally practice and play the guitar, you’re not going to want to give up! See how ChordBuddy works, and discover how beginners, teachers, senior citizens, people with arthritis, and those with disabilities can play the guitar. To contact us, click here or call 877-947-2641.
These negative reviewers don’t understand that their guitar arrived exactly as most mail-ordered guitars arrive: out of tune and probably needing a full setup by a professional guitar tech. That’s just the reality of the world we live in: mail-ordered guitars are rarely setup properly before they’re shipped, and even if they are they can get knocked out-of-whack during shipping. So when your guitar arrives, know that it’ll probably be out of tune, might buzz a bit, and it may need a full setup to play its best. Very seldom are these things the result of a defective or damaged guitar.
this is literally the worst piece of cow dung in the industry. I wouldn't even call it a guitar, it's so poorly made. Management, especially the CEO, don't care a bit about quality, the only thing that matters is their unrealistically high production numbers. the production processes are so archaic they are amateur, and they have the audacity to call it the worlds finest guitar. all of this stems from the CEO and his manic psychotic neurotic management style (he has to sign off on EVERYTHING: new hires, transfers within the company, promotions, raises, budgets, any funding for new parts or machines.

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Modifying this guitar is also quite easy and you can add things to it to make it a lot better. Overall, it is just the right value for your money item to have. Again, if you are an intermediate or expert level player then avoid this guitar. If you are a beginner & looking for the lowest price electric guitar for beginners clicks the button on this one. With the price you pay, I am pretty sure you will be impressed by the performance of this guitar. Here is the link to buy this product or know more about it –
Orion Blue Book Online (at UsedPrice.com): The Orion Blue Book Online will help you determine how much nearly anything that you own is worth, including guitars. This includes electric and acoustic guitars, as well as bass guitars, amplifiers, and other guitar peripherals. The company behind Used Price works in conjunction with Orion Bluebook, which makes this the largest website dedicated to pricing used musical instruments. The website is browsable by the first letter of your instrument's manufacturer or make. It has every major guitar manufacturer and most obscure ones.
In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
Consider the use of a power soak. A power soak is a supplemental piece of equipment used in-line to reduce the volume output of an amp while maintaining tone and sustain. The signal moves through the line to the power soak, which absorbs part of the full power of the amp. This adjusted signal is transmitted to the amp, resulting in quieter volumes.[26]

Most, if not all of us have at least given some thought to learning to play the guitar. It is, after all, an instrument which takes the leading role in virtually every genre of popular music. No matter what type of music you aspire to play, there is almost certainly an important part there for you as a would-be guitar player. Of course, learning to play begins with actually owning a guitar. 
A Reamp® box is essentially the reverse of a DI box and converts a balanced signal into an unbalanced signal suitable for driving guitar amps. Radial makes three different versions of this device with variations in features and in quality of the transformers. For an introduction to reamping there is the passive ProRMP™, for high quality reamping there is the Reamp JCR™, and at the top of the line is the dual-channel active X-Amp™.
The amplifier you choose to use will have a huge impact on the sound. Valve amps are still king for most players, but they can often be impractical in home recording scenarios. Though we’d all love to mic up a cranked Marshall Plexi every time a classic-rock sound is required, these days software and hardware modelling is so good that the results are almost indistinguishable from the ‘real thing’ in a finished mix. Though pricey, the Kemper Profiling Amp and Fractal Audio Axe-Fx produce seriously realistic results, while almost as impressive are software solutions such as IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube and Guitar Rig from Native Instruments. If you are recording on a Mac or iPad using GarageBand, don’t discount the built-in amp and pedal simulations either.
They say good things come in small packages. Well, "they" weren't wrong! The Orange Micro Terror Guitar Amplifier Head is no bigger than a lunchbox, but packs enough power to stand up to some of the bigger amplifiers out there, especially when you connect it to a 2x12 or even a 4x12 cab. It features a combination of solid state and valve technology and throws out 20w of pure power thanks to the 1 x 12AX7/ECC83 pre amp valve. Easy to use, affordable and even easier to carry around, you can easily gig with this or use it as a practice amp at home when coupled with the custom built Orange PPC108 1x8 Closed Back Speaker Cabinet.
Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.
Another thing to keep in mind is the purpose of the amplifier. And I don’t mean the actual purpose. We all know that I’m pretty sure. What I mean is what you will be using it for? Are you a beginner who wants to practice a lot in their basement before they ever take their guitar and amp into the daylight or maybe you have been playing for quite some time and want to record your music. MAYBE you have gathered all your strength and confidence (and your band) and decided to gig. All of these situations are somewhat different and various amps work for different purposes. While there are a lot of amps that do all of them together, sometimes getting an amp just for practice might be more efficient and, of course, affordable.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case

Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.


SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
yea, i’ve looked on a lot of websites. The way the 5-way switch is explained here helps a lot. Actually, the Dimarzio site has the closest wiring schematic that I’ve seen. I tried it and I got 2 out of the 5 positions to work. The problem is that all 3 pickups are running on both the working settings, just the bridge is more defined on the one setting and the neck is more defined on the other.

If you do have lead solder, the melting temperature is much lower, making for easier connections, but remember to wash your hands after you're done, and not to touch your face while working - lead is poisonous. With lead-free solder, the rosin lets off toxic smoke, so use a small desk fan to blow it away from you while you work, and open a window if possible.


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The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.
Every beginner guitarist deserves to learn on an instrument that's built by experienced craftsman who use only the finest materials. However, for many novice players, it's difficult to know for sure what's considered a high quality instrument. To make things easier, many popular guitar brands offer guitar value packages. These packages consist of all the essential pieces of equipment that a learning guitarist would use in the developmental stages of their playing. Within this section, you'll find more than enough guitar value package options to choose from.
Fender came up with the California Series lineup of acoustic guitars to celebrate its Southern California roots. Every aspect of this guitar is uniquely Fender, from the Strat-style headstock and vintage-style slot tuners to the slim-taper neck and preamp, which is the product of the collaboration between Fender and trusted electronics brand Fishman.

As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.


The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.
The first guitar developed was the K1 Series. Launched in 2000, this instrument had a dreadnought cutaway design and used inexpensive materials such as laminated spruce for tops, and sapele for back and sides. Kona Guitars then launched the K2 series after which it diversified, at present offering over 30 models of guitars, ukuleles, violins, and other instruments.
Delay is essentially echo, but it can be so much more when used well. The two most important knobs are “time” and “repeats”. Time will increase the length between repeats, and repeats will adjust how many echoes are heard. While it is tempting to max the repeats and enter space rock land, less can be more. Used gently you can get reverb or slap-back rockabilly sounds. With careful knob setting you can even create harmonies and loops like The Edge.
Open tunings improve the intonation of major chords by reducing the error of third intervals in equal temperaments. For example, in the open-G overtones tuning G-G-D-G-B-D, the (G,B) interval is a major third, and of course each successive pair of notes on the G- and B-strings is also a major third; similarly, the open-string minor-third (B,D) induces minor thirds among all the frets of the B-D strings. The thirds of equal temperament have audible deviations from the thirds of just intonation: Equal temperaments is used in modern music because it facilitates music in all keys, while (on a piano and other instruments) just intonation provided better-sounding major-third intervals for only a subset of keys.[65] "Sonny Landreth, Keith Richards and other open-G masters often lower the second string slightly so the major third is in tune with the overtone series. This adjustment dials out the dissonance, and makes those big one-finger major-chords come alive."[66]

Lol I agree I'm a nirvana freak, not a kurt freak.... but dam fender all you can make is the same butt ugly designs that you have made for years come up with a compleatly new body design and I mean COMPLETELY NEW and just use the same components or better for a new guitar called, idk caster lol or DOUCHECASTER lol don't matter to me just hive us something new
An octave pedal listens to what note you’re playing and adds the next octave up or down (depending on your settings) making it sound like someone is playing the octave note with you. If you’re familiar with guitar or just learning, you’ll know that an octave is the distance between one musical note and it’s corresponding note at a higher or lower pitch. For example, if you play an open E string and then play the E string on the 12th fret, it will sound the same, just an octave higher.
I use the boss me-8 for 15 years, now with the boss me-25 i have the same kick ass sound plus some more effects and customisations, also it comes with a beutifull surprise that i don't even expect, this guiar pedal is also an audio interfase that suport digital audio via USB, is really amazing you will not regret, it doesn't come whit a power supply only batteries, buy one separatly.
GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.

Another reason that some bassists prefer the "bass stack" approach is that it is much easier to customize a separate preamp/amp/speaker cabinet setup with a bass stack than it is to customize a combo amp. With a bass stack setup, a professional bassist can handpick the brands of preamplifier, graphic equalizer, power amplifier and speaker cabinet(s) they wish to use. It is also much easier to replace defective components with a bass stack than with a combo amp. If the power amp on a combo amp fails, only an electronics technician can repair or replace the power amp. With a bass stack, in which the power amp may be a separate component in a rackmount road case, the defective power amp can be removed with only a screwdriver and a new power amp can be mounted in the rack and connected to the other components. This facilitates replacement of components while on tour. Touring bassists may travel with one or more backup amplifier heads, to use in case the main amplifier head develops a technical problem.

In 1959, the Special was given the same new double-cutaway body shape as the Junior and the TV received in 1958. However, when the new design was applied to the two-pickup Special, the cavity for the neck pickup overlapped the neck-to-body joint. This weakened the joint to the point that the neck could break after only moderate handling. The problem was soon resolved when Gibson designers moved the neck pickup farther down the body, producing a stronger joint and eliminating the breakage problem.
Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place between "jazz-clean" all the way to "blues dirty." If you're aiming high, Ibanez has an ARTSTAR for you.

We have taken a look at the many varieties of electric guitars available in today’s market (you can read about the types of acoustic guitars and even guitar strings as well).  With this many options, it is wise to consider the genre and tone you are searching for by researching what your favorite artists choose to craft their sound.   Your choice may be based upon visual appeal and cool factor, but make sure the instrument you choose is capable of producing the tone of the style of music you play from your heart!  It's a large selection of body styles but hopefully now you're also comfortable with all of the sounds of the various types of electric guitars.
My brother had the single-pickup (neck) version of this exact guitar c. 1969, badged as a Tempo. I wound up with it but in the ’80s I butchered it into a four-string “piccolo bass” with a sawed-down Badass II bridge, a Bigsby, a Seymour Duncan stacked-coil J-bass pickup, and a set of phase/split switches. I sent it back to him in the mid-’90s and he tossed it. Now that I’ve gotten into guitar over the past few years, I’m sorry I don’t still have it in its original condition. I don’t believe it was ever plugged into a proper tube guitar amp.
As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
There are a few approaches you can take to get started browsing all this tablature. For example, you might start by looking for music that fits a certain theme. Alfred's 2015 Modern Christian Hits, the Hal Leonard The Ultimate Christmas Guitar Songbook and the Hal Leonard VH1 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs are just three examples of tab books aimed at specific genres or occasions. Another idea would be to narrow down your options to tablature with included CDs; they give you the option to play along, making the songs easier and quicker to learn.
It has been said that Barney never played his signature Kays. On the contrary... Barney Kessel has been photographed in concert with the Kay K8700 Jazz Special on multiple occasions, has made appearances at Waldo's Jazz Club on the television classic "Johnny Staccato - Television's Jazz Detective" and has been confirmed by son Dan (who also recorded with the Artist on several famous recordings) to have used the Artist to record countless rock, pop, r&b and blues hits with the most popular performers of the early '60s.

Before buying any guitar you have to fix a budget range, so that later on you do not end up blowing off more money than you actually wanted to. Yes, it is true that buying a guitar can be expensive, but you do not have to burn a hole in your pocket in order to buy one. Just have a price range fixed and then search for the best ones accordingly. You may not find the good ones right at the beginning, but eventually you will definitely find the perfect one that will even last long.


Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.
Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""
The EC-1000ET is an all-mahogany single-cut loaded with an set of EMG 81 and 60 active humbuckers, a comfortably modern neck and a high level of construction quality. Its key selling point, however, is a fitted EverTune bridge -  unlike other tuning systems, it doesn't tune your guitar for you or offer altered tunings. Instead, once set and tuned, it simply aims to stay there, thanks to a series of tension-calibrated springs and levers. We tried everything we could to knock it out of whack: huge, three-step bends, wildly exaggerated string stretching... we even put the guitar into a freezer. It came back perfectly in tune every single time.  What's more, a guitar that's perfectly tuned and intonated up and down the neck seems to play much more musically. We're not aware of any tone compromises, either. The EC sounds as full and aggressive as ever, with the more mellow tones of the neck EMG being pleasantly rounded, and all bereft of any metallic spring clank. If never going out of tune is important to you, this is one of the best electric guitars going.

Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]
I knew what it is that I need to do. The friend who worked on it with me said when we were finished, "Oh right, it sounds like all your records all put together." I guess that got the job down. Without getting too technical about it or elitist, it kind of does the job of a Gretsch, sonically, and a Rickenbacker, sonically, but I play it like a Fender. It's kind of handy, really. I used to it pretty much exclusively during my time with Modest Mouse. And totally exclusively during my time with the Cribs. I've used it nearly entirely on the new solo record.
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If you’re looking to get this pedal as a first in your arsenal, then don’t worry at all, you can keep it simple with the offered Reverb dial as it offers high-quality effects which you can tune to your liking. This astonishing “stomp-box” by TC covers guitarist’s needs who possess different ranges of experience, all available at a fantastic startup price.


What makes the RG421 particularly interesting is the neck. The Ibanez Wizard III neck used is thin, fast, and very comfortable. These aspects makes it suitable for shredding as well as playing rhythm guitar. The bridge is a simple fixed unit that is paired with an above average set of tuning machines on the headstock. Overall, the RG421 is capable of holding a tuning even if you go a bit wild with string bending.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.
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Many community, vocational or technical colleges offer technical and musical programs for those who wish to become guitar technicians. Many are instrument construction and/or repair programs. Guitar tech courses include construction, set-up, structural repair, fretwork, structural design and finishing for acoustic and electric guitars. Any courses involving musical theory and music technology may be helpful in advancing a guitar tech's career.

Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the ubiquitous ii-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression (which, in contrast to a blues-style 12 bar progression, may have two or more chord changes per bar) the minor jazz-style blues form, the I-vi-ii-V based "rhythm changes" progression, and the variety of modulation-rich chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.
Before it gets shipped to you, each Monoprice guitar undergoes a setup, tuning, and inspection process by Master Luthier Roger Gresco here in Southern California. The setup ensures that the neck is straight, the action is right, and that it will stay in tune. Additionally, it comes with everything you need to get started, including strings (installed), a heavy-duty zippered black gig bag with shoulder strap, and a truss-rod wrench.

Looper pedal: A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase, riff or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance (live looping) or they can be pre-recorded. By using a looper pedal, a singer-guitarist in a one person band can play the backing chords (or riffs) to a song, loop them with the pedal, and then sing and do a guitar solo over the chords. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops, enabling the performer to create the effect of a full band.[87] The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape loop effects are still used by some studio producers who want a vintage sound. Digital loop effects recreate this effect using an electronic memory.[88]
The trust you place in a guitar master's steady hand, keen mind and eye for detail when you hand him your baby is almost too much to bear. It's more hope than faith. For you need someone who's knowledgeable, but not just book smart. A guitar master needs to know more than just how to solder the yellow and green wires together, glue a new bridge and replace a few strings. He must know its rhythm, that steady beat pulsing through the wood.

You are likely to encounter phase issues when you have the same sound hitting a microphone from two different positions. The more mics you use or the more distance is put between mic and speaker in a reflective room, the more likely this will occur. The result is an effect called “comb filtering,” which cancels out certain frequencies and emphasizes others, creating an odd sound. Part of the reason for using distant-miking techniques is to obtain some “room sound” in the tone, which is created in part by such reflections, but at times these will have an adverse affect on the focus and solidity of your guitar sound. If a distant position with just one mic is sounding considerably more thin, loose, and washy than a close mic on the same amp, move it around, experiment with other locations, and see if you can eliminate these issues through mic placement alone. Otherwise, consider using a baffle or two to shield the mic from specific reflective surfaces.
1Note that no signal processing is instantaneous, so every effect adds some small delay. For digital effects, this is the measurable and sometimes notable latency of something millisecond-ish (hopefully not more than a few ms). In simple analogue effects like distortion it's at most in the nanosecond range and basically neglectable. Any equaliser/filter component also introduce phase delay, which can be interpreted as delaying various frequencies by different amounts; but this too is normally not noticeable and works quite differently from a digital delay.
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.
Pickups are transducers that convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating guitar string into electrical energy by way of electromagnetic induction. It is a fundamental concept studied in physics and electronics that a changing magnetic field will generate a current through a coil of wire. The electric guitar pickup uses permanent magnets and pole pieces to form a steady magnetic field in the vicinity of each individual guitar string. An opposite magnetic polarity is induced in the metallic (steel core) guitar string when mounted above its respective pole piece and when the string moves, the otherwise steady magnetic field changes accordingly. Wire is wrapped around the poles thousands of times to form a coil within the magnetic field to pick up an induced current and voltage.
After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:

While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.


By 1939, Supros had grown again. The ’38 line was essentially intact with the addition of a number of new resonator acoustics. New was the No. 23 Supro Arcadia Guitar, a sunburst birch-bodied resonator made by Harmony. This had a simple nickel coverplate with two concentric circles of round holes, a slightly-rounded head with an oval Supro metal logo plate. The fingerboard had four dot inlays, the body two f-holes. Cost was $22.50.
Travis adapted the syncopated rhythms of Ragtime Piano music to the guitar – (the term syncopation refers to deliberately playing off the regular beat). Travis would pick the strings alternating the bass note on the low E and A strings. This style of finger picking was given the name ‘Travis picking’ and went on to influence Chet Atkins and Scott Moore’s ‘Rockabilly’ sound.
One unique application of a fuzz pedal involves starving the pedal of voltage--which will produce a scratchy, velcro-like tone. This is desirable by some musicians because it is a highly unique sound and is often employed by more avant garde musicians. This sound can be achieved by purchasing a power supply with a sag output, or using a nearly dead battery, although the pedal won't last long when using that method.
What style of music do you play? While there are many versatile guitar amps that can be used for many styles of music, if you play a particular style of music a majority of the time, then you should get an amplifier that best suits it. Do you play acoustic or electric? Certain guitar amplifiers are designed specifically for acoustic guitars although it is possible to play an acoustic through any amp. In terms of styles, jazz players typically do not need an overdrive option as clean tones are best suited for that style of music. Blues aficionados will be happiest with a clean channel plus an overdrive channel with plenty of sustain, such as one finds on many vintage Fender models. Shredders will require an amp that will accept distortion pedals without losing signal quality. Do your research regarding which guitar amps are best suited for the type of music you play.
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The company makes four models, the FS (fingerstyle), GC, D, and the Jumbo, each retailing at a flat price of $8,880 as of September 2011, making them amongst the most expensive new guitars in the world. The company also provides the option for customized furnishings such as exotic woods, buffalo horn nuts and saddles, mammoth ivory bridge pins and nuts, and specialized inlay and cutaway designs etc for an additional fee. The customized Petros guitars made of rare woods such as African Blackwood, Ceylon Satinwood or old flitch matched Brazilian Rosewood are sold for an extra $4,000 which with other furnishings such as ivory bridge pins can fetch over $13,000 in total.[2]

The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.
STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.

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For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.


Hey! I just opened up my 1984 g&l for the first time today and I found a design very similar to this. I had always loved the tone control on it but was too nervous to open it up for whatever goofy reason. I may try to draw it out and share it but maybe include a picture at some point as well. I’m glad someone else has looked at this because it definitely threw me for a loop when I first saw the two caps both headed to ground.
All of the guitars on this list except for the Blueridge BR-160 are equipped with an electronics system that make them stage- and studio-ready. You can simply plug and play when you need to perform in front of an audience in a crowded or big venue where there’s a lot of ambient noise. If you don’t need amplification – for example if you’re just practicing at home – these guitars sound great unplugged as well.

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Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Orange
Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.
DIY Guitars is Australia’s home of the best guitar kits. We stock a large range of kits at great prices, which will be delivered to your door! Whether you’re looking to shred like a madman, or play some classical blues riffs, we have the guitar kit for you! We also stock high quality ColorTone guitar stains and plenty of guitar accessories to help make the perfect guitar to suit your needs.
There have been a series of the Boss RV pedals, some of which have included delay as part of the package. The RV-6 doesn't brand as a reverb/delay pedal, but it does have a "+Delay" mode that incorporates it into the reverb's decay trail. While it doesn't quite meet the same decorated feature list as the HOF (no true bypass, no analog signal, less modes) the RV-6 does add an expression pedal option, which gives you some added flexibility that might be more helpful in performance situations.
Hawaiians were still available, but no information was available to me except on the EG-TW which was an eight-string double-neck with three telescoping legs. Each neck had two pickups, a selector switch, volume and tone control. Also offered was a curious instrument called a “Harp Guitar,” which was some sort of three-legged Hawaiian console with four electronic pedals!
Integrated MIDI Learn and automation tools streamline your workflow, while the dedicated Live View makes GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER the perfect companion when performing. A range of versatile built-in tools assist you in the studio and on stage: A Metronome with different syncing options, two Tapedecks for easy recording and play-along, a Tuner and a Preset Volume tool with Dry/Wet settings are all at your disposal.
Shimming a neck: The best shims are one piece and the full size of the neck pocket. For this veneer from the hardware store works well. However, it is very hard to get an even taper on these. The next best option is to use masking tape. Masking tape is paper which is wood fiber so it's almost as good as a solid shim, and much better than the smaller shims which leave large gaps which impedes the transfer of vibration, and could cause problems later on. To make a tape shim, lay strips of tape side by side perpendicular to neck, and add layers to provide the taper. i.e. stripe 1- 1 layer, stripe 2- 2 layers, stripe 3- 3 layers. Place the neck in the pocket, mark outline of pocket, and trim just inside outline.

Gold models had single coil pickups with clear silver plastic covers and phillips head bolt adjustable pole pieces. The Upbeat model came with an optional transparent black plastic cover. These pickups appeared on Kay instruments through the late 1960s and are sometimes called “Kessel” or “Kleenex Box” pickups.[citation needed] The Jazz Special Bass has a single blade pickup as used on the K-161 and K-162 (tilted slightly towards the neck at the treble side), as well as a distinctive, oversized headstock.


The guitar pedal community is enormous. From the big name brands like Boss and Electro-Harmonix, to the lesser-known boutique effect pedal brands, such as Big Ear N.Y.C and Adventure Audio (the creators of the Fuzz Peaks pedal). This vast sea of guitar pedal manufacturers makes sure that if there is a tone or sound you are looking for – you can probably find a guitar pedal to do the job. However, sometimes you need something done your way, and that is where building DIY guitar pedals comes in.
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I am old enough to remember Kay guitars back in the 70's. And what I remember of playing them is they were poorly put together, poor action (like mile high action), poor sounding pickups etc...They also seemed to always be the guitars that were the cheapest in all the mom n' pop stores, and the ones that were just sold to students, if they were sold at all. In other words,
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches (18.4 cm). Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars' compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.
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