While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally.
Starting to learn on an electric guitar can be much easier as compared to an acoustic guitar. Electric guitars chords are easier to hold down as the width of the neck is shorter. The strings on the electric guitars are softer than those of acoustic guitars, which is easier on your fingertips if you're just starting out. They can be slightly more expensive than acoustic guitars, especially because other gear is needed to support your playing (i.e. amps, cables, and so on). It's all a matter of personal preference, but here are some of our top choices.
Due to the great sensitivity of some advanced vibrato systems like the Kahler, the Steinberger and the Floyd Rose, a light touch is required. Simply placing one’s hand on the bridge can cause notes to drift in and out of tune. So players — especially the heavy handed— would be wise to try a variety of vibrato-equipped guitars out before making an instrument purchase or modifying a valued six-string friend.
Minor chords arise as the tonic notes of minor keys that share the same key signature with major keys. From the major key's I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio progression, the "secondary" (minor) triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key's corresponding chord progression as i-iv-v (or i-iv-V or i-iv-V7): For example, from C's vi-ii-iii progression Am-Dm-Em, the chord Em is often played as E or E7 in a minor chord progression.[24] Among basic chords, the minor chords (D,E,A) are the tonic chords of the relative minors of the three major-keys (F,G,C):

The use of overdrive distortion as a musical effect probably originated with electric guitar amplifiers, where the less pleasant upper harmonics created by overdriving the amp are filtered out by the limited frequency response of the speaker. If you use a distortion plug-in without following it up with low-pass filtering (or a speaker simulator) in this way, you may hear a lot of raspy high-end that isn't musically useful. This is why electric guitar DI'd via a fuzz box or distortion pedal sounds thin and buzzy unless further processed to remove these high frequencies.
There are a huge number of different style tone controls in musical equipment; this hardly scratches the surface. If you’re interested in what your tone controls do to your sound, agood place to look is at Duncan’s Amp Pages, where there is a tone stack calculator that shows frequency graphs of several different types of tone controls. Check out http://www.duncanamps.com/tsc/ for more info.
Phase Shifter pedals found their way into the guitar community in the 70’s with pedals like the MXR Phase 90, Mutron Phase Shifter, EH Small Stone, Foxx and others. The sweeping sound it produces is unmistakable and a legendary trademark of many guitarists sound. The MXR Phase 90 can be heard all over Van Halen 1 and II. Brian May used the Foxx phase on “Sheer Heart Attack,” The Eagles “Life In The Fast Lane”, and Led Zeppelin’s “The Rover” to name but a few.

Frets on finished fingerboards may be tough to measure accurately when the finish has appreciable thickness (think Rickenbackers, 70s Fenders) as these manufacturers spray the finish over the fretted neck.  I have measured a finish chip from a 70s Fender maple neck refret that was .010” thick – lowering the fret height by .010” (25% in the case of the stock medium wire at the time) from just finish alone.  I recently refretted a 2008 Fender Eric Johnson Strat where the fret height prior to any work was .040”, yet the crown of the fret removed from the fingerboard was .045”.  I personally do not like this feel and so often I will suggest refretting over a finished fingerboard when working with them rather than under the finish.
Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
Taylor's rise to fame has been relatively quick, thanks to their combination of impressive build quality and tone. Their diverse list of celebrity endorsers also helped, which include artists from different musical styles like Tony Iommi, Jason Mraz and Taylor Swift. Founded in 1974, the company has grown to be a major competitor in the acoustic guitar market, challenging older and well established brands in many price points. The Taylor 110ce is one of their more popular models, a mid-priced acoustic with solid spruce top that makes for a great entry point for intermediate players who want a "branded" workhorse acoustic.
By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."
I don’t mean to be unfair to the effect (and theoretically, this should be an article devoid of opinion). Flanging is impressive stuff. It’s just that, used heavily—where it best shows off its massive harmonics-plinking capabilities—it can become too imposing a sound for a guitarist to easily play with, which relinquishes it to the realm of background effects and early-’80s electro-pop. Still, plug in and send your brain to space and back.

Just knowing three chords will enable you to play all of these, albeit sometimes in a key that doesn't suit the song too well. As Rockin Cowboy illustrates, chords come in 'families', so if you understand that, songs become far more predictable. Sometimes I play with others, and when they try to explain that this new song 'has G, C and D in it', all I need to know is the key - in this case, G. The other two chords are virtually inevitable, but that fact seems to have escaped them!


Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.


I own one of these that I found in the trash on the side of the road - I have to say it has a good bit of wear and looks like it might fall apart any second in blue with black and chrome hardware - you couldn't pay me to get rid of this thing. I love the way it sounds and plays - its the benchmark for me for all my other acoustics - I dig the sound of this beast. Been a total metal monster for an acoustic \m/>.<\m/

Amazing unit! I loved using my POD XT Live for years and wanted to upgrade. This unit totally exceeded my expectations. Sounds amazing and it's incredibly flexible for routing processing and effects chains. They built the hardware better and it's got a better set of pedal buttons too. Absolutely recommend! (Plus, they announced at NAMM that there will be more model packs, so that's great too!)
In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.
As opposed to the modeling amps and amp profilers already on the market, the Power Head doesn’t just offer a number of pre-set amp settings that would allow you to imitate the styles of famous guitarists (among many other things), but it can also copy the settings of other amps it is connected to, or let you load your own so that any particular style you’ve stumbled upon during a recording session can be re-rendered with crystal-clear accuracy when performing live.
{ "thumbImageID": "G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/H99532000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Takamine G Series GD30CE-12 Dreadnought 12-String Acoustic-Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000034308", "price": "499.99", "regularPrice": "499.99", "msrpPrice": "769.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Takamine/G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black-1500000034308.gc", "skuImageId": "G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/H99532000002000", "brandName": "Takamine", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Black/H99532000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51372692952068", "price": "499.99", "regularPrice": "499.99", "msrpPrice": "769.99", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Takamine/G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural-1372692952068.gc", "skuImageId": "G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural/H99532000001000", "brandName": "Takamine", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/G-Series-GD30CE-12-Dreadnought-12-String-Acoustic-Electric-Guitar-Natural/H99532000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Perry has also endorsed an affordable replica version of the Boneyard guitar made by Epiphone that carries the same USA made Burstbucker pickups as the Gibson model. It is a customized Gibson B.B. King “Lucille” guitar; however, instead of the black finish and “Lucille” signature on the headstock, Perry’s guitar features a white finish, a “Billie Perry” signature on headstock and an image of Billie Perry on the front of the guitar.
Tone woods only effect acoustic or hollowbodys. The more dense wood harder tighter grained woods along with steep pitched saddle to stop string angle increases sustain.research labs experimented with marble body's and had tremendous sustain.also effecting sustain is type of neck.ie. bolt on set or thru. A bolt on May have equal sustain to a set if the thickness of body at bolt joint is made thicker but thru are best all have give and takes. Thru are less adjustable and limit repairs. Bolt on offer more adjustment. Set necks can be replaced or reset but cost more to do so. Thick heavy gibson let Pauls are known for the sustain.but endurance limited by heavy weight. It's all matter of choice. Buy usa or if not available japan. Stay away from Chinese or Korean they are bottom feeders
Taylor is other remarkable guitar brand which manufactures good looking guitar with easy instruction to play. And people can easily but it medium price budget. Just try out this brand and test once and you will get to know its specifications well. This has been placed on the eight positions due to its some unique characteristics including clear sound.
Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.

{"pageName":"[gc] pdp: epiphone 1967 ft9 el dorado acoustic guitar","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","events":"event3,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","prop5":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps","prop6":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps: guitar straps","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars: acoustic guitars: 6 string acoustic guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks","products":";113478791;;;;evar65=Vintage-Guitars-Epiphone","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","channel":"[gc] shop","prop7":"[gc] product detail page"}
As with so very many elements in the great world of guitar, however, once the novelty wore off and we were less awestruck by the new technology—and, in many cases, came to realize that we had little use for 2 seconds, or even 500 milliseconds of delay time—many of us came to miss the warm, pliable sound of the analog pedals. Today, as with all such things, the jury is still out; plenty of great players use each type of pedal, and the music you make with the technology remains more important than the type of technology you choose to use to make music. Used in isolation, at the same delay settings, each would probably sound just a little different to a guitarist with good ears. At the back end of a pedalboard with eight or ten other effects on it and three or four running at a time, the differences are likely to be negligible—but different players have different preferences, depending on what makes them feel good about their tone.
The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.
Hello. I am trying to find out more about my Hohner electric guitar. I've been trying to research it online but cannot find ANY information or reference to this particular model. Some people have told me that it may have been a prototype sample that never went into production. The only reference number I can find on the guitar is a label that says Sample by Nanyo CG300G and Made in Japan. I bought this guitar around 1980-1982 when I was 13-15 years old and it is still in mint condition. I would really love to know more about it's origin.
70s Morris D-28 Gorgeous Rosewood body Dreadnaught Acoustic Japanes Vintage BOOMER with Martin Set Up Just in folks get the jump on this being processed now- pictured etc measured and pictured We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle se as well as upgraded bridge Pins to solid Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from woods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic Dreadnought style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. More info soon .
@Christos – As mentioned in the article above, wherever they sound good to you is the best place to put them! However, traditionally people tend to put filter pedals near the beginning of the chain (like wah pedals), and volume pedals as well. An EQ can go first if you just want to EQ your guitar signal before running into your effects, or last if you want the EQ applied to your entire signal chain, or somewhere in between. It really depends on what you personally are going for.
I've been playing guitar for several years now so I have played a wide variety of instruments. Of course bigger companies such as Martin or Taylor are going to be higher up in the ratings because they produce very expensive guitars and their name has been widely spread. My first ever Yamaha six string, which after three years is still my favorite guitar, is amazing. Its deep and rich tones makes it a blast to play. I can find myself playing any genre for hours because of how reliable and durable it is. They are very well priced for there quality and I would label Yamaha as being the working mans guitar.
The amplifier you choose to use will have a huge impact on the sound. Valve amps are still king for most players, but they can often be impractical in home recording scenarios. Though we’d all love to mic up a cranked Marshall Plexi every time a classic-rock sound is required, these days software and hardware modelling is so good that the results are almost indistinguishable from the ‘real thing’ in a finished mix. Though pricey, the Kemper Profiling Amp and Fractal Audio Axe-Fx produce seriously realistic results, while almost as impressive are software solutions such as IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube and Guitar Rig from Native Instruments. If you are recording on a Mac or iPad using GarageBand, don’t discount the built-in amp and pedal simulations either.
If you have any comments about what you see in this web site,  we would love to hear from you.  Our E-Mail address is below.  Of course we are particularly anxious to talk to you about our repair services or our handcrafted guitars.  But  --  don't let that limit you.  We would love to hear your ideas about any guitar related topic.  (One such e-mail led to the harp guitar project)   We WILL respond, generally quite soon.    If you have a question that you would like to see addressed in our Q& A page, let us know.  Our E-Mail Address is: hoffmanguitars@qwestoffice.net
Danelectro's new '59XT guitar was an exciting announcement at NAMM 2018, and we're stoked to have a chance to test out this sharp-looking axe. Control-wise, the guitar keeps it simple, with a three-way pickup selector switch stacked above tone and volume control knobs, but it ups the game with a Wilkinson tremolo and a lipstick pickup. Watch along as Andy tests out the Dano's sound, and look below for more information about how to get one of your very own.

The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.
The Jeff Beck Oxblood is available in limited numbers. The first 50 of these historic guitars were aged at Gibson Custom to look like Beck’s original, then signed, numbered and played by Beck himself. The next 100 guitars were prepared with Gibson Custom’s V.O.S. finish, bringing the total run to 150 instruments. Each one also comes with a standard Gibson Custom case.
A more successful early electric was the Ro-Pat-In "Frying Pan" guitar. This was played lap-steel style, and was the earliest I know of that uses something close to the magnetic pickups as they exist in modern guitars. This was conceptualized by George Beauchamp in 1931... he played Hawaiian style, thus the lap steel design. He met Adolph Rickenbacker and together the two worked out the details of the pickup system, and put this into production in 1932... the company name was eventually changed to "Rickenbacher".
Nickel finish Frequensator style split trapeze tailpiece. This split fork design originated on archtop models from the 40's. The difference in fork length alters string tension behind the bridge to add depth to the bottom strings and brilliance to the top strings. Width of plate with mounting screws = 2 17/32 in. (64.3mm). Length of mounting bracket side with mounting holes = 1 39/64 in. (41mm) from end to bend Length of mounting bracket from bend to trapeze hook tops = 1 13/64 in. 30.5mm.) Length of short trapeze to top of string retainer bar (not including nut heights) = 2 1/2 in. (63.35mm). Short bracket width = 1 3/64 in. (26.65mm). String Bracket width = 1 3/16 in. (30.35mm). Length of long Trapeze section including string bracket = 6 in. (152mm). Widths of each trapeze and string bracket are equal.
It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.
Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.
The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
This is because sound in an acoustic is dependent upon the bridge, saddle, and soundboard’s (top) ability to transfer string vibration through the sound hole of the body. The top (soundboard), back, and sides makes the body of the guitar where the sound hole is designed and cut. Knowing this, you’ll not only need wood that’s strong, but wood that can offer unique acoustic properties that emphasize its ability to project differing sounds at various frequencies. Of course, your choice of strings also lends to the harmonic ranges of a guitar.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst
You’ll need to get yourself setup with an account on some of the web stores selling components such as effects pedal specialty stores listed above, and some general component stores such as Mouser and Digikey. AMZ provides a list of the components required for each project. Make sure you check carefully the component requirements such as type of capacitors. Many components may have suitable electrical values but different physical layouts, so use the datasheets for your chosen component. Measure the spaces and holes on your PCB to make sure the components will fit. Remember that you’ll also need an enclosure in which to install the finished circuit and don’t forget things such as knobs, battery holders etc.

The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.

The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.
The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]

Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.


A boost pedal is one of the most useful pedals one can have. Simply put, it boosts the signal that goes into it. It can perk up a low output guitar, or bring out more character or a different quality to your amp. This is especially useful for solos where overdrive or distortion would overwhelm the tone you've got. Boost adds more “you” to the sound. Look out for what tone the boost adds, like treble or mids before purchasing. Some boosts claim to be transparent, maintaining the same EQ of your original tone, while others spike a certain part of your EQ intentionally.


Also still in the line in ’66 were our old friends, the MJ series. These were essentially unchanged except for a new striped metal guard, the new hooked headstock, and a new chrome-covered oval pickup with an oval indentation stamped in the center and six flat, round poles. Available were the MJ-3L (Teisco Del Rey ET-300), MJ-2L (promoted in Japan, but not the U.S.) and MJ-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-120). The MJ-1 had a new on/off rocker switch and a second rocker for solo/rhythm. Promoted in Japan, but not the U.S., was the little BS-101 bass, pretty much unchanged from before.
Most reverb pedals fall into the ambient effect category, similar to delay and echo in the way it manipulates your signal. It's likened to the delay effect because it's technically a timing effect which, in the world of signal processing, can be described as "sound after sound." In other words, the original sound is produced and another sound follows.

The neck and fretboard (2.1) extend from the body. At the neck joint (2.4), the neck is either glued or bolted to the body. The body (3) is typically made of wood with a hard, polymerized finish. Strings vibrating in the magnetic field of the pickups (3.1, 3.2) produce an electric current in the pickup winding that passes through the tone and volume controls (3.8) to the output jack. Some guitars have piezo pickups, in addition to or instead of magnetic pickups.

Chorus is useful for 'softening' rhythm guitar or synth pad sounds, but it does tend to push sounds further back into the mix, so it should be used with care. Adding more brightness to the sound can help compensate for this effect. Chorus also works well on fretless bass, but tends to sound quite unnatural on vocals. Phasing can be used in a similar way to chorus but, whereas chorus creates the impression of two slightly detuned instruments playing the same part, phasing sounds more like a single sound source being filtered, where the frequencies being 'notched out' vary as the LFO sweeps through its cycle.
Hi Timothy, sorry it took a while for me to respond. Yes, from your first statement it sounds like you’ve correctly understood the operation of ‘normal’ guitar pickup selector switches (i.e. standard 3 and 5 position), the wiper contacts overlap as they move across each other. Unfortunately I’ve never seen anything that matches your 4 pick-up idea, if I were you I’d start looking at the 5-position mega switches which have lots of possibilities but can get pretty complicated. Good luck!
The pitch shifter effect can also be used to detune or “capo” a guitar without the need to actually retune the instrument.  These detuning type pedals have become prominent in the age of dropped tunings and seven string guitars.  The Digitech Whammy Pedal is the most widely known pitch shifter for guitarists and has been used by players like Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine fame.

I have been playing for two years. I use to play (and still have) a fender squier. Today I bought a Lyle on impuls. I wasn't planning on buying one, i just walked in and it looked so beautiful. I have a feeling it is about 10 years old or so, but the sales man didn't know much other than it was a Lyle and it had new tunning pegs on it. I got it for 150$ and i would REALLY love to know more about it. Thanks.
In the 1980s, digital rackmount units began replacing stompboxes as the effects format of choice. Often musicians would record "dry", unaltered tracks in the studio and effects would be added in post-production. The success of Nirvana's 1991 album Nevermind helped to re-ignite interest in stompboxes. Some grunge guitarists would chain several fuzz pedals together and plug them into a tube amplifier.[47] Throughout the 1990s, musicians committed to a "lo-fi" aesthetic such as J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., Stephen Malkmus of Pavement and Robert Pollard of Guided by Voices continued to use analog effects pedals.[48]
X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.

So, I was looking for a single-ended amp. Say what you will about class A/B amps (and, to be fair, most of the great recorded tones in rock history are class A/B push-pull amps), some of them don’t really get singing until they’re too loud for the bedroom or studio. Sometimes you just need to hear that cranked tone without getting the knock from the neighbors. To quickly recap:
Zappa – would have liked to hear him play with Hendrix – as a compliment not competition. Zappa, a classically trained musician, playing in a rock and roll world,had such depth of experience from without – as much as Hendrix had from within – too bad the intensity killed him; Zappa tamed it and had fun with it. Hendrix was driven by it. Great guitarist? Who cares! My picks are artists, something a machine, human or otherwise can not approach let alone touch, and that is what it is all about, touching the soul through music. One trick ponies are a dime a dozen – some of them are at the right place at the right time and their ego does the rest. Who will be remembered a hundred years from now – it will not be the "best".

Ribbon mics exhibit a figure-of-eight pickup pattern. One useful close-mike application for achieving heavy rock sounds involves a ribbon mic (or large-diaphragm condenser set to a figure-of-eight pattern) aimed toward the center of the speaker, with a cardioid dynamic mic angled next to it at roughly 90°, aimed off-center, with the capsules almost touching. Record the mics on separate tracks, and with proper balancing the sound should be powerful and frequency-rich.
If you use amplifier overdrive, want to use delay and reverb but still crave simplicity—I’d suggest designing a “hybrid” pedalboard. Just run your gain and filter effects in front of the amp, and use a pedal like the TC Electronic Nova System in your amp effects loop for time-based effects. This will require more cabling between your pedalboard and amp, but will sound much better than running your delay and reverb effects into a distorted amp. Pedals like the Nova System or the Eventide units boast specs rivaling studio quality rack gear.
The open strings of a guitar can be tuned to microtonal intervals, however microtonal scales cannot easily be played on a conventional guitar because the frets only allow for a chromatic scale of twelve equally spaced pitches, each a semitone apart. (Certain microtonal scales, particularly quarter tones, can be played on a standard guitar solely by adjusting tunings, but the distance between notes on the scale makes it somewhat impractical.) It is possible to play microtonal scales on a fretless guitar, to convert a fretted guitar into a fretless, or to make a custom neck with a specific microtonal fret spacing.
At £499, the MBC-1 is designed to hit a completely different price point to the Muse genius's full-fat Manson models, and although still designed by both Matt and Hugh, it's made in Indonesia by guitar-making giant Cort. Price aside, a quick strum lets you know this is a Manson through and through: it rings like a bell, the sort of acoustic response you'd expect from a quality guitar, but not always at this price. In style, the MBC-1 is a pretty accurate repro of the instruments used by Matt. That big upper shoulder won't be to everyone's taste, but in playing position, it's not only lightweight (3.52kg) but with forearm and ribcage contours, it fits like a glove. And the bolt-on maple neck feels superb, too, with a deep C profile and sloping shoulders that tell your hand it's thinner in depth than it actually is. Unusual at this price, too, is the compound radius fingerboard, which flattens out as you move up the neck; with tidy jumbo - but not over-tall - frets, it's a fast, fluid player, as well, which makes it one of the best electric guitars for hard-rock players. Pickup-wise, we have a fairly hot Alnico-powered humbucker at the bridge and a single coil at the neck. Along with a master volume, tone and three-way pickup selector, the upper shoulder also holds a kill button for stutter effects.
There is enough acoustic guitars in the world to rock it to sleep, with a peaceful feeling of spanish legends to it. On the other hand there are enough electric guitars in the world to guarantee that it will never go to sleep, because there is always an electric guitar playing somewhere in the world. Which is exciting and which also causes the prices for electric guitar amps to be lower than for the amps of acoustic guitars, while retaining the same level of quality. The Roland Micro Cube Guitar Amplifier is a tiny little angel in the form of metal and plastic combined. It is small enough to be easy to carry around and store wherever, but it is also powerful enough to attract the attention of anyone passing you in the street, sitting in the bar, or otherwise hanging out in your vicinity. With a punkish style and a punk attitude, it is the perfect little helper for any musician, beginner or otherwise.
Indeed, the Adamas was not the only technological exploration conducted by Ovation. In 1973, as the threat of copying loomed, Ovation decided to manufacture its own inexpensive “copies.” Launching a full-out research effort Ovation came up with new bowl materials, a new way to make tops, and a new neck construction based on more technology used on the helicopter side.

As discussed, Delay pedals add so much more weight to your sound and gives your guitar a doubling effect, which is really useful to make it sound like there’s two guitars on stage. They’re also great for creating psychedelic sounds and experimenting with riffs. Again, you don’t have to dial in big delay effects and can use the pedal subtly to add resonance.
Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
×