DR Strings makes strings that were specifically designed for drop d tuning, other alternate tunings, and even standard tuning. Known as DDT strings, DR spent over two years perfecting them. DR created a new patent pending method for constructing these strings to ensure great performance with lower pitches. Because of the amazing construction, and their ability to quickly lock into tune so quickly, DR calls their DDT's "Superstrings". Why not try a set? DDT's are available for electric guitar or bass guitar.
I have established a broad network of invaluable contacts in the vintage guitar business. Please let me know what you are looking for, and I'll do my best to find it! Also, I am paying the highest prices for clean lefty vintage guitars. Let me know what you have; I'll be happy to work out a deal you will be happy with. I do want to mention that I buy righty guitars on ocassion as well, especially those that can be easily converted to lefty, including Fender Strats and ES-335/345 guitars.
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.

There are over 200 choices of electric guitar strings, combining Ernie Ball's diverse selection of materials, string gauges, and styles. Ernie Ball electric guitar strings come in a variety of different high quality materials including M-steel, cobalt, nickel, stainless steel, titanium, and bronze. Our guitar string sets are available for 6-string, 7-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 12-string guitars.
MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
The 4000 series were the first Rickenbacker bass guitars, production beginning in 1957. The 4000 was followed by the very popular 4001 (in 1961), the 4002 (limited edition bass introduced in 1977), the 4008 (an eight-string model introduced in the mid-1970s), the 4003 (in 1979, replacing the 4001 entirely in 1986 and still in production in 2012), and most recently the 4004 series. There was also the 4005, a hollow-bodied bass guitar (discontinued in 1984); it did not resemble any of the other 4000 series basses, but rather the new style 360-370 guitars. The 4001S (introduced 1964) was basically a 4001 but with no binding and dot fingerboard inlays. It was exported to England as the RM1999. However, Paul McCartney received the very first 4001S (his unit was left-handed, and later modified to include a “zero fret“).

Harmony almost wrote the book on guitars and responsible for so many rock stars. Youngsters all over the world ordered guitars from Sears, Montgomery Ward, and later by JC Penny. These affordable guitars are now very sort after and have become very expensive. Many of these models have been copied and reissued over the years. In their heyday, Harmony was the largest manufacture of guitars in the USA. In 1964-65 they sold over 350,000 instruments. The pickup used during and around those years were made by DeArmond Company. Today Vintage DeArmond Pups are still valued and sold. Look into years of bands, and you will find VIP's of the Rock World, with a Harmony in their hands.

The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   


There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.
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Guitar has a vicious tone, nice wood, great p[ickups. However the guitar I received has a problem with the volume control acting as a tone knob and also cuts out sometimes. The guitar chord had to be replaced because it was cheap and cut out like a bad phone chord. I have to take it in to a local guitar shop and have the volume control fixed. Not too expensive but some additional cost. I didn't want to send it back as I otherwise love the guitar and didn't want them to send me a different one rather than just repairing it. Plus I don't want to wait that long. But certainly a great guitar for the money. No question.
Several producers like to create larger-than-life recorded sounds by splitting the guitarist's instrument signal to several different amps, which are then recorded simultaneously. Joe Barresi is a devotee of this tactic, and uses a dedicated guitar splitter box, such as the Little Labs PCP Instrument Distro or Systematic Systems Guitar Splitter, for the purpose. "In choosing the amplifiers and speakers, it's important to remember that larger speakers give a more compact, tighter sound. A tiny amp turned all the way up will give a more blown-out sound."
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Natural
Unfortunately this guitar does not come with a solid top, but for its price you really can't expect much. Still, it is much better than what guitarists of old had to start out with! If you are looking for a beginner's guitar to test the water or if budget is limited, then you should check out the Epiphone DR-100. It currently comes in 3 colors - Ebony, Natural, and Vintage Sunburst (my personal favorite among the three). The MSRP is 182.00 but most online guitar shops sell it for $109.
Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.
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Steve is the best. He made time for me to come in and talk about the problems I was having with my electric bass. When I got there, he knew exactly what was wrong with my bass, and he adjusted it quickly and perfectly. He also gave me a lot of incredibly useful information about what he was doing and why. I could not recommend Steve Morrill more highly.
Further simplifications occur for the regular tunings that are repetitive, that is, which repeat their strings. For example, the E-G♯-c-e-g♯-c' M3 tuning repeats its octave after every two strings. Such repetition further simplifies the learning of chords and improvisation;[71] This repetition results in two copies of the three open-strings' notes, each in a different octave. Similarly, the B-F-B-F-B-F augmented-fourths tuning repeats itself after one string.[73]

Since they present a finer break point at the neck end of the strings’ speaking length, narrower vintage-gauge frets are generally more precise in their noting accuracy. From this, you tend to get a sharper tone, possibly with increased intonation accuracy, plus enhanced overtone clarity in some cases, which could be heard as a little more “shimmer.” If you’re thinking these are all characteristics of the classic Fender sound, you’d be right—or they are, at least, until you change those vintage frets to jumbo.
Two other totally new guitars debuted in November of ’88, the ST-3 ($225) and ST-4 ($235). These were both Strats, with maple necks, rosewood fingerboards, volume and two tones, five-way select, chrome hardware, SAT non-locking vibrato, in black, white or red with graphics. The ST-3 had three single-coils, whereas the ST-4 had a ‘bucker and two singles. Cases or gig bags were extra.
The only guitar instrument I can think of that is NOT sampler-based and that actually sounds decent would be RealGuitar. It's not the most realistic (IMO) and it's $160+. But if you ask most people for recommendations on realistic guitar instruments, you will hear stuff like Shreddage, Electri6ity, ProminyLPC, Lyrical Distortion, Strawberry Electric Guitar from Orange Tree... all Kontakt libraries, and all undoubtedly better than the 3 products you listed in your initial post, two of which are simply synths and not at all meant for realistic playing!
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)
Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!

The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
While many appreciate its bulk of features, there are a few who feel that Fender went overboard, and should've limited the voicings to just a few to ensure that sound quality is not compromised. On the other hand, there are some who felt that the extra features are nice, but they are turned off by the need to use a computer to get full access to all the controls.
The FR6UC's matt black flat finish and lack of bling lends the instrument a mean, no-nonsense aesthetic that would be a perfect fit for the modern metalcore player. There's an ebony fingerboard and its neck is a five-piece affair, with two thin strips of 0.5mm walnut between three sections of maple. The FR6UC's suitably rock-looking distressed pickup covers house a pair of Bare Knuckle Aftermath humbuckers with "accelerated bass response for exceptionally fast tracking of high-speed staccato riffing with crushing midrange and precise high-end articulation". The 14.7k-ohm bridge unit comprises a trio of ceramic magnets, while the neck is Alnico V with a DC resistance of 11.5k ohms. This instrument is built cleanly with excellent fretwork, as you would expect from a Japanese guitar at this price point, although it has to be noted that - considering its relatively compact proportions - it's a little on the weighty side, weighing in at 3.8kg (8.4lbs). The FR6UC's Bare Knuckle Aftermaths in full humbucking mode are perfect for a gamut of king-size-yet- articulate heavy rock tones, from Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age right through to Deftones and Slipknot. That said, the Aftermaths are by no means all about metallic high gain; back off the volume and switch to position two or four to get one of the inner coils in isolation and you'll enjoy pleasantly springy Strat-style tones. It may be none-more-black in appearance, but there's a broad range of hues on the FR6UC's sonic palette.
The first impressive thing about the Zoom G3X is its build quality. This unit is solid, which puts our fears to rest that Zoom may have sacrificed build quality since the G3X is more on the budget side of the price spectrum. In the reviews and recommendations we read, several owners make it a point to comment that it feels like a serious piece of equipment that could withstand some abuse because of its sturdy metal construction. The G3X can be powered with a 9V adapter (which is conveniently included), or four AA batteries. Zoom claims about 6 hours of battery life, but in our experience manufacturers tend to exaggerate battery life a bit. Still, battery power is very convenient if you’re traveling with the G3X and want to do some on-the-go playing, or just taking it from room to room in your house (to save some money in the long run we recommend rechargeable batteries).
An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
Established over a century ago as a piano and reed organ builder, Yamaha has since expanded into building other musical equipment and even went on to successfully expand into other industries. But in all this success, Yamaha continues to stay true to their musical roots, producing highly rated instruments, amps and other gear. While they are not primarily a guitar amplifier builder, Yamaha's extensive reach and resources give them an almost unfair advantage over the competition, as exemplified by the success of their THR line of desktop guitar amplifiers. This line of portable amps combines Yamaha's penchant for student friendly features and modern studio functions that many guitarists appreciate, ultimately securing Yamaha a special spot on this list.
Although Led Zeppelin disbanded in 1980 after drummer John Bonham’s death, they have reunited on a few occasions, most recently in 2007 for a tribute concert in memory of Ahmet Ertegun, who had signed them to Atlantic and launched their career. Page continues to go strong. After reissuing the band’s catalog in 2014 and 2015, he’s promised a new project to come in 2016. We couldn’t be happier, and more eager to hear what he has.
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.
Guitar has a vicious tone, nice wood, great p[ickups. However the guitar I received has a problem with the volume control acting as a tone knob and also cuts out sometimes. The guitar chord had to be replaced because it was cheap and cut out like a bad phone chord. I have to take it in to a local guitar shop and have the volume control fixed. Not too expensive but some additional cost. I didn't want to send it back as I otherwise love the guitar and didn't want them to send me a different one rather than just repairing it. Plus I don't want to wait that long. But certainly a great guitar for the money. No question.
Thanks, guys....well, I don't think I'll be able to play any Agiles but I'll try and get my hands on some Epi's and give them a whirl. How are the stock pickups on both? Definitely in need of a swap? I had an Epi Les Paul an eon ago and don't recall liking the stock pickups, but I was also in highschool then and knew nothing about tone. Also, a quick look at Ebay indicates that any Epi SG in a color other than black or cherry will be hard to come by...
Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
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Our list of best electric guitar brands will remain incomplete if we do not add Schecter in it. Schecter Guitar Research is a firm that evolved from a startup into a guitar giant during the recent years. Aimed mainly at the heavy metal side, Schecter produces several guitars that metal players look. However, players from all genres will find something of their wish at Schecter as it touches every side of this domain. Created with the utmost care, delicacy, and artisanship, these guitars exhibit the most amazing and high-end features that suffice to surpass most expensive brands in the market today.
I have had an old beat-up non-functioning norma electric archtop (hollow body) since i was 13(in 1984). A friend gave it to me and said i could have it if i could fix it... well like 20 years later i fixed it! and had the electrical redone for like $60.00. it needed some new parts (basiclly EVERYTHING) but i really wanted an archtop and knew i could fix this one up to sound pretty cool.... what i have found out about these guitars is that they really arent worth anything... i thought this one may have been from the late 50's early 60's so i may be worth something.. but as it turns out most people i have talked to about restoring it says its not worth anything that they were just little copies made in the 50's-60's and bought in the US at probably sears or something.... oh well I DONT CARE i really like it and its made well, so for the sheer vintage look and great feel I LOVE IT!-jj
Hector Berlioz studied the guitar as a teenager,[10] Franz Schubert owned at least two and wrote for the instrument,[11] Ludwig van Beethoven, after hearing Giuliani play, commented the instrument was "a miniature orchestra in itself".[12] Niccolò Paganini was also a guitar virtuoso and composer. He once wrote: "I love the guitar for its harmony; it is my constant companion in all my travels". He also said, on another occasion: "I do not like this instrument, but regard it simply as a way of helping me to think" [13]
The exact effect of the smaller cap depends on the other components in the circuit, including the guitar cable but for a typical humbucker with the tone control at max treble, volume at max and 470pF of guitar cable you get a 6dB boost peak at 3K rolling off at 12dB thereafter without the small cap.With the small cap, the peak shifts down to 1KHz and you get 10dB boost. This is because the capacitance of the guitar cable forms a resonant circuit with the inductance of the pickup then you add a further cap in parallel which shifts the resonance down in frequency. if you then roll off the volume to about 7 the peak drops to about 9dB of boost and shifts up a little in frequency because the resistance of the volume control decouples the cable capacitance from the pickup inductance.
A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.
Their designs do not require them to have comparator inputs as with solid-state amps. The small amount of negative feedback in valve amps is only required to provide damping to the speaker. Valve Amplifier Design From physics we know certain things must be a particular order and size to be efficient and this is acutely so with valve amps. 60Watts is the minimum power capacity for an amplifier to bring quality speakers to life with full fidelity.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica for 60 years. I started when I was ten-years-old. I have taught guitar and banjo for a number of years. My guitar of choice is a Martin D-41, an affordable guitar that is much like the D-45. The woods and construction are famous. There are other makes but none surpass Martin. My harmonicas are Hohners given to me by my father when he passed-on. Anyone can learn. I learned the fiddle after I reached my 70's. Just listen, play, and learn. Don't give-up. There are many good guitars, and banjos. Martin makes the best, and Stelling makes the best banjos. I started-out with a japanese banjo in the 1970's. A white Eagle, distributed by Alvarez.
Boost effects are simple effects that increase overall volume. However, every boost pedal is very unique and often sounds different. It always comes down to the type of components the effects pedal manufacturer used to achieve the volume boost. Some boost pedals try to maintain the guitar tone while providing a volume boost, others can heavily affect the guitar tone while providing a volume boost. Oftentimes, guitarists will get a specific boost pedal and use it as an always-on effect because they like the way the boost pedal colors their tone.
Hughes & Kettner is another new comer that's making really good progress in the market, thanks to the surge in popularity of their TubeMeister line of low-wattage tube amps. For a company that just started in the mid '80s, this is an incredible feat, and it seems like they are not letting up because they continue to get good market feedback from users and experts alike. This is mostly due to their commitment to building quality tube driven musical equipment, the same commitment which inspires their latest guitar amp models. Nuno Bettencourt, Alex Lifeson, Tony Macalpine, Allan Holdsworth are just a small sample of big name guitarists who help further expand the company's reach.
Most guitars and basses have one or more tone knobs, which offer a simple form of EQ control. Using these tone knobs adds or cuts the treble frequencies of the instrument’s signal. Most guitar and bass amps also have some tone control available, usually in the form of a 3-band EQ section, allowing you to control bass, mid, and treble frequencies with independent knobs. These knobs boost or cut frequencies when you turn them up or down. Some amps and effects offer more precise control of equalization as we’ll see next.

We are going to start with a Fender amplifier. This Mustang I V2 is a 20-watt combo amp that has won over hearts of a lot of players because of its ease of use and versatility. With one channel that has 24 presets and eighteen amp models you won’t be scrambling for diversity. Apart from that, of course, you get some of the major controls like Gain, Volume, Treble, Bass, Master, Preset Select, Modulation Select, Delay/Reverb Select, Save, Exit and Tap Tempo. The size and price of this model really do not do it justice (I mean, don’t make it more pricey but still). You also will find that this amp features USB connectivity, chromatic tuner and black textured vinyl covering with silver grille cloth that accentuates the simple and elegant look of this model. While 20-watt, as you might know, is not much (unless it’s a tube amplifier) this baby is pretty great if you want it for practice.
While we are on the subject of cute little things, I want you to consider the idea of a small amplifier with a cute name but with the looks of Marlon Brando in his early years. Wait, no, that is incredibly freaky and not something anyone wants to imagine. I mean how would you even connect your guitar to that? What I mean is imagine an incredibly handsome amplifier. Well, now that you have, let me ruin your dreams by directing your attention at the pignose 7-10 legendary portable amplifier, which is an actually rather handsome piece of equipment. The great thing about this beautiful box is that it also has a great sound, comparable to that of its betters (read: of the more expensive models). Being very light and fun to possess, it is highly portable and loud enough to captivate audiences. A great, affordable small amplifier that does not look Marlon Brando in any way, and thank god for that.
While relatively new compared to many established brands on the market, Seagull has managed to gain traction in the past few decades. Started in Canada in 1982, the company focuses on building high-quality acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars. These usually use solid tops rather than laminated tops, resulting in crystal-clear sounds and superior quality.

An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:


Amazing guitar for the price point. It's build is so accurate it requires no setup, just tune and it's ready to go. Great rich sound, very bright, great action up and down the neck. I can't put it down and I'm enjoying it more than my six string acoustics. There's something very forgiving about playing a 12 string vs a 6 string, the neck is slightly wider and there's more room for the fingers, and the pressure points on the fingers are wider too which lends to smoother playing.
Need an affordable luthier who is easily approachable with a cool little shop that rivals Pinocchio's gepetto? Then Steve Morrill in Boston is the place to take your beloved stringed contraption. I took my stratocaster here a few months back for a basic setup( innotation, neck/pots cleaning, truss rod adjustment, etc.) He did it all in less than a week's time and at a very good price--just $65 for everything including new string setup. I was able to play a few notes on his fender amp when I picked it up and was immediately pleased. The aura and smell in the little shop is enough to guarantee Mr. Morrill will do your guitar right. Also doesn't hurt to help out a small business as opposed to going to guitar center, there's much more thought and time out into the work here.
In the early 1980s, some performers began using two-way or three-way cabinets that used 15" woofers, a vented midrange driver and a horn/driver, with an audio crossover directing the signal to the appropriate driver. Folded horn bass guitar rigs have remained rare due to their size and weight. As well, since the 1990s, most clubs have PA systems with subwoofers that can handle the low range of the bass guitar. Extended range designs with tweeters were more the exception than the rule until the 1990s. The more common use of tweeters in traditional bass guitar amplifiers in the 1990s helped bassists to use effects and perform more soloistic playing styles, which emphasize the higher range of the instrument.
Orville Gibson founded the company in 1902 as the "Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd." in Kalamazoo, Michigan, to make mandolin-family instruments.[1] Gibson invented archtop guitars by constructing the same type of carved, arched tops used on violins. By the 1930s, the company was also making flattop acoustic guitars, as well as one of the first commercially available hollow-body electric guitars, used and popularized by Charlie Christian. In 1944, Gibson was bought by Chicago Musical Instruments (CMI), which was acquired in 1969 by Panama-based conglomerate Ecuadorian Company Limited (ECL), that changed its name in the same year to Norlin Corporation. Gibson was owned by Norlin Corporation from 1969 to 1986. In 1986, the company was acquired by a group led by Henry Juszkiewicz and David H. Berryman.
Just In: another great from Japan at Yamaha Nippon Gakki and wow this model was a good surprise by the big sound it projects I know why Martin made this shape guitar now they weigh nothing and put out a big sound I hardly believed it when I first heard one of these well that was years ago and I have had quite a few of these but non sounded any better than this baby. its in very good - excellent vintage condition no structural issues or cracks or even finish checking its neck alignment is excellent and its top is flat and bridge is tight its action is within Martin specs medium low and it plays excellently all throughout the fingerboard no weird buzzes its fun to play and sound is recording worthy, well taken care of over 40 years old and well maintained has resulted in a better than average survivor. Big sound and a pleasure to play with Martin like tone for a fraction. Questions or to buy contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
A passive pickup doesn’t produce a very strong signal, which can result in a small amount of volume and an anemic tone. However, the signal can either be boosted at the p.a., your amp, or the most versatile option' via an Acoustic Preamp. Active pickups don’t require any external technology to boost, though they do require a battery, but some people still use acoustic preamps for the tone shaping and DI benefits..
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.

If you've ever seen an electric guitar, you'll have noticed that most of them have solid bodies that are thinner (and sometimes much smaller) than those of acoustic guitars. Although most electric guitars are wooden, the material from which they're made is not critical. As George Beauchamp (pioneer of the modern electric guitar) pointed out in his patent back in the 1930s: "The body may be varied considerably in size, shape and construction, and may be constructed of various materials without departing from the spirit of the invention"; his original design suggested the body could be made from "a simple integral casting of metal such as aluminum." Early electric guitars were made from all kinds of materials, including molded Bakelite (one of the first plastics) and sheets of soldered brass.
The Epiphone Les Paul SL guitar (seen here in a Vintage Sunburst finish) is a great option for beginner guitarists out there as well as those in need of a high quality, budget friendly guitar that actually sounds and feels great. This is one of our best cheap electric guitars thanks to the fact you get a Les Paul style guitar packed with ceramic single coil pickups capable of spanning a range of different genres for under £100.
Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
Relatively new to the amplifier world, Paul Reed Smith is building some of the most interest amps out there. After tapping legendary amp builder Doug Sewell to head design, the company has produced a range of boutique-quality amps for a fraction of the price. The Sonzera 20 is a reliable amp that is incredibly versatile, with a full tube sound similar to American amps from the ’60s.
Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 
There is competition for Guitar Tricks and this is a good thing, as this makes sure that they have to keep improving. Prior to starting with Guitar Tricks I bought some lessons from True Fire. While the lessons were good and very well presented they needed to be downloaded onto a PC and could only be played in a special player program. TrueFire also offer an online service that includes group and one-on-one lessons.  Another alternative worth checking out is JamPlay. JamPlay has been continually gaining ground on Guitar Tricks and is worth while checking out. They do not have a free trial period, but you can get started with a very low amount for the first month and they also have some free lessons. Another option is a fairly new program called Infinite Guitar. They seem to be doing a rather good job too and also offer some free lessons.

Hal Leonard's series of books may be more responsible than any other series of books for people learning the guitar. It may be an understatement to call it a standard for students starting to learn the guitar. This book covers introductory topics like how to read music, chords, different scales and keys. Beyond that, it moves into advanced techniques and music theory in later books. The book is available as a stand alone, but we think the 3 CDs that come with the book are really useful, especially for practicing. It is so helpful to improving timing as a fundamental skill to play along with the CDs that are included with the book.


First off, I would like to say I had a lot of fun building this. Also, my hat goes off to the person that hand wrote all the tiny labels on the parts. With that being said, I couldn't get it to work. No sound at all, and only the light came on when I hit the switch. Now the fact that it didn't work could totally be an error on my part, but who knows. Now what I didn't like about this product is this: the casing is pretty small, so everything is pretty cramped (which may also contribute to why I wasn't able to get this to work, although, if you read other reviews, which I recommend for further useful information, some managed just fine), some pieces were mislabeled (There is a review that sorts this out), and the directions aren't very clear...well I thought they were clear enough, but look where that got me, so be ready for that. So 3 stars for fun, good price, and faster than expected delivery.
Phasers like the popular DOD-Phasor 201 are a perfect example of what a solid phaser pedal should sound like. Modern designs allow you to control many aspects of this effect, which makes them pretty versatile and suitable for most genres of music. Guitar players like Van Halen heavily rely on phasers to build their foundation, while some have even become famous due to their use of phasers. Phase shifters are generally very flexible and are among the most utilized modulation effects today.
The Fender Hot Rod Deluxe or its big brother the Deville come to mind. I have a hot Rod Deluxe tube mode 40 watts and it really pumps out the volume. The simple foot switch allows four settings from clean, mean, beyond mean and in your face. It really makes slide guitar sound like a male cat calling to a female in heat. Also, it can be mellow. I have seen many youtube videos with Eric Clapton playing a Tweed Model. I also own a Line 6 Duo Verb, Line 6 DT50, and of course and old US Made Peavey 5150 Eddie Van Halen Signature Model. The Peavey really pumps up the heat and the sustain is as wide as the Grand Canyon.
Overall length is 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm.), 10 in. (25.4 cm.) width, and 1 5/8 in. (4.1 cm.) in depth, measured at side of rim. Scale length is 15 1/4 in. (387 mm.). Width of nut is 1 3/4 in. (44 mm.). All original and complete, and quite clean overall; there are a few small dings to the finish and some light checking-almost inevitable on the Eko-made Vox instruments. The only notable finish marring is one spot where a superglue repair to a cracked pickguard corner left a bit of residue behind. A very nice little player, with an awful lot of chime! Excellent - Condition.
It’s the knob that controls a potentiometer (informally a “pot”) which acts as an inhibitor of sorts (when used in conjunction with a capacitor), bleeding off the high end frequencies of a guitar’s pickup (or pickups) signal that has passed through the volume control and is on it’s way out of the guitar, giving it a “warmth” (think muffled-ish) sound.
The Yamaha APXT2 is a 3/4 size version of the world's best-selling acoustic-electric guitar, the APX500III. This well-constructed, compact guitar makes a great companion when you're on the road. The APXT2 features an ART-based pickup system and Yamaha's proprietary tuner, offering great sensitivity and accuracy for quick tuning. The APX T2 also includes a gig bag.
Inspired by the Fuzz-Tone’s ability to add an aggressive swagger to any guitar melody, the mid-60s saw an explosion of copycat fuzz stompboxes. Most of the imitations were atrocious, but some became infamous. A few deliberately tried to combat the limitations of guitars themselves, like Gary Hurst’s 1965 Sola Sound Tone Bender MKI, which reused the three-transistor circuit of the Fuzz Tone. For the MKI, Hurst tweaked certain resistor values, which extended, or sustained, the guitar notes for longer. A two-transistor version of the tone bender (the MKI.5) morphed into Jimi Hendrix’s favorite stompbox, the simple and durable Arbiter Fuzz Face. The later model, the MKII, was at the heart of Jimmy Page’s secret sound in early Led Zeppelin recordings, When the Fuzz Face was released in 1966, it set a precedent for Hendrix imitators (“I Don’t Live Today” being the most frenetic extension of the Fuzz Face’s limits). With a keen ear for experimentation, Hendrix would often prefer the Fuzz Face’s tone when the battery was half-charged, in large part because germanium transistors fluctuate according to voltage. Guitarists would often have to wade through different batteries in order to find their own tone.
To capture two speakers in a multi-speaker cab or record a bigger sound that delivers the response of two different microphones in similar positions on one speaker, you can try using two mics in a close or semi-close placement. If you’re using two different mics on a single speaker, place the capsules of each as close together as possible, without touching, in order to minimize phase cancellation. This technique might seem redundant, but can often yield outstanding results, allowing you to blend the characteristics of two different microphones to capture one amp sound – a bright, detailed condenser and a punchy, midrange-heavy dynamic, for example. On guitar cabs carrying two or more speakers, try miking each speaker separately, placing each of two mics – same type or different – at the same distance. Some amp makers use different types of speakers in cabs to enhance sonic complexity, and this miking technique will make the most of those. Even two speakers of exactly the same type, however, will often sound slightly different, and blending them might yield great results.
Great article and very enlightening comments too. One thing I’d like to add is that it seems to me that a considerably large expense is necessarily involved in going the ampless route i.e. Axe FX + midi controller at the least, in an Axe Fx setup. Granted, amp setups can be just as expensive or more expensive, but cheaper amp options are available.

In 1935, the Dobro Corporation and National Stringed Instrument merged to become the National Dobro Corporation. The Dobro operation moved into the larger facilities of National, however, the two organizations never really reintegrated. Both National and Dobro maintained separate production lines, sales organizations and distributors throughout the rest of their L.A. tenure. Before long, as we shall see, National Dobro would relocate to Chicago while keeping its facilities in L.A. for a few more years. Dobro production would continue in L.A. through ’37 or so, with some leftover parts being assembled perhaps as late as ’39, after which the Dobro name went into hiatus until revived by the Dopyeras in ’59, but that, too, is another story in the Big Guitar City!
Conversely, buyers can use these websites to find out what the real value of a guitar is. This can be useful whether you're buying from a private seller or the guitar store down the street. Don't be afraid to haggle if the seller wants more than the guitar is actually worth according to book value. While the seller may eventually find another buyer, there's no reason for you to over pay.
#A1056:Another super rare piece from Guitars West! This little number found its way across the pond and onto our doorstep. A very early VamPower 70's 100 watt P.A. 6 channel input head. With speaker channels, one 4 ohm-100w-#1 & 2 input, one 8 ohm-100w-#3 & 4 input, one 15 ohm-100w-# 5 input, two 8 ohm-50w-# 1 & 2 input, two 15 ohm-50w-# 3 & 4 input.
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.

Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.


The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.
• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
Not nearly as popular as single-coils and humbuckers, piezo pickups can be found on electric guitars as well. These crystalline sensors are usually embedded in the saddle of an electric guitar. Piezo sensors operate on mechanical vibration as opposed to magnets to convert sound from vibrating strings into an electric current. Piezo pickups can be used to trigger synthesizer or digital sounds much like an electronic keyboard. Most often, piezo pickups on an electric guitar are used to simulate an acoustic guitar tone. Piezo-equipped guitars often also include magnetic pickups to expand their tonal versatility.

Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.


YP - The Real Yellow PagesSM - helps you find the right local businesses to meet your specific needs. Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria. These factors are similar to those you might use to determine which business to select from a local Yellow Pages directory, including proximity to where you are searching, expertise in the specific services or products you need, and comprehensive business information to help evaluate a business's suitability for you. “Preferred” listings, or those with featured website buttons, indicate YP advertisers who directly provide information about their businesses to help consumers make more informed buying decisions. YP advertisers receive higher placement in the default ordering of search results and may appear in sponsored listings on the top, side, or bottom of the search results page.
Fender’s open-back combo tube amps have been used on countless hit records in practically every genre of music in the past half-century. They can deliver both warm bell-like clean tones and gritty overdriven snarls. The Blue Junior III is a relatively inexpensive way to get into Fender tube amps, and it’s the perfect size for studio and small venues.
The first “production” electrics were made by Stromberg-Voisinet in Chicago in 1928 under the direction of Henry Kay “Hank” Kuhrmeyer, soon to be president of the company which would shortly be renamed the Kay Musical Instrument Company. S-V developed the first commercially viable (more or less) pickup and amplifier. The pickup – we’ve yet to see one so an accurate description is impossible at this point in time – was probably a quasi-transducer which probably adapted phono cartridge or telephone receiver technology. It was placed on S-V’s two-pointed Venetian-shaped acoustic guitars and was greeted with great ballyhoo in the music trade press. The amp was produced before the development of preamp tubes, and was undoubtedly very primitive (there is no mention of even volume controls), and probably not particularly loud (though, of course, listeners had nothing to compare). Apparently, the reality didn’t live up to the hype, because Kuhrmeyer later suggested than only a few hundred of these guitars were actually made, and mention of them evaporates after 1928, likely done in by a combination of lack of performance and the upcoming Great Depression, which descended in 1929.
Replace or upgrade your guitars pickup selector and other switches with the highest quality switches available from Switchcraft, CRL, Fender, Oak Grigsby Gotoh, Philmore and other top brands. Lever/blade style switches, toggle switches, mini switches, rotary switches, slide switches and other styles. For pickup selector and mini switch technical data, visit our Pickup Selector & Mini Switch Connections page to view drawings with the internal switch connections of each switch position. And if you are upgrading or replacing your pickup selector switch with a different type or style, check out the Pickup Switch Terminal Cross Reference page to view the corresponding terminals of the most common pickup selectors and switches.
Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
Up for sale, a 1956 Fender Deluxe in excellent condition and in perfect working order. A previous owner also very lightly added their ID number to the faceplate between the On switch and Tone knob. It's an example that will satisfy collectors and serious players alike, and the amp has recently been given a clean bill of health, ready for your next gig or studio session.

The Whammy pedal is truly one-of-a-kind. It gets its name from the slang term for a tremolo arm on a guitar, which allows a player to control the pitch of the strings while playing. In much the same way, The Whammy pedal allows a player to perform radical pitch-shifting in real time by rocking the foot treadle back and forth, sweeping between the intervals set on the pedal. This pedal is a lot of fun and allows guitarists to create the dive-bomb sounds that are associated with JImi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen, and Joe Satriani.
In Chicago in the sixties, "the rules had been laid down" for young, white blues bands, Mike Bloomfield told Rolling Stone in 1968. "You had to be as good as Otis Rush." That wasn't easy. A Mississippi native who moved to the Windy City in the late Forties, Rush was a fearsome electric guitarist – with a grittytreble tone and lacerating attack, like a gunslinging cross of Muddy Waters and B.B. King – as well as a knockout songwriter. Along with guitarists like Magic Sam and Buddy Guy, Rush helped create the more modernized, R&B-influenced approach to Chicago blues that came to be known as the West Side Sound. Rush's impact on later generations was enormous: His late-Fifties and early-Sixties singles were go-to covers for Led Zeppelin ("I Can't Quit You Baby"), John Mayall ("All Your Love [I Miss Loving]") and the J. Geils Band ("Homework"), while Stevie Ray Vaughan named his band after Rush's lethal '58 lament "Double Trouble."
Repair body wings. These wings form the main body shape and may have been broken by dropping the guitar or other damaging methods. If you do not properly glue in the wings you will need to use extra caution as to not break the bond. Repairing wings or any body wood is rarely necessary, especially on a thick guitar body such as a Les Paul Standard. It may be needed on a smaller bodied guitar much like a Les Paul Junior.

In late 1960, the amp was redesigned with three, rather than two, channels, each with two inputs, and offered with an optional Top Boost, or Brilliance, circuit, which introduced an extra gain stage and separate bass and treble controls. The Top Boost feature proved popular enough that it became standard on the AC30/6 (so named for its six inputs). Its chimey high end was a signature of the Beatles’ early recordings and was later favored by guitarists like Brian May, Tom Petty, Peter Buck and The Edge, whose 1964 AC30/6 has been featured on every U2 album.
Curiously, Les Paul also contributed to recording... along with building his own recording studio at his home, he built his own disc cutting system, and did multitrack recording on acetate discs... recording on a disc, then overdubbing himself and that original disc playing onto another disc, and so on. He later worked with Ampex on multitrack tape machines, and released the first multitrack electric guitar recording on Capitol records in 1949... however, Sydney Bechet had released a multi-track recording using Paul's techniques back in 1941. 
For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.
The Fender CC-60SCE acoustic-electric guitar combines the powerful onboard electronics with classic Fender tone and the comfort of their longstanding craftsmanship. The smaller concert body features a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and "Easy-To-Play" neck, making it a perfect choice for beginning to intermediate level players looking to take the next step in their music. 
In Hamburg in 1960, Beatles guitarist John Lennon bought a Rickenbacker 325 Capri, which he used throughout the early days of The Beatles. He eventually had the guitar’s natural alder body refinished in black, and made other modifications including the fitting of a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece and regularly changing the control knobs.[7] Lennon played this guitar for The Beatles’ famous 1964 debut on The Ed Sullivan Show (as well as for their third Sullivan appearance, pre-taped the same day but broadcast two weeks later). During Lennon’s post-Beatles years in New York, this guitar was restored to its original natural wood finish and the cracked gold pickguard replaced with a white one.[7]
This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.
The majority of favoured mic pairs seem to include the trusty SM57, but its most popular partner appears to be the larger-diaphragm MD421 — users include Bob Rock, Bruce Fairbairn, Alan Winstanley, Joe Barresi, Simon Dawson, Stephen Street and The Matrix. Also high on the list is the pairing of the SM57 with a large-diaphragm condenser of some type, and Steve Churchyard, Toni Visconti, Jim Scott, Stephen Street, and John Leckie all name-check the U87 in this role.
Jazz rhythm guitar often consists of very textural, odd-meter playing that includes generous use of exotic, difficult-to-fret chords. In 4/4 timing, it is common to play 2.5 beat intervals such as on the 2 and then the half beat or "and" after 4. Jazz guitarists may play chords "ahead" of the beat, by playing the chord a swung eighth note before the actual chord change. Chords are not generally played in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, like a rock rhythm guitarist would play.

The only guitar instrument I can think of that is NOT sampler-based and that actually sounds decent would be RealGuitar. It's not the most realistic (IMO) and it's $160+. But if you ask most people for recommendations on realistic guitar instruments, you will hear stuff like Shreddage, Electri6ity, ProminyLPC, Lyrical Distortion, Strawberry Electric Guitar from Orange Tree... all Kontakt libraries, and all undoubtedly better than the 3 products you listed in your initial post, two of which are simply synths and not at all meant for realistic playing!
Follow your musical vision and express yourself with the unique Fender Newporter Player. The exclusive medium-sized Newporter shape gives it a balanced voice that's both articulate and powerful, perfect for backing up any singer. Designed for performing, the fully-painted gloss metallic solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, matching painted 6-in-line headstock and creme binding give this guitar a shot of electrifying style. Unconventional to the core, the Newporter Player is definitely something different and exciting.
As mentioned, most of the ’50s Teisco guitars were heavily influenced by Gibson-style design. At the very end of the decade or just at the dawn of the ’60s, Teisco guitars began to change to double cutaways and exhibit a playful � if slightly frumpy � more Fender-oriented design aesthetic. This was almost in lock-step with American guitar industry trends. Gibson launched its thinline ES-335 in 1958 and, indeed, changed its single-cutaway Les Paul to the double-cutaway SG in ’61. American manufacturers such as Kay and Harmony quickly followed suit. The Teisco change was a part of the guitar Zeitgeist.
Acoustic guitar is the first choice of many guitar beginners. There are a lot of benefits to start with an acoustic guitar. First of first, acoustic guitars are cheaper than electric guitars. Then acoustic guitars are easy to carry, you don’t need electricity and amplifiers. The most important reason I think is a good acoustic guitar make amazing sound that different from electric guitars.
Bottom Line: The biggest downside of the Line 6 M5 is that you can’t use more than one effect at the same time, and that it’s missing a looper function. But then again, you’re asking it to be more than what it’s trying to be. This is a Swiss Army Knife of a pedal that can morph and change shapes to whatever effect you need (we should also mention it’s true bypass when switched off). Sure, the drives/distortions are a weak area, but most effects are nearly indistinguishable from the classic pedals they are trying to emulate. We love this quote from a user:
The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.
The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!

70s Morris D-28 Gorgeous Rosewood body Dreadnaught Acoustic Japanes Vintage BOOMER with Martin Set Up Just in folks get the jump on this being processed now- pictured etc measured and pictured We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle se as well as upgraded bridge Pins to solid Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from woods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic Dreadnought style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. More info soon .


“I was trying to help Henry and shoo him away from areas that he was spending a whole lot of money in,” Schon says. “All this electronical, robot crap. I told him, point blank, ‘What you’re doing, Roland and other companies are light-years in front of you, you’ve got this whole building you’ve designated to be working on this synth guitar. I’ve played it. And it just doesn’t work.’ And he refused to believe that.”

Starting in January 1999, Taylor guitars are made with a patented bolt-on neck; the NT neck (new technology). It differs from other necks by using a continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.[7] The standard practice is to support the fretboard up to the fourteenth fret with the unsupported portion being glued to the constantly moving soundboard. The NT neck fits into a pocket on the top of the guitar body with the desired angle being achieved by small, accurately milled neck spacers (shims). Over time, some guitars require the neck angle to be realigned (referred to as a neck reset). This process is greatly simplified by allowing the replacement of different sized neck spacers to return the neck to the required angle. Prior to 1999, Taylor Guitars had a simpler bolt-on neck. These guitar necks allow for simple adjustment later if needed. Traditional (Non-Taylor) guitars with a glued neck with a dovetail would need to be disassembled to be adjusted.[8][9]

Finally the ease and portability of the small amp will allow you so much more flexibility with when and where you can practice. Just weighing a couple of pounds is already a great advantage over the rest of the amps available on the market. And being able to take it on road trips, travel trips, backpacking trips (for a bit of extra buck, we all have thought of doing it) means you can practice anywhere, any time. Small storage requirement means a great storing capability where you don’t have to worry about taking up too much space in your tiny room or apartment. It is great stuff, honestly.

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Purchase the required hardware. There’s a lot of variety in terms of the looks and capabilities of the parts you’ll need for your guitar. You can choose based on the kind that existing guitars you like use, or experiment with something new. You can easily buy the equipment you’ll need from most guitar shops or online. For an electric guitar, you’ll need:[3]
Most electric guitars feature multiple pickups. Some will have two or three single-coils. Some will have two or three humbuckers. Many offer a combination of single-coil and humbucker pickups. This combination offers the player a wide range of tonal options. Pickup configurations are often abbreviated by referring to single-coils with an "S" and humbuckers with an "H." The placement of each pickup is indicated from the neck down towards the bridge. Thus an SSH configuration has single-coils at the neck and middle positions and a humbucker at the bridge.
In 1978 the Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the “mini-humbuckers” of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in Ebony, Cherry Sunburst, Tobacco Sunburst or Gold finishes. Interestingly, it was first launched in Europe, rather than the US. It was discontinued in 1983.

Although there’s no clear delineation for when Phase Two officially began, the Hi-Flier began to develop new features. While it maintained the P90-style pickups, other aspects of the guitar were changed. The fret markers shrunk and were made uniform in size, the rocker switches were replaced by three-way toggles and a plain white pickguard was made standard.

To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]
Russell, George (2001) [1953]. "Chapter 1 The Lydian scale: The seminal source of the principal of tonal gravity". George Russell's Lydian chromatic concept of tonal organization. Volume One: The art and science of tonal gravity (Fourth (Second printing, corrected, 2008) ed.). Brookline, Massachusetts: Concept Publishing Company. pp. 1–9. ISBN 0-9703739-0-2.
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
The transparent overdrive is the most natural sounding overdrive. Unlike the most commonly used multi-processing type overdrives, the transparent overdrive does not alter the tone of the input signal. The transparent overdrive's output signal will sound exactly the same to that of the input signal tone wise, just with added drive and boosted signal (dependent on the users settings). Which means there is no tone loss for more natural sounding drive. The transparent overdrive is typically priced higher due to it having nothing but the purest of sound and smooth drive.
There’s another wrinkle: vintage-style pickup magnets can weaken over time, resulting in a softer, smoother tone. Some pickups are designed to mimic this ageing process. Say you were looking for a vintage P.A.F.-style humbucker: You could choose between one of our models that that sounds like a pickup straight off the late-’50s production line (the Seth Lover humbucker), and another that mimics a similar pickup as it would sound and look today after decades of wear and tear (the Antiquity humbucker).
After Fender’s decision in 1982 to switch Squier’s production from strings to guitars, the Stratocaster was one of the first models put under the Squier production line in Japan. It was the most commercially successful guitar Fender had produced. Originally in 1982, the headstock had a “Fender” name written in large script, followed by “Squier series” in smaller script. In 1983, this was later changed to the current 1970s large headstock featuring “Squier” in larger script, followed by “by Fender” in smaller script. Since then, there have been several variations of headstock size and Squier logos, typically based on what series the guitar is.
By the way, I’d like to also take this opportunity to thank collector and one of VG’s earliest subscribers Jim Dulfer for invaluable help in an ongoing research effort, providing access to his truly impressive paper collection and photographs of some of his instruments. These catalogs are filling in many, many holes in information. You will be reaping the benefits in upcoming “Different Strummer” columns in both information and illustrations, as well as in upcoming book project. Thanks to Jim from guitar fans everywhere!
REGOLAZIONE DELL'INTONAZIONE (FAT20) Per garantire l'assenza di movimento, ogni selletta è provvista di una vite di fissaggio. Per regolare l'intonazione, allentare la vite di fissaggio della selletta con una chiave a brugola da 2 mm (D). Per regolare l'intonazione, inserire una chiave a brugola da 2,5 mm nella vite della selletta sul retro del tremolo.

1958-1969: replaces the "U" models and now has a double cutaway body with short horns. Masonite/poplar frame bodies, 13.25" wide. Models numbers include the "Standard": 3011 (black 1 pickup), 3012 (bronze 1 pickup), 3021 (black 2 pickup), 3022 (bronze 2 pickup), 5025 (blond 2 pickup). The 3021 is considered THE Jimmy Page model. "Seal" shaped pickguard and concentric knobs on 2 or 3 pickup models. Round control knobs.

Distortion was not an effect originally intended by amplifier manufacturers, but could often easily be achieved by "overdriving" the power supply in early tube amplifiers. In the 1950s, guitarists began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to achieve "warm" distorted sounds.[29] Among the first musicians to experiment with distortion were Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf,[29] Goree Carter,[30] Joe Hill Louis,[31][32] Ike Turner,[33] Guitar Slim,[34] and Chuck Berry.[35]


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I’m not a very good guitarist. In fact, some people would probably say I’m really awful. And that’s ok. But I’ve owned guitars. I can play a G chord. I can fumble my way through some 3-chord punk, alternative rock songs and a Beatles tune here and there. At the very least, I know a tiny bit about guitars and things. For example, I wouldn’t confuse a drum kit with a guitar, so score points for me there.
T3 (2009) – The T3 shares the same body styling as the T5 with some electronic and structural differences. It is a semi-hollow-body because it has a solid center block in the body. It comes standard with a quilted maple laminated top, and has and electric style bridge. The electronics include multiple humbucker pickups, coil splitters, and push-pull tone and volume pots. The T3 is available with the optional Bigsby vibrato in the T3/B.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
The x99 is as Soldano as an amp can get; its purple! The X99 (a step above the 3-channel X88) is a unique MIDI-controlled preamp, featuring Tim Caswell’s innovative system of real-time-controllable motorized knobs. Modeled after the SLO, the X99 has got the Soldano character that everyone’s grown to love. If you find one, let us know! Like most discontinued Soldano’s, the X99 is virtually impossible to track down.
When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.

Clapton himself has repeatedly called Guy “the greatest living guitarist.” Hendrix literally knelt at Buddy’s feet in the late Sixties, the better to study his riffs. Guy’s secret? He combines an old-time blues feel with the technical facility of a modern guitar player. He was a youngster at the legendary Chess Records in early Sixties Chicago. Fresh up from Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy was some 20 years junior to giants like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, yet old enough and gifted enough to share the studio with them.
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
The Rolls-Royce of multi-effects pedals is the Line 6 POD HD500X. As far as the top 5 pedals in this guide, the HD500X is the most full-featured, most complex, and also the priciest. Despite carrying a higher price tag than the others, it comes very highly recommended and landed a solid second place on our list, and this is mostly due to two things:

Electri6ity is frequently compared to Musiclab’s real electric guitar line as they came out around the same time, and while Musiclab delivers better quality in most aspects, you only have one guitar per VST - where Electri6ity has eight. However,  while Electri6ity will give you twice as many guitars for the price, Musiclab continues to update their Real line, now blowing Electri6ity out of the water.

All the effects that were created up through the early 1980s were based on analog circuitry. That is, they operated by directly modifying an actual sound signal. Starting in the ‘80s, the digital revolution invaded the realm of guitar and bass effects with digital signal processing. Digital effects convert the instrument’s output to a digital bitstream that is then modified by digital circuitry before being translated back to analog sound signals for output. The first digital effects were all modeled on existing effects, but devices that followed such as pitch-shifting effects, delays, and harmony processors only became practical with the advent of digital signal manipulation.

In the early 1960s Rickenbacker history became forever wedded to one of the biggest music upheavals of the 20th century: the invasion of the mop-top Beatles from Liverpool, England. The Beatles used several Rickenbacker models in the early years. Before the group broke up, John Lennon would own at least four. This love affair began in Hamburg, Germany in 1960 when he bought a natural-blonde Model 325 with a Kauffman vibrato. Lennon played the original (which was eventually refinished black but still easily identified by its gold-backed lucite pickguard) on all Beatle recordings and in all concerts until early 1964.
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While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.
It was also in January of ’64 that the Westheimer Sales Company, 1414 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, began advertising its New Kingston, the “S” line of quality guitars. These double-cutaway guitars included the #S-1 single pickup, #S-2 double pickup, #S-3 three pickup, the #S-2T double with tremolo, and #S-3T with tremolo. These were most likely versions of the little MJ and WG guitars.
There’s so many multi effects pedals out there to choose from, that finding the right one that suits your musical style and your budget can be a little difficult. depending on what your style or genre is, you’re could be wondering which multi effects pedal is best for metal, or curious if your multi-effects pedal will work with your tube amp or even which option is right for your acoustic guitar, but fear not as we aim to answer all those questions and more.
Any experienced professional guitarist will tell you there’s usually a big difference between what works on the live stage and what works in the studio. Most discovered early on that the carefully honed live tone they were so proud of just didn’t work on the recorded track, for any of several reasons, or not without a lot of tweaking and readjustment, at least. The first thing you’re likely to discover is that it’s a lot harder to record satisfactory overdriven and distorted guitar sounds than it is to record clean or mildly crunchy sounds, a revelation that often goes hand-in-hand with the fact that big amps tend to be more difficult to record satisfactorily in general.

Martin makes classic guitars that have been featured in countless hit tunes. While they are best known for their top-of-the-line $2,000+ models, Martin also makes great guitars for any budget. Martin guitars always honor their tradition while continuing to strive for a better instrument. Give Martin’s new 17 Series a try if you want to see that theory in action.

Pickups are complex devices. No matter what we do, we cannot model them with spot-on accuracy. They do have a series resistance (R6), but the L1 and C3 inductor and capacitance, respectively, but these are not real circuit components, but are a simple model placeholder for the complicated interactions that appear due to Maxwell’s equations, when we have a wire wound around magnets (see below image):
For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.
Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.
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Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece
In 1958, Gibson updated the Les Paul yet again. The new model retained most of the specifications of the 1957 Goldtop, including PAF humbucker pickups, maple top, tune-o-matic bridge with a stop tailpiece or Bigsby vibrato tailpiece. The most significant change in the new models was the finish. The Goldtop color used since 1952 was replaced by the Sunburst finish already being used on Gibson’s archtop acoustic and hollow electric guitars, such as the J-45 model. To differentiate from the earlier Goldtop model, the new Les Paul was referred to as The Les Paul Standard. Original production of the standards lasted from 1958 to 1960. Only 1,700 of these early models were made and have subsequently become highly collectible.[note 6] Original production ended when, in 1961, Gibson redesigned the Les Paul to feature a “double cutaway” body, which has subsequently become the Gibson SG. Due to high demand, Gibson resumed production of Les Paul Standards in 1968. Today, the Gibson Les Paul Standard has BurstBucker pickups on the Vintage Original Spec models and Burstbucker Pro on the lower end models bearing the ‘Standard’ name.
The Wave's all tube design utilizes four dual triode vacuum tubes - three 12AX7s and one 12AT7 - and comes with a MOD® three-spring reverb tank. MOD® reverb tanks are deemed the closest to the original reverb tanks from the '60s made today. The Wave's reverb function can be switched in and out pop-free via the front panel toggle or with a footswitch. Footswitch sold separately (see P-H470 for compatible footswitch).
Some of the more distinctive specifications include, the headstock shape, tuners, neck and fretboard, bridge, and pickups and electronics. The headstock shape is based on PRS’s trademark design, but inverted to both accommodate Mayer’s playing style and also to keep a consistent length of string behind the nut, which makes staying in tune easier. The tuners are a traditional vintage-style, closed-back tuner, but with PRS’s locking design. The neck shape was modeled after 1963/1964 vintage instruments, and the fretboard has a 7.25” radius. The moment your hand grabs this neck, it just feels right. Like the tuners, the steel tremolo takes a classic design and incorporates PRS’s trem arm and Gen III knife-edge screws. The bridge on the Silver Sky is setup flush to the body in the neutral position so that the tremolo bridge only goes down in pitch. By keeping the bridge in contact with the body, the guitar itself is acoustically louder, which improves the signal to noise ratio of the single-coil pickups. The 635JM single-coil pickups are very round and full, with a musical high end that is never “ice-picky” or brash.
Since 1971 Hoffman Guitars has provided a full range of services to guitar players nationwide.   We have always worked to provide the finest in instrument repair services and handcrafted guitars.  We provide a full range of repair services, including factory authorized warranty service for C.F. Martin, Gibson, Guild, Fender, Taylor, Jim Olson and others.  I (Charlie Hoffman) have built over 600 individually handcrafted guitars, which are (or have been) played by such players as Leo Kottke, Tim Sparks,  Dakota Dave Hull, Ann Reed, Jerry Rau, Charlie Maguire and others.  In addition, we carry a fairly complete range of accessories for guitar players (strings, picks, capos, pickups, cases, etc, etc.).  In this day and age it may seem a bit anachronistic but we really believe in customer service and strive to provide the very best.
Not the first commercially available flanger pedal, but probably the first that really worked properly with the full sonic depth of the effect, the A/DA Flanger was made possible by the advent of the SAD1024 chip (others were used through its lifetime, depending upon availability). It hit the shelves in 1977, and was shortly followed by Electro-Harmonix’s equally beloved Electric Mistress, and MXR’s big, gray Flanger. Nearly every big maker slapped its own flanger on the butt and sent it toddling down the pike within the next few years. These were serious pedals in their day, the big boys requiring their own regulated onboard AC power stage to run all that thirsty silicon. Most required a serious investment on behalf of the impoverished guitarist, too. A/DA’s unit retailed at $199.95 when introduced, and others went for even more. Not a steal, when you consider that minimum wage was $2.30 an hour in 1977.
Several concert sound subwoofer manufacturers suggest that their subs can be used for bass instrument amplification. Meyer Sound suggests that its 650-R2 Concert Series Subwoofer, a 14-square-foot (1.3 m2) enclosure with two 18-inch drivers, can be used for bass instrument amplification.[23] While performers who use concert sound subwoofers for onstage monitoring may like the powerful sub-bass sound that they get onstage, sound engineers may find the use of large subwoofers (e.g., two 18" drivers) for onstage instrument monitoring to be problematic, because it may interfere with the "Front of House" sub-bass sound.
Simple mistake that the beginners do is not selecting the right pickup on the right time. For example Normally they put the switch for the bridge pickup for soloing or do the powerchords. But then, to do some plucking, clean strumming or ryhthm, they still using the bridge pickup. So the sound is so dry, They should change it to toggle number 2(or for 5 way switch, toggle number 2 or 4)
While the acoustic-electric guitar isn’t actually its own body type, it’s simply an acoustic guitar with electric pickups to amplify its signal (we’ll talk about pickups soon!), it’s worth mentioning that you’re almost never going to get a comparable tone to that of a hollow body or really, any kind of electric guitar. It’s just not built for that, and in fact, it’s almost always better if you want that acoustic sound, to buy a really resonant acoustic guitar and add a nice soundhole pickup (like this one) instead.

This set has all three of the best pianos available in a size that can be handled by most modern devices devices (PCs or recommend iPhone 8/iPad Pro). Needlessly long samples have been shortened but looping only happens at almost inaudible trailing ends of samples (many after 20s).  If you are looking for a quality set with different piano types to choose from then this is the one. This set is already included in the Nice-Keys-CompletePlus and Nice-Keys-Extreme.
Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.
eyelet boards. Today BYOC leads the way in DIY FX kits for guitarists. With distribution in Canada, Europe, Australia, Great Britain, and Asia, and over 25 thousand kits sold worldwide, BYOC is a leader in DIY effects. And our goal has not changed – to bring guitar players a product that is more than just some DIY effects project that merely “works”, but a complete stompbox that will rival or surpass any of the big name boutique pedals on the market today.

Included here after the filters are shifters like your standard pitch shifters, harmonizers, or octave pedals. You want to take care of any pitch changing (I'd argue even vibrato should happen here) before you add other effects into your signal, since they will react to the audio signal itself. You don't want to add reverb and then try to pitch shift, because the signal you send becomes too complex and inaccurate for such a precise effect.
Paint chips and cracked binding: Common on older instruments. Over time these openings will collect sweat, polish, and dirt, causing discoloration, lifting of the edges, and further deterioration. It is best to clean these spots w/ naptha (lighter fluid)or alchohol, remove any loose edges around the chips before cleaning (they will be holding polish and grime preventing the glue from working), then seal the chips and cracks with thin superglue. Super glue can be heated in the microwave for a few seconds (plastic bottles) to make it flow better. Drop Filling is a technique for filling chips with paint. This is covered at the ReRanch site.
But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.

There were differences between the pickups as well – the National had slanted units under enormous covers, while the Supro featured 8-string versions of the Alnico V pickups found on many Spanish-style guitars. The difference in tone proved to be minimal. The Supro has a more refined sound than its cheaper cousins with the famous string-through pickup, but it can still be raw and biting when required. Although it is a single-coil pickup, it has excellent hum rejection and sounds wonderful either overdriven or clean. The guitar has plenty of sustain and a surprising level of output, making it an excellent instrument for rock and roll as well as country music.


When you have a setup that you like, you can easily save it as a track preset — or, better still, create multiple track presets for different types of sounds. Cubase can even make a fine host for live performance, should you decide to trade your rack of effects for a svelte laptop that patches directly into the PA system, as you can switch instantly between racks. (I'll cover how to do this at the end of the article.)

There’s an old joke in the technology industry: If a product has a problem, simply sell it as a feature. The electric-guitar-effects industry is no different. Music has often thrived on transforming faults into influential sound effects. Before professional studio production enabled granular tweaks in sound, standalone guitar effects emerged from deliberately converting hardware faults—often caused by the limitations of amplifiers—into positive features. By the end of the 1970s, it had become impossible to imagine how R&B, blues, and rock could have existed without these fortuitous mistakes.


This is normally when I tell you about a crowdfunding campaign, but there isn't one currently running for this device, so if you're interested in getting a ToneWood-Amp when it's launched, sign up at their website to register for pre-ordering. There is no commitment to buy one for signing up, but if you sign up now, you can then order one at half-price ($90) when the pre-order campaign goes live (mid-October).

EQ placement is similar. Some players prefer to mold and shape their guitar’s primary tonal character before it is processed by other effects, but others prefer to adjust the EQ of the finished sound (again, placement in front of delay and reverb is preferable). Or maybe your distortion pedal’s EQ controls just don’t have enough bass or treble and you need to tweak its tone a touch more. If you own an EQ pedal, have fun and try placing it in different locations to see what works best for you.
Fernandes Guitars is a guitar and accessory manufacturer, that originated in Japan in 1969, building flamenco guitars. As the company grew it expanded production to include more acoustic guitars, electric guitars, bass guitars, amplifiers, and accessories to become one of the biggest guitar manufacturers in Japan. Fernandes also owns Burny, a brand for Gibson replicas.
The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).
The history of Electric Guitars is summarized by Guitar World magazine, and the earliest electric guitar on their top 10 list is the Ro-Pat-In Electro A-25 "Frying Pan" (1932) described as 'The first-fully functioning solid-body electric guitar to be manufactured and sold'.[31] The most recent electric guitar on this list is the Ibanez Jem (1987) which featured '24 frets', 'an impossibly thin neck' and was 'designed to be the ultimate shredder machine'. Numerous other important electric guitars are on the list including Gibson ES-150 (1936), Fender Telecaster (1951), Gibson Les Paul (1952), Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet (1953), Fender Stratocaster (1954), Rickenbacker 360/12 (1964), Van Halen Frankenstein (1975), Paul Reed Smith Custom (1985) many of these guitars were 'successors' to earlier designs.[31] Electric Guitar designs eventually became culturally important and visually iconic, with various model companies selling miniature model versions[32][33] of particularly famous electric guitars, for example the Gibson SG used by Angus Young from the group AC/DC.
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