.From its G logo cattle brand on top, to the fence rail pickguard graphic, the Chet Atkins Gretsch cowboy'd up big time with cactus, cattle, rifle and arrow inlays inscribed right into the mother of pearl. This 6120W  Reissue combines many of the most desirable features of this longtime favorite. Twin Filter-Tron pickups offer lively, hum-free performance, with master volume and tone controls for ease of operation. See pics,pricing and info here
• Do the Right String: Some instructional guides advise beginning players to try ball-end nylon strings because they are easier on the fingers and are more bendable than metal, but steel string guitars are called “steel string guitars” because that’s what they require. Nylon strings lack the tension needed to keep steel strings guitars at their peak, which means warping, bridge damage and other issues can occur. Likewise, steel strings on a nylon string classical guitar will warp its neck with frightening speed.
Between 1974 and 1984, production of Gibson guitars was shifted from Kalamazoo to Nashville, Tennessee. The Kalamazoo plant kept going for a few years as a custom-instrument shop, but was closed in 1984; several Gibson employees led by plant manager Jim Duerloo established Heritage Guitars in the old factory, building versions of classic Gibson designs.
May Music Studio's Guide: The May Music Studio isn't a true "blue book." Rather, it is the website of a guitar studio that provides a quick tip guide to help you determine the fair market value of your guitar. The studio has years of appraisal experience and though they no longer offer appraisal services, their wisdom is distilled in the evaluation tips that they describe on their site.

Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
Bruce Springsteen has always had a not-so-secret weapon: "I got signed in the pack of new Dylans," he told Rolling Stone, "but I could turn around, kick-start my Telecaster and burn the house down." Springsteen didn't make any technical breakthroughs on guitar, but few players are better at coaxing emotion from steel and wood: witness the surf-rock recklessness of the "Born to Run" solo, the junkyard-dog bite of "Adam Raised a Cain" and the melancholy twang of "Tougher Than the Rest."
Makers of the Elk badged guitar from the early to mid 1960s to 1975, although other sources indicate that the Elk brand did not stop production until the early 1980s. Elk badged guitars came in clear acrylics in addition to colors in the early 1970s, which was an attempt to copy clear acrylics designed by the legendary Dan Armstrong in the late 1960s.
Size & Weight: If the multi-effects pedal will stay in one place at all times, then perhaps size and weight is not a big deal. However, one of the biggest selling points of a unit like this is its portability. If you need to gig with it or simply take it to a friend’s house, make sure you’re fine with its dimensions. The good thing is that a manufacturer like Line 6 makes several versions of the same basic pedal. The Line 6 M13 is a great unit, but if you need it to be more compact you can opt for the M9, or smaller yet the M5.
Completely agree. A couple years ago I was also wanting a software guitar to play some simple chords over a track. Instead I spent about $140 on a guitar from Craigslist. A couple weeks and a couple dozen YouTube tutorials later and I was able to play the chords myself. Learning to play the instruments is a valuable skill that will separate you from others who just use software.
Starting to learn on an electric guitar can be much easier as compared to an acoustic guitar. Electric guitars chords are easier to hold down as the width of the neck is shorter. The strings on the electric guitars are softer than those of acoustic guitars, which is easier on your fingertips if you're just starting out. They can be slightly more expensive than acoustic guitars, especially because other gear is needed to support your playing (i.e. amps, cables, and so on). It's all a matter of personal preference, but here are some of our top choices.
"I have purchased 15 personalized guitars from the top guitar custom shop. All the guitars have met or exceeded my expectations. Great workmanship and quality work. An exceptional group of people to work with. They are ready to answer your questions or concerns. The one time i had a concern about a guitar they responded immediately and handled the situation more than i expected. I highly recommend this company!" Dr E C Fulcher Jr - Abingdon, Maryland USA.
Every electric guitar has a series of electronics that give the guitar its unique sound. Fender guitars signature sound comes from their five-way switches and single coil pickups where as Gibson Les Pauls comes from their three way selectors, multiple tone knobs, and humbucker pickups. Many other aspects of electric guitars affect the tonal qualities of the instrument, but the electronics cannot be overlooked. In this article, I will talk about different electronics in electric guitars as well as some common repairs. For more information about electric guitar pickups, see the electric guitar pickup page.
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.
Here you will find a selection of our most popular brands of acoustic guitars. This range includes Australian manufacturers Maton and Cole Clark, prestigious American companies C.F. Martin and Gretsch as well as fantastic value for money in Fender, Yamaha and Epiphone. We stock guitars ranging from beginner to professional, with and without pickups and in all different shapes, sizes and finishes.

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Who created the first distorted electric guitar sound in history? I’ll tell you: the first adventurous player to plug a hollowbody guitar into a tube amplifier way back in the 1930s, that’s who. We might have forgotten his name, or maybe there was no one there to witness the event, but you can bet he lifted up that guitar, checked out his new amp, saw that the loudness control went to 10, and cranked it up to hear just what it could do.
If you want to take your tracks to the next level, a multi effects processor can do the trick. For a high-end example of what one of these units can do, check out the Eventide H8000FW 8-Channel Ultra-Harmonizer Effects Processor. It supports 24-bit audio and comes with an impressive 1,600 pre-set effects. Some are even pre-customized for 5.1 surround sound, so production for home theater playback is a cinch. Its smorgasbord of I/O options includes AES/EBU, ADAT, S/PDIF and FireWire with sampling up to 96kHz, so whatever you're looking to connect to the H8000FW, it's a safe bet that you can get the job done. Of course, not all of the processors here are quite as advanced. There are plenty of setups out there that just need a straightforward solution, and if that sounds like yours, don't worry: you'll find plenty of those here as well. Take the TC Electronic M350 Reverb and Effects Processor, for instance. This single-space rackmount is easy to fit into any budget, living up to TC's reputation of delivering amazing bang for your buck. It's loaded with 15 different effects plus 15 reverbs, and even includes control software for your AU/VST environment.
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Choruses (Chori?) come in mono, stereo, and true stereo versions, and a good one will provide lots of control across the depth and speed of the modulation desired. In the case of a mono unit, the aggregate tone produced by the circuit is flattened and passed through a single jack, where as a stereo (sic) unit will pass wet and dry signals through different jacks. A true stereo chorus unit will produce a true stereo signal, where the effect is mixed properly into left and right channels.
The size and power rating of the amp, as well as the size and type of the speakers within the cabinet, will have a significant impact on the recorded sound. Obviously, huge stacks will produce a very different sound from small combos. That said, many recording engineers have found that a small, low-powered amp cranked right up can sound more exciting than a big powerhouse. Even cheap transistor amps with tiny speakers can sound great in the right context. Don’t be precious and don’t rule anything out; it’s all about the end result!
Hi Ri - Squier Affinity Stratocasters and Telecasters come in lefty designs. Unfortunately they are a bit more than $100. There are some guitars in that price range but unfortunately I don't have a lot of experience with them. I would tread carefully at that price point, as really cheap guitars often end up being more trouble that they're worth. Good luck, whatever you decide!
The lower strings of a guitar (E, A & D) will often have a nickel winding over their steel core. Nickel also makes an appearance in the frets of most guitars, which are commonly made from nickel-silver. Despite the name, this alloy doesn’t actually contain any silver, but is named for its silver appearance. It’s actually an alloy of copper, nickel, and zinc. These nickel-silver frets aren’t as hard-wearing as steel, so some guitar manufacturers use stainless steel instead to give the frets more longevity.

The Champion 40 is light, affordable, and easy to use. Besides, the brand should give you a clue as to whether or not it’s a good idea to invest your hard-earned money into this alternative. The 12” speaker that it comes with is perfectly capable of rendering both bass and treble, and most guitarists who’ve reviewed it say it works great for blues and country.


Fender got really good at producing affordable high quality electric guitars thanks to the Squire brand, and with the T-Bucket 300CE they are trying to achieve the same thing in the acoustic electric world. This is an instrument that features superb electronics and offers great potential, and if it is in the hands of a professional it sounds better than any other guitar on this list.
In addition to the Les Paul, Gibson is a brand well known for pioneering some classic guitar shapes and constantly innovating, introducing concepts such as the humbucker, the digital guitar, and – most recently – the Min-ETune automatic tuning unit. Since the fifties, Gibson electric guitars have been used by everyone from James Hetfield to B.B. King.
Do you know what does custom shop means? Like custom shop cars and motorcycle, furniture. With Top Guitars it pertains to woodworking, most of us would define a custom shop as one dealing with made-to-order goods with certain specifications. Someone comes into my realm with a certain vision. That vision may be on a set of architectural prints or still locked in their brain waiting for extraction. In either case, it’s a vision or plan that they have, not me.
The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.

What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.

Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)
Smaller players, musicians who travel frequently, and parents shopping for children, may also want to consider travel and mini-acoustic guitars. These guitars were designed for the comfort of smaller players, and for convenience when traveling, but many guitar manufacturers have invested significant time and resources into creating smaller-scale acoustic guitars that don't compromise quality or sound.
In 1947, Jerry Wexler, a writer for Billboard Magazine described African American music as ‘Rhythm and Blues’ and its appeal was spreading fast and wide helped by the popularity of the radio DJ. People across the states would tune in to their favourite stations to hear the music they loved. Whether or not the song was performed by black or white musicians became irrelevant.
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.
Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
As with other plucked instruments (such as the lute), the musician directly touches the strings (usually plucking) to produce the sound. This has important consequences: Different tone/timbre (of a single note) can be produced by plucking the string in different manners and in different positions. For example, plucking an open string will sound brighter than playing the same note(s) on a fretted position (which would have a warmer tone).

So leaving aside the complexities of exactly emulating acoustic instruments with speaker technology -- which we have all come to accept although no speaker can sound quite as sweet as (or at least not exactly like) the acoustical nuance of a fine wooden stringed instrument, we reach the vast majority of modern music - amplified sounds. Again, stringed instruments are among the most difficult to emulate, if not the most difficult to emulate technologically, because of the vast and infinitely variable set performance possibilities which in turn produce a vast and infinitely variable set of physical reactions. Even if MIDI notation can document the coordinated left-hand/right-hand performance of various pitches, velocities, durations and legato, our VST is strained to faithfully reproduce every possible physical result of every possible combination of performed licks.
The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
Dean Guitars is an American manufacturer, founded in Chicago in 1977. They build their guitars for speed players, and are famed for their eye-catching models, including the iconic Razorback. Signature models are also a specialty and they produce guitars for the likes of Dave Mustaine and Michael Angelo Batio, as well as huge line of Dimebag Darrell signature models.
Unfortunately it’s during this critical time that a lot of people get discouraged and may even give up on playing altogether. The first 6 months of learning guitar are critical, statistics show that if someone can still be playing at 6 months they will be much more likely to go on to play guitar for life, so the first 6 months are actually the most important time.
A common issue for playing on larger stages or in studios is the distance between a guitarist’s pedals and their amp. Guitar cables that are longer than eight or nine meters (25 or 30 feet) not only degrade the quality of the signal, but also become incredibly susceptible to noises like hiss and hum. To allow guitarists to drive their signal over 100 meters (300 feet), Radial created the SGI-TX/RX™. The SGI changes the unbalanced guitar signal to a balanced line-level signal, altering the impedance for longer XLR cable runs; guitarists are able to use their amps offstage or in an entirely separate room when trying to craft the perfect tone.
UPDATE 10/21: The good news first - I'm still absolutely loving the game and steadily improving. I'm only able to play about one to two hours a day, but even though that's all the time I'm able to put in, I'm already to the point of being able to play along with a song. But (here comes the downside), with my improvement audio lag has become a real issue. Before I was so horrible that I couldn't hit the right notes at all, let alone on time, so it didn't make much difference. But now that I've improved, it's a problem. To be fair, they warn you about this in the form of a pamphlet inside the game box, so it wasn't out of nowhere. I was just hoping that since I wasn't using HDMI, the lag wouldn't be too horrible. Wrong.
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When the Fender company was bought from CBS by a group of investors and employees headed by Bill Schultz in 1985, manufacturing resumed its former high quality and Fender was able to regain market share and brand reputation. This sparked a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments. Dan Smith, with the help of John Page, proceeded to work on a reissue of the most popular guitars of Leo Fender’s era. They decided to manufacture two Vintage reissue Stratocaster models, a maple-fretboard 1957 and a rosewood-fretboard 1962 along with the maple-fretboard 1952 Telecaster, the maple-fretboard 1957 and rosewood-fretboard 1962 Precision Basses, as well as the rosewood-fretboard “stacked knob” 1962 Jazz Bass. This project was very important and critical to the company’s survival. These first few years (1982–1984) of reissues, known as American Vintage Reissues, are now high-priced collector’s items and considered as some of the finest to ever leave Fender’s Fullerton plant, which closed its doors in late 1984.
I am not satisfied with the sound I am getting from my guitar so I have decided to invest in a new set of strings. I bought an Electric guitar about 1 year ago and have not changed the strings as yet. Since it was not new when I bought it so I do not know how long they have been on it. I am not sure what the gauge of the strings are. I am trying to play lead. Should I go for a .,08 or .09 or a bit higher? I want to do bends as well.
Thanks for this explanation. I have built a few electric guitars, but they have been in the Gibson style with two humbuckers. I am now working on a guitar with an HSH configuration, so for starters, I needed to understand the basic 5 way switch, which if you just looked at it, it makes no sense. Now I see that the wipers of each pole are on the opposite end of each side.
The vast majority of guitars use more than one pickup, and provide a switch that controls which pickup, or combination of pickups, is active at any one time. This article adds one more pickup to our circuit and shows how we can wire up a selector switch. We look at both toggle and blade style switches. This brings us to the point where we now know how to wire up a Telecaster in the standard way.
*The expensive Fender USA hardware (supposedly genuine, purchased at Guitar Center San Marcos CA), which includes the 2-point delux strat tremolo, big-apple scratch plate, Sperzal USA tuners, Graphtech nut, and pickup selector. These items should all combine to sound awesome, and coming from a reputable supplier and for the price I paid I would expect to be identical to what is found on a USA standard or delux Fender.
With electric specifically, it's important to ask what genre's of music do you want to play and who are your influences. A humbucker pick-up found in Les Pauls and SGs sound MUCH different than single-coils found in Stratocasters and Telecasters. If you like the sound of your guitar heroes, chances are you will like playing through similar gear. Again, go with my BUDGET, FEEL and SOUND trifecta!
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."
Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.
Uh, Roland. I don’t know when was the last time I read about the best amplifiers and one of Roland’s models was not there. That’s not due to their ability to market their instruments to everyone (well, they are good at that too, probably) BUT the main reason why they are always a talk of the town (of a very musical and amplifier obsessed town) is their quality of production. With a lot of expensive amps, they are also graceful enough to give us the MERE MORTALS ability to bath in the glory of what is Roland tone. This CUBE‌-10GX amp is a 10-watt little combo amp with one 8 inch speaker that is ideal for home practice or anyone who needs an inexpensive model that will not ruin their performance. With built-in effects, heavy-duty cabinet design, and a compact construction the CUBE‌-10GX amp might be your best choice for a practice amp that also works as a traveling amp.

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In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
Well built, beautiful rich sound and stays tuned. Made in Canada by the Godin family. The slim neck and close action makes it easy to play for those with smaller hands. I have the black Songsmith and will never part with it. Many of my friends and family thought I had spent $1000 to $1500 for it and were really surprised at the price under $400. Godin makes a nice case for it and all of their guitars for around $120.00. Definitely should be in the top 10 of best acoustic guitars!
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
Other defining features include its 3 on a side tuners on a painted headstock, a bound neck and body with trapezoid or block inlays on rosewood or ebony, and its Tune-O-Matic bridge with the Stop Bar tailpiece.  While some of these features are wonderfully cosmetic, the components such as the bridge set-up and pickup selection gave the Les Paul the massive sound and sustain for which the guitar is renowned.
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Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]

The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
Martin never actually produced Stinger catalogs, so a detailed accounting is pretty difficult. However, there were four basic Stinger body styles, a fairly conventional Strat shape, a Strat-style with an arched top, a Tele and a Fender-style bass. These came in a variety of finish and pickup configuration options. Headstocks were a kind of modified Strat-style six-in-line, with a pointed throat and slightly hooked nose, with a painted triangular Stinger logo running under the strings. All had bolt-on maple necks. Guitars had a 25.4″ scale, while the basses were 34″ers.
I have played all sorts of guitars, Guild, Gibson, Epi, Lowden, Fender etc etc. Walden for a beginner/intermediate are far beyond anything you can get for the same money. Exceptional sounding and great build quality, and because no-one has heard of them you can pick them up for half the price or any of the "named" brands if you get a good used one. I have had my hands on 3 in recent years, I got them for less than £100 each - one for £50 and it held its own with anything else I had that cost nearly £1k new. I would recommend them absolutely.

Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.
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The desire for innovative sounds has intrigued musicians in every culture since the dawn of time. Oscillating the volume of a note is an ancient technique — we’ve been able to do it with our voices as long as we’ve been capable of singing. Any musician playing a stringed instrument can create tremolo effect — they simply move the bow or finger back and forth while sustaining a note, as violinists and cellists do. But what about other sounds? How has the addition of mechanical and digital devices changed our music?
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Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
So there we have it. Acoustic guitars are not just slabs of wood, one much the same as the other. Each has its own characteristics. Some will major on comfort, while others go flat-out down the path of pure volume. Whatever it is you’re looking for, Dawsons has the whole gamut of acoustic guitar body types, and can help you choose the size and style that’s right for you.
This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.

A well-rounded complement of inexpensive microphones for recording an electric guitar would consist of a Shure 57 (a must have), an inexpensive condensor mic or two (I like some of the AKG models like the C-1000 and the C-3000), and an inexpensive compressor/limiter (dbx makes a few models that are a great value). If you have, or can borrow these mics, it almost doesn't matter whether you're recording on a 4-track Porta-Studio or using a Mackie 8-Bus with 24 tracks of adat, your guitar will sound great.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.

It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.
There you go! That's the way to go about it. Now keep practicing till you get perfect. I am sure you would get these bass guitar tabs for beginners in few attempts. These were some of the best guitar tabs for beginners. There are some best acoustic guitars for beginners that you can select among the different types of guitars. Buy the best guitar, so that you do not come across any problems later on. You could also purchase some guitar tab software and practice the notations. There are many musical sites that provide you with free guitar tabs and tutorials, that you can refer to. They may also help you get a broader view on how to play guitar tabs. Learning any instrument is fun and helps you overcome fatigue, thus rejuvenating your power and mood. You can definitely trust me on that!
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge: Double Locking - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 5-Way Switch - Pickups: Alnico Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Pearl White, Pearl Black

Most pedalheads consider the Ibanez TS-808 Tube Screamer and, to a slightly lesser extent, the TS9 which followed, to be the grandaddies of overdrive pedals—and, yes, they certainly generate an element of distortion, too. Indeed, more boutique overdrives are based on the late-1970s and early-’80s Tube Screamer template than on any other, but despite the claimed improvements and undeniable quality of many of these, original units still usually fetch far higher prices on the vintage market (ain’t it always the way?) than new units do in the stores. With all of these—and other vaguely similar units—the guts of the sound comes from a clipping amp based around the first section of a dual opamp (purists swear by the JRC4558 chip in the early Ibanez units) and a pair of clipping diodes, with transistorized buffer stages at both the input and output, and a section for tone-shaping and output level control which uses the second part of the dual opamp in conjunction with a network of capacitors and resistors.


Del Rey, of course, is Spanish for “of the king,” which explains the crown. This was no doubt added to the Teisco name, in part, to suggest quality. However, it was also a way to add the de rigeur Spanish cachet necessary for “Spanish” guitars of the time. It was convention that “Spanish” guitars carried Spanish names, except for the well-known brand names – Gibson, Fender, Martin or Kay; thus the plethora of imported guitars named Greco, Ibanez, Goya and Espa�a. Of course, none of these were made in Spain, but rather in Japan, Japan, Sweden and Finland, respectively!
It’s provided as-is with no support, but it’s still well worth checking out if you’re on a PC. According to the developers, it was born inside an academic research project about the modelling of electric devices, and then applied to the musical instrument field as an evolution of the techniques available in commercial units. Its most important feature is the high precision of the simulation.
In this guitar lesson you’re going to learn 7 of the most basic guitar chords for beginners. These beginning guitar chords are the first ones every guitar player should learn. They are sometimes referred to as open position chords, because they are played in the first few frets of the guitar and all contain at least one open string. If you are looking for easy guitar chords for beginners, these are the ones to start with.
Most Martin guitars made are "flat top" models. That is, they have a round sound hole in approximately the center of the flat top of the guitar, with a "pin" style bridge. Martin also made some archtop models during the 1930s. These can have a round sound hole, or two "f" style sound holes (one on each side of the top of the body), and have an arched top, with a "trapeze" style bridge. Martin also made ukuleles. If a guitar only has four strings (and is not a ukulele), this is known as a Tenor guitar. Uke size instruments with ten string are Tiples. Uke size instruments with eight strings are Taropatches. Martin also made mandolins, which have eight strings. To summarize:
Guitar Tricks is a step-by-step learning system that’s designed to make learning guitar easy. The Guitar Fundamentals level 1 training curriculum has been totally reworked, improved and only recently re-released. Nothing else is as beginner-friendly as Guitar Tricks. In addition to working your way through the fundamental lessons of the Core Learning system you can explore great songs arranged with beginners in mind.

In 1956, Albert King (real name Albert Nelson) had moved to St Louis Missouri and his soulful blues performances were becoming very popular in their own right. He changed his surname to King on account of B.B King’s success with “Three O’Clock Blues‘. By 1967, the title track of his album ‘Born Under a Bad Sign‘ became his most popular and influential release.
Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.
It features an all-mahogany body with a narrower depth that makes it easier to carry around and to play with. The downside being is lack of low end and projection - which can also be a good thing if you prefer acoustic tones with more midrange. Giving this guitar its amplified voice is a Fishman Sonicore pickup, which is paired to an AEQ-SP1 Preamp that also comes with a tuner. And since Ibanez is not one to skimp on aesthetic features, you get a really good looking instrument with distinct fretboard inlays, bindings and more.
If you’re making the crossover from electric to acoustic, then Takamine won’t be a particularly well known brand to you, but rest assured that they’re a top make when it comes to acoustics, and of course electric acoustics. The GN93CE-NAT is a mid-range electric acoustic that features some really nice touches, such as the rosewood fretboard, and is an interesting choice.
The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.
Melodious tuning powerful pickups and with supreme body ESP is also famous for its affordable prices. This brand is famous for its quality and best for the lovers of Electronic Guitar lovers. The Japanese company was founded in Tokyo Japan in 1975.it manufactures some best  brands like  “ESP Standard”, “ESP Custom Shop”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Navigator”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” and “Grassroots”.

The electric bass was invented in the 1930s, but the instrument did not sell well until Leo Fender developed the Precision Bass in the 1950s. As such, the type of bass players who first began trying methods to make their instruments louder with amplifiers and speakers were upright bass players. While the upright bass is a large instrument, standing about six feet tall (with its endpin extended), due to its low register, it is not a loud instrument when played acoustically. This is largely a result of the decreased sensitivity of human hearing, which is most sensitive to mid-range tones; equal perceived loudness for a mid-range sound and a low frequency sound requires much more acoustic power in the low-frequency sound. In the 1890s and early 1900s, upright bass players performing in bars and brothels in an era before amplifiers and speakers were available, particularly those who performed in bands with louder instruments such as trumpet, often found it hard to be heard. About the only solution available in the pre-amplifiers era was playing slap bass, a style of slapping the strings against the fingerboard to make a relatively loud percussive sound. Beginning in the 1920s, the first amplifiers and speakers designed for gigging musicians became available.


Hector Berlioz studied the guitar as a teenager,[10] Franz Schubert owned at least two and wrote for the instrument,[11] Ludwig van Beethoven, after hearing Giuliani play, commented the instrument was "a miniature orchestra in itself".[12] Niccolò Paganini was also a guitar virtuoso and composer. He once wrote: "I love the guitar for its harmony; it is my constant companion in all my travels". He also said, on another occasion: "I do not like this instrument, but regard it simply as a way of helping me to think" [13]

Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.

Telecasters are another guitar in Fender's lineup which include a single cutaway to get at those higher frets. These guitars feature two single coil pickups which can be used separately or with each other for producing large-scale sounds. Telecasters are well-known for producing a thin, biting sound which is common in country music, but nowadays they are popular amongst indie musicians as well. These aren't the ideal guitars for heavy metal or rock music. If you want to concentrate on country or indie music, a Telecaster can do the job for you.


The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.
All I can say is 5+ STARS, holy smokes and WOW!!!! ALL that for $140 SHIPPED!!!! AMAZING DEAL!!! The guitar plays GREAT! The color is very beautiful! The sound is quite impressive for the little money spent!!! The little AMP is adorable and works perfectly. All the accessories are great and are the perfect 'icing on the cake'!!! You will need a better gig bag than the one the guitar is shipped with, the gig bag that comes with it is thin and good to keep the dust off but not much more. So, buy a nice gig bag that will fit and your guitarist will be travel ready! I highly recommend this guitar ensemble to everyone! For $140 SHIPPED, you truly won't be disappointed!
Make sure to sit down and strum the notes when trying out a guitar. It should not be hard to push down the strings with your fretting hand, even if you are just starting out. The action should be as low as possible to make learning easy. Make sure to check for loose parts; there should be no rattling noises coming from the inside of the guide or inside of the neck. Also take a business card and run it along the bottom of the bridge to make sure that the bridge isn't coming off. An electronic system is not a big deal when buying an acoustic because it's relatively easy to add an electronic pickup component later on should you decide you need one.
Serial #59640 New York label Epiphone Triumph circa 1949. Blonde finish. Spruce top, tiger flame maple sides and back. Cherry neck with diamond mother of pearl inlay. Small nick less than an inch wide on left front. Original Frequensator tailpiece with nickel finish, partly worn. Grover tuners fastened with screws and glue. Edging on back body has .25” gap at connection.Blonde natural lacquer finish in good condition. Glossy and brilliant color. Shipping quote inside US only. Ask for quote outside the US. 

It's the neat switching that makes this very classic-looking Tele act a little differently. All the standard Tele pickup selections - bridge, bridge and middle (in parallel) and neck - are in place, but it's a four-way switch, as opposed to the standard three-way; the additional selection provides us with both pickups in series for a bigger, louder and more humbucker-like 'secret' sound. The volume control has the S1 push switch in the top of the control knob: pushed down, the parallel and series-combined pickup selections are out-of- phase, giving three additional sounds over the standard Tele. The Baja sticks relatively close, of course, to the classic 60s Tele recipe. The rosewood 'board and alder body just seem to give that lovely smoothness to the high end that will make it less ear-wearing, especially if you're swapping over from an older-style humbucking Gibson. The standard mix is typically classic, wider than a Strat's but still nicely textured; the neck pickup here sounds a little fuller than some older readers or vintage Fender electric guitar owners will remember.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]

Buy a kit if you want to make things easier. Several companies produce electric guitar kits that include all of the parts you’ll need, prepared and ready to assemble. If you just want to get your feet wet, these can be a good choice. While you won’t get the full experience of making a guitar from scratch, you’ll still get the satisfaction of putting it together and finishing it yourself.[6]


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According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
This is one of the best guitars according to many guitarists and there are many reasons for that! It has a nice weight, not too heavy, not too light, and it’s comfortable to play. If you want to find a good guitar but don’t really know what to look for this is a safe choice, you will most likely love this guitar, especially if you like vintage-looking things! Go wireless on stage with this guitar, with one of these awesome wireless guitar systems.

I put the pots into a wiring jig I made for Les Pauls: a piece of pickguard plastic with holes to match the LP control arrangement (cardboard works just as well). This lets me do my wiring outside the body, and everything fits back in neatly.The guitar’s controls were on a metal mounting plate. We decided to ditch the plate, sticking with the ’50s theme.
In 1967, McCartney gave his 4001 a psychedelic paint job, as seen in the promo film for Hello Goodbye, and in the Magical Mystery Tour film.[7] A year or so later the finish was sanded off; a second over-zealous sanding in the early 1970s removed the “points” of the bass’ cutaways. McCartney predominantly used the Rickenbacker bass during his time with Wings, until the late 1970s.

Generally, a band sounds the best to the audience when you have an attentive, knowledgeable sound person who is paid well by the band or venue. He also needs the right tools to balance the sound for the room. If all of the instruments onstage are blasting at full volume, the poor PA can’t keep up- and the people in the first few rows have their heads torn off by whatever instrument amplifier they are unlucky enough to be standing in front of. This results in an unbalanced mix that the sound person can’t fix. It might sound awesome onstage, but you want the audience to have a great experience too, right? With monitors, side fills, several amps/cabs, and a fort full of cymbals onstage, things get loud quickly, and everything competes for the same sonic space. It is easy for band members to get into ‘volume wars’ while the sound dude/dudette takes everyone out of the mix but the vocals right before they throw up their hands and shake their heads. The audience might not know what sonic problems are occurring, but they definitely will hear it. An audience member describing a gig like this to a friend might say, “I saw this band, but they sounded terrible.” No one wants that kind of review. We spend a lot of money on guitars, pedals, amps, and microphones. But many  musicians at the gig just set everything up and hope for the best. 

This has changed with the introduction of the 2018 Gibson Les Paul Studio, which now has white neck binding. Apart from this cosmetic addition, there are other new features. It has cryogenically treated frets, which means the fret wires have been exposed to extreme cold before they were fitted on the guitar’s rosewood fingerboard. The result? More durable frets that don’t wear out as quickly as regular frets.


If they're properly stretched it's usually not a big problem. Usually you can just push down on the new strings around the bridge and the nut and retune a few times to get the slack out, or do the push down/pull up technique to stretch them. I find that most players have more tuning issues from holding down the strings too hard or inadvertently slightly bending them with their fretting hand.
A record store owner named Leo Mintz explained his observation to his friend, DJ Alan Freed.  Freed had a popular show on WJW in Cleveland Ohio and loved finding and playing new music to his large audience. Mintz told him of a new trend he saw in his record store where many teenagers from white families were coming in and buying Rhythm and Blues records.
I'm pleased more and more people are realising this. It really is blindingly obvious when you think about it. Anyone who talks about "resonance" when talking about a solid electric guitar body is completely missing the point, and the point is to remove, as far as is possible (and that's pretty far), any influence the body has on the amplified sound. So the primary quality you're looking for in a solid electric guitar body is not resonance, but density.

When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
In the 2010s, virtually all of the sound reaching the audience in large venues comes from the PA system or sound reinforcement system, the huge speaker systems pointed at the audience. As well, in the 2010s on-stage instrument amplifiers are more likely to be kept at a low volume, because when band members have their onstage amps "cranked" to high volume levels on stage, this makes it harder for the audio engineer to control the sound mix and blend. For example, if a heavy metal bassist had two 8x10" cabinets and several 1x18" subwoofer cabinets and several thousand watts of bass amplifier heads, and these amps are set to a very high volume level, this bass player will be creating very significant onstage bass volume. If the sound engineer wished to turn down the bass in the PA/sound reinforcement system, this bassist's loud onstage volume would make it hard for this engineer to control and/or reduce the volume of bass in the FOH (Front of House) sound mix. Another issue that can develop with bass players who have very high onstage volume is that it can be hard for the audio engineer to produce a clean sound through the PA/sound reinforcement system. For example, if a bassist was driving her bass amp speaker stacks into clipping to create a fuzz bass tone, if the audio engineer wished to have a "clean" bass sound, this could pose a challenge.
But no all are created equal, and I don’t really do this — I have live performance gear for anything I do, actually, way more than I need at this point. But a good friend of mine does the whole live-thing-throug-PC and has completely sold his soul to Ableton Live (Music production with Live and Push). You can find Ableton Live Intro online for about $99. It’s not just a live performance tool but also a DAW, you can use it for recording, composing, etc. Again, not one I use, but probably what you want if you’re going for live playing.

Ovation makes a great acoustic electric that is only $469. It has a spruce top with a lyracord bowl back. Some people don’t like the rounded back as it’s hard to keep it in your lap, so a strap may be needed if you should choose this guitar. The onboard pre amp has a built in tuner which makes staying in tune very simple. It’s nice not having to keep up with a separate tuning device. The reviews for this guitar are positive, citing great tone and playability. Click here for more information and pictures of this guitar.
It is an obvious fact that all those great guitarists must have had a humble beginning, having started with the best beginner guitar that suits them. Some of these artists started with guitars inherited from their parent, friends and/or relatives while others ordered theirs from guitar shops. If you are a newbie yet a guitar enthusiast and you are seeking to buy one among the best guitars for beginners, then there are tips and facts you will have to put into consideration.

Epiphone was once among the most significant competitors of Gibson. Later on, Gibson acquired them and, now, Epiphone form sits budget-friendly. However, the popularity of Epiphone as one of the best electric guitar brands was always there owing to their affordability and near to top-notch quality. Thus, choosing an Epiphone Les Paul guitar doesn’t mean you have to compromise much on the tone and specs. In fact, you get a guitar with specs comparable to Gibson – that too – on a much cheaper rate.
Perhaps the most famous of these sounds—or, at least, the most formative—is that of Dave Davies, the lead guitarist for The Kinks, who got bored of his Elpico amplifier in 1964 and decided to pierce its speaker cone with a razor blade. This effect, known as “clipping,” cuts off the audible waveform at the height of the amplifier’s limits (voltage, current, and thermal), thereby distorting the signal. Although Link Wray had been doing this since the late 1950s, Davies popularized guitar distortion in the first few moments of “You Really Got Me,” changing guitar music.

It has a wide dynamic range and a 20dB attenuator, which alongside a bass-cut filter should clear out any noise that’s not supposed to get over your guitar track. Add to this an integrated suspension to reduce any vibrations when playing on stage and you get a highly functional condenser microphone that won’t capture anything else than what’s supposed to.

What makes this one of the best electric guitar amp for beginners is Peavey’s TransTube preamp technology which provides a realistic tube amp tone and response, with the price and stability of a solid state amp – the best of both amp styles. Loud enough to rock, yet the headphone jack allows you to rock in isolation without disturbing others. The line in lets you plug in a CD player or mp3 player to jam with your favorite bands. It currently retails for $79.99.
Every time I guitar shop I come back to Gibson. Pricey, but the look, feel and tone are to my tastes. A lot of classic songs have been recorded over the years on these guitars. Are they superior to Martins or Taylors? It's a matter of preference. I own a hummingbird custom and the aesthetics, tone and feel are unsurpassed, but it doesn't "cut" like a Martin. For chording though, it's a better balance. I also own a J-45 which is the ultimate acoustic blues guitar.

OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
Like effects pedals, multi-effects processors are used to modify and alter the clean signal of your guitar to produce a large variety of effects (reverb, wah-wah, overdrive, distortion, chorus, etc). Unlike a simple pedal that gives you one or two options for modifying tone, a multi-effects processor has a full load of effects and sounds that allow you to play music with a rainbow-colored tonal palette. There are processors for modifying guitar, bass, and even units for vocalists with pitch-correction tools and harmonizer effects.
Regardless of what side anyone is on, when it comes to the tonewood debate, tonewood's relevancy is just a small part of a bigger discussion. Simply talking about guitar, sparks interest in guitar. This is and will always be a good thing. Any pursuit that expands one's creative and mental abilities can be regarded, in most cases, as a grand and noble thing. So, in arguing about tone wood, it's fanatical sides raging against each other, interest in the instrument they're picking apart will inevitably grow.
Peavey - Hartley Peavey started Peavey electronics in 1965, it went on to one of the largest musical instrument and audio equipment manufacturer in the world. They offer a multitude of guitars, amps and related gear, and the price point they use are comparatively very reasonable. One of their latest guitars, the Peavey AT-200, has the guitar world talking about its innovative auto-tune feature.
Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.

Generally speaking, the amp market tends to be less fueled than other categories by the year-to-year cycle of new product hype that kicks off at the annual NAMM show in January. While there are always hot new models and brands (Quilter amps being a good recent example), amp sales on Reverb are largely dominated by tried-and-true favorites and good deals on used gear.

It is rare for any brand, let alone an entire company, to stay in business this long and their longevity speaks volumes to the exceptional quality of their instruments. Although they did dabble in electric guitars and basses for a short time, today the company is dedicated to making the finest acoustic guitars possible just as they were over 180 years ago.
Boost pedals increase the strength of your signal going in to your amplifier. This means you don’t have to use distortion to get that volume jump when you want to make the chorus or lead line jump out. A boost pedal increases the signal without adding distortion, and can be used to fatten up your sound, ‘pushing’ your amplifier harder and louder, just without the grit that a distortion pedal will add.
I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring
By and large, time-based effects split the guitar output into two identical signals and momentarily hold one back while allowing the other to play in real time. The two signals are mixed back into one at the output. Usually you can control the length of the delay and the amount of the signal that is affected versus the part that stays "dry" (unaffected). This latter control—found on most effects—is usually called the level control.
All guitars need to be tuned to play properly and sound on pitch. This is done with the tuning pegs (also referred to as tuning machines) on the headstock. On the top side of of the neck is the fingerboard, also called a fretboard, over which the strings are routed. Pressed into the fingerboard are small metal ridges called frets. They help delineate individual notes along the fretboard and also make it easier play on pitch.

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View tab notation as a representation of the guitar's strings. A tab is usually written using six horizontal lines, each corresponding with a string on the guitar. The bottom line represents the lowest, thickest string, while the top string represents the highest, thinnest string. For standard tunings, this means that the lines will represent, from the bottom up, the low E, A, D, G, B and high E strings.
Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 
The following songs have been selected to highlight some of the best electric guitar songs from the 1980s. Each song includes links to tab, and wherever possible links to free audio versions of the song. A guideline for the difficulty of each song has been included. The assumption with these guidelines is beginner guitarists can play the ​basic essential open chords, F major, plus basic power chords. Difficulty assessments do not include the guitar solos.
Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!

Another advantage of an Apple Macintosh computer is that they come with a much better built-in sound card than those of almost any brand of Windows PC. You can actually use the headphone audio output of any model of Apple Macintosh without needing a professional audio internal or external audio interface and get acceptable results. Of course, if you do in fact want the highest-quality audio output, especially for multiple channels, you would want to purchase a third-party external audio interface.


The third technique I would like to talk about today consists in, once again, doubling a distorted, or not, guitar sound with a...folk guitar. This will give you much more definition and sustain on arpeggios, while on rhythm guitars it will allow you to highlight the sound's percussive aspect, and on power chords it will make your sound more powerful. This production technique has been around for ages (Led Zeppelin was pretty fond of it, for instance). But this doesn't mean that it's an outdated trick and it can't be used on modern productions: lots of contemporary metal bands still use it nowadays.

The central idea behind Vintage® is to offer accessibly priced, vintage-looking guitars with great finishes, quality parts, and features that are typically found on guitars costing upward of a thousand dollars. So, to design an industry-leading line of professional but affordable guitars, Trev Wilkinson joined forces with JHS over a decade ago. These instruments now include class-leading Wilkinson®-designed hardware.
Started similarly to PRS, Taylor was a brand that began out of passion and the back of a car. In 1974, friends and coworkers Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug joined together to purchase American Dream, the guitar making shop for whom they both worked. Geared toward producing the most high-quality USA made acoustic guitars they could muster, they changed the name of the business to Taylor Guitars, as it sounded more “American” than Listug. Though they went through some financial troubles initially, the brand eventually grew into what they are today: the number one manufacturer of acoustic guitars in the United States. They’ve also taken it upon themselves to pioneer a business model based around sustainable practices – Bob even goes so far as to travel to competitors to share with them said practices, understanding that, in order for guitar builders to continue to flourish, everyone needs to be an active participant in taking care of the environment. Or else there might come a time when there’s no more wood with which to build guitars. And that makes the El Cajon, California-based brand even mightier.

Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).

The reverb driver amp consists of a phase inverting push-pull circuit made from dual sections of a 5532 high quality audio op-amp. This provides a voltage swing of approximate twice the supply voltage to the reverb impedance matching transformer, allowing higher power transfer. The 100 ohm resistor is critical for insuring a clean drive signal, without it, the op-amps can saturate when driving the transformer, producing unwanted distortion.

A great debate has raged hot and heavy throughout the guitar playing world since George Beauchamp and Rickenbacker invented the electric guitar. It's a debate that's ignited feuds, torn apart families and has surely broken some hearts and continues to this day. What debate drawn from the innocent depths of guitardom could illicit such a foul and unexpected response?
Very nice. I'd love to hear it. 12 strings seem to emphasize the difference among guitars, the 335-12, the Firebird 12, etc. I like the sound of the Rick, but playability is an issue, you might go through three or four before one feels right, then they are so easy to pull out of tune. But you've got a totally unique variety one of a kind variety there.
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
Launch price: $599 / £500 | Body: Basswood | Neck: Hard maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Manson Design bridge humbucker, Manson Design neck single coil | Controls: Volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Two-piece bridge and tailpiece, staggered height locking machineheads | Left-handed: Yes: MBC-1LH | Finish: Matt Black
The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.
Boost effects are simple effects that increase overall volume. However, every boost pedal is very unique and often sounds different. It always comes down to the type of components the effects pedal manufacturer used to achieve the volume boost. Some boost pedals try to maintain the guitar tone while providing a volume boost, others can heavily affect the guitar tone while providing a volume boost. Oftentimes, guitarists will get a specific boost pedal and use it as an always-on effect because they like the way the boost pedal colors their tone.

Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.
Amazing guitar for the price. Honestly plays almost as good as the Paul Reed Smith I used to have. Light weight, great sustain, built in tuner and the pick ups produce a great sound. I was shocked at how good the guitar was... HOWEVER - the amp is total crap. It cracks and pops... my suggestion is to buy the guitar by itself and spend the $100 you save on a real amp (many starters that are superior to this one are the around that price.
I have a Kona Signature Acoustic with beautiful inlays in the wood. I believe the body is mahogany, decent resonant tone, and once I shimmed up the saddle bridge (which technically should have been replaced all together due to notching), sounds better than my Martin in many ways, where it better distributes the low, high, and mid-range tones. The Martin is too bassy sounding, but have ordered new bone bridge saddle, which hope it improves the cheap plastic one it came with...
I'm pleased more and more people are realising this. It really is blindingly obvious when you think about it. Anyone who talks about "resonance" when talking about a solid electric guitar body is completely missing the point, and the point is to remove, as far as is possible (and that's pretty far), any influence the body has on the amplified sound. So the primary quality you're looking for in a solid electric guitar body is not resonance, but density.
Next up are the wonderful vintage Kluson reproductions by TonePros (Fig. 16). These are some of my favorites, and they weigh in at a moderate 186 grams with all hardware included. For many of my builds, the characteristics of these tuners are ideal. I enjoy the modern engineering these tuners hide within their vintage-styled exteriors, and the weight is almost perfect.

Les Paul created an early solid-body electric guitar in his spare time after work at the Epiphone factory in the early 1940's famously known as "The Log". It is believed that this was the first solidbody 'Spanish guitar' every built. He went on to develop the idea further until he took it to managers at Gibson sometime in 1945 or 1946 who immediately...
Along with Taylor, C.F. Martin and Co. sets the mark for top-level American-made acoustic guitars. They’ve been around since 1833, and today they make most of their guitars in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. They use premium materials to get the best look and sound out of their guitars, but they’re also a leader in understanding the environmental impact of over-harvesting tonewoods.
Those influences helped him develop a truly unique rhythm guitar style that no one has been able to duplicate since. Perhaps the coolest thing about Joe Strummer is no one could ever predict what he would do next. In 1981, the Clash played 17 consecutive nights at the 3,500-capacity Bond’s International Casino nightclub in Manhattan, but when they returned to New York the next year they played two sold-out shows at Shea Stadium as an opening act for the Who.
Early Teisco instruments were primarily electric Hawaiian guitars and accompanying amps, although the company quickly got into electric Spanish guitars, too. Little information is available on these earliest Japanese Teiscos. Teisco guitars from most of the ’50s were clearly inspired by Gibson; presumably this was true from the very beginning. We’d welcome any information on these early Teisco guitars and amps, including photos and photocopies of catalogs or ads, from our Japanese readers, if they can provide them.
After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
I was a guitarist for almost 18 years now I am a session musician. For me choosing the best string gauge is one of the most important things a guitarist should know. During those early years our band tends to play on Heavy metal music and if you are using those lighter string gauge its ineffective for those kind of genres. So at that point I have been using .011 or .013 string gauges to gain fat tones and huge sustain. But however as years goes by we tend to play lighter music so I am using .09 and .010 string gauges. For me using those heavier strings for a long time will cause damage in your wrist, after acquiring a carpal tunnel syndrome I have used lighter strings in my guitar.
An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is fed to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.
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