Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
DR Strings makes strings that were specifically designed for drop d tuning, other alternate tunings, and even standard tuning. Known as DDT strings, DR spent over two years perfecting them. DR created a new patent pending method for constructing these strings to ensure great performance with lower pitches. Because of the amazing construction, and their ability to quickly lock into tune so quickly, DR calls their DDT's "Superstrings". Why not try a set? DDT's are available for electric guitar or bass guitar.
Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
Five string guitars are common in Brazil, where they are known as guitarra baiana and are typically tuned in 5ths. Schecter Guitar Research produced a production model 5 string guitar called the Celloblaster in 1998.[43] A five-string tuning may be necessary in a pinch when a string breaks on a standard six-string (usually the high E) and no replacement is immediately available.

While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.

Rule 4—Taking sound-making devices like stompbox pedals out of the equation, there’s an order to the way sounds naturally occur in physical space. For example, guitar amp distortion is made in physical space by turning an amp up enough to cause its circuits to overload, and any echo you might hear happens after the distorted sound hits walls or ceilings and bounces back to your ears. Therefore, logic says that your reverb and/or delay pedals should be last in the signal path, since that is how the sounds they produce actually occur in three-dimensional space.

While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
Mike Longworth’s book shows at least three guitar amplifiers carrying the Martin name from the early ’60s. Who made them is unknown… most certainly it wasn’t Martin. In 1961 Martin marketed a pair of combos, the Model 110T and Model 112T. Both had top rear-mounted controls and a very groovy geometrical grillcloths in a sort of M.C. Escher pattern. Presumably the 110 featured a 10″ speaker, while the 112 had a 12″. The “T” suggests a tremolo circuit. In 1962 Martin offered a very cool #700 portable amplifier, a unit ensconced in a leather carrying case, presumably battery-powered.
Nice-Keys-Extreme-2.0  Still a big SoundFont set at 1gb or 1000mb (645mb dedicated to 3 pianos with 6 velocity layers). Similar to the top set but the main piano is a little less detailed so it leaves room for an extra piano (Steinways).  PC users should not have any problems or if running on iOS this set runs perfectly well on iPhone 6s or iPad Air 2. It is still possible to load this set within the bs-16i app and run Sweet Midi Player app using GM set one at the same time for midi backing if required. This set has everything described below plus the addition of guitars.

Next up is this beautiful standard Telecaster from Fender. All the words in the name are words that appeal to us. Fender is a well-renowned brand that most guitarists consider a safe option that delivers great guitars. The next word, ‘Deluxe’, suggests that this particular guitar is a little bit better than all the rest, and then we have Nashville, which makes all country enthusiasts curious.
This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
Good looks and playability seem to be the two biggest selling points of the Ibanez AEG10II. Many describe it as a fun instrument, thanks to its comfortably thin profile body and fast action setup. A good portion of its positive reviews are from users who after gigging with the guitar, have great things to say about its reliability and amplified sound.
If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location.

Harmonizers blend the note from your original guitar signal with a note shifted to a preset interval. For example, you may set it to a Major 3rd interval and it will create a similar sound as if you played a root-plus-Maj-3rd diad. Harmonizers are pretty diverse effects, but using one correctly obviously means understanding a little about music theory and how scales and intervals work.
3) Had a little fret buzz on the high E but that was probably more my fault than anything else because I changed the light gauge strings to extra lights which sometimes requires the neck adjustment to be loosened. This guitar is set up from the factory with light gauge strings which means if you put on extra lights, the neck will have a tendency to straighten out too much which brings your strings closer to the frets and sometimes results in fret buzz. An easy fix though...just take a straight edge, like an aluminum yardstick, and lay on the neck, or hold down the string on the first and last fret and you should have just a slight space (approx. 1/64" - 1/32") between the frets and strings in the middle of your fret board. In other words, contrary to popular belief the neck is supposed to have an ever-so-slight dip in the middle and IS NOT supposed to be perfectly straight. My guitar required about a 3/4 turn (loosened) on the neck adjustment to fix the fret buzz. And, remember when adjusting the neck don't expect immediate results. Give the neck time to settle-in adjusting a little at a time and then waiting a couple hours or so before checking it again. If you still have fret buzz after adjusting the neck then it most likely will be at the nut because Yamaha keeps their action really low at the nut. If so, just take a piece of paper and put it under the string at the nut which should be an easy fix.
Here is one electric guitar that has all the incredible features expected from an electric guitar. In terms of vibe and clarity of sound, this guitar is a jewel to have. The Gretsch G5422TDCG Electromatic Hollow Body Electric Guitar is a snow crest white guitar which features a laminated top, including at the neck, back and sides of the instrument.
In choosing an amp you have to first consider how much you have to spend, the style of music you like to play, and what kind of tone you like best. It is perhaps best to start with something small. You might feel that a Marshall stack is the way to go, especially if you have the money, but for home use, big amps are hard to work with because to drive them into distortion, you have to get really loud. They also take up a lot of space.
This guitar master started building guitars when he was 12 in the early '80s when Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstein guitar inspired him to create his own beautiful monstrosities. Since then, McCarthy worked at several music shops, doing repair work on the side, and learned from master luthiers working in their dungeons before finding a home at Dallas Repair Shop. Paul also does warranty work for Fender in its custom shop, which led to repairing Buddy Guy's guitar and Ted Nugent's. "Selling guitars at a guitar shop, you really have nothing to show for it," McCarthy says. "But here at the end of the day, I can see what I've done. Work with my hands, fix problems, and it pays pretty good, too."

Subtlety: You don't always have to make longer echo or delay effects obvious in the mix for them to be effective. Once you've set up the delay times and panned them to suit your song, try dropping the delay levels until you scarcely notice them during most of the mix (listening on headphones often helps set the most suitable level). This generally results in intriguing little ripples of repeats that you notice at the end of verses or during pauses, that add interest and low-level detail to the mix. Martin Walker
Combo guitar amplifier cabinets and guitar speaker cabinets use several different designs, including the "open back" cabinet, the closed back cabinet (a sealed box), and, less commonly, bass reflex designs, which use a closed back with a vent or port cut into the cabinet.[26] With guitar amps, most "open back" amp cabinets are not fully open; part of the back is enclosed with panels. Combo guitar amp cabinets and standalone speaker cabinets are often made of plywood. Some are made of MDF or particle board—especially in low-budget models.[26] Cabinet size and depth, material types, assembly methods, type and thickness of the baffle material (the wood panel that holds the speaker), and the way the baffle attaches to the cabinet all affect tone.[26]
Guitar signals cutting out is a very common symptom of a simply wiring problem. Usually when your guitar cuts out, it means that you have a loose solder somewhere. Your guitar will sound fine when the solder connection is joined, but your guitar will cut out when the loose wire disconnects for the lug. Broken solder joints are common on electric guitars especially when your output jack becomes loose and rotates in the pocket. That is why it is extremely important to keep your output jack tight and secure at all times. If your output jack is loose and rotates, it will probably break the wiring connections inside the guitar. Luckly, loose connections are easy to fix. The only problem is trying to find them.

CF Martin & Company was established by Christian Fredrick Martin in 1833, is an American guitar manufacturer. It is highly regarded for its guitars with steel strings. Martin Company is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars that produce top quality sound. They fabricate classic and retro styles of guitars with varied body type and sizes available in 12, 14, and 15-string styled guitars. Top quality tonewood is used after testing the sounds and vibrations produced within a pattern of a time frame. Choose the strings based on the genre of music and style you will play this guitar. The starting price of an acoustic Martin guitar is 23,000 INR approximately.


Solder is basically a low melting alloy, which in a nutshell means it’s melting point is far lower than the typical materials it will be used to join. It’s melting range is generally between 200 to 800 °F. Solder is available in either lead-based and lead-free. Most commonly you will use a 60/40 (60% tin, 40% lead) rosin core solder when working on guitar wiring.
In a band and got your slot to wail? Think about it. Shredding scales is all well and good but the best songs and solos have structure, tempo changes and memorable licks. It may be a cliché, but listen to Jimmy Page’s solo in Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” – now that’s how you build-up to a solo. It may be your time to shine, but don’t just gush everywhere – think about structure and let your solos build and breathe.
You have so many effects on this that you’ll find it difficult to get bored, all of which have been modelled on some of the most iconic sounds in effects pedal history including Boss, Line 6, Electro Harmonix, Z Vex and more. You have a huge amount of distortions, delays, reverbs, modulations, pitch/synth/filters, compressors/limiters, EQs, wahs, and even a looper to sculpt your sound with, all of which have been meticulously modelled to include the subtlest qualities and sound abnormalities that made these effects and their respective pedals so revered.
I own a v100 gold top modified to fit regular humbuckers and boy it is great. I have played it with gibson lps and it holds it own. Not as nice really but damn it sounds great. I have an SG too but have never played an SG before this guitar. I am weirded out by the light body. Are they all like that? I know they are all neck heavy but this seems out of order. I do like the sg though more every time I pick it up.
A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.
There’s a lot of knowledge here to digest, so the best advice anyone can give you is not to sweat it too much. You aren’t going to become a pedal encyclopedia overnight, and even if you could, you’d be missing out on the fun experience of trial and error that comes with figuring out your first pedals. The truth is that some of the most distinctive guitar and bass effects ever recorded have been the result of artists experimenting with effects units they’d never used before – especially in the 1960s, when pedals were brand-new to everyone.
The Pacifica family of guitars was launched years ago to address this market in particular. They’re excellent guitars for the working man and student alike. After a break-in period, these machines should provide stable, frustration-free operation for many years, with enough tone and versatility to play any style. The video below even demonstrates how, with a solid amp, you might not even know it was inexpensive.

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The SIX6FDFM’s jaw-dropping aesthetics belie its price tag. It has an arched flame maple top on a bound mahogany body, a bound ebony fretboard, and a three-piece maple/purpleheart neck that has a colorful streak running down the middle. Only a Blue Space Burst finish is available, but, coupled with a matching headstock, it looks good enough to lick.
Most metal guitarists would kill to have half of the power and precision of James Hetfield’s right hand, not to mention his ability to write the most devastating riffs known to mankind, from “Seek and Destroy” and “Creeping Death” to “Enter Sandman.” Of course, most musicians with skills comparable to Hetfield’s have such big egos that they become the targets of our murderous intentions. That’s not the case with Hetfield.
Rackmounts are most commonly used in recording studios and "front of house" live sound mixing situations, though professional musicians who play electric bass, electric guitar, or synthesizers may use them in place of stompboxes, to create a rackmounted head unit for their speaker cabinet(s). Rackmounts are controlled by knobs, switches or buttons on their front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface. During live performances, a musician can operate rackmounted effects using a "foot controller".[14] By setting up effects in a rack-mounted road case, this speeds up set-up and tear-down, because all of the effects can be connected together with patch cords (which can be left connected permanently) and all of the units can be plugged into a power bar. This means that a musician only needs to plug in the main power bar into AC Mains power and plug their instrument into the rack, and the last effect unit's output into their instrument amplifier and/or the PA system.
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If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
The irony with guitars is that an original 1950s Gibson, for example, whilst capable of producing the most amazing sounds, and playing like butter - may not stay in tune, or intonate quite as well as a modern day equivalent. Consequently old guitars have very often been 'upgraded', with original parts lost. But this can seriously down-grade their value. Replacing missing parts with original or period-correct ones can very much improve a guitars collectability, saleability and therefore value.
Completely agree. A couple years ago I was also wanting a software guitar to play some simple chords over a track. Instead I spent about $140 on a guitar from Craigslist. A couple weeks and a couple dozen YouTube tutorials later and I was able to play the chords myself. Learning to play the instruments is a valuable skill that will separate you from others who just use software.
Multi-effects processors come in various configurations, too. Some are floor units that have built-in foot pedals and controllers so they can be operated while your hands remain on your guitar. There are rackmount processors (these can be fitted into a rack of recording gear in line with your signal chain) that incorporate a preamp for your guitar. The more sophisticated models have MIDI I/O for connecting guitar synthesizers to keyboards, modules, computers and other MIDI devices and include a divided pickup to attach to your standard guitar. These processors pack effects libraries that offer combinations of effects, amp models and stompboxes that can number in the thousands. Switching can be controlled by onboard knobs, foot controllers or guitar-picking technique. Expect to pay considerably more for a rackmount effects processor, in a range of three- to four-digit prices. 
I have a Fender Chinese made Telecaster from the Modern Player Series. The finish is spectacular, and while it sometimes feels like they just used a lot of gloss to cover it, it plays and sounds well. I have played it through many amps and it does the job of both a Telecaster and a Strat style. With a humbucking pickup, a lipstick and a strat pickup, this is a satisfying guitar and moddable for people looking for something they can work on without fear of screwing up and wasting a thousand dollars.
This guitar master started building guitars when he was 12 in the early '80s when Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstein guitar inspired him to create his own beautiful monstrosities. Since then, McCarthy worked at several music shops, doing repair work on the side, and learned from master luthiers working in their dungeons before finding a home at Dallas Repair Shop. Paul also does warranty work for Fender in its custom shop, which led to repairing Buddy Guy's guitar and Ted Nugent's. "Selling guitars at a guitar shop, you really have nothing to show for it," McCarthy says. "But here at the end of the day, I can see what I've done. Work with my hands, fix problems, and it pays pretty good, too."

Effects such as chorus, phasing, flanging and pitch vibrato are created using pitch modulation and, except in the case of vibrato, the modulated sound is added back to the original to create the effect. The pitch modulation is generated by delaying the signal by just a few milliseconds, and then modulating the delay time, using a low frequency oscillator (or LFO). For vibrato, this is all that needs to be done and, because the delay time is actually very short, the effect is perceived as happening in real time. The other effects, however, generally rely on an equal balance of the dry and modulated signals to achieve the strongest effect, so it is easier when working with plug-ins to adjust the wet/dry balance using the plug-in controls, rather than adding the wet only signal via a send/return loop. As a rule, these effects aren't very processor-intensive so, if you're working with plug-ins, you can probably afford to insert as many as you need into track or bus insert points as required. Stereo versions of these plug-ins may generate different modulated delays for the left and right channels to create a more dramatic spatial effect.


When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
Frets & Necks did an AMAZING job on my RG7421. They installed my BKP Black Hawk p/u's and new tone/volume pots. Frets & Necks service was above and beyond, fast and super knowledgeable. I am very pick...y about who works on my guitars, I am beyond pleased that I chose Frets& Necks to work on my RG. I will be bringing my RG7421 back to Frets & Necks for future upgrades very soon. Be good to yourself and treat your guitar, give Frets & Necks a try. You won't be disappointed. Thank you F&N. See More
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
If the LR Baggs Venue is a little too expensive for your taste, the Acoustimax Sonic Maximizer preamp from BBE gives you a lot of the same controls at less than half the price. Like the Venue, the Acoustimax is ideally designed for the gigging or studio acoustic guitar player who wants to have more control over their tone and be able to adjust for different rooms and environments. BBE delivers this control with a five-band EQ, as well as feedback and frequency dials.
Third, the amp should be easy to use: If the controls are hard to figure out, they’ll likely frustrate those who’d rather spend their time playing than trying to figure out how their amp works. Also, every guitarist will at some point have to use someone else’s amp, so starting with an amp that has a fairly common control set will help you learn to dial in your sound when using an unfamiliar amp.
The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.
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Tone pot usually connected just as a variable resistor (one lug is not connected), so you got some “small” resistance (when compared to amp’s input) and a cap going to the ground. When you crank your tone there is no significant resistance, so all signal above cutoff freq is shunted to the ground (with graduate slope) — but still this is the brightest position of the tone pot.
This is an echo effect – every time you play a note it is repeated quieter and quieter, just like an echo. You can get a variety of different delay effects, from old-school “tape” echoes which are said to sound more natural, to analogue delay pedals and more modern digital ones. Digital pedals tend to sound clearer and a little harsher than their analogue cousins, making them more suited to modern styles such as modern metal.
Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitar players, who wanted to play single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Les Paul, Lonnie Johnson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, T-Bone Walker, and Charlie Christian. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in popular music.[1] It has evolved into an instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles in genres ranging from pop and rock to country music, blues and jazz. It served as a major component in the development of electric blues, rock and roll, rock music, heavy metal music and many other genres of music.
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