The question of how far away to place your mic really divides opinions. While Chuck Ainlay's 'just off the grille' seems to express the majority view, Bill Price preferred a position six inches away on the Sex Pistols sessions, while Steve Albini usually starts from around 10-12 inches away. Alan Parsons, on the other hand, avoids close placements: "Every engineer I've ever come across has always had the mic touching the cloth, and the first thing I do is move it away literally a foot. Let's hear what the amplifier sounds like, not what the cabinet sounds like... I might have it even further away if it's a really loud 4x12 cabinet — as much as four feet away." Ben Hillier also extols the benefits of more distant placements, up to six to eight feet, when he's trying to capture his favourite 'amp in a room' sound.
As we discussed in our post about cheap effects pedals, price does not always indicate quality. As with buying anything, simply picking out the most expensive item isn’t the way to ensure you get the best product for your needs. Sure, you might really want to own a Ferarri, but have you ever spent any time driving one around town to pick up your groceries? Fortunately, we live in an era of truly great, yet inexpensive, guitars. There are lower-priced riffs on old classics right alongside purpose-built value axes. You don’t have to settle for that rattling pawn shop special. With a few hundred dollars you can buy a guitar that will suit all your needs and last for many years to come.
A tremolo effect simply alters the volume of a signal at a preset interval, within a preset range. Some amps have this effect built in, and in some cases it’s called vibrato (a misnomer that caught on long ago and has stuck around to this day). Tremolo sounds much like hitting a note and then turning your volume knob up and down rapidly. Most tremolo effects have two controls: speed and depth. Adjusting speed changes how rapidly your volume fluctuates. Adjusting the depth controls the range of volume from loud to soft as the tremolo fluctuates.
It is to note that each of these metal strings is made to vibrate at a particular rate. The amount of electrical charge produced by the vibrating motion in the pickup coils is then sent to an electric circuit, consisting of resistors and capacitors, which controls the tone and amplitude of the electric signal. The electric signal is then sent to an amplifier which is electrically connected to the magnetic pickups.
Artists have been converging on this sound for more than a decade before Davies used it. In 1951, “Rocket 88” by Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm took advantage of a distorted amplifier that had been damaged in transport. The same thing happened to the Johnny Burnette Trio in 1956, when Paul Burlison pulled out a vacuum tube from his amplifier after it fell off the top of the band’s car. He loved the sound so much he used it to record “The Train Kept a-rollin,” which inspired a whole raft of British musicians:
Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.
In the eighties, the Sonic Youth leader emerged as indie ­rock's premier guitar radical, mixing strange drone tunings, jamming screwdrivers or drumsticks under his strings, and blasting out feedback-swirled punk jams. Thurston Moore influenced a generation of noise­heads, from grunge rockers to shoegazers. Neil Young once said that if Sonic Youth wanted to record with him, "Hell, I'd be there."
This is the point where the neck meets the body. In the traditional Spanish neck joint the neck and block are one piece with the sides inserted into slots cut in the block. Other necks are built separately and joined to the body either with a dovetail joint, mortise or flush joint. These joints are usually glued and can be reinforced with mechanical fasteners. Recently many manufacturers use bolt on fasteners. Bolt on neck joints were once associated only with less expensive instruments but now some top manufacturers and hand builders are using variations of this method. Some people believed that the Spanish style one piece neck/block and glued dovetail necks have better sustain, but testing has failed to confirm this. While most traditional Spanish style builders use the one piece neck/heel block, Fleta, a prominent Spanish builder, used a dovetail joint due to the influence of his early training in violin making. One reason for the introduction of the mechanical joints was to make it easier to repair necks. This is more of a problem with steel string guitars than with nylon strings, which have about half the string tension. This is why nylon string guitars often don't include a truss rod either.
There are over 200 choices of electric guitar strings, combining Ernie Ball's diverse selection of materials, string gauges, and styles. Ernie Ball electric guitar strings come in a variety of different high quality materials including M-steel, cobalt, nickel, stainless steel, titanium, and bronze. Our guitar string sets are available for 6-string, 7-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 12-string guitars.
On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.

Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]


I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.
A few years ago I wanted a mini/parlor guitar. I tried a few, did not like what I heard in the Taylor line and I did not want another Larrivee. The irony of it is, I did buy a Taylor and now realize it was because it sounded like a Larrivee, bright and even. This is an anomaly Taylor, I know that now. I bought a Larrivee Parlor which is okay but I also have learned that I am not a parlor, mini fan. They, for the most part, do not deliver an even enough sound for me. I have played Lowden, Martin, Gibson, Guild, Olsen, Huss and Dalton. I recently played an Irvin guitar. Wow, what a beautiful line of guitars. I want one. It is my next guitar with its sustain, consistency, brilliance and ease of ...more
This model offers the pretty standard budget Stratocaster experience, with the bright, open tone of alder as the body wood. It comes in two configurations, S-S-H and H-H, and given that the humbucker is the star, you might opt for the H-H version, especially because it comes with a coil tap. It’s a solid guitar and should give you everything you need for short money, minus the frustrations of a lot of cheap guitars out there. If you’re just starting out, you could also go cheaper with the PAC112J, but you have to give up the coil tap.
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I commented earlier that the guitar amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, but if the guitar is played in the control room with the amp itself in the studio (assuming decent separation between the rooms), a capacitor microphone close to the guitar neck may be used to capture the direct sound from the guitar strings. This sounds a bit thin and naff on its own, but sometimes works well in combination with the miked sound. A similar effect can be achieved by splitting the guitar output, feeding some of it direct to the console via a DI box and then either removing some low end or using an enhancer to exaggerate the brightness. DI'ing the piezo bridge pickups (where fitted) may also produce a similar result, and any of these techniques may also be used with guitar recording preamps as well as when miking.
The classical guitar (also known as the nylon-string guitar, or Spanish guitar) is a member of the guitar family used in classical music. It is an acoustic wooden guitar with strings made of gut or nylon, rather than the metal strings used in acoustic and electric guitars. For a right-handed player, the traditional classical guitar has twelve frets clear of the body and is properly held on the left leg, so that the hand that plucks or strums the strings does so near the back of the sound hole (this is called the classical position). The modern steel string guitar, on the other hand, usually has fourteen frets clear of the body (see Dreadnought) and is commonly played off the hip.
Here we have yet another fine 1971 Yamaha FG75 made in Japan Nippon Gakki Red Label Grand concert like Gibson LGO-1 but sounds better for less New Arrival: Be sure to ask for "Clean Boy" This example is just like our other 71 FG75 Nippon Gakki but this guitar is much cleaner and is JVGuitars rated in very good + condition- Excellent vintage for a 42+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. its one of the nicest we've seen, this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its good action, and it sounds absolutely great... upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins .... for a good volume transfer and superior tone over the old plastic parts,,,, we dressed the frets as well. not a crack anywhere to be found, great vintage patina but no structural damages or abuse or neglect this instrument has been well taken care of as one can tell from its condition and playability ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song Original Specifications: - Year(s) Sold: 1968-1974 - Top: Spruce- Back / Sides: Agathis - Neck: Nato - Fingerboard: Indian Rosewood - Bridge: N/A - Notes: Folk Guitar Classic Type - Upper Bout - 11-1/8” - Waist - 9-5/8"- Lower Bout - 14-5/8" Ok so thats what the official specs are but here is what we se and have seend with 2 other fg75;s we have had, one I had to refinish its back and when sanding off the mahogany finish it was blond flamed maple sides and back,,, as this one surely looks to be just look at that flamed back and sides this example is kind of special looking. She;s got it going on just check her out. Yamaha Nippon Gakki guitars are highly respected at being well made and of great value and after 40+ years this example has stood the test of time and is still a formidable player you can compare its sound to a much more expensive guitars tone they are simply wonders to find one this nice is RARE… get her before she’s gone. Any questions or to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest..

Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black
This is hands down THE BEST brand there is! Trust me, I've been playing guitar since I was a kid. I've had used, owned, and tried every guitar there is. Gibson is NO WAY better than PRS, the sound quality of a PRS is awesome! They are pretty light, the designs are awesome as well, although PRS is a bit more expensive than your average guitar it is worth every penny! Gibson's are way too over priced and would never match the PRS. I used to own a gibson sg and lp, and I sold them after I had my own PRS. If you really know the difference between a good and a great guitar you would pick PRS over any other brand. Period.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
Half a step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as: Jimi Hendrix, Coheed and Cambria, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Cannibal Corpse (Chris Barnes era), Nirvana, AFI, Rise Against, Failure, Weezer, Green Day, Kiss, The Hellacopters, Backyard Babies, Guns N' Roses, Neil Young, Van Halen, Brand New, Blind Guardian, Metallica (on the "Load", "Reload" and "Garage Inc." albums, "The God That Failed" and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 1995), AC/DC (some songs and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 2008), Slayer, Alcest, Rage Against The Machine, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Yngwie Malmsteen, Alice in Chains, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Killers, Relient K, Suede, RED on "Not Alone", Beach House, Third Day (on "I Can Feel It"), Die Ärzte (since "Geräusch") Skillet (on "A Little More"), and Vertical Horizon, Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.
Great guitar this is my 2nd one fist one i purchesd in 2010. Had to pown it I was realy upset about it but nothing i could do. I was so happy to find another one here on Amzon!!! Only thing it did not come with A pick card as addvertized. Thats why iam giveing it 4 in stead of 5 stars. Case that comes with it is realy cheep you would think the money invested the would at least give you a padded soft case.I have orderd a hard shell Gator case for it it will be here in 2 days. This is why it gets 3 stars. Iam a pro. Guritist and song writer,singer. Guitar it self gets 5 stars
It’s safe to say a wah-wah pedal will be your first stompbox if it’s not already. The wah is a sweepable fixed bandwidth filter that has a treadle you rock back and forth producing vowel-like inflections. The phrasing possibilities are only limited by the player. These days, you have an array of major as well as indie pedal builders who make incredible wah pedals such as Dunlop, Vox, Fulltone, Teese, Xotic, and Wilson Effects.
Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
Nicknamed - "Papa-Papa". DADDAD is common in folk music (Irish, Scottish), and for the execution of a rhythm guitar in "heavy" (alternative music) on 6th on the third string at the same time. To reach the tuning from DADGAD, Open D or Open D Minor, the G string is dropped to D so that the 3rd and 4th strings are tuned to the same pitch. DADDAD tuning is sometimes used on Dobro guitars for rock and blues. Notable users of this tuning include Billy McLaughlin and John Butler.

The Ibanez Artcore AS53 is a semi hollow-body guitar created for guitar players from diverse genres as blues, country, rock and jazz. The guitar feels nice and has a compact and comfortable body. The tone is rich, warm and full. If you are looking for that fat hollow body sound, this guitar makes it possible to switch from jazz to every semi-hollow rocking style of music. A combination of quality and affordability.


The 2008 Les Paul Standard is one of the first models from Gibson USA to utilize the revolutionary Plek machine in setting up the guitar. The Plek is a German-made, computer controlled machine that carefully measures each fret, along with the fingerboard height under each string, and then automatically dresses each fret, virtually eliminating string buzz and greatly improving the overall playability of the guitar. This pioneering process does in minutes what it takes a luthier several hours—sometimes even days—to accomplish. Every fret is accurately aligned, and the guitar is properly intonated, leaving the instrument “Plek’d” and amazingly playable.
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Play with it, see what happens. Worst case; you’ll set it, forget it or use it as a means to dial out some hum. Best case, you’ll find the guitar in your hands is far more versatile than advertised and use the tone knob to wield it like a musical samurai and leave everyone wondering…”how the hell do they get so many sounds without a guitar change?!”
Ovation backed off from its more exotic design directions and in ’77 introduced two more conservative models, the Preacher and the Viper, and its first solidbody basses, the Magnum I and II. The Preacher featured two equal cutaways, whereas the Viper sported more of a Les-Paul-style single cutaway, though neither would never be confused with a Gibson equivalent. Their shape was, in fact, essentially a downsized version of the Ovation acoustic outline. The Magnum shape was derived from the earlier Breadwinner and Deacon, with more contouring.
Most guitars out there usually feature a version of either one of many Gibson designs or Fender ones, but there are exceptions. Paul Reed Smith is a brand that took their own path in just about every aspect of guitar design. This made it popular with many famous guitar players, most notably Carlos Santana. The model we're looking at today is a basic version of one of their flagship guitars. The balance of performance and pure style it offers is nearly as impressive without forcing you to extend out of your monetary reach.
Taylor’s 214ce Grand Auditorium acoustic guitar has undergone a few changes over the years. One of the latest improvements added in 2017 concerns the wood used for the body. Because of the restrictions on the importation of rosewood, Taylor no longer uses it for their 200 series of guitars, which the 214ce is a part of. Instead, the company used the next best wood for a great, balanced tonal response: Hawaiian koa.
Given the small amplifier that comes with the Rise by Sawtooth, one would have thought it wouldn’t offer much, but it turns out to be just everything you ever wanted in a beginner or intermediate electric guitar, even as it is capable of giving that adequate sound and melody when connected to the guitar using the connecting cable that comes with it.

Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
that is not quite the reality since most are made in mexico or japan as they are of lower quality. You only meet those type of criterion when you buy a high handmade guitar which will be at least 1200 us or 1600 canadian. As you meet the entry level of solid wood prices better overall quality. It doesn't matter who makes the guitar : martin taylor, gibson, maton, collings, santa cruz, or even a high end a high high luthier like Olson, traugott or Ryan. The sound of the instrument and the perception that we have while we stroke a chord will define if we like the sound. We see how it feels, we look at a price that we feel comfortable with. Otherwise anyone would land a lowden, huss and dalton, bourgeois and the marquis version of Martin hd-28vs for instance. The personality of your style will infuence a lot of more then who makes it, because you buy the final product not the people who makes it.
Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
The fuzz pedal is one of the earliest stomp boxes on the market. A very simple circuit the fuzz box altered the guitar’s signal by transforming it into a square wave. The first widely available fuzz was the Maestro Fuzz Tone by Gibson. The Fuzz Tone pedal was released in 1962 and didn’t really catch on until Keith Richards used one on the opening riff of “Satisfaction” and the floodgates opened. Another definitive fuzz pedal of the late 1960’s was the Sola Sound Tone Bender made famous by Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page.
Despite what the Peate copy says, these instruments are not Dobros, but rather Supros. The guitars and mandolin shown in the Peate catalog are identified as being “The New Dobro Electric Guitars,” part of National Dobro electric guitars. However, the No. 1 Hawaiian shown is clearly the Supro frying pan (recall that the Hawaiian in ’35 was the fancier Dobro), and the No. 2 Spanish Guitar and No. 3 Mandolin are clearly labeled “Supro.”
Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
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While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
Microprocessor technology allows the use of digital onboard effects in guitar amps to create numerous different sounds and tones that simulate the sound of a range of tube amplifiers and different sized speaker cabinets, all using the same amplifier and speaker. These are known as modeling amplifiers, and can be programmed with simulated characteristic tones of different existing amplifier models (and speaker cabinets—even microphone type or placement), or dialed in to the user's taste. Many amps of this type are also programmable by way of USB connection to a home computer or laptop.[15] Line 6 is generally credited with bringing modeling amplification to the market.[18][19] Modeling amplifiers and stompbox pedals, rackmount units, and software that models specific amplifiers, speakers cabinets, and microphones can provide a large number of sounds and tones. Players can get a reasonable facsimile of the sound of tube amplifiers, vintage combo amplifiers, and huge 8x10” speaker stacks without bringing all that heavy equipment to the studio or stage.
The first electric instrument amplifiers were not intended for electric guitars, but were portable PA systems. These appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes enabled economical built-in power supplies that could plug into wall sockets. Previously, amplifiers required heavy multiple battery packs. People used these amplifiers to amplify acoustic guitar, but electronic amplification of guitar first became widely poplular in the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively used amplified lap steel guitars.[2]

Start with all of the mics clustered together three to six inches from the grille cloth, pointed at the center of the speaker. On a multiple-speaker cabinet, don't assume that all the speakers sound the same. Rather, listen to each of them at a sensible volume, and then mic the one that sounds best. If the speakers sound alike, a miking position close to the floor will generally provide a little more low end.


The fully hollow body electric guitar is almost always a finely crafted work of art.  These instruments are a throw back to the days of hand shaped acoustic instruments of yesteryear.  The hand carved archtops and backs are designed to take advantage of pure acoustic detail, such as resonance and tone, while the electric aspect allows the performer to be amplified.  A pure traditionalist could ask for nothing better tone wise, but must contend with other aspects of these incredibly resonant instruments.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Custom - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red
i have a grand total of 1 pedal. it's an overdrive pedal that i only use when playing heavier songs. Other than that, i tend to play just guitar and amp. My amp has reverb and i tend to set that at about 1/3 the way round. Does that count as effects? My settings are set just on the edge of break up so i get a nice clean tone, but when i hit it harder, it gives a little crunch.
Paul Reed Smith’s offering to pro musicians with exacting standards, the PRS McCarty 594 takes its name from two things. The first is its scale length of 24.594 inches and the second is that it’s a 1959-spec guitar with four knobs. According to Paul Reed Smith, this vintage-inspired instrument aims to recreate the most desired classic Gibson tone, that of a ‘59 Sunburst.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
It’s big, it’s brawny and it’s bold—the Reverend Jetstream HB represents a ton of value for its price tag. Although it excels in rafter-shaking rock ’n’ roll tones, this offset guitar has a few nifty tricks that make it more versatile. Add to that quality construction and components, and you’re left with one of the best electric guitars under $1,000.

3/4 guitars are fine for children under the age of 11, or as travel guitars, but if you want to learn properly, then buy a full-size guitar at the start. I started on a full-size classical guitar right back when I was knee-high to a grasshopper; initially, it's hard, but your fingers adapt fast enough and you will soon develop flexibility and dexterity. For children under 11, a 3/4 guitar is an option, but even then I still feel that full-size is better. Check out all the amazing 6-year-old kids playing amazing stuff on the internet, 9 times out of 10 they are playing full-size instruments.


At the core of this pedal is the Line 6 HX technology, which emulates the behavior of actual amp and stompbox components. This means that instead of merely copying the sound, it recreates the entire pedal or amplifier in digital format, allowing the models to respond to guitar tone and adjustments much like the real thing. While it originally had 70 effects, firmware updates have raised this number to 104, which is more than enough to keep you busy for months, if not years. Amp, cab and mic models were also increased to 115. Since Line 6 is well known for providing updates, it is reasonable to expect more expansions in the future. It does everything that the Helix LT can, with some extras, most notable of which is the LED scribble strips for labeling each footswitch. The Helix Floor also comes with expanded input/output options to work with mics and other instruments.
Think of Stevie Ray Vaughan, and you’ll have a good idea of what overdrive effects can do. They’re based on the ‘broken’ sound that vintage tube amplifiers would make when they were fed a signal too strong for them to handle smoothly. Modern overdrive pedals can also have circuitry that emulates the same effect even when connected to a solid-state amp. Because they work by boosting the signal, experimenting with the effects of an overdrive pedal can be as simple as adjusting the volume and seeing what happens.
Simple mistake that the beginners do is not selecting the right pickup on the right time. For example Normally they put the switch for the bridge pickup for soloing or do the powerchords. But then, to do some plucking, clean strumming or ryhthm, they still using the bridge pickup. So the sound is so dry, They should change it to toggle number 2(or for 5 way switch, toggle number 2 or 4)
Acoustic has never had much of a following amongst guitar players, but they made (original company out of business) some of the best bass amps that were ever made. Advanced solid state construction and creative speaker design finally gave bass players something besides Fenders lame sound and Ampegs wall of mud. To top it all, they are durable, ask my 30+ year old 360. Mosrite and Gibson basses and Acoustic amplifiers, life just doesn't get better.

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Fuzz was originally intended to recreate the classic 1960's tone of an overdriven tube amp combined with torn speaker cones. Oldschool guitar players (like Link Wray) (citation needed) would use a screwdriver to poke several holes through the paperboard part of the guitar amp speaker to achieve a similar sound. Since the original designs, more extreme fuzz pedals have been designed and produced, incorporating octave-up effects, oscillation, gating, and greater amounts of distortion.
Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]
Being one of the reputed organizations, operating in this domain, we are engaged in manufacturing and supplying a quality range of Gigmaker Electric Guitar. We only use high grade components and latest technology while designing these guitars. The offered range is widely appreciated all over the nation for its salient attributes. With our quality range, we
I'll be referring to a lot of different producers in this article, and it's understandable that you may not have initially heard of some of them, even if you've probably heard some of their productions. To avoid an avalanche of parentheses, I've put a list of all the producers I mention into a box which runs across the bottom of this article. The box also includes a few of their most celebrated credits, so that you can have some idea of where each of them is coming from stylistically.

Epiphone Broadway Electric Guitar Make way for the Broadway, Epiphone’s big, bold and blindingly beautiful hollow body archtop guitar. The Epiphone Broadway has been a jazz club staple since the 1930s and it continues its soulful career with new appointments. The big-bodied Broadway features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, a hard maple neck, a rosewood fretboard and Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups.
Which tonewood works the best for you will depend on your personal preference as well as the genre of music you're playing. Electric guitar bodies come in a whole range of styles. You have classics such as the Stratocaster and the Les Paul shape, but there's much more out there to explore. Granted, a vast majority of these were heavily inspired by the aforementioned models and you probably don't want to go too far off into the realm of the strange.
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SG Special is pretty much the same thing as the Les Paul 100. The most obvious difference is the body style. Other than that, you get very similar electronics and overall build quality. A lot of people learned their first chords on this guitar, still keeping it as one of their favorite axes. I’ve played this thing a few times and it definitely has some juice.
There were at least three different versions of this guitar with differing knobs, fingerboards, control plates, cord mounting, and trim. One even had a nice rosewood fingerboard with dots. This version was the most monochromatic of the bunch, I suppose. It cleaned up really nicely for these pictures. Okay, so it's an ugly little spud. My wife describes this guitar as "so ugly it's cute," and she fell in love with it in the store for that reason. I like that.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.
The smallest bass amps, which typically have 10 to 20 watts of power and a small 6.5" or 8" speaker, are known as practice amps. They amplify the instrument enough for individual practice in a small room, such as a bedroom. Practice amps do not typically produce enough volume or low-frequency sound reproduction to be used in a band rehearsal or show. As such, they are mostly used by beginners or, when used by professionals, for warm-up or individual practice. They are more likely than full-size combo amp cabinets to have an open-back design, like an electric guitar combo amp. The use of an open back cabinet in small practice amps makes these models different from most bass combo amps and speaker cabs, which are closed-back (often with bass reflex ports or vents, or less commonly, with passive radiator speakers, both of which are designed to boost the low-frequency response). Some buskers playing on the street for tips may use battery-powered practice amps, a feature available on some models.
They have the same basic principles, but most people start on acoustics. This is because they are more difficult to play, but you build up your finger strength and calluses (tough lumps of skin on the end of your fingers; you'll need them!) much faster. But the acoustic guitar is limited. If you feel an electric guitar is the way you want to go, then by all means get one. Just because most beginners have acoustics doesn't mean you have to. The best thing to do would be to go to your local guitar shop, tell them your budget, and see what they have to offer. You can get starter packs which come with a guitar and an amplifier but you may be better off looking at some cheap electric guitar models at your local shop, as the starter packs can be really inconsistent. Good luck, my man
If you’re looking to get this pedal as a first in your arsenal, then don’t worry at all, you can keep it simple with the offered Reverb dial as it offers high-quality effects which you can tune to your liking. This astonishing “stomp-box” by TC covers guitarist’s needs who possess different ranges of experience, all available at a fantastic startup price.
Known for their distinctive jangle and chime, Rickenbacker guitars tended to be favoured by Jangle Pop, Power pop and British Invasion-style groups – bands such as The Who, The Byrds and The Beatles. The early Rickenbackers that made this sound famous were equipped with lower-output “Toaster” pickups. These pickups were phased out circa 1969-70 for newer “Hi-Gain” pickups, which had twice the output of their illustrious predecessors. This change was almost certainly due to the trend toward the louder “Rock” sounds of the 1970s, despite the earlier models being credited by Pete Townshend as being key to the development of “the Marshall sound” and his refinement of electric guitar feedback techniques[8]
One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 

The 700-series guitars had all controls and pickups mounted on a faux-tortise shell pickguard. That makes it very easy to do any required work on the electronics. By contrast, On the 800-series, with a couple of exceptions, the tone and volume control pots and the jack socket are mounted to the body, a three-way pickup switch, and a lead/rhythm slide switch are mounted to the pickguard; and the pickups are mounted to individual little mounting plates made of the faux-tortise shell material.


Amazing guitar for the price. Honestly plays almost as good as the Paul Reed Smith I used to have. Light weight, great sustain, built in tuner and the pick ups produce a great sound. I was shocked at how good the guitar was... HOWEVER - the amp is total crap. It cracks and pops... my suggestion is to buy the guitar by itself and spend the $100 you save on a real amp (many starters that are superior to this one are the around that price.
Clean or replace jacks. To clean jacks use solvents such as contact cleaner or other solvents as a spray and spray the metal parts, clean any excess solvent with a rag. To replace jacks first obtain a similar one that complies with your guitar, then soldering in properly. Work in well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
Unlike fuzz and distortion pedals, booster effects typically are engineered to boost the signal reaching the amp without adding coloration. Some booster pedals do slightly fatten the tone of the guitar by overdriving the preamp stage of the amplifier. They can be very useful in getting your amp to break up and produce musical-sounding distortion at lower volume levels as well as adding clarity to your solo riffs. A booster pedal can become an essential part of your rig when you have more than four effects in your signal chain or 18 feet or more of cabling between your instrument and amp.

It also has an overwhelming amount of sheet music in it. These music sheets allow you to practice what is being taught in the given chapter, which is nice, but going through the books, I felt there was a lot left unexplained. This was probably a result of them trying to simplify things as much as possible, but this actually leaves holes in the padawan guitarist's knowledge.
Personally, I chose the Everlast version of Folsom Prison Blues because I find that the Everlast cover is so much more fun to play along with. The Everlast version is a little bit faster to play along with, but I think of a twelve bar blues while I’m doing the chord progression with this song; it really helps me to keep up and maintain a steady tempo.
Market sentiment is overwhelmingly positive, with many reviewers describing how the Seagull S6 Classic M-450T exceeds their expectations. Build quality and playability gets the bulk of commendations, along with its clear sound and good acoustic projection. Some even dare to compare the Seagull S6 Classic with super expensive guitars from major brands.
This is one of the best guitars according to many guitarists and there are many reasons for that! It has a nice weight, not too heavy, not too light, and it’s comfortable to play. If you want to find a good guitar but don’t really know what to look for this is a safe choice, you will most likely love this guitar, especially if you like vintage-looking things! Go wireless on stage with this guitar, with one of these awesome wireless guitar systems.
Phase Three began in 1974, bringing some of the biggest changes to the series with it. Univox swapped in its own humbuckers, made unique in part due to their visible white bobbins. This change took the Phase Three Hi-Flier solidly out of the realm of Mosrite Ventures copy territory and into its own realm, considering the tone and high output changed the sound so significantly. The presence of these humbuckers – found on other Univox guitars of the same era – make the Phase Three versions some of the most highly sought after Hi-Fliers.

Boost/volume pedal: A boost or "clean boost" pedal amplifies the volume of an instrument by increasing the amplitude of its audio signal. These units are generally used for "boosting" volume during solos and preventing signal loss in long "effects chains". A guitarist switching from rhythm guitar to lead guitar for a guitar solo may use a boost to increase the volume of his or her solo.[59]


There’s 2 very small and cheap amps that are widely used by guitarists and by guitar technicians across the globe and the Marshall MS-2 Micro Amp is one of them. The other is number 2 in our list, before you ask… This tiny 1-watt Marshall amplifier may fit in the palm of your hand, but it sure packs a punch and is a LOT louder than you’d expect. Styled just like the classic Marshall amplifier stacks now synonymous with rock n roll, this is one of the best cheap amps thanks to its convenient size, 9V battery powered operation for ultimate portability and the fact you can plug your guitar into it and rock out anywhere you like.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
Browse guitar sheet music for all levels of guitar players. Whether you're a beginner starting from a clean slate or a guitar shredder gigging on a nightly basis, our guitar sheet music collection has everything you need. Find thousands of guitar method and guitar etude books as well as your favorite guitar songbooks from Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Metallica, The Beatles and more. Looking for digital guitar music, guitar chord books, guitar play alongs and guitar transcriptions? No problem. Take a load off, put up your feet and browse and buy guitar sheet music today.
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Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.

If you already have an electric guitar and you're looking for replacement strings, carry cases, guitar stands, or other accessories, you've come to the right place. Amazon.com offers a selection of tools and accessories designed for players of every age and skill level, from beginners to pros. Look for amplifiers, cables, and microphones too—you can enjoy great selection right here online, with no need to make a special trip to the guitar shop.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: S-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Five Alarm Red, Desert Sun Yellow, Magenta, Black, White


Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
Dobro was founded by John Dopyera and a brother after he left National Guitar in 1928. The history of Dobro and National is long and complicated. Dobro merged with National in 1934. They contracted with Regal to build their guitars and for a time Regal was the exclusive builder of resonator guitars. They lost the rights to the names during World War II which led to a number of other names. The Original Musical Instrument Company was the last name used with Hound Dog being a brand of resonator guitar when Gibson eventually purchased them in 1994. Gibson currently sells Dobros (single cone, spider bridge resonator guitars) and Hound Dog brand guitars. Epiphone has also made resonator guitars.
I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you).
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If this doesn’t work, or you’re just a little paranoid about hooking the guitar directly into the PC, you can get one of these. This is the Line 6 Pod Studio GX, and it’s a great value and pretty much a one-stop shopping starter kit. The box you see there is a guitar USB interface, with an input designed for guitar. It’s also got a headphone output, so you can listen through the interface. I had an older version of this ages ago, which I used for basic guitar input until I got some more advanced recording gear that worked well with guitars.
Wet Set: If you have a sound that you want to push a long way back in the mix, it can often be better to make your reverb effect pre-fader, and temporarily remove all the dry sound. Then alter the sound's EQ and reverb settings while listening only to the wet reverb sound. Once you've got that sounding good, gradually fade the dry sound back in until you're happy with the wet/dry balance. This approach can often be more effective than simply whacking up the reverb level while you listen to the whole song. Martin Walker
Got one, a V-???? Gold Top w/ P-90's. Way hotter than my PRS or my Gibson. Plays about as well. If I were a LP kinda guy I'd probably rant and rave, it has a special place in my herd but not in the top five. If you want an LP style and sound but don't want to spend $3K plus, it's more worthy than any of the Epi's I looked at including the '56 reissue.

Washburn is known for producing great value guitars, and they take their reputation seriously. While other guitar builders tend to compromise cosmetics, this company does not hold back on visual details even in the entry-level market. The WD7S shows the company's design philosophy in action, featuring elegant body binding and custom wood inlaid rosette that makes the guitar look far more expensive than its actual price.
Jump up ^ DeCurtis, Anthony (1992). Present Tense: Rock & Roll and Culture (4. print. ed.). Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ISBN 0-8223-1265-4. His first venture, the Phillips label, issued only one known release, and it was one of the loudest, most overdriven, and distorted guitar stomps ever recorded, "Boogie in the Park" by Memphis one-man-band Joe Hill Louis, who cranked his guitar while sitting and banging at a rudimentary drum kit.
The guitar features what is called a Super Strat shape. In other words, it is an evolution of the Stratocaster body style. Ibanez used mahogany as the main tonewood and maple for the neck. This guitar comes with two finish options. You can have the blackberry sunburst or the light violin sunburst. In terms of pickups, we have a set of two Ibanez-made passive humbuckers which pack a decent amount of heat. They handle distortion great but also sound very decent on a clean channel too.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
The ‘boomer’ kids wanted their own voice and opinions to be heard, they wanted to be taken seriously – and like the quote from the 1966 film ‘The Wild Angels’ which exaggerated this rebellious angst to the extreme “…We wanna to be free to do what we wanna do…”  There was a sense of needing to rebel against ‘The Man’ – basically anyone who told them what to do or how to conform to society respectfully.
I followed with visits to six Los Angeles music stores to play as many guitars as I could (more than 60, including multiple samples of many models), so I could get an idea of what their right-out-of-the-box quality was like and which ones offered the best value. I emerged with a list of the most promising models, and I contacted the manufacturers to request samples. In a couple of cases, I allowed the manufacturers to substitute models that they felt were better suited for this article.
Yes, most of them are very useful! These days there are hundreds of online tutors offering great guitar lessons. And there’s no need to throw your money at the first offer you see, as a lot of quality instructional and tutorial videos are completely free on platforms such as YouTube. Generally, paid courses tend to be better because they are tested and are well-structured, and – in theory – you should be able to progress faster. But it all depends on your budget and on your will to learn on your own.

Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.


Except if, like George Gruhn, you know better. The 71-year-old Nashville dealer has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift. Walking through NAMM with Gruhn is like shadowing Bill Belichick at the NFL Scouting Combine. There is great love for the product and great skepticism. What others might see as a boom — the seemingly endless line of manufacturers showcasing instruments — Gruhn sees as two trains on a collision course.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-
Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!
A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.
I think that a good EQ in the loop is awesome. If you find an amp that has a great overall sound, but you wish that it was a bit brighter, darker, etc, but you find that you loose the character of the distortion when you get the tone you like you can play with both EQs to have a lot of controll over the final sound. It won't make up for a crap amp, but it can make a great amp a whole world of awesome.

000-28EC[10] and 000-28ECB: Two of the five “Eric Clapton” models. Same body size as the 000-15, but with the Martin short scale (24.9″). This artist signature model is constructed with higher-quality woods (especially the more expensive 000-28ECB constructed from Brazilian Rosewood, hence the “B”), a different shape to the neck, and more ornamentation around the edge of the body.
Humbuckers use two magnets, one which works as a pickup and one which cancels out 60-cycle hum (hence the name humbucker). These pickups generally have a darker voice and a higher output, which allows them to perform better under high levels of distortion. These pickups also tend to sound better playing jazz, as the genre benefits from the darker voice these pickups provide.
Eddie Kramer has a slightly different approach, working from a familiar setup of favourite close and ambient mics (including the Beyerdynamic M160 ribbon mic) and then mixing them together to taste. "I use a three-mic technique: an SM57, an MD421 and an M160, all in a very tight pattern. Then I can pick and choose the tone quality, because each mic is totally different. I combine these together, and then I put a U67 away from the amp to get the ambience."
AMAZING. Awesome place. Will NEVER go anywhere else for guitar work again. I am sitting in the parking lot of this place writing this on my phone, THAT'S how good of an experience I had. I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL. What a wonderful person, awesome shop, honest, quality people. And for a steal. Cannot recommend enough!
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Making their second appearance on our list, Mesa Boogie delivers with the Dual Rectifier Rackmount (appropriately nicknamed the “Racktifier”). This 3-U behemoth is simply a Dual Rectifier Head, and is one of the very few rackmounts to contain a pre-amp and power-amp all-in-one.  The Racktifier is made for those who simply want the dual rectifier sound, but have the “rack-gear bug”.
Another Japanese brand is Yamaha. They started making pianos and organs in 1887 and since then they have made all sorts of things. You know Yamaha motor cycles? Yep, same brand. But even though they seem to have a hard time deciding what kind of a brand they are they manage to make pretty decent musical instruments, often for affordable prices, so if you want to find a cheap but good guitar they probably have something that could work.
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.
My favorite guitar effect is Tremolo with a touch of echo. This works well on songs with slower melodic guitar leads and slower rhythms. Tremolo is an effect that has a speed adjustment and amplitude adjustment. The speed needs to be adjusted to the song tempo. This was popular for many songs written in the 1950’s. If you are a guitar shredder you will not be happy with this effect. I have a Boss Guitar Pedal and Line 6 Pod XT and use this effect from the pedal. I am not crazy about software generated effects as there is not enough space on stage for all the equipment and adding a MacBook and keeping it from getting knocked around would be too difficult. After recording I have used Garage Band and this software is easy to use. I probably have four or five software packages and they are too overwhelming at times. I have given up trying to figure out how to use the software with my expensive Presonus 24 track digital AI Board. It is almost impossible to use these recording software packages without having expensive school training.
The Orange Crush PiX CR12L is another fairly standard style beginner amp. It has the same standard features as most beginner amps. The Crush PiX CR12L is a little more expensive than some similar featured amps, like the Velocity V10, but it makes up for the extra cost with a better build quality, better tone, and a well designed control layout. The Crush PiX CR12L gives a lot of control over the tone, but manages to do so in a clear, easily understood control panel.
With a delightful dreadnought shape, this steel-string acoustic is made with a pressure-tested solid cedar top, with solid mahogany back and sides, all with a semi-gloss custom polished finish that allows the guitar to sing – and sing it does! The tonewoods combine to deliver a rich and bright sounding instrument, with plenty of warmth that would please the most demanding of guitarists.
• Stop: A stop tailpiece is a bar, typically made of an alloy, which is held to the body of a guitar by large screws threaded into embedded sleeves. They are most often aluminum, zinc or brass based, with the latter the most costly. Aluminum has a few advantages. When the stop tailpiece was perfected by Gibson over a half-century ago, the originals were made of aluminum. Many players prefer those today for the vintage vibe, but aluminum is also the lightest weight tailpiece alloy, which some believe allows the strings and the guitar’s body to connect — which is another function of the tailpiece — in a more resonant fashion. It’s best to be careful while changing strings with a stop tailpiece, because they sometimes fall out of their sleeves and can scratch the finish.
The main benefit with tube amps is the tone. They offer what is often described as a pure, natural, creamy or fluid guitar tone, which is incredibly responsive to the player’s dynamics. When pushed hard enough, they overload and produce natural overdrive (which is how overdrive first came to be). While their tone is hard to beat for all styles of music, tube amps tend to be expensive, harder to maintain and heavier than other amps. For more on tube amps, check out our dedicated tube amp page.
Blueridge makes some excellent acoustic guitars, many of them based on historic designs. So, what does that mean? Many players feel that acoustics made in the early days after the dreadnought design had been created used better construction methods, qualities and materials compared to guitars produced today. In their historic designs, Blueridge attempts to capture some of that magic.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy

So to get the most from your book, it’s important that you respect the intent of the author in how you approach it. That doesn’t mean you have to work through parts of the book that are below your skill level, it just means that you should always work through the book in a linear fashion. If you need to skip to the middle of the book to find something that applies to you that’s fine, just work chapter by chapter (or exercise to exercise) from that point on. It will help you retain the information that you learn in the book if you work through it gradually as opposed to skipping through it.
The solid-body electric guitar is made of solid wood, without functionally resonating air spaces. The first solid-body Spanish standard guitar was offered by Vivi-Tone no later than 1934. This model featured a guitar-shaped body of a single sheet of plywood affixed to a wood frame. Another early, substantially solid Spanish electric guitar, called the Electro Spanish, was marketed by the Rickenbacker guitar company in 1935 and made of Bakelite. By 1936, the Slingerland company introduced a wooden solid-body electric model, the Slingerland Songster 401 (and a lap steel counterpart, the Songster 400).
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