Ibanez is the most important Japanese guitar brand, and this new book tells the story of the electric guitars the company has made since the late 50s. The story tracks the fortunes of Ibanez from its early years as a copier of prime American models to later success as a creator of impressive original designs. The big break came in the late '80s with the launch of Steve Vai's JEM models and the related RG design, which have ensured Ibanez's popularity among metal and extreme rock players. Players include George Benson, Phil Collen, Allan Holdsworth, Pat Metheny, John Petrucci, Lee Ritenour, Joe Satriani, John Scofield, Mick Thompson, and more, many of whom are featured or interviewed for this book. With a gallery of full-color pictures of famous guitars and players, a reference section detailing production years and specifications, and a section covering how to interpret serial numbers. 160 pp.


The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.
Getting your guitar action set up by a good luthier can make a huge difference to any guitar's playability (you'll usually find someone at your local store who can do it). I have a number of private students that found an AMAZING difference when they had set their guitar up properly, and of course, get all mine done too. If you are struggling to play barre chords (particularly the dreaded F chord) on an acoustic guitar, then a too-high action could certainly be a part of the problem.
Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!

No doubt many of you thought that the very first electric guitar was Les Paul’s legendary “Log.” Well, regardless of who was responsible for its invention and evolution, electric guitarists throughout the world are truly grateful for the ability to amplify their instruments, as are their audiences. This capability to connect to dedicated guitar amps along with the use of distortion and guitar effects has spawned entirely new genres of music. Pickup types and configurations, as well as specialized switching options and tone controls also help generate different sounds. But when you break it down to the basics, there are really only three types of electric guitars in existence to this day, excluding acoustic-electrics - the aforementioned Hollow Body, Semi-Hollow Body, and Solid Body varieties.
While it’s not the most refined thing out there, Jackson Pro Series SL2 is definitely a force to be reckoned with. Minimalist design combined with bulletproof components is the type of recipe you want if you’re looking for a solid guitar. Playable, with great tone, this Jackson definitely spiked my interest in the brand again. Best of all, it’s reasonably priced considering what it offers.

Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
SOLD OUT: Super condition its been kept in the case over 25 years WoW!... JVG just set-up and plays wonderfully no buzz no drag its EASY to play now and it has NO WEAR almost like owning NEW Vintage! Sounds good ! its loud and robust TONE this is a great deal on an absolutely wonderful guitar. This was well crafted in Korea in the late 1980's same as Japan spec incredible. Lots of vintage guitar for a great price Its woods are as follows... Top is Spruce nice straight grained and may be solid cant see a seam it is what it is as made, the back and sides are all a fine instrument grade mahogany as is the neck a medium slim profile neck feels great , the headstock has the rosewood overlay with Fender logo in mother of pearl with gloss finish to front headstock as the body is gloss front - sides and back and the back of neck smartly in satin finish to not show finger prints easily.. Fit and finish is rated JVG at very good - excellent vintage easily Near Mint rating I'm still looking for a dink and cant find one yet, but thats not to say there may be something minute somewhere but I looked it over good and she qualifies for near mint rating vintage and is WAY BETTER than average. The fingerboard I believe is ebonized rosewood and shows no divots at all... same with frets I polished them pre set up and I can attest they are excellent too... Neck angle and action is very good straight and as a result the action is set to within Martin spec and plays excellently with no buzzing. Original tuners on board and are good quality and do the job well, intonation on this guitar is good so it sounds sweet up or down the fingerboard... surprisingly great tone for a guitar anywhere near this price point, You will be very pleased. Comes with its original semi hard chipboard case black good all latches and handle are good, Here is a great sounding and playing Vintage Korean guitar that will be sure to please. Questions ? asl Joe jvguitars@gmail.com .
Even working on the assumption that you're only using one mic, the professionals have an awful lot to say about where you might put it. For a start, it seems to be fairly common practice to audition the different speaker cones of your guitar amp. "They're supposed to sound the same," says Roy Thomas Baker, "but if you're using a 4x12 cabinet, each of these four speakers may sound different."
A great debate has raged hot and heavy throughout the guitar playing world since George Beauchamp and Rickenbacker invented the electric guitar. It's a debate that's ignited feuds, torn apart families and has surely broken some hearts and continues to this day. What debate drawn from the innocent depths of guitardom could illicit such a foul and unexpected response?
All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
One step up is the combination of a treble cut and a bass cut, with a single knob to select between them, like the one in the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff (Figure 2). The knob selects a blend of highs left over from the bass cut side and lows left over from the treble cut side. If you make the cut frequencies of the treble and bass sides far apart, you get a persistent midrange scoop, as in the original Big Muff. You can also have the bass and treble sides overlap in the middle and get a midrange hump in response. The near-endless variations you can get by tinkering with the relative values of the parts and the need for only one knob make this a favorite in effects.
Even cheaper (abour $40) is the Behringer Guitar Link (review: Behringer Guitar Link UCG102 USB Interface Review). One nice thing is the long cord.. you can sit a ways away from your PC without needing an extender, and like the line 6, it’s also got a headphone output. They offer some guitar effects software as well, via download, and a basic DAW program. Worth checking out, as this does check every basic box for forty bucks. I have not used this, but I have used other Behringer audio interfaces. Cheap, basic, but they do include ASIO drivers (read ahead).
Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
What is an Essex? Also who compiled this list? It definitely wasn't guitar professionals. Every guitar maker has top line and then entry level guitars. Top line for those that can play and entry for the beginner who 9 out of 10 stop playing and they don't care that a $60 to $200 mistake lays in the closet for years. Yamaha makes 100's of styles and a lot are great guitars and some stink. It goes with the territory in a very competitive market. This should have been better defined and broken down by cost levels. Because this could have even been titled "The 10 Best Guitar List"

The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:


The Blueridge BR-160 Historic Series dreadnought features classic vintage styling with modern improvements. For its Historic Series, Blueridge took inspiration from guitars made before the Second World War. However, instead of using the rarer and restricted woods such as Brazilian rosewood used in vintage guitars, Blueridge opted to use more abundant tonewoods that produce the same sound quality.
Ovations reached the height of their popularity in the 1980s, where they were often seen during live performances by touring artists. Ovation guitars’ synthetic bowl-shaped back and early use (1971) of pre-amplifiers, onboard equalization and piezo pickups were particularly attractive to live acoustic musicians who constantly battled feedback problems from the high volumes needed in live venues.[citation needed]
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.

An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 

How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
This is the Autumn Brown El Dorado. The finish is outstanding, and it’s also very easy to handle at only 7 lbs. We used 24 extra fat frets. Dual humbuckers provide the sound, and it comes with a whammy bar. We used gold hardware to complement the nice finish. Like other Big Lou guitars, this one features our 1 7/8″ nut width and 8mm string spacing. The construction involves a “set” neck, so it can’t be swapped out, but the factory is ISO9001 certified, so this guitar is a very high quality instrument. Considering the price at $379, it’s a great value. I really tried to keep the cost down, but that arched top costs a small fortune to build. If you can make a statement by playing, that’s the best. But if your still in training, this guitar will make a statement just sitting there. I took the first one off the assembly line for myself. I had to have it.
Along with Taylor, C.F. Martin and Co. sets the mark for top-level American-made acoustic guitars. They’ve been around since 1833, and today they make most of their guitars in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. They use premium materials to get the best look and sound out of their guitars, but they’re also a leader in understanding the environmental impact of over-harvesting tonewoods.

George Harrison of the Beatles and Roger McGuinn of the Byrds brought the electric twelve-string to notability in rock and roll. During the Beatles' first trip to the United States, in February 1964, Harrison received a new 360/12 model guitar from the Rickenbacker company, a twelve-string electric made to look onstage like a six-string. He began using the 360 in the studio on Lennon's "You Can't Do That" and other songs. McGuinn began using electric twelve-string guitars to create the jangly, ringing sound of the Byrds. Both Jimmy Page, the guitarist with Led Zeppelin, and Leo Kottke, a solo artist, are well known as twelve-string guitar players.


OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.

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I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say. He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston. It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it! Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC. Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!

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While it can be a troubling task to find the perfect electric guitar to bring out your inner rock star, we hope that our electric guitar reviews & our comprehensive guide has helped you narrow down your choices. Our best piece of advice is to determine the type of genre you’re interested in playing. That will be a good basepoint for you to work from in order to determine the best electric guitar that fits your needs. Afterward, it is important to select the guitar that has the best components to give you the highest quality of sound. The color does not matter too much but the next most important factor to think about is certainly the wood type used to build the electric guitar. Picking the right type of wood is going to more or less, create better or worse sound.

That’s not all modeling processors can do. In addition to offering guitar and amp models, most guitar modeling processors have libraries of the kinds of effects you would get from individual pedals—reverb, echo, chorus, overdrive, distortion, fuzz, etc., as well as integrated drum machines with scores of preset rhythm patterns to help your practice. You can run several effects simultaneously, combining them to create your own unique tonal palette. Most modeling processors now have USB connectivity, some even with two-way audio streaming, for use as interfaces in direct computer recording.
Companion to the TG-64 was the TB-64 bass. This was virtually identical to the guitar – including the three pickups and monkey grip – except it was a bass, so it had no vibrato. Two other basses debuted in ’64, the NB-1 and NB-4. These were basically the same guitar as the TB-64 except they did not have the handle cutout in the body. The NB-1 had a single pickup and the NB-4 had two.

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Remember how we said that Ibanez has some pretty rad entry level guitars? Well, Ibanez GRX70QATBB is one that is worth mentioning. It belongs to the legendary GRX family, and brings a well-balanced performance for the money. I actually bought one of these for my nephew, and had to put it through its paces before I handed it over. It’s a bit rough around the edges, but one visit to a guitar shop took care of that.
Though comfortable playing many styles, Atkins was most often associated with country music and the acoustic guitar. By using a combination of his fingers and a thumb pick, he created his signature “fingerpicking” sound—a style somewhat inspired by fellow guitarist Merle Travis. Atkins even recorded a duo album with Travis, as well as with other respected guitarist like Doc Watson, Les Paul, Jerry Reed and Mark Knopfler.
Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.
What I really want is a pelham blue or mostly-bluish-but-a-little-teal gibson sg with an ebony fretboard. the fretboard is absolutely a deal breaker. i'll probably change the pickups to WRC's so stock pickups are unimportant. Could get a used Elliot Easton, but I'd have to buy it used, sight unseen, and the trem isn't really ideal for how I tend to play, so I was hoping there was someone out there who does this. I am kinda surprised that no one does. It's one of the most iconic designs in history, why no interest in BTOs?

The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
2) Use a line-out box (I use the Suhr Iso Line Out box) between your amp and dry speaker cab to take a tap off the dry signal. Run the line-out signal into a small mixer, and run the outputs of the mixer into a stereo power amp and two guitar cabinets. As with the previous rig, use the mixer sends and returns to patch in effects—which you will set at 100 percent wet (no dry signal) and blend to taste. In this setup, you can blend the dry signal into your “wet” cabinets. For live applications, mic all three cabinets, and pan the wet cabinets hard left and right in the PA. This is the setup I use, and I was inspired to go this route by guitarists such as Steve Stevens and Eddie Van Halen. I like to blend a significant amount of dry signal into the wet cabs. In the PA, the sound is absolutely massive! I also use an expression pedal to control the amount of effects in my wet cabs, so I can tailor my delays and reverbs on the fly.
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The guitar is built of full, all-solid maple that gives a nice clean tone and helps to avert some of the feedback prone to other fully hollow guitars. There’s a mahogany set neck to both help with longer sustain and to give you the premium fit and finish usually reserved for more expensive hollow-body instruments. The two ACH-ST humbuckers aren’t ultra-heavy metal pickups, so you won’t get a ton of snarling distortion out of the AF55, but you can push an overdrive sound to the next level if you want to. It all adds up to a sound that’s perfect for a player who’s looking to go for the jazz/blues vibe, or someone who’s looking to go for a singer/songwriter roots project. The trapezoid tailpiece also gives you a nice nod to vintage axes, too.
Continuing the example of making comparisons of specifications, there are Guilds in this price range that come with all solid woods, a rosewood fretboard, and with built-in tuners. Also, Epiphone Masterbuilt has solid wood acoustics, even some with cedar tops which are highly sought after by finger style players, plus they have a rosewood fretboard, a built-in tuner, two pickups and deluxe tuning machines. Moreover, both of the above guitars sell for less than the Taylor 200 series model you listed. So which is better?
Luthier Steve Lamb has been providing quality instrument repair in Fort Worth for over 30 years. Steve’s years of experience has provided musicians, collectors, students and friends the information and service necessary to keep their instruments in shape. Lamb’s Music is an authorized service/warranty center for most guitar manufacturers including – Fender, Gibson, Martin, Taylor and more.
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Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.
Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.
Right-handed players use the fingers of the right hand to pluck the strings, with the thumb plucking from the top of a string downwards (downstroke) and the other fingers plucking from the bottom of string upwards (upstroke). The little finger in classical technique as it evolved in the 20th century is used only to ride along with the ring finger without striking the strings and to thus physiologically facilitate the ring finger's motion.
It is possible to perform a setup at home, but it can easily become a laborious and time-consuming process. You can instead bring your instrument to a local store or other professional. Guitar setup cost is usually a large value in comparison to the work it would take to do the job at home. You should consider that the cost of a guitar setup includes the addition of new strings but may not cover the actual cost of them. Whether or not strings are included in the price is something that should be investigated prior to having an instrument professionally setup. Guitar setup cost may also increase if the tuning keys need adjustment, or if you have a complicated bridge system (like a Floyd Rose) that requires extra knowledge and skill to be properly fine-tuned.

Since 1994 The Music Zoo has been a trusted source for musicians around the world. We've located guitars for Slash, sold guitars for Steve Miller, held performances by major artists like Steve Vai, built thousands of customer relationships, and helped countless enthusiasts find just the right instrument. Today we look forward to finding your next guitar!
I've spent years playing only my Gibson Les Paul. Right out of the box the Hummingbird blew me away. It came tuned perfectly to E flat. Tuned it up to E and continue to be blown away. It's warm and mellow where it should be, and bright and crisp as well where it should be. I've found it very easy to switch from my butter smooth LP to this acoustic, and it's beautiful sound has inspired me to get writing again. Then...I plugged it into my Epi Blues Custom 30W tube amp on the clean channel, and fell in love with the guitar all over again. Brilliant, full, radiant, crisp, warm and so much more. I don't use a pick, and this thing still rocks. I couldn't say enough good things about it! Far better quality than I'd ever expect for $300.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.
In launching the AZ series, the goal was not to merely create a completely new guitar model, but to sculpt a great guitar that can foster the potential of the modern ?third phase' while maintaining traditional elements. Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, it has decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities. The harmonic balance between bridge and pickups, nut and machine heads, neck and fret material all work together in order to help the guitarist create their desired sound. From A to Z, there is no aspect of guitar making that we ever overlook. This tradition has been passed down masterfully to the AZ series.
Two solidstate Tempo beginner amps were offered in ’71. These had black tolex covers, front-mounted controls and a rectangular logo with block letters on the grille. The Tempo No. 158 ($65) had an 8″ speaker, 10 watts of power, tremolo with speed control, reverb with depth control, three inputs, volume, tone and a black grillcloth surrounded by white beading. The Tempo No. 136 ($31.50) offered a 6″ speaker, six watts, three inputs, volume and tone. The grillcloth was dark (probably black) with horizontal flecks.
Interestingly, the neck is crafted from maple, topped by a 20-fret walnut fingerboard which complements the back and sides nicely. Following the specs of older Gibson guitars, the scale length is shorter at 24.75", while the nut width is 1.725", which gives the instrument a comfortable playing feel. Adding to the already good vale of this guitar is the built-in LR Baggs Element electronics for stage performance, with discrete soundhole mounted volume control. If you are looking for a handcrafted workhorse acoustic guitar that will not break the bank, then check this out.
Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II, Aria Diamond, Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Cimar, Cortez (electrics only), Columbus, Conrad, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage,V entura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn, Westbury, Westminster, Westone
this is a norma guitar. i think from the late 1960's to maybe 1970estate find. has scratches in some placeshas two on and off button in white they push in real easy. theres a rhythm, and solo button theres two knobs bellow.theres only 3 strings on it. theres three missing part off the r is missing on the norma. i have no equipment to test it to see how it sounds it seems ok when i play with what strings i have on it.please check out all the pictures for better detail selling as is no returns... more
German tonemeister and Vintage endorsee, the one and only Thomas Blug arrives in the UK for a promotional tour this weekend. Following an appearance at Northern Guitar Shows London International Guitar Show at Kempton Park Racecourse on Sunday, Thomas will perform the following in-store clinics to launch the brand new BluGuitar AMP1 Mercury Edition.
It’s a good idea to make a template for your wiring on any guitar where the controls aren’t mounted to a pickguard (like a Strat) or a control plate (like a Tele). To make the template, put a piece of non-corrugated cardboard over the guitar, use finger pressure to find where the control holes are, and very carefully poke through the cardboard with a punch or a nail to make a hole for your template. You can enlarge the holes with a pencil or a round file until they are big enough for the controls to be mounted snugly. It’s also a good idea to write what is supposed to go where on the template with a marker.

Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.
Planning for this review started right after the January 2018 National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Anaheim, California. We didn’t notice any significant introductions in the under-$200 electric guitar category during our time there, but new guitars can appear at any time. We’ll be watching out for them, and we’ll get our hands on them as soon as we can.
Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.
Description: Natural Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, Classical Tuners - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
Launch price: $1,949 / £1,639 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 21 | Pickups: 3x Pure Vintage '65 Gray-Bottom Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge/middle tone | Hardware: Pure Vintage 6-saddle Synchronized vibrato, Pure Vintage Single Line 'Fender Deluxe' tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Olympic White, 3-Color Sunburst, Candy Apple Red
One that I love listening to, and playing, is Under the Bridge - RHCP... also if you're not yet intermediate it's a good transition from beginner to more intermediate/advancey stuff. Anyways a lot of Beatles is good... same with Eric Clapton, John Frusciante and John Mayer. Really anything that is considered 'mainstream' is good to learn, 'cause odds are you already know it... making it easier to learn.
I like the pseudo PTB scheme where the tone cap (I prefer .033 or .022mF) is attached to lug 3 of the pot and to ground. Lug 2 is connected to the Volume pot’s lug 1 and there’s an additional small cap (0.001mF or smaller) connected between tone pot lug 1 and Vol pot lug 2. Assume both pots are Log types: with tone at 7.5 (ie halfway along the pot’s sweep) there is no appreciable treble cut, and the volume pot gives a pretty even tone throughout its range. With tone pot higher than 7.5 bass is cut as you roll back the volume, with tone pot lower than 7.5 treble is cut. Minimum bass setting – vol approx 3, tone full up. Minimum treble setting vol full up, tone full down. I have this in most of my guitars and love it.
“The acoustic guitar is something you can travel with easier and make money with easier,” Salas said. “When I used to tour with Rod Stewart, we had jets and gigantic trucks but now there’s no record-company support so no there’s tour support. Record companies aren’t offsetting the tour expenses because they can’t make their money back in record sales.”

There’s a 10-watt, eight-ohm Fender Frontman 10G amplifier with a six-inch Fender design speaker that will give you plenty of amplification if you’re learning in your bedroom or apartment. There’s even a two-band EQ giving you more tonal control and a silver-face mesh grill paying homage to Fender’s classic vintage amps. They’ve also thrown in an instrument cable (for connecting your guitar up to your amp), an electronic tuner for keeping things sounding right, a gig bag, a guitar strap, a pick sampler (so you can audition different thicknesses of pick to determine the best for your playing style), plus an instructional DVD to make sure you start your learning off on the right foot.

Get ready to rock with the First Act Electric Guitar with Amp. It's scaled down for smaller players, yet it's designed with the same materials, electronics and appointments as First Act's full-size guitars for full rock sound. Kids will feel encouraged and excited about an authentic music-making experience while playing an instrument designed especially for them.
Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.
The case raised concerns for musicians who lack documentation of vintage instruments made of traditional, non-sustainable materials.[50][51] However, officials from the Justice Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have stated that musicians who unknowingly possess instruments made from illegal wood would not be treated as criminals.[52]
In 1950 and 1951, electronics and instrument amplifier maker Leo Fender through his company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. The Broadcaster name was changed to Telecaster because of a legal dispute over the name.
Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.
Leaving aside guitarists whose relative fame is debatable (such as Steve Hillage or Terje Rypdal), how can you have a wannabe like John Mayer on your list, but not Dr. Brian May, Jerry Garcia or Jeff Beck? And I’d have also swapped out Tom Morello in favor of Adrian Belew. Belew was making his guitar sound like “everything but a guitar” more than a decade before anyone had heard of Morello. Adrian played with Talking Heads, Joan Armatrading, David Bowie (that’s him playing the crazy solos on DJ and Boys Keep Swinging), and King Crimson back in thee late 70’s and early 80’s. And his song Oooh Daddy at least grants him one hit wonder status, as far as “fame” goes.
Clear and easy to follow instructions. I re-wired my Gibson Les Paul 60's Tribute for new pickups after removing the easy connects and circuit board that came stock. I ended up re-using the 3 way switch that came in the guitar instead of the one in the kit since it was shorter and the guitar didn't have room for the full length switch in the kit. They were both Switchcraft so same quality. I'm very happy with the results. After shopping prices, the kit is very reasonable versus buying the components separately.

It depends on what you call important. Does an electric guitar's tonewood affect the tone? No. Sorry. When the thing capturing the sound is directly under the thing generating the sound and, it makes no sense for the wood, which vibrates in a secondary fashion, to have any effect on a tone that has already left the guitar. Think of it in layers, like this:
EQ (Equalizer) – A frequency-based effect that allows you to boost or cut frequencies along the audio spectrum. Graphic EQ pedals such as the GE-7 and GEB-7 have faders for each frequency band that you can move up or down to boost or cut the frequency. EQ pedals can be used to tackle problem frequencies such as mid-range honk or to give a bass boost or add some high end sparkle. Alternatively you can use EQ to create interesting tones such as emulating a small radio by rolling off the bottom end and boosting the high mids.
What made him truly special was that, unlike other guitarists of his time who stuck to one style of playing, Jimi combined styles and used strumming alongside licks and other additions to create a fuller and more organic sound. Amazingly, he also used his thumb to do do a moving baseline whilst he was playing chords – he wanted to do what no other guitarists were doing, or were able to do and he succeeded. The way he dressed his chords with so many different sounds and rhythms just shows how naturally talented a guitarist Jimi Hendrix was. His guitar was like an extension of his body, a part of his left hand that had no boundaries.
If you like to run all your effects into an amp set clean and get your gain sounds from pedals, you probably don’t ever need to consider using amplifier effects loops or a wet/dry/wet rig. If your amp(s) are set relatively clean, you will be able to use any of the effects listed above straight into the front of the amp—and they should sound really good.
And when you shop with Guitar Center, you can search through our entire chainwide inventory and have any item shipped to your local store for free, or directly to your home. Whether you’re a devoted collector, a player looking to get back that one instrument that got away, or an audiophile trying to capture the true vintage sound you’ve always wanted, the Guitar Center Vintage Collection has everything you need. Start searching today.
Modeling pedals use a host of methods to make your guitar sound like it’s coming from a specific sound source. For example, there are many pedals out there that are designed to model the sound of classic amps. This allows you to plug your amp and pedal straight into a PA system or even a pair of headphones, while maintaining the characteristics of the amp the pedal is modeled after. This also helps you avoid having to carry your amp with you everywhere you go.

It would be great if we could be born with all our favorite music already memorized. But we're only human, so we don't get that luxury - if we want to know a song, we have to learn it! The process starts with reference materials, so don't wait to start building up a repertoire of your own favorites. Add the tablature to your collection and make sure to practice, and you'll be playing like your favorite guitar heroes soon enough.

If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.
I played a gig (to an empty house) at The Haunt in Ithaca NY. A lot of up and coming regional bands play there. We, on the other hand are just a cover band from Binghamton, about an hour away. While setting up, the sound man left a mic on the floor where I’d be setting up. I let him know that I send a direct signal. I could tell he wasn’t happy. After the gig though, he came and complimented me on my sound, saying that he didn’t expect a direct sound to be that good.
The new Martin electrics were offset double cutaway guitars which, in terms of shape, fall very loosely into a Stratocaster category. The cutaways are a bit wider and shallower than a Strat, both pointing away from the body. The horns are much more rounded than a Strat. Like a Strat, the waist is slightly offset, and the lower bout has a slightly asymmetrical slant to it. The bodies were initially built of hard maple and rosewood laminates that imitate the look of neck-through guitars popular at the time, but actually have neck pockets with glued-in mahogany necks. These had unbound 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays and a distinctive three-and-three variation on the old Stauffer/Viennese headstock � which may have originally inspired Leo Fender’s Strat creation � with script CFM logo decal. (Prior to developing the Strat, Fender visited the Martin factory and was shown some of the old Stauffer/Martins with the round-hooked Eastern European headstock shape.) These all featured chrome Sperzel tuners, brass nuts, twin humbuckers, threeway selects, two volume and two tones with chrome dome knobs, and a Leo Quan Badass bridge.

"I'm the famous guitar player," the late Duane Allman said, "but Dickey is the good one." The two spent less than three years together in the Allman Brothers Band, but they established an epic rapport – jamming at length, trading solos and playing their famous twin-guitar leads. After Allman's death in 1971, the group continued with Betts, scoring with "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica." For all his blues and slide chops, his roots are in jazz, and you can hear the influence of his clean-toned modal soloing in every Southern rock group that's followed.
Hybrid amps are a strange beast. As the name suggests, they combine multiple technologies to produce a unique hybrid amp experience. They may use the digital front end of a modeling amp with a tube-based power stage, or a tube preamp with a solid-state power amp. The benefits of this style of lesser-seen amp is that you can sometimes get the best of both worlds, with the awesome tone of a tube amp, but with the processing power of a solid-state amp. These amps tend to be cheaper than tube amps and generally easier to maintain.
Nice ible. I JUST got a Squier Tele Custom ii (2) in the mail Friday after selling a keytar on ebay for $355. I bought it because it got great reviews for having 2 Duncan (designed, made in asia?) P90's and the price was right for a 1st guitar. the only thing i do not like is the ugly tele headstock. I bought a '68 Harmony Marquis last year for my 1st 1st guitar, not really knowing at the time how unrewarding/difficult it would be to learn on a P.O.S like that. So, even tho the pups are probably the last thing I would replace on it, it was cool to read a bit by someone else with a "less expensive" tele. Look up the Custom ii online, it has a great looking pickguard and the pup selector is up on the top horn like a les paul. Thanks for the tips!
Gretsch was founded in 1883 in Brooklyn, with their biggest boom coming in the fifties and sixties, at the birth of rock n’ roll. Famed for making hollow and semi-hollow models, their guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
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In this modern world of in-ear monitors and digital consoles, both guitarists’ amps face the back wall of the stage rather than forward toward the audience. This allows them to crank their amps as loud as they need to achieve their signature Skynyrd-like drive without blowing out the Front of House engineer or the first three rows of the arena they’re performing in.
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It is entirely possible with most guitars. Very rarely will there be a time you will be unable to achieve that same sound with a decent amp. So make sure you do get a quality amp─it doesn't have to be extremely pricey, just good enough. Always make sure your guitar has multiple pickups if you are planning to play different styles of music; it allows for more perfect fine-tuning.

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With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.
While Dave Matthews Band has no more confirmed dates on their schedule, Matthews and guitarist Tim Reynolds have a number of duo performances on the docket, including a slot at Farm Aid 2018 in Hartford, CT on September 22nd alongside Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp, Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, Kacey Musgraves, Margo Price, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, and Particle Kid. Dave and Tim also just announced their return to Mexico for a concert destination event set to take place February 15th–17th, 2019.
And that’s exactly what reverb effects are trying to emulate: the way a single instrument sounds different in different spaces and reflecting off of different materials. Many common environments that reverb units try to emulate are halls, churches, and chambers. There are some pretty unique reverbs like a particle reverb that adds special effects to make things sound more spacey, and there’s even one that attempts to emulate what we imagine a black hole to sound like.

I have a question you might be able to help me with. I currently have a Yamaha silent guitar both nylon and steel and want to set up a home speaker system for a small room. I use a couple of pedals with my guitar. (reverb & delay) and at present use a Yamaha THR amp for sound. This is great for practice but does not fill the room so to speak. I have a larger acoustic amp but not happy with the sound. Can I use a pair of studio monitor speakers instead and if so would I need anything else e.g. (EQ or amp)I am looking to recreate the best possible sound I can get. At present it is only through my headphones. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated.
The massive slabs of rock-candy noise that J Mascis heaved from his Fender Jazzmaster in Dinosaur Jr. contained multitudes: Black Sabbath savagery, melodic Neil Young soul, punk-rock pig slop. As his recent solo set, Several Shades of Why, showed, he can get shamelessly pretty with an acoustic, too. "I remember seeing Dinosaur play this soft, plaintive song – and then it was just completely detonated by this ravaging solo that J did," says Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore. "The whole room was incinerated."
Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.
The AC15C1X is a modern take on the venerable AC15, with improved reliability and built-in effects. Vox's familiar clean and overdriven tone is ever present, courtesy of its three 12AX7 preamp tubes and two EL84 power tubes that drive a 12" Celestion Alnico Blue speaker - a speaker that many Rock and Blues players prefer. The amp has a dedicated Top Boost input for those who want Vox' distinct jangly tone. Finally, it comes with tremolo and reverb effect to add space and texture to your guitar tone.

This guitar is one of the most popular choices for those looking for a quality acoustic guitar under $500. It comes in a dreadnought size or concert (smaller body) size. It also comes in a variety of colors (10 at time of writing). Some of the features of this acoustic are: Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, new scalloped bracing. Owners describe the sound of this guitar as full, bright, and balanced. It will surely bring a smile to your face as you strum chords for hours while learning new songs. See all the available color choices for this guitar here.
Do you know what does custom shop means? Like custom shop cars and motorcycle, furniture. With Top Guitars it pertains to woodworking, most of us would define a custom shop as one dealing with made-to-order goods with certain specifications. Someone comes into my realm with a certain vision. That vision may be on a set of architectural prints or still locked in their brain waiting for extraction. In either case, it’s a vision or plan that they have, not me.

If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.
• How to check frets: The easiest and quickest way to make sure a guitar’s frets are in good shape is to look straight down the neck of a guitar, from body to headstock. If the frets are at different heights (improper installation is the culprit here with new guitars) or askew, there are problems. They should look uniform and exhibit as little denting or wear as tolerable. 

eyelet boards. Today BYOC leads the way in DIY FX kits for guitarists. With distribution in Canada, Europe, Australia, Great Britain, and Asia, and over 25 thousand kits sold worldwide, BYOC is a leader in DIY effects. And our goal has not changed – to bring guitar players a product that is more than just some DIY effects project that merely “works”, but a complete stompbox that will rival or surpass any of the big name boutique pedals on the market today.
Not all stompboxes and rackmounted electronic devices designed for musicians are effects. Strobe tuner and regular electronic tuner pedals indicate whether a guitar string is too sharp or flat.[105] Stompbox-format tuner pedals route the electric signal for the instrument through the unit via a 1/4" patch cable. These pedal-style tuners usually have an output so that the signal can be plugged into a guitar amp to produce sound. Rackmount power conditioner devices deliver a voltage of the proper level and characteristics to enable equipment to function properly (e.g., by providing transient impulse protection). A rackmounted wireless receiver unit is used to enable a guitarist or bassist to move around on stage without being connected to a cable. A footswitch pedal such as the "A/B" pedal routes a guitar signal to an amplifier or enables a performer to switch between two guitars, or between two amplifiers.
1975 Gibson Les Paul "Goldtop", Deluxe to Standard conversion, Electric Guitar. This is from my personal collection. I have another and mostly play my Strat and Tele for the music I'm doing now, so it's time to thin the herd (be aware that I might change my mind about selling it). Great, original Gold Top finish with nice checking. I was actually trying find one with a lot of "green" wear on the top of the body, but this one still has some good character (I hate shiny guitars). Plenty of wear to the finish on the back (see photos). Other than a pickup change and strap button change, the guitar is as I bought it used. When I purchased it there was a set of THC, PAF'S installed (don't ask, they're gone). Personally, I didn't care for them for a few reasons, so I replaced the front with a new, Gibson 490R, AlNiCo II and a Seymour Duncan, Seth Lover in the bridge.  Pots have been replaced and the selector switch appears to be original. It already had the Deluxe to Standard conversion work done (no the truss rod cover is not the original, as it should say deluxe). I believe the bridge and tailpiece are newer units as they shine too much for the rest of the guitar. The jack plate has been changed from plastic to metal. I installed the Schaller strap lock buttons. The tuning machines have been changed to sealed Grovers. The headstock has been re-fin'd in the back, from an what looks to be repairs around the tuners. In doing so, the serial was made very faint, and only somewhat readable. Appears to be "92?128". Has the 70's volute for added headstock strength. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Mahogany neck. Plays and sounds great. Original frets have normal amount of wear with plenty of years left in them. Neck and action is adjusted perfectly (for me anyway) and I did guitar set-ups for 12 years at a Fender / Gibson / Martin / Yamaha / etc dealership at $45-$150 a pop. I have sold guitars for many years and have been to "vintage" shows, so I'm fairly versed in guitar speak. This is not a "minty" show piece. If that's what you're looking for, then buy another guitar. This is a player's guitar. The guitar has not had the headstock broken off however like many used Gibsons. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. STAYS IN TUNE!!! I play it though all three of my amps, a Trace Elliot "Super Tramp", Marshall JCM-800 and a '67 Fender Super Reverb (original). Plays and sounds great for about any type of music, except the currently installed pickups are probably too hot for jazz. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. The cream colored pick guard and chrome bracket is in the case pocket, I just removed it as I don't play with them installed on any of my Pauls. It's in fine shape if you wish to install it. Guitar weighs in at 10.5 lbs, assuming our UPS scale is reasonably correct. Original Gibson, Les Paul case with the purple lining included (the lockable latch is locked "open" and we do not have a key. Case still stays closed with the other latches. It was that way when I bought it years back).
In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.
I got this guitar just a couple months ago, not knowing much about guitars and not really knowing much about quality or anything I did a lot of research about what would be the best purchase for the right price for a beginner guitarist.. and I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG700, Fantastic reviews and ratings for beginners with great overall quality and overall sound, especially for the cost. I did a bit more research, comparing instruments and what not just to be sure I didn't purchase something that was made out of cardboard and shoe strings when I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG800, which was said to be the upgrade of the 700. I did some reading and though it didn't have as many reviews it was said to have improved sound and durability for the exact same price. Knowing that Yamaha has pretty much always been rather good quality
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If your volume and tone knobs start to make crackling or popping noises through your speaker whenever you’re plugged in, or if the signal is weak, inconsistent, or cuts out altogether in certain positions on your controls, some foreign matter (however minute) has probably lodged itself in your controls. Dust and rust pose the greatest potential threat to any electronic connection.


We noticed in our last article, 10 best Acoustic Guitars Under $500, some readers mentioned the Luna series of guitars. Thank you all for pointing these out! What a truly beautiful line of acoustic and electrics. The Luna Ash, an acoustic electric hybrid is a sleek, responsive guitar ready for any setting: playing live, recording, or jamming with friends. With a mahogany body and rosewood fretboard, this visually stunning guitar is just one in the line of Luna guitars that provides ridiculous eye candy and amazing sound quality and playability. The Ash goes for around $499, and that’s a steal! 

First, remove the knobs of the pots that you want to replace. Some knobs are held in by setscrews. Look around the shaft of the knob to see if there is a screw head then unscrew the screw and remove the knob. Most knob are mounted on split shaft pots. There are no setscrews on a split shaft pot. Friction and pressure hold the knobs on the shafts in this case. You can pull the knob directly off the shaft of the pot since there is no screw. If the knob is stuck on the shaft, I usually use heavy gauges guitar picks to try to pry up the knob. You may also wrap a thin rag around the bottom of the knob and pull the knob off the shaft. Regardless how you get the knob off, be careful not to dent or ruin the finish on the top of the guitar. It is easy to rip the knob off of the pot and accidentally drop it on the guitar. Once the knob is removed, you can unscrew and remove the nut on the top of the shaft.
Personally, I just don’t understand how you can justify calling guitars that go for 2-3x the price an “alternative”. In a list like this, you should be providing alternatives that provide superior quality, sound, and ergonomics for a SIMILAR pricetag, not a jump from $200 to $600. Also, the concept that a beginner musician will have absolutely any clue that these guitars will sound poor is almost laughable to me. A good amp will do a lot of the work, and another portion of your sound goes into technique and playing style. An actual guitar itself is less important than the amp and the player. Think of an amp as a GPU and the player as the CPU cooler: if the GPU runs fine and the CPU cooler can do its job efficiently then your CPU will manage just fine as long as it isn’t so horribly behind as to bottleneck the GPU. Also, tonewoods only affect tone in a very small way that unless you are doing a back to back comparison on a clean channel with a flat response cab is very, very difficult to notice, and once you add any crunch or dirt or even distortion it’s just out of the question altogether. If somebody has never picked up a guitar then they could hardly appreciate a Mexican Strat more than a Squire at all.
In music, a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar. A chord's notes are often played simultaneously, but they can be played sequentially in an arpeggio. The implementation of guitar chords depends on the guitar tuning. Most guitars used in popular music have six strings with the "standard" tuning of the Spanish classical-guitar, namely E-A-D-G-B-E' (from the lowest pitched string to the highest); in standard tuning, the intervals present among adjacent strings are perfect fourths except for the major third (G,B). Standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major triads.
Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar The Gibson Les Paul Studio electric guitar has been around since 1983. For 2018 Gibson upgraded one of its most well-loved models, fitting it with cryogenically treated frets for greater fret durability, adding fingerboard binding and giving it a Slim Taper neck profile. The core Les Paul tones and quality hardware and electronics are still there, of course.
Efficiency – also called sensitivity this is measured in dB at a distance of one metre. This has more to do with how loud a speaker sounds than its power rating. A Jensen P10R, for example, is rated at 95dB; a Celestion G12 65 at 97dB and an EVM12L at 100dB. The numbers don’t look that different, but the difference in terms of perceived volume is truly staggering.

I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.

Boost effects are simple effects that increase overall volume. However, every boost pedal is very unique and often sounds different. It always comes down to the type of components the effects pedal manufacturer used to achieve the volume boost. Some boost pedals try to maintain the guitar tone while providing a volume boost, others can heavily affect the guitar tone while providing a volume boost. Oftentimes, guitarists will get a specific boost pedal and use it as an always-on effect because they like the way the boost pedal colors their tone.
It starts off with a chambered basswood body with an arched maple top, that follows the Pro Jet single cutaway shape. Because of the semi-hollow body, it is lighter on your shoulder and on the ears, and many notice that it emphasizes the high frequencies a bit more. Playability is also light, thanks to this guitar's shorter 24.6" scale length. The maple neck is topped by a 22-fret rosewood fretboard with a standard 1.6875" wide nut. Giving this guitar its biting tone are two Blacktop Filter'Tron Humbuckers.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
I have my Dad's '68 Kent guitar and am looking to have it restored..any info on parts would be helpful...I think all it needs is the spring for the vibrato (whammy bar)...everything else is there...the rubber piece on the bridge looks quite worn or perhaps brittle (rightfully so). Does anyone know what this guitar is worth? It's in orange sunburst ...It's a left handed guitar
So, I’m 50+, I’ve never played a guitar, and I’m trying to decide on an electric guitar. I’m less concerned with the brand name, more concerned with high quality and workmanship, and last, I like the tone of the guitars played by the late Pete Ham of Badfinger (especially Baby Blue), and Joe Walsh. I know Ham played a cherry red Gibson SG standard, but I’m seeing quite a few mixed reviews on the quality control and workmanship of the current SGs. I listen to a lot of jam band music (i.e. Widespread Panic) and enjoy the rhythm guitar best. So, where to start and stay under $2000 to get a guitar that will produce the type of sound I’m looking for?

Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.
Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.

It’s true that the best guitars are built from the inside out, and Vintage enjoys a well-earned reputation for building great vintage electric guitars. Working with acknowledged guitar industry guru Trevor Wilkinson, Vintage has created a fantastic line-up of Wilkinson-equipped Vintage electric guitars and basses. Using Trev’s excellent range of pickups, tuners and hardware has taken Vintage electrics to the next level.

There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
There’s a huge range of cheap electric guitars out there that would not look out of place on the stages of the world thanks to high quality manufacturing and the brands actually caring about their products – “cheap” does not always mean poor quality and plenty of guitars out there will give you a fantastic playing experience for many years without breaking the bank.
Amps and effects don't have to be just for guitars and basses, either - nor do they have to play out loud. While the vast majority of amplifiers fit into the categories we've just been through, some exceptions would be amps made for keyboards and electronic drums, which can generally be used to amplify just about any instrument as long as you can attach a pickup or microphone. And if you want to practice the guitar or bass without waking up the neighbors, be sure to look into headphone amps as well: they'll push all the sound you love, but to your ears instead of a loudspeaker, so you can keep the sweetness to yourself... until you're ready to share, that is!
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
Now if this house is rocking, don’t bother knockin. Famous words by Stevie. Many people perhaps know him for Hendrix covers, but where Jimi left off Stevie continued, and continued he did. The elements of Hendrix were alive and plain to see in SRV, but with it, he also mixed in his own influences such as Albert King and his own soul to make it his sound a trademark spot on his songs. I vaguely remember a car commercial where I spotted Stevie’s playing (Pride and Joy) in a Nissan ad. That was much before I really got into Vaughan’s work. SRV was an artist who could play while absolutely stoned face. And when he did sober up, he actually played better. His newfound health and love for life and music are showcased on In Step his last album before his death a year later. Stevie’s footprints will always be in the air and in our hearts.
5) BE KIND AND CONSIDERATE! /r/Guitar is a melting pot of people from different backgrounds and skill levels. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. If you do not agree with something someone else said, please either have a polite discussion or do not comment at all. Remember that everyone is a beginner at some point. Any inflammatory, disrespectful, and/or hateful comments or usernames will result in a ban. We have a zero-tolerance policy regarding such comments/posts. Sub/mod bashing is not productive and will be met with a ban. Contact mods if you have a complaint. Please report any comments or posts violating these rules.
In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash’s Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash. The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash’s Snakepit logo in gold.
10% of our readers voted for brands that were not listed in the survey. So, besides G&L, Jackson, Yamaha, Danelectro, Charvel, Cort, Washburn, Framus, Parker, Dean, B.C Rich, and Aria, you might also want to check Duesenberg, Wild Customs, Mayones, Caparison, Reverend, Blackat, Hagstrom, Peerless, Carvin, Guild, Cole Clark, Seagull, Meloduende, Suhr, Nik Huber, Feline, Ozark, Burns, Ruokangas, and Eko.
Chords in a song are arranged according to chord progressions, which are chord intervals that work pretty much the same as single notes in a scale. It’s very important for you to learn chord progressions for the various keys, because then, as long as you know what key the song is in, you can figure out the chords in it very easily. There may be times when you want to change the key of a song to one you can sing or play in better, and for this, knowledge of chord professions is critical.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar.  I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best.  You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment.  You get treated like a valued customer.  Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars.  They have a great variety of quality instruments.  Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars.  A place like this is so rare nowadays.
I became more and more frustrated with as my playing did not mach my ambitions at all. I tried to listen to records to figure out what was being played. I tried to come up with the proper techniques on how to play the riffs that I could hear. I tried to make my guitar and my playing sound the way it should. But, even after long hours, it always felt like I did not quite get there. What I really wanted, was to be a Rock Star!The written music available in the music stores was expensive and incomplete. There was nobody around who could make me understand what a power chord was, how to mute individual strings while letting others ring.  I was locked in my open chord basic folk guitar strumming background. I knew that I needed a totally new approach to become the lead, riff and chops playing blues pop and rock guitar player I wanted to be.  And there was no way that I could see how to simply snap out of my predicament…….
I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.
Gibson 2012 SG Special '70s Tribute Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$649.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 SG Faded Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$659.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar, Left Handed (with Case)   New from$2,299.00In Stockor 12 payments of $191.59 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2019 LP Junior Tribute DC Electric Guitar, Left Handed, (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping See All Left-Handed Electric Guitars
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