Humbuckers use two magnets, one which works as a pickup and one which cancels out 60-cycle hum (hence the name humbucker). These pickups generally have a darker voice and a higher output, which allows them to perform better under high levels of distortion. These pickups also tend to sound better playing jazz, as the genre benefits from the darker voice these pickups provide.

Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type, still widely regarded as the tone machine. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.

I first met Ralph Novak in 1980, when he was working at Subway Guitars in Berkeley, California. I'd assembled a kit Strat and it needed a refret. My monstrosity was painted Shell Pink in tribute to Strats from Fender's surf era. Little did I know what was to come of Ralph's distant future. He was the fret guru in Berkeley, and his work was astounding - the best I'd ever seen! Ironically, Vintage Guitar columnist Stephen White was also working at Subway at the time. So began our journey into luthiery madness! Fast forward to 1989.
Chris Broderick (b. 1970) is the lead guitarist for Megadeth, formerly of Jag Panzer and Nevermore. His main guitar was a 7-string RG model. During the recording of Endgame, he started using 6-string Ibanez S series guitars, which are painted with artwork from various Megadeth albums. This is because Dave Mustaine didn't want Broderick to use his 7-strings in the studio. He has since switched to Jackson Guitars.
4.) Check the guitar’s string height by pressing down on the first, second, and third fret. You should be able to do so with minimal effort. Come to the 12th fret and press down. The distance from the top of fret to the bottom of the string should be no more than three times. If it is five times, the guitar may have a warped neck or too high of a bridge.
When Levon Helm of The Band sang "I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin' about half past dead" in "The Weight," he wasn’t alluding to a weary pilgrim’s desire for salvation. Rather, he was singing about a mythological trip to Nazareth, Pennsylvania, home of C. F. Martin & Co., makers of Martin flat top acoustic guitars. Founded in 1833 by a German immigrant named Christian Friedrich Martin, whose father was also an instrument maker, Martin...Continue Reading

The Univox/Aria Les Paul openly copied its American original, but would never be mistaken for it because it continued many characteristics typical of Japanese production at the time; a bolt-on neck with the usual narrow fingerboard, sitting relatively high on the body, zero frets, block inlays (with rounded corners) and rounded ends. The headstock was a copy of the Gibson open book. And, obviously, it didn’t have Gibson humbuckers, favoring instead a design with 12 adjustable poles in a metal cover with a narrow black insert slit in the middle, sitting on black surrounds. Controls were standard three-way with two volumes and tones. The knobs were those tall, skinny gold kind seen on many early Japanese copies. Hardware was gold-plated. These first Univox Les Paul copies survived into the early ’70s, but were probably gone by around ’74. By ’71, the model was called either the Mother or the R&B Guitar Outfit and was available in either black (U1982) or gold (U1983) finishes. Also by ’71, the Univox logo had changed from the early plastic version to the more common outlined block letter decal.
Among the popular performers of Hawaiian (and most other types of) music on the Vaudeville music hall circuit was Roy Smeck (1900-1994). Smeck was a talented instrumentalist who played guitar, banjo, ukulele, and lap steel guitar, earning the sobriquet “Wizard of the Strings.” Smeck made quite a few recordings and starred in part of the first “sound on disk” movie that was released in 1926. Like many other performers, Smeck endorsed a number of instruments by various manufacturers over the years, but is probably best known for the line of Harmonies introduced in 1927 with the pear-shaped Vita-Uke. Smeck’s name would be associated with Harmony instruments until near the end of the company’s run in 1973.

The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)
Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!
I found myself un-obligated, bored and holding a fist full of cash one Friday afternoon, so I wandered into my local guitar shop. With a new found love of single coil pickups I had been eyeballing the Gretsch and Guild hollow bodies unfortunately too poor to actually buy one. On this afternoon, however, I played the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It was love at first strum. Mine is called Cognac Burst. The satin finish on these instruments is beautiful, and give it a vintage, played look. This guitar has a really nice feel in terms of the neck and the thickness of the body. I have fairly long fingers and the neck is comfortable to play. It feels to me, a bit like the thicker necks on the Les Pauls of the late 50s. When I got the guitar, the shop said they'd dial it in for me for free, but frankly, I have no complaints as it is. With the classic style floating bridge you can drop the action impossibly low before you start to get fret buzz. After I brought mine home, I did just that and it plays like a dream. The frets are finished well and there is a bevel on the edge of the fret board and frets that keep them out of the way if you're in the habit of sliding your hand up and down the neck quickly. The Kingpin has a warm mellow tone when unplugged that is perfect for playing jazz and blues. I also enjoy the lower volume of the guitar since it has f holes when I play later in the evening. Plugged in, the P90 kills and sounds good clean and driven. It also retains that warm, mellow tone when played without distortion. I haven't had any trouble with feedback as I tend to keep the volume a bit lower for small spaces. My one complaint is the hideously ugly case, that costs 80 bucks. It's like its made of extra tough styrofoam. I understand they were going for lightness, but it's just ugly. All in all though, this guitar is a great choice and plays as well as my Gibson Les Paul and my buddies Gretsch 51... whatever.
70s Morris D-28 Gorgeous Rosewood body Dreadnaught Acoustic Japanes Vintage BOOMER with Martin Set Up Just in folks get the jump on this being processed now- pictured etc measured and pictured We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle se as well as upgraded bridge Pins to solid Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from woods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic Dreadnought style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. More info soon .
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 45mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.4" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Antique Blonde
Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.
Ibanez are a Japanese musical instrument company. Although Yamaha is a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez exceeds expectations for electric guitars. This brand of guitars stands out in the world of rock guitars. They gained popularity in the 1980s when they introduced their original designs for guitars based on Steve Vai’s JEM Universal. Their designs have since become some of the biggest selling metal guitars. The Ibanez guitars are used by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Satriani. In addition, Ibanez guitars tend to be very affordable, giving you a great guitar for a cheaper price.

Also still in the line in ’66 were our old friends, the MJ series. These were essentially unchanged except for a new striped metal guard, the new hooked headstock, and a new chrome-covered oval pickup with an oval indentation stamped in the center and six flat, round poles. Available were the MJ-3L (Teisco Del Rey ET-300), MJ-2L (promoted in Japan, but not the U.S.) and MJ-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-120). The MJ-1 had a new on/off rocker switch and a second rocker for solo/rhythm. Promoted in Japan, but not the U.S., was the little BS-101 bass, pretty much unchanged from before.
Aaron Staniulis is not only a freelance live sound and recording engineer, but also an accomplished musician, singer, and songwriter. He has spent equal time on both sides of the microphone working for and playing alongside everyone from local bar cover bands to major label recording artists, in venues stretching from tens to tens of thousands of people. Having seen both sides at all levels gives him the perfect perspective for shedding light on the "Angry Sound Guy." You can find out more about what he’s up to at aaronstaniulis.com.
Martin makes classic guitars that have been featured in countless hit tunes. While they are best known for their top-of-the-line $2,000+ models, Martin also makes great guitars for any budget. Martin guitars always honor their tradition while continuing to strive for a better instrument. Give Martin’s new 17 Series a try if you want to see that theory in action.
Nothing sounds as good as a tube amp turned up to 10. You can do this with some old amps, and they will sound fairly clean; others will explode. Use caution and keep an eye out for plumes of smoke. Newer tube amps generally have separate preamp and master-gain controls that can duplicate the gritty anarchy of yore, minus the lease-breaking SPLs. For jazz and other clean guitar styles, it's okay to turn the volume down a bit, as long as you don't "underdo" it.
It's the neat switching that makes this very classic-looking Tele act a little differently. All the standard Tele pickup selections - bridge, bridge and middle (in parallel) and neck - are in place, but it's a four-way switch, as opposed to the standard three-way; the additional selection provides us with both pickups in series for a bigger, louder and more humbucker-like 'secret' sound. The volume control has the S1 push switch in the top of the control knob: pushed down, the parallel and series-combined pickup selections are out-of- phase, giving three additional sounds over the standard Tele. The Baja sticks relatively close, of course, to the classic 60s Tele recipe. The rosewood 'board and alder body just seem to give that lovely smoothness to the high end that will make it less ear-wearing, especially if you're swapping over from an older-style humbucking Gibson. The standard mix is typically classic, wider than a Strat's but still nicely textured; the neck pickup here sounds a little fuller than some older readers or vintage Fender electric guitar owners will remember.
The 2008 Les Paul Standard debuts Gibson’s newest neck profile—an asymmetrical design that makes it one of the most comfortable and playable necks ever offered on any guitar. The new ergonomically-correct profile is tapered, and designed to be thicker on the bass side, and thinner on the treble side, closely outlining the natural form of the hand as it grips the neck. The 2008 Standard necks are machined in Gibson’s rough mill using wood shapers to make the initial cuts. Once the rosewood fingerboard gets glued on, the rest—including the final sanding—is done by hand. That means there are no two necks with the exact same dimensions. So while it still has the basic characteristics of its respective profile, each neck will be slightly different, with a distinct but traditional feel.
Engl is not particularly famous among US guitarists, and even veterans in the field might be unfamiliar with this hard-to-pronounce name. A good shorthand to give you an idea of what they’re about is to make a mental list of the features most readily associated with German products: good manufacturing quality, reliability, an adequate level of innovation (but only when needed) and higher than average performance.
Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.

Just SOLD #2 another fine example of the vintage 1960s era J200 copy by the great luthiers at Alvarez in the mid 1970s - the 80's WoW very well done impressive... Alvarez from over 40 years ago. This example is JVG rated at very good + 8.6/10 vintage condition with beautiful patina and character mojo as well so cool Gotta love this Beauty! This instrument has received our JVGuitars "set up" and several upgrades as well we have installed a new set of Martin 80/20 bronze Marquis strings for a crisp tone with great bass and volume as well as a Martin solid natural bone nut & a compensated saddle set custom fit into its original fully functional adjustable bridge with plenty of room for up or down adjustments to your personal taste further upgrades do include throwing out the old plastic tone robbing bridge pins for the superior resonation of solid ebony wood with brass ring and beautiful abalone inlay bridge pins and this was for tonal reasons and it looks much more high end as well, then we removed the old economy tuners of the era ( a weak point ) and installed a set of Grover tuners old holes were touched up in the process looks good and works excellent now to keep this guitar in tune and as a side benefit the added girth at headstock increases sustain as well. The medium slim profile C shaped neck is 1-11/16ths at the nut and also is pretty much the same as the 60's Gibby profile the frets are the originals as well and still playing well without buzz as per JVG set up. Truss rod is working fine and the headstock is looking cool with its Old School script Alvarez mother of pearl logo and crown design with its patina and cool old Alvarez Truss rod cove this guitar is striking as well. Great sounding like a Piano wow and she's playing with ease with excellent string action now. She retains her excellent vintage Sunburst and finish still shines nicely of course she is not new or mint it has some natural finish checking several that only adds to its Mojo along with several doinks here and there on the body and top a few that caught edge near binding on front and back not so big rather small and small paint had chipped off and so I addressed them with a fine tip matching color lacquer tip pen to touch up and to help preserve original finish integrity and looks much better as well. We also installed a replacement pickguard and it fits perfectly and looks great too. The 1960's VIBE and this instruments playability makes this an excellent choice for that SWEET Jumbo tone well crafted over 40 years ago Vintage Script Logo on headstock inlayed in mother of pearl on correct law suit era open book Gibby style headstock. Made in Japan well taken care of all these years and ready for you to enjoy another 40. Overall she is SWEET! Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com.
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Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.
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This includes guitar tutors and coaching software, guitar & amplifier emulators, reference tools and more. You will find tablature software in the Tablature category and software to slow down guitar solos in the Slow Down Music category. Software to tune your guitar can be found in the Instrument Tuners category and specialized chord software in the Chords category. Software designed specifically for bass guitar players can be found in the Bass Guitar category.
Frank Zappa was a lot of things. A writer of hilariously satirical lyrics. A composer of technically brilliant music. And a player of some of the most innovative and inventive guitar heard to date. His lightning fast fretting hand gave rise to some truly remarkable guitar improvisation. One of his best performances can be heard on the song, “Watermelon in Easter Hay.” “Muffin Man” is another great example of his titanic ability.
Let me shoot you some names Mr Pro Guitar player. When those you mention can play with the likes of Jack Pearson you can put them on a list. You didn’t even touch on country or bluegrass so I have to assume you know nothing about them. So let me throw this out there. There is only ONE called Mr. Guitar. Chet Atkins. His protege, Jerry Reed is another great. Let’s try Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and in recent years Redd Volkaert. I think you need to expand your listening radius. Let’s not forget the man who likely has his name on your guitar, Mr. Les Paul. Then I would ask you listen to bluegrass flatpicking. You want speed? These guys can play with Ygnwgie and do it on a Martin D28.
(https://rytmenpinne.wordpress.com/sounds-and-such/salamander-grandpiano/) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). Some versions on this site have been carefully edited down to 6 velocity layers and looped at the almost inaudible tail ends to reduce Ram usage but the quality is almost indistinguishable.  They are based on a nicely sampled Yamaha C5 Grand. Samples have been normalised, re-attenuated, latency reduced and modified for sf2. Three or more brightness levels are available plus optional resonance.
The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.
Many distortion pedals can also be used as overdrive pedals simply by reducing the gain, so once again we see how these terms are a little loose. In high gain amps like a Mesa rectifier the amp is taking advantage of gain staging, many pedals do this as well. Gain staging is simply putting one overdriven tone into another and cascading them to produce even more gain or distortion. So in a Mesa, one preamp tube is being run into another to bump up the level of distortion, there can be any number of gain stages. We can also do this by stacking pedals as well, as we will see in the gain staging pedal chain section. Dialing in a good distorted tone can take some time and slight EQ changes can make a big difference.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...
In addition to modern versions of tricones and single cone resonators, National Resophonic also produce Dobro-style guitars. This company made the Model D during the latter part of the 2000s. Production of the Model D guitar has now ceased, but a few dealers in the UK and USA have stock available. National Resophonic are now producing their Smith & Young `Spider Cone’ models and the Model 11 is built on traditional Dobro lines. Also, Goldtone, Paul Beard and a number of custom builders are producing good guitars.
I skimmed ahead and quickly realized that, at last, someone has written THAT GUITAR BOOK that we are all looking for when we start out but that no one seems to have written yet but that you hope to write someday when you finally figure out what you are doing so that you can help others and prevent them from wasting so much time and money and hopes....(takes a breath)
When making solder joints to switches and pots, the lug and wire should be heated by the tip of the iron and the solder pressed (or flowed) onto the joint. In this manner you can avoid cold solder joints as both components are properly heated prior to the application of solder. Melting solder on the tip of the iron does not insure the actual components are being heated properly.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst
Since we only want to check how straight the neck is, we need to isolate this aspect of the guitar. In other words we don’t want the height of the nut or the placement of the saddles to confuse us, so we take them out of the equation. Don’t worry; we’re not going to remove any of these components, just circumvent them. I use a ruler to do this, but you can do it using only strings. I’ll describe both methods below.
Super info. thks. Just found your site as I too, had some questions about action. I have a Martin D-28, manufacture date late 2013 and I purchased new in Feb. of 2015. It has always been humidified and kept in the case. I only really noticed the ‘high’ action when I changed to drop D tuning and I noticed amplified ‘string whip’. I estimate the height to be 4mm. I re-tuned and looked again and the action is noticeably higher than my Epiphone EJ 200 and Simon & Patrick Woodland Folk. I think, as you have said, the guitar is just getting acclimatized to it’s ‘new’ home. Play ability is still good, (although the player needs work!) but I think I will take it back to Folkways Music to have the Tech take a look. Thks. Great site, I will bookmark it!
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Integrated MIDI Learn and automation tools streamline your workflow, while the dedicated Live View makes GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER the perfect companion when performing. A range of versatile built-in tools assist you in the studio and on stage: A Metronome with different syncing options, two Tapedecks for easy recording and play-along, a Tuner and a Preset Volume tool with Dry/Wet settings are all at your disposal.
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)

The actual key that this song was written in is Bb (B flat) and can be a bit difficult for beginners; I prefer using a capo for this song and playing it in the Key of C. Using the capo to play this song doesn’t change how the song sounds, but it makes playing the song a lot easier. Using your capo on the third fret, you chord progression will look like C – G – Am (A minor) – F.


Depending on the components used in the delay pedal, delays can either sound exactly like the original source sound, or the delays can sound like they have a modulation effect on them. In fact, some of the most popular delay pedals apply a phaser modulation effect on the repeated delay sounds. Stacking different effects on top of one another in a single pedal is not uncommon at all, and delay pedals typically have some other effect added-on.
Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]
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If you are using the bs-16i or similar app try changing the Rx. Channel for say the first 8 channels all to 1. You will then have 8 easily accessible sounds to play at the touch of the Solo/Mute button. You can then mix for instance piano and pads together. Alternatively you could leave the channels 1 to 16 and use channel select to choose your favorite sounds.  To play two sounds together just put them on the same channel. This is handy for pianos where you can add the level of resonance you prefer. When layering sounds with piano choose the non resonance piano versions (available in all the SoundFonts) to avoid lack of polyphony problems.

Dobro also sold a Dobro amplifier to accompany the Dobro All-Electric. The first Dobro amp had a large cabinet made by Bulwin of Los Angeles. The grillcover was a smaller version of the typical guitar resonator cover, provided by Rickenbacker. This had five tubes and an 8″ Lansing field coil speaker. The Lansing was probably a matter of convenience because the company was located down the street from Dobro. The rectifier tube was an 80 and the output tubes were two 42s. These apparently had two inputs, volume and an on/off switch. The chassis on these amps were supposed to have been made by Dobro itself, but more than likely they were sent out to some local L.A. radio manufacturers and assembled at Dobro.
If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech "programs" are called patches). But I think it's not as trivial to use as out of the box products.
Chrome ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Why the Ultra Hard Bodies flopped is a mystery, since they certainly fit with the superstrat rage of the times, but they hung around for only a year or so. According to Walter Carter, Ovation briefly contracted for a shipment of solidbodies made by a Japanese manufacturer. No information is available about these, but it doesn’t really matter since only one carton of 100 or so guitars ever came in. If you find an animal that doesn’t fit the descriptions here, take a picture and let us know about it.
Much like booster pedals – where its placement depends on what exactly you’re looking to boost – the location of compressors and wah-wah pedals in a signal chain will vary depending on what type of sound you are trying to create. In this case, you are encouraged to experiment with their order and see what you like best. Although as mentioned above, try to keep the wah-wah after tier one effects as they generally do not sound that usable in that order. Compressors, on the other hand, can be placed before any pedal, even distortion, as it shapes the signal rather than modifies it.
Our congratulations and deepest thanks on making Ibanez your choice of instrument. Ibanez standards are second to none. All Ibanez instruments are set up to our strict quality control standards before shipping. The purpose of this manual is to explain how to maintain your instrument’s finish and to keep your guitar playing as well as it did when it...
• Why frets come loose: Wear from string contact, fretboard drying and jarring mid-gig or during transportation can cause frets to pop loose. And if binding loses moisture, that can cause the ends of frets to rise or be exposed. These all create troubles that can wrongly be blamed on the more typical problem of fretwear, but in these cases dressing or replacement isn’t necessarily the answer. If there’s enough fret wire left, a loose fret can be reseated in its slot along the fingerboard, and a skilled luthier can often fill the gaps between the binding and the fret ends.
It goes to show…there is no “best” guitar players…it’s all a matter of perspective, taste, interpretation, etc….. Above all, much of it has to do with the players in question being at the right place , at the right time, playing what the audience wanted to hear from that performance at that point in time. It’s a big world full of talent undiscovered and sadly, it will remain just that: undiscovered.

Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
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The original run of Marshall Silver Jubilee amps were designed to celebrate Jim Marshall's 50th anniversary in music as well as 25 years of Marshall amps. These beautiful sounding (and highly sought after) amps have been brought back from extinction with the Marshall 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee Head, matching cab and combo and have been constructed using the original 2525 diagrams. This means you have all that vintage sounding goodness with modern reliability. You can even switch it from 20 Watt to 5 Watt power so you can go from live sound to home practice easily without ever losing your tone. A great amp for stage, home and studio recording.
Guitars. Having all your guitars set up properly is an obvious essential for dialing in good tone. I like low-ish action, and for low action to work, I need to set my guitar necks to have just a bit of relief so the strings won’t buzz and rattle, and in turn choke the tone. I’m always checking the neck relief on my guitars and adjusting the truss rod accordingly.
Original Martin OMs from approximately 1929 to 1931 are extremely rare and sell for high prices. Many guitarists believe that the OM—a combination of Martin’s modified 14-fret 000 body shape, long scale (25.4″) neck, solid headstock, 1-3/4″ nut width, 4-1/8″ maximum depth at the endwedge, and 2-3/8″ string spread at the bridge—offers the most versatile combination of features available in a steel-string acoustic guitar. Today, many guitar makers (including many small shops and hand-builders) create instruments modeled on the OM pattern.[5]
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It was shortly after the debut of the first Supros that National Dobro entered a period of major transition. By 1935, at least, the company had decided to abandon the sunny beaches of L.A. for the freezing winters of Chicago, then the principal home of America’s instrument makers, and not coincidentally, America’s giant mass merchandisers Montgomery Ward and Sears. Both Wards and Sears had been offering National and Dobro resonator guitars since the late ’20s. Being in Chicago had the obvious advantages of proximity to the resources surrounding the business and being next door to the world’s two largest retailers of the day. The move to the Midwest began early 1936 and took almost a year and a half. Throughout most of ’36, the majority of production continued in L.A.


Beginning in 1960 with the T-60 solidbody, Teisco began to use the elongated “Strat” six-in-line headstock. This lasted through 1963. In 1963, the squarish Strat headstock appeared with the GB-1 solidbody bass. This seems to have lasted through 1965, but only on selected models, and with several subtle variations, including a slightly more rounded version. In 1964, probably later in the season, most of the Teisco solidbody line acquired a new hooked Strat-style headstock with four-and-two tuners on the guitars and three-and-one on the basses. This had the little hook at the throat like a Strat, and a larger hook on the tip, almost like a Woody Woodpecker plume.
Here we have old "3-hole" this is another great Japanese Vintage Guitar! this one is over 40 years old wow! ...its wonderfully aged woods contribute to its rich great sound... this example is one of the greatest Martin style Copies from one of the finest "law Suit" Acoustic instrument builders of Japan Yamaha Nippon Gakki...This model is the very popular FG-140 RED LABEL ....JUST IN!...so more info soon to come please see the detailed pics of this guitar for a link to many more pictures ( 40 ) or more from every angle Very good- excellent condition If your wondering why we call this one "3-hole" is because someone in its past life had an electric pickup of some type and it came to us with 3 tinny holes in the top... we have since filled the 3-tiny holes one on upper treble bout and 2 below the rosewood bridge... we filled & clear coated so its all solid and is very hard to see but are their also a fine hairline crack threw the finish exists at the bottom of the neck the original owner said its been their more than 20 years and has not changed and is solid...if wanted after sale for free at your request fill sand it and fill with lacquer and sand and buff smooth I expect that would do the trick to cosmetically improve the look of that but its really fine as is... What is rare about this oldie but goodie its all original and even has the original gold lined Yamaha logo Hard shell case in pretty respectable shape too...see the extra pics ( I will have a link to those pics posted later ) for those details... Great sound and pretty EZ to play too I just Cleaned it to remove the grime but leave all the original patina and also dehydrated the woods and she drank it up and after drying we finished it of with a fresh coat of wax finish was applied the woods still shine like a shinny new dime.. great old guitar.. JVG Rated in Very good Original Vintage condition with its share of natural play ware visible upon closest inspection of the neck width is 1-3/4 @ nut and the action is set good at 3-16ths @ 12th fret.. the fretboard and frets still playing well no need for a refret some fret indentations yes but its still plays just fine at 80+%, top has aged naturally with nice Patina now and has several fine finish cracks etc..same as a well loved and played 40+ year old Martin would have at several thousand dollars less than a 40+ year old martin. This guitar has been restrung with New Martin Marquis Strings and sounds great...This one you have the option of buying an original vintage Yamaha Hard Shell Case..these cases are rare and hard to find now the handle was warn and has a replacement quick fix and it works perfectly...just $69.00 additional .

Fortunately, some of the best happy accidents have been preserved for posterity. For over 40 years Seymour W. Duncan has kept meticulous notes on the best pickups to cross his workbench. Many of these have been resurrected as Seymour Duncan models. For example, our ’59 Model is based on a particularly sweet-sounding ’59 P.A.F. in one of Jeff Beck’s guitars. Another of our models, the Pearly Gates, is inspired by another, rawer-sounding ’59 P.A.F. That’s just one example of two supposedly identical pickups from the same year displaying different musical personalities.
Reverb effects are another staple in the toolbox of guitarists across all genres. Just like how delay effects produce a sense of depth and space, reverb effects provide the same ability, but with a different approach. Frequently, especially in modern music, reverb effects are so subtle that it’s hard to even notice that they are there. It’s only when they are removed do we realize that suddenly the sound has become too “close” sounding.
Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.
One notable exception is a pitch shifter or harmonizer, particularly if you plan on using a pitch shift and envelope follower together as the pitch shifter may have greater difficulty accurately tracking an envelope follower-processed signal. Similarly, a standard wah pedal generally sounds best in the very front of the signal chain, but once again I recommend placing pitch shifter/harmonizer effects in front of a wah if you plan on using both together. Also, many players prefer the sound of a wah with a distortion pedal placed in front of it as this configuration can produce a more dramatic or more refined sweep depending on the distortion pedal’s tonal character (See Example 1, below).
I hope the list is somewhat correct on peoples lists although it is just an opinion! and just a small thought and insight on angus young he might not make the top 50 for me he plays just a few chords and everything sounds the same, he is with a unique voice and a band who was made by bon scot that put ac/dc on the map!! I know of no really good guitar player that names angus young as their inspiration or was influenced by angus young it is just that his work was too simple!!
@BLAKTORX - Charvel is a great brand for metal and shred that is really starting to regain some prominence in the music world. I really like the Pro Mod Series. Music Man, too, makes some good gear, but I tried to keep my list to 10. The Ibanez GIO series guitars are good for beginners. Seems like you're into metal. In that price range you might also check out the Jackson JS Series.

The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.


Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.
Greetings from Adam Reiver! Welcome to the new FU-Tone website! (Formerly FloydUpgrades.com) FU does so much more than upgrade parts for "Floyds" and FU just seems so fitting for the circumstances of the name change! I have been working on improving tone with the greatest guitarplayers in the world for the last 25 years. I have found out what works and what does not... I am happy to share this with you. Tone is selective! FU is dedicated to help you find what is best for YOU! Using the best materials available, FU manufactures the ultimate in high performance guitar parts used by the PROS! Obviously, FU specializes in locking tremolo parts but if you dig around the site you will find upgrades for your Strat, Les Paul, Tele, Acoustic and more. In my dedicated effort to bring you the best of the best, I will continue to design and manufacture new FU products as well as bringing in other items that I think are cool. Check back often, feel free to ask me questions and keep chasing TONE!

’71 blue vinyl combo guitar amps included the Univox 1040 and 1240. The 1040 Guitar Amplifier ($480) was a combo sporting 10 tubes, 105 watts RMS, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle, treble controls for each channel, presence, reverb, tremolo, footswitch, and two 12″ Univox Heavy Duty speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets (possibly Jensens). The illustration shows a grille with two small circles on top and two large circles for the speakers. It’s possible this had a pair of tweeters in the small holes, but the description doesn’t say. The 1240 Guitar Amplifier ($399.50) featured eight tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1040, and four 10″ Univox Special Design speakers with 10-ounce ceramic magnets (again, sound like Jensens). The grille had four round cutouts.
The Wave's all tube design utilizes four dual triode vacuum tubes - three 12AX7s and one 12AT7 - and comes with a MOD® three-spring reverb tank. MOD® reverb tanks are deemed the closest to the original reverb tanks from the '60s made today. The Wave's reverb function can be switched in and out pop-free via the front panel toggle or with a footswitch. Footswitch sold separately (see P-H470 for compatible footswitch).
Other Ovation innovations include composite tops and multiple offset sound holes on guitar tops, pioneered in the Adamas model in 1977. Kaman Music has also sold budget guitars—and even mandolins and ukuleles—based on similar design principles to the Ovation such as the Korean-built Celebrity series and the Korean or Chinese-built Applause brand.[citation needed]
For an overdrive pedal, turn your attention to the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Drive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal. Compact yet versatile, this pedal is great for anyone who likes a raw vintage-like overdrive, and it even makes a great boost pedal. Now, if it's a distortion pedal that you're after, take a closer look at the Electro-Harmonix Classics USA Big Muff Pi Distortion/Sustainer Guitar Effects Pedal. The Big Muff Pi is a legendary pedal in itself, and this reissue has 3 controls that let you dial in the finest harmonic distortion/sustain ever produced. From warm bass to crisp treble, you'll be blown away by what this distortion pedal can do for your hard-rocking guitar performance.
Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.
Here we have a VERY WELL MADE 1978 Vintage Japanese Quality Replica of G!b$@n Dove Acoustic guitar. This is a "SUPERB" top of the line model its Premium woods used in its construction along with very good workmanship see the bindings and the detail wow...and has now over the past 28 years has wonderfully aged into a very nice vintage guitar in its own right. The Vintage aged spruce top is of a high quality on often seen today with a woderful aged finish, also see the sides back & neck all made of premium grade mahogany WoW! The finish is SUNBURST and was done by a master no doubt I compair this very favorably with any G!b$@n for its fit & finish and sound! Believed to be from the same factory as the Aria and a few others exported to St. Lousi music in the 70's...this example is in very good - excellent original condition rated 8.5++/10 Quite a clean example. The frets are in good condition the neck is straight and tuners work well all and all a very enjoyable player with a wonderful rich tone. A Gig bag or case is optional and is available. Dont be fooled by the low price under $400 this guitar would cost over $1200 today out of Japan! Thie is a Bargain find get her before shes gone. .

A reluctant soloist, Yo La Tengo cofounder Ira Kaplan was credited with “naïve guitar” on the band’s first single in 1985 and didn’t begin taking the spotlight regularly until some two years later. Starting with a bucket of Velvet Underground moves, Kaplan became a consummate inside guitarist, too, a deceptively normal-looking dude folding in space jazz, barbed noise, spare country soul, and — when very occasionally called for — traditional feet-behind-knees rock jumps.
The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.
Designed by Todd Langner (who also engineered the ADA MP-1), the Langner DCP-1 possesses somewhat of an infamous reputation. Very few know about it, but everyone who does, swears by it’s greatness. Built with much of the same blueprint as the Bogner Fish, the Langner features two independent channels with fully adjustable boost functions. Using five 12ax7a tubes, it’ll produce the glassiest cleans to the highest of high gain tones. Presets can be front panel selected or footswitched. If you’re into rare gear, this is the amp for you. Good luck finding one!
 Great, low priced, vintage Japanese project guitar. May be Decca, Teisco or similar. Has "P90" style, Japanese pickup installed which is not original to the guitar. Solid Mahogany body and neck with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard. Body is perfectly flat and is a thin 1.25" thick. Back of neck profile is very "flat". Top of original bridge is missing and has a wooden one laying in it's place. The pickup is wired directly to the output jack as there are no pots. 3 of the original tuning machines have had their gears changed. All work fine. The headstock logo is missing. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
I heard off of a great guitarist years ago when I asked him about fender and gibson he said they were expensive and not great and also said the Gordon Smith guitars played and sounded great and as they never advertised and were a small builder in the uk the cost was cheap for the quality of the guitar. A players guitar rather than a fancy looking guitar thats all show and less go. I think they are the price of a mim strat but great hardware not chinese.
Our 4 yr old grandson picked this guitar out and we purchased it for him as his Christmas present, he absolutely loves it. His dad has been teaching him to play it and he said that you can actually plug the guitar into his amp instead of the one that came with it. Our grandson will most certainly grow into this guitar and will get many hours of playtime with this guitar.
From the 1920s to the 1940s, upright bass players who wanted to strengthen the acoustic sound of their instrument had to use small portable PA systems or guitar amp combos designed for acoustic guitar or archtop guitars. Since these systems were not specifically designed to amplify bass instruments, it is unlikely they provided good low-frequency sound reproduction (particularly guitar amps, which are not designed to go down as low in pitch as the low E (41 Hz) and A (55 Hz) strings). In the early 1920s, it was very hard for an upright bass player (indeed for any musician) to find any amplifier and speaker system to make their instrument louder. The only speakers that could be bought during the early 1920s were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output", and the cone speaker (which is widely used in modern-era amp cabinets), was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers were PA speaker setups; while an upright bassist could potentially have used one of these early PA systems, they could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.
There are two main types of electric guitar bridges. There is the "Tune-O-Matic"/"Roller" type, which is found on Gibson, Gretsch and Epiphone guitars. This is usually a removable long oval part sitting on adjustable posts. These posts determine the height of the strings. Another is the "Vibrato"/"Hardtail" type, which is common to Fender and Paul Reed Smith guitars. In this case, bridge and tailpiece are one; there is usually a large, rectangular plate bolted directly onto the guitar with a raised heel which holds the strings and individual string saddles acting as the bridge. These saddles determine the height of the string and can be adjusted individually to create either a flat or arched effect, depending on the type of neck your electric guitar has. According to Chicago Luthiers, "Some just have adjusters that raise and lower the whole bridge, but not the individual strings, and some have both. This applies to guitars with tremolo bars as well as those without."
We tried adding treble to the acoustic guitar.. It sounds like a xylophone, only the highs are heard. Panning is a good idea. I remember doing it with several synthesizer tracks to make more space. Unfortunately we already have a compressor in the pedal-board and it doesn't help much. The dynamics are flat but the electric guitar is still screening the acoustic one even at a quite low volume. I guess it will still be so... whatever we do. I wonder how people manage 4 or more guitars all at once. – SovereignSun Jan 10 '17 at 9:28

Guitar Neck wood Fingerboard Blanks Electric guitar wood Burl Poplar 1pc Walnut Spalted Apple Burl poplar Spalted Maple Olive Spalted Walnut Burl Elm African Mahogany body wood Red Willow 1pc body blanks Plum Red Willow 2pc body blanks Spalted Birch Pear Mulberry Maple Acoustic / Classic guitar wood Flute and Oud blanks Pool Cue wood blanks & Wood Turning Gallery Sold examples Custom Wood Products Binding wood NEW! Gun Stock Blanks
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Satin Oil, Transparent Black Sunburst

Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug, and has grown into the leading global builder of premium acoustic guitars. Renowned for blending modern, innovative manufacturing techniques with a master craftsman's attention to detail, Taylor acoustic guitars are widely considered among the best-sounding and easiest to play in the world. The company is a pioneer in the use of computer mills, lasers and other high-tech tools and proprietary machinery, and today, Bob Taylor is widely recognized throughout the musical instrument industry as the visionary acoustic guitar manufacturer.
Among the favorite brands of Gretsch lie the signature variants Brian Setzer and Chet Atkins models. Whereas, its Jet and Duo Jet are equally worthy. All these models are aimed explicitly at Jazz. In fact, you can think of them for Jazz as what you call Jackson for metal. For intermediate and pro players looking for affordability, its Electromatic Series is the desired option.
Combo guitar amplifier cabinets and guitar speaker cabinets use several different designs, including the "open back" cabinet, the closed back cabinet (a sealed box), and, less commonly, bass reflex designs, which use a closed back with a vent or port cut into the cabinet.[26] With guitar amps, most "open back" amp cabinets are not fully open; part of the back is enclosed with panels. Combo guitar amp cabinets and standalone speaker cabinets are often made of plywood. Some are made of MDF or particle board—especially in low-budget models.[26] Cabinet size and depth, material types, assembly methods, type and thickness of the baffle material (the wood panel that holds the speaker), and the way the baffle attaches to the cabinet all affect tone.[26]
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Being a sub-brand of Gibson, it is Epiphone's task to get the Les Paul design out to as many hands as possible, and they did just that with many various iterations of the classic single cutaway design. For this list, we chose Epiphone's tribute to Les Paul, who incidentally also worked with the company in the late 30's, which is a bit in the mid-tier price, but worth every penny.

One reviewer mentioned that anyone wanting to purchase the C40 will need to change the strings to get the best sound out of this model. Another reviewer uses the C40 as their main guitar for composing, and it works quite well for the job. So, overall, if you feel the need to be cost-conscious at this point in time, but want a quality instrument, the C40 should be on your list of models for proper comparison shopping.
I agree that you should spend more on the guitar than the amp, but if you have a nice guitar and a cheap amp, you aren't giving the guitar enough width and breadth of tone capabilities to warrant spending $1500 or more on a guitar. So, if you're going to spend over $1200 on a guitar, don't buy a lousy amp. A Peavy 30 is a decent amp, but is short on breadth of tone as compared to a Fender Deluxe Reverb 22 watt. Marrying the guitar and amp is an important part of the process, they are symbiotic. My advice, as a player for over 40 years is to buy as good a guitar as you can. For beginners, a bad guitar will not get you playing, in fact, the most common reason young novices stop taking lessons is that the cheap junker they got is unplayable, even by professionals. It's hard, not fun, seems like a world of work and they quit. That's not how it's supposed to be. It's a fun thing, so get out there, get a good playable instrument and you are on your way to a lifetime of good times.
The Wah Wah pedal is one of the coolest guitar effects ever. Released in 1967 as the Vox Clyde McCoy. Oddly enough Clyde McCoy was a trumpet player as the pedal was to be used when amplifying the horn. Fortunately guitarists picked up on the almighty wah. The name Cry Baby has become de facto for the wah as it became the most popular. A wah is basically an active tone control that boosts lower frequencies through higher ones by using the sweep of the pedal. A guitar’s tone knob is passive and just rolls off high end, the wah electronically boosts frequencies.
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If they're properly stretched it's usually not a big problem. Usually you can just push down on the new strings around the bridge and the nut and retune a few times to get the slack out, or do the push down/pull up technique to stretch them. I find that most players have more tuning issues from holding down the strings too hard or inadvertently slightly bending them with their fretting hand.


There is no such thing as a best amplifier. It's all about what kind of music you want to play and what sort of sounds are in your head trying to get out. Different amplifiers have different characteristics. Some have amazing cleans, some are known for their heavy distortions, some take pedals very well, some are built trying to be a "jack of all trades."  Only way to know what amp is best for you is to plug in and try them out. Try to "A-B" them,  trying one amplifier and then plugging into another immediately after with the same settings, playing the same thing. It will give you a good idea about how their characteristics differ. If you have favorite pedal effects that you  know that you're going to want to use, make sure you try those two.  Petals can sound quite different going into various amplifiers.

New Born has a great riff that starts at about 1:00. It is repeated a few more times during the rest of the song. To play this riff like Matthew Bellamy does, you'll need to tune down one of your strings. Click the button below to find out which string and how to tune it. Oh, and if you look closely at the video there are some clues there for how to play it!


David Gilmour: Two models of Gilmour’s famous “The Black Strat” are available from the Fender Custom Shop: One is an American ’69 Strat body with an ’83 remake C-shaped ’57 RI maple neck (labeled as New old stock) with electronic and cosmetic modifications. The other is a”relic” style guitar that replicates the “The Black Strat” down to every scratch and dent. The relic version has two completely different coats of paint, just like the original.[16]
With sharp double-cutaways and the recognizable Rickenbacker body shape made from maple, the semi-hollow Rickenbacker 330-12 12-string electric guitar has proven to be one of the brand's most popular models since the 1960s. The 330-12 has been used for its jangly sound, perfect for pop and various other genres, by the likes of Tom Petty, Johnny Marr, and Peter Buck, to name a few.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.

As one user put it, this is one of “Amazon’s hidden little gems”, with a good set of tube electronics that gives out a natural sounding overdrive and some crystal-clear rhythmic sounds. If you want to make your guitar sound clear enough to accompany Porcupine Tree while also having the option for a natural grainy sound that might work well for jazz and blues, then this item is definitely something to look into.  
This may seem like an odd value to consider, but most guitarists need to feel a certain connection to their instrument. It’s part of what makes being a guitarist different from other types of musicians; a sense of individuality as well as style. Your guitar will be a significant investment regardless of which brand you settle on, and while sound and construction are more critical factors overall, it’s important that your instrument inspires you. Different brands are known for cultivating different images; Gibson’s and Fender’s were made famous by the rock gods of yesterday, while Taylor’s unique acoustic bodies will conjure up a different vibe for a folk player. Again, this aspect speaks to your individual needs as a guitarist.
Looks awesome. Great tone. Had A LOT of fret buzz out of the box (EADG strings from 7th-11th fret). Got it set up to try to eliminate buzzing...only way the guitar tech could seem to get rid of it was by raising the action quite a bit, so now it's much higher than I like...bummer. No buzzing and sounds great, but the playability is definitely not what I was hoping for considering the price.

In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."


Cap in series with a resistor (shouldn’t matter which comes first). Kinman recommends this for single coils but it works rather well for humbuckers too. I installed 1nF cap in series with a 130K resistor and it works awesome. Resistor is there to limit the effect of the cap and having it in series with the cap means it shouldn’t affect pot taper as much. Larger cap means wider frequency range, so treble jump isn’t as sudden. So far, this is my favorite treble bleed circuit.

Clipping is a non-linear process that produces frequencies not originally present in the audio signal. These frequencies can be harmonic overtones, meaning they are whole number multiples of one of the signal's original frequencies, or "inharmonic", resulting from general intermodulation distortion.[34][35][36] The same nonlinear device will produce both types of distortion, depending on the input signal. Intermodulation occurs whenever the input frequencies are not already harmonically related. For instance, playing a power chord through distortion results in intermodulation that produces new subharmonics.

Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut or the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. The motivation for this can be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-hollow tone, or both.

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