This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.
The Fender T Bucket is a great choice for beginner guitarists looking for a great sounding entry level acoustic. It is frequently the top choice for new guitarists looking for a an affordable acoustic guitar. Many owners site it’s ease of playability as one of its greatest attributes. It is available in 3 different color combinations: 3-Color Sunburst, Moonlight Burst, and Trans Cherry Burst. It is made of maple wood. It has a preamp installed, making it an acoustic electric. It is our top pick for the best acoustic electric under $500. It is a great choice for beginners.
The Rocker 32’s secret weapon is its stereo capabilities courtesy of two output stages and a mono out/stereo in valve-buffered effects loop – and it’s this that opens the door to some tantalising effects possibilities. It also features a half-power option incorporated into the front panel standby switch. The enamel control panel follows Orange’s classic 1970s ‘graphics only’ format, using pictograms to describe the control functions. The Dirty channel includes gain, bass, mid, treble and master volume controls, while the clean Natural channel has a single volume control. The Natural channel may only have a single volume control, but it’s perfectly dialled in to flatter practically any guitar and it sounds wonderful, with a glassy treble giving way to an addictive chime at higher volume levels. The Dirty channel’s gain control has a very wide range, allowing fine control of moderately driven sounds, with plenty of Dark Terror-approved filth at the top of its travel, making it ideal for everything from classic Brit rock and blues to modern metal. The Rocker 32’s stereo capability will make it almost irresistible to effects users. Plugging in a decent stereo chorus and setting the outputs to dry/wet sends a clean uneffected sound through one side and a fully wet modulated sound to the other. This wet/dry combination generates the chorus effect in the air between the loudspeaker and the ears, creating a real three-dimensional soundscape that swirls and breathes like a classic Leslie rotary loudspeaker.
Pickups are complex devices. No matter what we do, we cannot model them with spot-on accuracy. They do have a series resistance (R6), but the L1 and C3 inductor and capacitance, respectively, but these are not real circuit components, but are a simple model placeholder for the complicated interactions that appear due to Maxwell’s equations, when we have a wire wound around magnets (see below image):

Generally, a band sounds the best to the audience when you have an attentive, knowledgeable sound person who is paid well by the band or venue. He also needs the right tools to balance the sound for the room. If all of the instruments onstage are blasting at full volume, the poor PA can’t keep up- and the people in the first few rows have their heads torn off by whatever instrument amplifier they are unlucky enough to be standing in front of. This results in an unbalanced mix that the sound person can’t fix. It might sound awesome onstage, but you want the audience to have a great experience too, right? With monitors, side fills, several amps/cabs, and a fort full of cymbals onstage, things get loud quickly, and everything competes for the same sonic space. It is easy for band members to get into ‘volume wars’ while the sound dude/dudette takes everyone out of the mix but the vocals right before they throw up their hands and shake their heads. The audience might not know what sonic problems are occurring, but they definitely will hear it. An audience member describing a gig like this to a friend might say, “I saw this band, but they sounded terrible.” No one wants that kind of review. We spend a lot of money on guitars, pedals, amps, and microphones. But many  musicians at the gig just set everything up and hope for the best. 
Here are the reasons why you MIGHT want to raise it: 1. The break angle (the angle change of the strings as they pass over the saddles) is so severe that the strings keep breaking as they pass over the bridge. 2. The break angle is so steep that the strings hit the edge of the bridge before they go over the saddles. I’ve never had a problem with 1 above. However, 2 often happens and it’s not something that bothers me unless it’s severe.
“William Kraus, who uses the logo (in highly stylized abalone) “WK” in which both the W and the K seem to be mating or something, is a maker of extremely fine sounding, beautifully hand-crafted guitars, in the traditional design of the great dreadnoughts of the past. This one, however, exceeds all expectations of excellence and beauty in that it has a Honduran rosewood back, sides and headstock overlay. About Honduran Rosewood, according to the website “globaltrees” (edited): Honduran Rosewood is a valuable timber species. Honduran rosewood – a/k/a Dalbergia stevensonii is known only from Belize, Guatemala and southern Mexico. Its valuable rosewood timber is highly sought after for quality products including musical instruments, turnery and carving. Honduran rosewood is reportedly the best wood for marimba and xylophone keys and it has been suggested as an acceptable substitute in guitars for Brazilian rosewood – Dalbergia Nigra — (international trade in which is now banned under CITES). Because it is a Dalbergia, like Brazilian, it sounds absolutely unbelievable!”
Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!

VintageSilvertones.com is a curated collection of electric guitars chosen for their unique tone, design, and significance in electric guitar history from approximately 1950-1980. This collection approaches electric guitars from the underdog perspective. So we carry guitars built for the masses, luthiers & manufacturers who pushed the boundaries as to what was possible in terms of not only instrument quality but tone. Design also plays an important consideration in this collection. Alternative materials, innovative tuning systems, and high quality-low cost manufacturing processes are only some of the unique qualities found on instruments at VintageSilvertones.com.


VintageSilvertones.com is a curated collection of electric guitars chosen for their unique tone, design, and significance in electric guitar history from approximately 1950-1980. This collection approaches electric guitars from the underdog perspective. So we carry guitars built for the masses, luthiers & manufacturers who pushed the boundaries as to what was possible in terms of not only instrument quality but tone. Design also plays an important consideration in this collection. Alternative materials, innovative tuning systems, and high quality-low cost manufacturing processes are only some of the unique qualities found on instruments at VintageSilvertones.com.

My epi is very nice (Almost like a gibson for 1/3 of a gibson price) and obviously, my Jackson is far superior than my other guitars. But I'm just have mid end ibanez guitars and they are very good guitars. The high end ibanez are awesome and worth less than high ends of other brands in most cases having with the same quality (or superior in very cases).

The K161 Kay Thin Twin electric guitar was originally introduced in 1952 and was known as the "Jimmy Reed" or "Howling' Wolf" model. "T-Bone" Burnett played a Thin Twin with Robert Plant and Alison Krauss at the 2009 Grammy Awards. The Thin Twin was the first guitar that was able to create that unique Blues sound. The special Kay interior bracing made the instrument a favorite among Blues players as well as rockers of the '50s and & '60s. The hand-wound pickups and separate center chamber allowed an extra biting natural distortion without feedback. The combination was a mellow clean gritty sound with natural sustain. The pickups are so hot that they needed to be contained in the center chamber, which is why the Twin Thin and Pro Bass made anyone who played it feel there was nothing else like it. The Pro Bass had a unique feature of a switch that cut off the high frequencies to reproduce an "upright Bass" sound but in the off position the Pro Bass gives a punchy Jazz sound. The Pro Bass comes with electric flatwound bass strings.


Some bass players cannot use a bass combo amp, either due to strict noise and disturbance rules in their apartment, lack of space to store a combo amp (if they live in a small room) or due to the need for a set-up which can amplify multiple types of instruments and/or voice. Alternatives to buying a bass amp for people who have noise or space constraints include a headphone amplifier or a micro-practice amp which includes a headphone jack (on bass amps, connecting headphones to a headphone jack automatically turns off the main loudspeaker). Multi-instrumentalists and bassist-singers can consider a keyboard amplifier, a small PA system, or some models of acoustic instrument amplifiers which include bass as one of the instruments which can be used; all of these options have full-range speakers that can handle the bass range.

Likewise, the two coils of a humbucker which are wired in series can be connected in parallel. This results in a brighter sound and lower output resembling that of a single-coil pickup. Compared to coil split the sound is usually a bit fuller and the pickup's hum-cancelling properties are retained. Like coil split, wiring a humbucker in parallel requires the start and end of both coils to be accessible, which is sometimes possible with stock pickups. Unlike coil split, it also requires a DPDT switch (coil split only requires a SPDT switch).[26][28]

The Gretsch G5421 Jet Club in Firebird Red is one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that features superb, world class build quality at an extremely budget friendly price tag. This is a professional level guitar at beginner prices and an absolute workhorse ready to be unleashed upon the stage of the world or just to accompany you on your journey into guitar. A chambered basswood body construction makes the guitar light on the shoulder but also provides a fantastic resonance and crispy treble.
Daisy Rock? Sounds like guitars for girls or something. It is! Daisy Rock is a company dedicated to empowering girls and young women and giving them the resources they need to learn to play the guitar. They have starter, short-scale acoustic guitars for little girls, and some really cool electric guitars in the shapes of hearts, butterflies, and flowers.
Petros Guitars are an elite customized acoustic guitar luthier, formed by the Petros brothers, Bruce and Matt Petros, based in Kaukauna, Wisconsin. They are noted for their exceptionally high quality craftsmanship and often make guitars similar in appearance to Spanish Baroque guitars with the design, making both steel and nylon string hand-made guitars. Bruce began making guitars in 1972, and in 2000 he was joined by his brother to form the Petros company.[
Flanger effects simulate the studio trick of repeatedly putting your thumb on a tape recorder’s reel for a second and then letting the reel (and music’s pitch) catch back up while a dry (unaffected) signal plays alongside. Flangers usually have a depth setting, which controls the intensity of the effect, and a rate control that adjusts the speed of the cycles.

Fender California Series Classic This acoustic guitar series will make you swoon with its original Fender body shapes, fully painted tops of solid Sitka spruce and matching Stratocaster-style headstocks. But the California Series Classic models don’t only have the looks; they also have the sound and tonal quality to match. We don’t expect anything less from Fender, and this lineup surely delivers.
Like trapeze tailpieces, top mounted vibrato bridges transfer the string tension to a guitar’s side, offering more natural string resonance. Embedded units like the Vibrolas found on Gibson Flying Vs transmit the tension to the guitar’s body. Through-body units do neither, employing strings to absorb the string tension. Another system, the TransTrem, developed by Steinberger in the ’80s, has locking positions that allows players to transpose their tuning to other keys.
Here’s one more metal marauder that is worth mentioning. Schecter Hellraiser C-1 comes packing a lot of output and a tone that handles all kinds of distortions naturally. We are talking mahogany body combined with a set of EMG 81/89s, which should be enough to spark your imagination. Plugged into a Messa/Boogie Dual Recto’s red channel, this puppy simple felt at home
SOLD OUT: Here is another fine example of a Professional high quality Japan Crafted guitars...this one is "cross-braced" and is a Dreadnought style acoustic like a martin type exhibiting superior solid construction as well as the very high grade Mahogany body Top - Sides & Back which appears to be all-solid. The necks fretboard is a wonderful Indian Rosewood. This example is believed to be a Vintage 1986 Model. Serial # 86021355. The sound is rich and expressive and very tonefull as would be expected from a quality built instrument. The playability "action" is great EZ to play and this guitar stays in tune very well to with its quality Original Takamine sealed Chrome tuners "grover type" This guitar is professional grade and will serve you well. This guitar is not a new guitar and IS a real VINTAGE guitar and has mellowed well and its condition is rated a solid 8.5/10 very good-excellent with some natural wear -dings-scratches etc.. Overall appearance is Gorgeous! and is sure to please. SOLD .
A simplistic design and an affordable price make the Squier Bullet Stratocaster SSS an ideal guitar for those who are just beginning their foray into the musical world. Here’s a huge drop in price and mentioned halfway in our list just in case you wanted to find a budget-friendly and cheap electric guitar to start with. With a basswood finish and a ‘C’ shape design, this electric guitar is lightweight and comfortable, making it ideal when just beginning to learn basic chord progressions and needing long periods of time to practice. The twenty-one frets that are included come in a medium-jumbo size, making it easier to learn the basics of strumming and moving from chord to chord. The string pickup is only a single coil, which provides an adequate sound and balanced tone when utilizing the 5-position pickup blade. With three different color options to choose from (Candy Apple Red, Sea-foam Green, and Lake Placid Blue) the Squier Bullet is one of the best electric guitars for those who are looking to begin their musical journey in style.

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For many years, Martin has used a model-labeling system featuring an initial letter, number, or series of zeros specifying the body size and type; traditionally 5- is the smallest (and technically a terz, tuned a minor third higher than a guitar, at GCFA#DG), advancing in size through 4-, 3-, 2-, 1-, 0-, 00- and 000- (though these are commonly referred to as “Oh”, “triple-oh”, etc. they are, in fact, denoted by zeros, keeping the numerical-size theme constant. These instruments originally had in common a neck that joined the body at the 12th fret. In 1916 Martin contracted with Ditson’s music store to produce a much larger store-badged guitar to compete sonically in ensembles; this boxy thunderer was named the Dreadnought in honor of the most horrific weapons system of the day, a British Navy battleship so large it could fear nothing, or “dread nought”. Indeed, HMS Dreadnought was its name, and it proved an apt product tie-in between the huge ship and the huge guitar. In 1931, Martin introduced D-bodied guitars under their own name, and a new standard was set. Around the same time, to meet the needs of banjo players wanting to cash in the guitar’s new popularity, Martin unveiled a second line of letter-named guitars, the OMs. Taking the body of the 000-, squaring its shoulder to meet the body at the 14th fret, and lengthening the scale, they created a truly legendary line of instruments (OM- wood-and-trim packages ranged from the plain -18 (mahagony back and sides) and -21 (with rosewood) to the full-on pimpmobile OM-45. The 14-fret body of the OMs proved so popular that it quickly became the standard for 00-, 000-, and D- models as well. There things stayed for about 45 years; then, in 1976, Martin debuted the M-36 and M-38. Keeping the narrow-waisted shape and moderate depth of the 000-, and combining it with a width slightly more than even that of a D-, the M-s (sometimes called 0000-) were phenomononally well-balanced in their tone. These have lately been joined by the Gibson-Jumboesque J, and the even larger SJ. The numbers/letters denoting body size and shape are generally followed by a number that designates the guitar’s ornamentation and style, including the species of wood from which the guitar is constructed. Generally, the higher the number, the higher the level of ornamentation. Additional letters or numbers added to this basic system are used to designate special features (such as a built-in pickup or a cutaway).
Before Gruhn Guitars puts out any of our fine instruments for sale, they go through our repair shop to get them ready to play. Some older instruments require extensive repairs and restoration, while others just need new strings and basic setup. But every guitar, mandolin and banjo has to meet the high standards of the repair crew before it's released for sale. Our repair staff has over 75 years combined experience repairing, restoring, building and designing guitars.
THE NECK POCKET The next step is to rout the neck pocket and body cavities. For the neck pocket I like to use a 1/4" bit and leave the scrap wood edge around the body to give the router the extra support it needs when routing the neck area. To find out how deep you will have to rout the pocket measure the total thickness of the heal of the neck. Then measure the hieght of the bridge from the bottom to the top of the groove the string will sit in on the saddle and add about 1/8" to it. That allows for the string clearence over the frets. The subtract that from the overall thickness that you came up with when you measured the heal of the neck. That will give you a pretty accurate depth that you will need to carve the pocket down to. Be very careful when you rout the neck pocket! You don't want to make it too big otherwise you end up with gaps between the neck and the body and you don't want to go too deep because it can be impossible to fix. Rout a little bit at a time, and set the neck in each time to make sure you get the proper fit. It shouldn't fit to tight and the pocket should be slightly lager than the heal of the neck because you will have paint accumulation in it which will shrink it a little.
One of the key features that makes this stand out is the 7-inch high-resolution touch display which allows you to move amps, effects and set up your pedal board to exactly how you want it, sculpting the chain to your exact specifications. Want to run a reverb pedal before a distortion? Well, just move it around using the touch screen! The OLED scribble-strip and assignable colour LEDs appear above the switches and allow you to keep track of where your effects are – a great idea!

Anonymous, that's tough one. Usually, breaking the D string would be down to two things - a sharp edge on the saddle (unlikely if you're using a roller bridge) or your technique. The only other thing I can think of right now is the break angle (how sharply the strings pass over the saddle on the way to the tailpiece). Perhaps raising the tailpiece (or feeding the strings through from the front and then passing them over the tailpiece - you could do this second one with the D string only) might help.


A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.


Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
ACT TRMOLO REPLACING THE STRINGS ACT tremolo allow two styles of string installation. 1) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end below the string catch at the rear of the tremolo unit. 2) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end in the string catch at the bottom of the tremolo unit.
Hector Berlioz studied the guitar as a teenager,[10] Franz Schubert owned at least two and wrote for the instrument,[11] Ludwig van Beethoven, after hearing Giuliani play, commented the instrument was "a miniature orchestra in itself".[12] Niccolò Paganini was also a guitar virtuoso and composer. He once wrote: "I love the guitar for its harmony; it is my constant companion in all my travels". He also said, on another occasion: "I do not like this instrument, but regard it simply as a way of helping me to think" [13]

Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!

Ah, this is an interesting subject. I could never play a Rick, nor buy back my 1966 Fender XII, so I bought a Dano, then another which I kept and could play (nut width). Then around 2000 I bought a Yamaha Pacifica 12 -the blueburst with gold hardware. I had the nut intonated, like all my other guitars (this was before Earvana which I am about to try out my first "drop in" on a new parts Strat, Epi Night Hawk and a GS Mini on layaway). The Pacifica is good tho again only 1+11/16ths " and I am ready for 1+3/4 or even better 1+7/8ths. I bought a set of Duncan Designed lipsticks for it, thinking I could easily find a neck with 1+7/8ths nut. No joy, yet, tho I have talked to a builder about one and am trying to sort out whether to do that to the Pacifica or use a really nice looking cherry stained strat body that I've had for 31 years.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.

At Sam Ash, we maintain close relationships with the most prominent electric guitar brands to make sure that we always have the very best, latest selection of electric guitars in our inventory. We carry acclaimed electric guitar brands including Fender, Gibson, Paul Reed Smith, Ibanez, ESP, Gretsch, Dean, Epiphone, Yamaha, Schecter, and so much more! If you’re a discerning player or guitar aficionado looking to add a new guitar to your collection, be sure to check out all the fine, premium electric guitars featured in our exclusive Electric Guitars of Distinction collection.
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