SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
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Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.

For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.
The Jasmine S35 acoustic guitar has its share of criticisms, most notably its heavier strings and bargain basement appearance, but what keeps it popular with customers is the starter kit. Other entry-level acoustic guitars rarely include the accessories that the Jasmine S35 offers. It is also valued as a good back-up guitar for advanced players who want a dependable spare on hand during performances.

Get ready to rock! This kid's electric guitar set has everything little rockstars need to jam out in style and foster a growing passion for music. Whether a child is just learning the basics or has mastered every chord, this guitar is the perfect practice tool to lift them to the next level. Hook it up to the included 5-watt amplifier and let your kid experience music like never before!


Unfortunately, National’s line of instruments was not well diversified and, as demand for the expensive and hard-to-manufacture tri-cone guitars began to slip, the company realized that it would need to produce instruments with a lower production cost if it was going to succeed against rival manufacturers. Dissatisfaction with what John Dopyera felt was mismanagement led him to resign from National in January 1929, and he subsequently formed the Dobro Manufacturing Corporation, later called Dobro Corporation, Ltd, and began to manufacture his own line of resonator-equipped instruments (dobros). Patent infringement disagreements between National and Dobro led to a lawsuit in 1929 with Dobro suing National for $2,000,000 in damages. Problems within National’s management as well as pressure from the deepening Great Depression led to a production slowdown at National, and this ultimately resulted in part of the company’s fractured management structure organizing support for George Beauchamp’s newest project: the development of a fully electric guitar.[5]

hey guys im just curious as i just got back from a music store that had to basses from two different brands (local luthiers) and they were virtually the same (5 string, j pickups, Aggie 3 band mahogany body, set neck) the only difference was one had a alder tone block, i personally couldn't hear a difference but the owner of said shop said tone wise it makes a huge difference, any thoughts?
It’s as simple as it gets: On/Off, Tone and a “clean-to-drive” Volume switch that becomes dirtier at higher volumes. Anything else you will need stomp-boxes, which this amp pairs well with thanks to its no-frills concept. Just do yourself the favour and invest in high-end pedals – otherwise you will ruin the amp’s exquisite tone with unsuitable digital effects.
Regardless of the invention debate, it is clear that former radio repairman Leo Fender was the first to mass-produce and sell a successful solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar. His company’s simply constructed 1950 Fender Broadcaster (renamed Telecaster as the result of a trademark dispute), with its flat body and a neck bolted onto it, was initially derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Gibson’s president Ted McCarty dismissed it as a “plank guitar.” Yet everything about its patented, practical design was optimal for mass-producing an inexpensive solid-body guitar, earning Fender the moniker “the Henry Ford of the electric guitar.”
Pedals. I have a basic rule when it comes to overdrives, distortions, and fuzzes: When I engage them, I want the volume to either stay the same or increase a bit, so I’m “pushing” the amp with the pedal. Because drives compress the sound, they can tend to seem louder overall when you turn them on, but actually they might be reducing the overall peak level. I don’t want to diminish the natural output level coming out of my guitar, and I don’t want my guitar tone to vanish in the mix when I hit a pedal. As I mentioned earlier, I often run the tone control quite low on drive pedals, which I feel keeps them sounding warm and natural.

In 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom guitar, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which was used by Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones. Vox guitars also experimented with onboard effects and electronics. The Teardrop won a prize for its design. In the mid 1960s, as the sound of electric 12 string guitar became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII and Mark XII electric 12 string guitars. Vox produced many more traditional 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy. It may be noted that the Phantom guitar shape was quite similar to that of first fretted electric bass guitar, the Audiovox "Electric Bass Fiddle" of 1934.


The electric guitar was at the heart of popular music for the new generation. Fender released the Telecaster – the first mass produced solid body electric which made it possible for the average Joe to buy a guitar and start a band to express themselves.  With amplifiers and solid body electrics the volume could be cranked and every bit of emotion displayed through the music.
Remember that when buying a guitar, quality usually comes with price tag to match. Consider paying a little more for the right guitar. Often, you can save money in the long run by purchasing a better guitar up front, skipping over the incremental upgrades along the way. A seasoned guitar player will often have a very good idea of what they like. With experience comes a desire to invest in quality. Musician’s Friend offers a stunning selection of Private Reserve Guitars. When gift shopping for a high-end guitar, it’s usually wise to forego the element of surprise and find out exactly what your giftee wants.
I've got a vox white shadow too though its a crimson/red colour with 2 chrome plated humbuckers, it has one volume pot, two tone pots, 1 toggle switch aswell as 2 further switches to change between pick-ups. It has stamped on the back neck plate "made in japan" I can't seem to locate the serial number though. Would love to know more about this guitar.

Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.
If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
The actual key that this song was written in is Bb (B flat) and can be a bit difficult for beginners; I prefer using a capo for this song and playing it in the Key of C. Using the capo to play this song doesn’t change how the song sounds, but it makes playing the song a lot easier. Using your capo on the third fret, you chord progression will look like C – G – Am (A minor) – F.
The 50-watt version is driven by seven 12AX7 preamp tubes with two 6L6s powering the amp, which is surprisingly huge in output – capable of filling an auditorium no problem (depending on your cab, of course). Other features that make this such a popular choice among gigging guitarists include three customizable channels and a four-button footswitch.
Buying an electric guitar is a very personal process, with many things to consider before you make your final choice. It’s not just a case of picking something with a nice color – you are usually parting with a substantial chunk of hard-earned cash, ranging anywhere from $100 to $2000 – or more – for some guitars, and therefore patience is required to find something that really suits you.
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
The following effects are a step up from your basic overdrive, distortion and fuzz, with more specialized sounds. In this category, you’ll find pedals that include effects such as time delays or frequency modifications – things that go beyond changing the shape of a sound by also changing the pitch, rhythm or both. Others are simpler, but still offer enough tone-altering potential to set them apart from the basic pedals.
When you have a setup that you like, you can easily save it as a track preset — or, better still, create multiple track presets for different types of sounds. Cubase can even make a fine host for live performance, should you decide to trade your rack of effects for a svelte laptop that patches directly into the PA system, as you can switch instantly between racks. (I'll cover how to do this at the end of the article.)
Before buying any guitar you have to fix a budget range, so that later on you do not end up blowing off more money than you actually wanted to. Yes, it is true that buying a guitar can be expensive, but you do not have to burn a hole in your pocket in order to buy one. Just have a price range fixed and then search for the best ones accordingly. You may not find the good ones right at the beginning, but eventually you will definitely find the perfect one that will even last long.
The DI approach most likely to capture the spirit of the original sound is to take a DI feed from the speaker output of a conventional guitar amplifier and feed this into the type of speaker simulator that also includes a dummy load to keep the amplifier happy (valve amplifiers can be damaged by running them into an open circuit). Emulators with a built-in load are generally very much larger than the regular DI box-size emulator-only products. Some of the emulator-only devices can be run from a speaker output, but you still need to plug in either a separate dummy load (usually an 8Ω resistor rated at over 100 Watts on a heat sink) or the original speaker to protect the amplifier from possible damage. Apart from the dummy load, which is passive, the circuitry may either be passive or active.
A guitar tuner pedal is an absolute must have if you’re serious about guitar as it provides accurate tuning instantly and can even allow you to tune your guitar to alternative tunings such as Drop D, open tunings and more. Check out our top 12 Best Guitar Tuners blog for more info on guitar tuners. The absolute industry standard is the BOSS TU-3 tuner pedal - a must have.

The C7’s back, fretboard and bridge are all rosewood, which makes for a stunning color contrast with the spruce. The strings are Savarez Cristal Corum, in high tension (500CJ), but according to one professional guitarist, the action is very easy no matter the tension, so a beginner should have no problems starting out on this model. Even someone who’s played a good while but simply wants something they can “jam” on whilst out on a recreational road trip, or play on a small-gig basis, will love the Cordoba C7 spruce-top.
Now we’ve got the basics down, let’s have a look at some simple modifiers to the circuit. This article first shows you how to add a “killswitch” to the guitar, then uses the lessons learned from that process to change that killswitch to a volume control instead. Finally, we’ll find out how capacitors are used in guitar circuits and install our first tone control.

While modified four-stage phasers like the Uni-Vibe and other effects before it had sought to evoke a choral-like sound, the chorus pedal as we know it didn’t arrive until affordable short-delay chips became widely available in the late 1970s. This in itself implies that chorus is a type of delay, and indeed it is, but the sonic results of the ways in which these short delays are transformed lands the effect firmly in the modulation camp, so it’s easiest to consider it as such (the function of these delay chips will be explained in more detail in the Echo & Delay section down the road). IC-based chorus effects work in a manner very similar to flangers, detailed above. The main difference, put simply, is that the short delays used to create harmonically spaced notches and peaks in the frequency spectrum are manipulated to modulate more tightly above and below specific frequency ranges, rather than shifted to swoosh broadly up and down the entire spectrum. The result, and intention, is a sound like a group of singers or similar instruments, where some voices/strings inevitably waver slightly from those beside them, producing a quivering clash of harmonics that evokes space and dimension when used subtly. The effect is possibly best heard—as pure effect, at least—in stereo, and the nature of the beast lends itself readily to stereo outputs. The broad soundstage and Doppler-like movement a good stereo chorus can spread out before you between a pair of spaced amps or L-R headphones make it one of the most spacious, three-dimensional effects available, short of long delays or cavernous reverb settings.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.
My purpose for the visits were neither to buy, nor to have repaired, an instrument. It was to have the proprietor take a look at the bass that I had build. To give me his opinion and estimation on how I did. He walked through the process I'd used, for defretting, paint stripping, and then staining and poly sealing. Demonstrated how to adjust the truss rod, and complimented me on the work I'd done.

Packing almost the entire tonal essence of 80's arena rock n' roll into one bar-shaped unit, with a glassy and transparent, BBD-style chorus, a crushing hot rod Marshall-stack crunch distortion, a natural-sounding delay, and a spacious reverb. Turn on every module on the bar, with a little tweaking, you've got yourself THE EPIC lead tone, which is dynamic, responsive to your hands, with long sustain, and cuts through the mix like a knife through butter. A built-in cab simulator for getting a real guitar cabinet sound straight from the PA system; Max delay time: 500ms It is the ultimate tool for road touring gigs. Aluminum-alloy, metal casing, stable and strong; compact size. Grab it! Plug it! Tweak it! Rock it! LED indicator shows the working state; Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center negative,.
Chosen by artists over 3 decades for use on stage and in studio, the Zager 80 Series is the “go to” guitar for the touring musician or veteran player wanting a professional grade lifetime instrument. Consistently rated in the top 5% of acoustics in national and international publications competing with guitars 2 and 3 times its price, yet costs 50% less since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. If you enjoy the deep rich bass that’s common in rosewood guitars, a solid cedar top takes it to the next level providing a very mellow, sweet response.  Combined with legendary Zager playability and you have a guitar that will go head to head with any acoustic on the market today…regardless of price.
The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
When you start to look for that great beginner's electric guitar, focus on an instrument with good-quality wood and reasonable workmanship. That's the most commonly accepted method of choosing a low-cost electric guitar for a beginner. Guitar manufacturers tend to cut corners with cheaper guitars by using, for instance, cheaper pickups and hardware. But for the guitarist who gets more serious about playing, these are all upgradeable parts that can be swapped out for higher-quality parts. So begin with a good-quality wooden frame and upgrade as time and money allow.
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Although early Les Paul imitations in the 1960s and 1970s, such as those made by Höfner, Hagström, Harmony Company and Greco Guitars differed from Gibson’s design, with different electronics, and even bolt-on necks, in the late 1970s some Japanese companies came very close to perfecting copies of the original 1958–60 Standards. These guitars later became known as “lawsuit” guitars. The lawsuit was brought by the Norlin Corporation, the parent company of Gibson guitars, in 1977, and was based on an Ibanez headstock design that had been discontinued by 1976. Ibanez settled out of court, and by 1978 had begun making guitars from their own designs.[citation needed]
I know of two amp-and-effects modeling apps for the iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad, both of which are great and allow you to get realistic amp tones through your headphones. AmpKit and Amplitube both do a great job of simulating all the standard amp models and pedals, and they aren't very expensive. I use and prefer AmpKit myself, and between the app and the guitar-to-iPhone interface, I spent a total of $50.
Played by Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend—among countless other electric guitar innovators—the 1959 Super Lead helped shape rock and roll as we know it. Introduced in 1965 (1959 has nothing to do with its year of release), the amplifier included four inputs, two channels, 100 watts of searing power and a Plexiglas faceplate (hence “Plexi”). Matched with 4x12 cabinets, the 1959 Super Lead helped to popularize the “Marshall stack.” The amplifier can be famously seen being played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock. It’s been highly sought after ever since.
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
By and large, time-based effects split the guitar output into two identical signals and momentarily hold one back while allowing the other to play in real time. The two signals are mixed back into one at the output. Usually you can control the length of the delay and the amount of the signal that is affected versus the part that stays "dry" (unaffected). This latter control—found on most effects—is usually called the level control.
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
Multi-effects pedals and processors come in three basic formats: floor-based units equipped with foot-operated pedals and switches, tabletop units with knobs and switches, and rack-mounted units. Most tabletop and rack-mount units offer foot control options in addition to the knobs, switches, and menus accessible from their control panels. Pedals and footswitches are often user-assignable so that you can instantly engage various effects settings and other presets with a single toe tap.

Frets are the metal strips (usually nickel alloy or stainless steel) embedded along the fingerboard and placed at points that divide the length of string mathematically. The strings' vibrating length is determined when the strings are pressed down behind the frets. Each fret produces a different pitch and each pitch spaced a half-step apart on the 12 tone scale. The ratio of the widths of two consecutive frets is the twelfth root of two ( {\displaystyle {\sqrt[{12}]{2}}} ), whose numeric value is about 1.059463. The twelfth fret divides the string in two exact halves and the 24th fret (if present) divides the string in half yet again. Every twelve frets represents one octave. This arrangement of frets results in equal tempered tuning.

We've watched Dan Erlewine repair this 1930s Kay over the previous 3 Trade Secrets. It's time to finish it up. Elliot John-Conry of EJC Guitars ages Dan's patch of new plastic binding so it blends in with the old binding around it. About the guitar in this video: This 1930s Kay Deluxe is a fixer-upper that Dan Erlewine repaired in order to sell. Now that it's in great shape again, maybe Dan'll keep it!
I have a friend with a cool little music store here in St. Louis. I pop in from time to time since he always has a great selection of vintage lap steels, as well as an ever-changing assortment of oddball pieces to check out. As I was on my way out the door after one of my most recent visits, I spotted an early 80s Harmony “Flying V,” and immediately stopped in my tracks.
One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."
Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.
In the 1970s and ’80s the sound of the electric guitar was stretched in heavy metal music. As one of its leading practitioners, Van Halen pushed his self-built “Frankenstein” (based on a Stratocaster but with a mish-mash of other guitar parts) to the limit, experimenting, for instance, with “dive-bombing,” which uses the tremolo arm to drive the guitar’s lowest note ever lower. Hendrix had done this but forced the guitar out of tune as a result. However, by the mid-1980s, inventor Floyd Rose had improved the tremolo system, allowing players like Van Halen to dive-bomb repeatedly. The guitar sound was now not only loud but also really raucous, flashy, and a bit dirty—just the way musicians, and their fans, wanted it.
I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
Love love love this guitar! I ordered it because it reminds me of my Dad's old Kay archtop that I initially learned to play on. The retro jazz style of this guitar is awesome. My musician friends love it and and like the sound of it although they haven't heard it plugged in yet. It took me a very short while to get used to the strings (made by the company for this guitar) and while they have a tinnier sound than what I'm used to for an acoustic guitar, they do deliver when it is plugged in. Overall it really seems to be more of an electric-style guitar. The neck is narrow and the body is small - something that I am so happy with! It is extremely playable. I may switch to bronze strings to get a warmer tone, but for now I want to give these strings a chance to sing. I also ordered a case from the company that fits this guitar, and for the price, it is awesome as well! Very light and the guitar fits perfectly and securely. At a recent gig, a complete stranger came up to me to look at and admire this guitar - it truly is a beautiful instrument. The woodgrain is rich and not as red as the pictures make it look. I feel like Stu Sutcliff - don't really need to know how to play - I can simply stand in the background and look cool ;-)
yeah, i used to play the vht straight up sometimes. that amp was tonal sweetness, and had a tank reverb. if i dime it, i can get away with playing alot of stuff on the ac4. but i like having a little chorus for certain things, and i do a couple of songs that i would like to have a rotary pedal for, and although i'm not big on reverb, i don't mind using a touch of delay in place of it. if i did have a wah, i'd use it as a tone knob. oh, and i want a harmonizer. specifically, the eventide pitchfactor.

Speaking of tiny little helpers that could fit anyone, let me introduce to another seemingly impossible amalgamation of great sound and great look. The Line 6 Micro Spider 6-Watt Battery Powered guitar amplifier has a whole lot of qualities that make it the favorite small amplifier of so many musicians who are constantly on the go or don’t have too much space. With its small form and light body it can be easily transported anywhere you go, while its battery negates the need to be constantly plugged into an outlet and hoping that you have some kind of source of energy. The best part of the amp is of course the sound of the guitar, which is quite outstanding for the price it is offered up at. One of the best options of small guitar amplifiers available for you that I want you to remember when you start attempting to make a decision on buying one. Great stuff to have, really.


If a player uses a separate preamplifier and power amplifier, she or he can buy a power amplifier intended for a sound reinforcement system or PA system or pick a power amplifier designed specifically for bass instruments. These preamps and power amps come in two formats: 19 inch rack-mountable units and units with their own wood or metal case. If a player uses a rackmountable preamp and power amp, these units and any effect units, such as an audio compressors, can be mounted in 19" rack mount road cases for safe transport. When a bass player selects a variety of different preamps, effects units and a power amp and puts them all in a rackmount case, this setup is colloquially called a "bass rig". Amp heads with their own wood or metal case may use many of the same appearance and transportation-oriented design features used on combo amps. For example, if a bass amp head is designed with a wooden case, it will typically have a vinyl, felt or sturdy fabric (or painted coating) to protect the wood case during transport; a carry handle; and corner protectors.
In about 1975, Ernie Briefel and Merson parted company with Unicord/Gulf + Western, becoming Music Technology Incorporated (MTI), on Long Island, taking the Giannini brand with it. Later, in the early ’80s, MTI would import Westone guitars made by the great Matsumoku company, which it would sell until St. Louis Music began its partnership with Matsumoku and, in 1984, transitioned its Electra brand to Electra-Westone and then ultimately Westone, which lasted until 1990, when SLM’s guitars all became Alvarez.

Semi-hollow, slim, and designed with a comfortable ‘C’ shape exterior, the D’Angelico EX-DC Standard is a high-price electric guitar with professional grade features. Creating a more natural tone that delivers an organic quality to its sound, the Standard guitar uses Kent Armstrong Vintage humbuckers for a focused sound free of excess reverberation. The Super-Rotomatic tuners maintain their tuning accuracy for a longer time, due in part to the turning radius within the design. Strings remain at a comfortable tension due to the unique Stairstep tailpiece, creating both a strong resonant sound and assured sturdiness. A semi-hollow body designed with maple on the top and back, other features include a 3-way toggle that provides two modes of volume as well as two separate tones. Meant for use throughout various genres of music, the EX-DC Standard is an electric guitar to please the masses.


What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.

Another exotic tonewood is making a name for itself in the guitar industry. It’s similar in appearance and sound performance as Mahogany. It has a distinctive punch for the mid-range tones, but it emphasizes the bright trebles that can be an asset in music when you achieve pitch-perfect intonation. The Martin Road Series DRS1 Guitar sports Sapele beauty perfectly!
Wow !...TOP 5...When inbought this game I had my diubts that it wouldnt be as good as everyone said it was; but was I wrong this game is literally one of the best games I have ever played I definetly recomend it to everyone....I researched this Grand Theft Auto V for Xbox One and watched the "trailers" on it and it was the best pixel graphics and audio sound that both were very realistic, and the recipient is a "car enthusiast" appreciation of cars, so I was sure he'd really enjoy this game, just as I'm sure that we have the best value benefit of a really great fun game, so I would highl recommend!
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
On guitars with tremolo bridges, the bridge must be stabilized before any adjustments are made. Regardless of the manufacturer, the correct position for any bridge, under string tension, is going to be parallel to and essentially flush with the top (or up to 1mm, or so, above the top). Ultimately, we want the bridge assembly to sit such that we have a range of adjustability over the bridge saddles, so that we can dictate the preferred string height over the fretboard.

But you should remember that it is still a great value and the best guitar for the money. For this price, I don’t think you will get a better guitar anywhere else. If you are an intermediate or expert level player, this one is not for you. Let’s check out some technical features of the guitar: it comes with bolt-on neck joint, 12”radius of the fingerboard and nickel hardware etc. 
The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.

I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.
As this effect is more pronounced with higher input signals, the harder "attack" of a note will be compressed more heavily than the lower-voltage "decay", making the latter seem louder and thereby improving sustain. Additionally, because the level of compression is affected by input volume, the player can control it via their playing intensity: playing harder results in more compression or "sag". In contrast, modern amplifiers often use high-quality, well-regulated power supplies.
The reality is, each of these approaches to adding effects to your tone has advantages and disadvantages. Are you a no-effects type of player, or a pedalboard kind of player? Maybe you like some pedals for your dirt, but would like your delay and reverb in the effects loop of your amp. Or maybe you would like to go the full on w/d/w route, for the ultimate in power and programmability! Let’s take a closer look at the options that are out there. 

At Kay, we knew this project was not just assembling parts and a Kay "Kel-von-a-tor" chevron headstock logo and calling it a Kay Vintage Reissue. The 1950's guitars of that time not only have a special look, but a special sound. To just make another mass-produced vintage looking guitar, as other companies have already done, was not enough. Only an electric guitar that could duplicate the '50s sound would be successful. To remake the products in the United States was a challenge, but it was more of a challenge to reproduce the instrument off-shore and still maintain the necessary strict quality control. The Vintage Reissue Line sat on the back burner for many years until all the components were able to come together. The Vintage Kay Reissue project came alive when Roger Fritz came into the picture.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
Thunders had the riffs to match the glam-trash group’s mascara. He took rock guitar and cooked it down to its essence, playing open chords and switchblade riffs that laid bare the amphetamine urgency behind the Dolls’ concise, catchy tunes. The Dolls had split up by the time punk rock got underway in New York and London, but their influence was profoundly felt on both shores.
Parallel coils: coil tap connection needs to be broken for this kind of wiring, so three lead pickups cannot be wired this way. The idea is to join start of each coil with finish of the other coil. One on those connections will be hot, the other ground. Parallel coils will sound more like a single coil sound, noticeably quieter and shallower than a series connection.
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.
Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.
That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.

1961 is the sweet spot for Fender Strats IMO: the best 3-tone sunburst and tone! My 1961 Strat has been called one of the best sounding vintage Strats by Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music, who has been working on vintage guitars since 1968. This Strat is the closest thing to that incredible Strat; this is a very rare opportunity for anyone looking for the classic vintage Strat tone without equal!


Some guitars incorporate a “blend” of both magnetic and piezo pickups, and others may have one of these options with an internal mic. All nylon string guitars with the option of pickups will always have piezo pickups and/or a built-in mic because there’s no way to sense vibrations from nylon – a non-magnetic material. But, many acoustic electric guitars have steel strings, so what options can you expect with these?
Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.
Then I remembered Kent Guitars. I thought it would be pretty cool to have a guitar with my last name on it. Although they didn't appear on the U.S. west coast very often, if at all, (I would remember them if they did), It turns out there is a whole crapload of them out there. Information is scattered around the internet in bits and pieces and nobody who was making them at the time is talking about it. So I have started gathering information, limiting myself to the 500,600,700, and 800 series models. The only ones I am interested in owning are the 700 and 800s. I have a 740, an 820, 823, 833, and 834. I may never get the chance to buy another.
FX or no FX? Again, it's almost a question of valve or solid state, here. Most valve amps don't come with any effects other than tremolo and reverb, at most. Solid State amps often come with a wide range of features such as digital FX and amp modelling. If you're an have lots of fx pedals, you don't really need a modelling unit, but if you're new to guitar playing, buying an amp with modeling FX might be a good way to get familiar with all those sounds.
We’ve all been there, and it’s actually pretty easy to fix once you know how. The reason we hit those walls in our playing or get bored with what we’re currently doing is that we start falling into set patterns with our playing (pentatonic scale over and over again, anyone?). Whatever we’re playing starts to feel stale and derivative because we’ve gone over it so many times, and it can end up being a pretty frustrating experience.
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
Editor’s Note: My previous top choice, the Yamaha APX500iii, is now replaced with a newer and better model, the Yamaha APX600. What make’s it better, you ask? Well, there were some complaints regarding the previous model for having a lack of bass response and a “bland” sound when unplugged. Yamaha addresses this issue by changing the guitar’s bracing pattern, thus improving it’s overall sound response, making the APX600 a good choice for an acoustic-electric guitar. I suggest you go check this bad boy out.
Whether you’re in the market for an acoustic or an electric guitar will likely impact which brand you may want to purchase from. While lines like Fender and Yamaha offer both acoustic and electric instruments, a guitarist who plays strictly one or the other may prefer to stick to a brand that specializes in that category. A classical guitarist who strictly plays acoustic might gravitate Taylor or Fender for their world class offerings, while a member from a rock band might seek out Epiphone or Gibson’s time tested tone. Most brands will offer instruments in either option, but it's best to know beforehand which ones cater to your needs.
• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
The implementation of musical chords on guitars depends on the tuning. Since standard tuning is most commonly used, expositions of guitar chords emphasize the implementation of musical chords on guitars with standard tuning. The implementation of chords using particular tunings is a defining part of the literature on guitar chords, which is omitted in the abstract musical-theory of chords for all instruments.

Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.
Launch price: $799 / £826 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Pau ferro (rosewood reviewed) | Frets: 21 | Pickups: American Vintage '58 Single-Coil Tele, American Vintage '52 Single-Coil Tele | Controls: Volume (with S-1 Switch), tone | Hardware: 3-saddle American Vintage strings-through-body bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Faded Sonic Blue, 3-Color Sunburst
The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard sports a mahogany back with an artisan-grade AAA figured maple top and a mahogany neck with Ultra-Modern weight relief. This chambering technique is provides a solid core through the center of the guitar, retaining the classic Les Paul sound and making the guitar less prone to feedback. The Ultra Modern weight-relieved body also makes playing long sets a breeze. The neck has an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck profile for increased playability and comfort.
: I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]

A simplistic design and an affordable price make the Squier Bullet Stratocaster SSS an ideal guitar for those who are just beginning their foray into the musical world. Here’s a huge drop in price and mentioned halfway in our list just in case you wanted to find a budget-friendly and cheap electric guitar to start with. With a basswood finish and a ‘C’ shape design, this electric guitar is lightweight and comfortable, making it ideal when just beginning to learn basic chord progressions and needing long periods of time to practice. The twenty-one frets that are included come in a medium-jumbo size, making it easier to learn the basics of strumming and moving from chord to chord. The string pickup is only a single coil, which provides an adequate sound and balanced tone when utilizing the 5-position pickup blade. With three different color options to choose from (Candy Apple Red, Sea-foam Green, and Lake Placid Blue) the Squier Bullet is one of the best electric guitars for those who are looking to begin their musical journey in style.


We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Fender: Fender guitars are the best example of the old saying “Keep it simple”. They aren’t futuristic, there’s nothing unique about them, they are kinda too simple, their craftsmanship isn’t astronomical but when it’s about outright ruggedness rarely any other guitar comes close to them. Leo Fender designed the Fender guitars to be reliable working man guitars and they still hold true to that quality of theirs. I’m pretty sure if someone buys a good quality Fender guitar (especially the Tele) pretty much his sons, grandsons will still be able to play on that.
Maton was founded in 1946 as the Maton Musical Instruments Company by Bill May and his brother Reg. Reg was a wood machinist, and Bill a jazz musician, woodwork teacher andluthier who had for some years operated a custom guitar building and repair business under the name Maton Stringed Instruments and Repairs. The name “Maton” came from the words “May Tone” and is pronounced May Tonne.
Altium is known for it’s high end PCB development application called Altium Designer which starts at around $7000 and there’s a yearly subscription fee too. Gulp! Altium Designer is used by many industry professionals for product development. Altium just recently released Circuit Maker, which has many of the features of Designer and is, Gasp!…. Completely free!  The trade off at this point seems to be that it’s designed around a community and apart from a couple of private slots, you have to share your work, so it’s not very useful for completely proprietary projects.
Here we have a real vintage Rare IBANEZ CONCORD beauty from the Golden Era of the Best Japanese Martin D41 style guitars period... This example is Ibanez Model #679 and is the Top of the Line and is an exact Martin copy and is a great " Law Suit " model from the era where Ibanez set out to make the best guitars worldwide period...Fit and finish even after 30 years it is simply superior it appears to be thin old school Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish, this guitar was constructed using the best woods very ornate intricate triple bindings with lots of beautiful inlaid abalone on the Brazilian Rosewood fretboard and the spruce top body WoW...please do have a very good look ...This example has employed the best exotic woods in its construction, The top looks to be solid no seam edge showing at sound hole some pick wear and looks solid, the sides & back also look the same on the inside and outside grain matches so again it looks to be solid?.... A high grade mahogany neck, Sitka spruce top, Choice Indian Rosewood sides & back, and what seems to be a beautiful Rich Chocolate brown Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard with gorgeous abalone, frets show some wear lower several yet plays excellently all the way up with very good action and fast & plays easily...Neck width is a nice slim-med super comfortable 1-3/4" at the nut with no buzzing all the way up action is good set at 5/32nds @ 12th fret. This guitar has been well played and well taken care of and is a good professional grade instrument ready to record tonight. Cosmetically this is a 8.5 out of 10, A real vintage player that has not been abused at all yet has been lovingly well played its tone has richly mellowed with the years and only improved with its age and now after 30 years it shows this wonderful patina that can not be replicated that only comes with age, vintage is not for everyone some like it new we understand that this vintage Martin Copy Japanese Guitar however is not new or is it in mint condition yet it is very beautiful in vintage terms of mellowing with age and patina Wow this is for the TRUE VINTAGE LOVER... also you Ibanez Collectors of Japanese vintage. Its Sound is second to none it has nicely articulate lows with nicely contrasting bright highs and the mid-range has a good punch and ring when finger picked, full on sweet big tone when strumming open cords. This one is a real pleasure to play and is EZ on the eyes too. These are really great old classic guitars and are getting very difficult to find now in anywhere near this kind of vintage condition...its all original and the original tuners work very well with no need to change them out they are keeping the guitar tuned well...no cracks or repairs non needed , excellent original neck set and angle, intonation is good. This Rare beauty is conservatively JVG condition rated at very good - excellent in a 30 year old Vintage guitar...amazing looks and tone & playability in a real vintage collectible that your not going to want to put down.. Every bit as good as the much more expensive Martin for a fraction of that. Any questions ask? gr8bids@comcast.net .
The Fender Bassbreaker 15 Amplifier Head presents a budget friendly option for those in need of great tone. You have 15 watts of pure power to channel here as well as a studio friendly Power Amp Mute so you can record straight into a desk - a great feature for those in need of a powerful stage and studio amplifier. This is a professional grade amplifier head that features 3 very unique tonal options and overdrive levels to provide you with a whole host of lush fender tones that range from glass like cleans to vintage overdrive. Perfectly paired with the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab.

First established in 1952, Guild has a long history of building guitars, and they draw from this experience with every guitar they produce. The company was previously acquired by Fender, and was sold to Cordoba back in 2014 - and they have since been making a steady comeback in the market. The Westerly Collection D-120 is a great example of what keeps the Guild brand alive - having impressive specs at accessible price points with Guild's characteristic old school appeal.

The models in this list of best acoustic guitars have their own visual charm that appeals to different people. For example, the Blueridge BR-160 has those ornate inlays on the headstock. Some guitarists love those kinds of design elements, while others may find them a bit over the top and would much rather prefer the fretboard inlays on the PRS Angelus, or the simple but classic cutaway design of the Taylor 110ce.


I played electric guitar in a band from the age of 12 through to the age of 36, then gave it up. Now, at the age of 68 I want to get back into playing. I went into a store and tried playing and found that my fingertips really hurt! Are there any electric guitars where the metal strings don’t hurt or do I just need to “grin and bare it” until my fingertips get calloused again?
This list is called "best guitar techniques" not hardest guitar techniques, people are looking at some of more shreddy elements first, but many other things are far more important. I think alternate picking is one of the most important because it is the technique that truly gives you control over individual notes (not chords). It is commonly used in both rhythm and lead guitar unlike sweep picking which is only used by shreddicus maximus/l0rd 5hr3dd0rz. All these techniques are important but think of some more basic techniques first.

Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ200T - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural


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