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By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
The Roland Blues Cube Artist looks and sounds the part of a vintage tweed tube era amplifier, but the innards tell a different story, being a solid-state amp with Roland's Tube Logic technology. And for something with tube amp modeling and USB direct recording, the amp comes with a streamlined set of features, having just two channels, clean and crunch, both of which have boost switches. Interestingly, this more traditional setup helped the amp score high points from users who want a pedal friendly amp that has the feel of tube without its usual drawbacks. Giving it a bit of an edge over older amps, is its built-in power attenuator that lets you lower the power rating from 80W down to 0.5W. For a bit of tone experimentation, the amp comes with a "dual tone" switch for blending the two channels in a way that's musically pleasing. Roland also equipped this amp with tremolo and reverb that complements its simple setup. Finally, the Blues Cube Artist lets you expand your tonal palette via its swappable "tone capsule", which is an analog component that you actually switch out to give the amp a different sound. There are currently three available tone capsules, two of which are artist signatures from Eric Johnson and Robben Ford, and the third one being Roland's own rendition of the Blues sound.
Why We Liked It - The Martin DRS2 will take some beating as one of the all-round best electric acoustics you can buy, simply because you’re getting the finish and tonal quality of a much more expensive guitar for a solid price. Whether you’re mainly looking for a traditional acoustic you can occasionally amplify, or you need something professional grade for gigs, this could be it. In terms of recording your guitar, you can mics for guitars or a microphone for the guitar amp. If you're looking for an alternative, check out the Martin Road Series DRS1 Dreadnought.

Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender’s Radio Service where he first repaired, then designed, amplifiers and electromagnetic pickups for musicians—chiefly players of electric semi-acoustic guitars, electric Hawaiian (lap steel) guitars, and mandolins. Players had been ‘wiring up’ their instruments in search of greater volume and projection since the late 1920s, and electric semi-acoustics (such as theGibson ES-150) had long been widely available. Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Clayton Orr “Doc” Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. It sounded shiny and sustaining. Fender got curious, and in 1949, when it was long understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solidbody Spanish guitars had caught on (the small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solidbody electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.
Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
Shortly thereafter, the American instrumental rock band The Ventures asked their friend, session musician and electronics enthusiast Orville "Red" Rhodes for help recreating the Grady Martin "fuzz" sound.[18] Rhodes offered The Ventures a fuzzbox he had made, which they used to record "2000 Pound Bee" in 1962.[19] The best-known early commercial distortion circuit was the Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone, manufactured by Gibson, released in 1962.[20]
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.

I have owned Fender amps and Line 6 amps and while they have been "ok" amps, none of them come close to my newly acquired Mesa Mark V 90watt and 4� - 12 rectifier cab. Amp is super versitile and the time is out of this world. I knew I'd hit the jackpot the first time I plugged up to one. Mark V pairs nicely with my variety of guitars including PRS Holcomb sig, Fender Tele and Strat, Schecter Hellraiser, and Epiphone Les Paul. There's a tone in there for everyone, every guitar and every style of music... you just have to be willing to sit down and get to know the amp. Mesa Boogie is definitely the brand for me so I cast my vote in with them. Great company with quality amps and super friendly/helpful custom service.


Perhaps not as famous as its brother, the EMG 81, this awesome EMG 85 still rocks and makes a worthy appearance in our chart. Perfect for the neck position (although equally solid in the bridge), the EMG 85 features Alnico V magnet-loaded close aperture coils to deliver a natural tone with a huge output, with no loss of clarity as the volume is pushed to its highest.
Fender’s open-back combo tube amps have been used on countless hit records in practically every genre of music in the past half-century. They can deliver both warm bell-like clean tones and gritty overdriven snarls. The Blue Junior III is a relatively inexpensive way to get into Fender tube amps, and it’s the perfect size for studio and small venues.
Naturally, it all comes down to manipulating the effect to fit the occasion. There is definitely such a thing as too much reverb or not enough. However, this is the type of thing you will have to figure out on case to case basis. With that said, you would be surprised at just how often reverb is used in music these days. Some sound engineers and producers like to be subtle to a point where you won’t notice the reverb unless you are actively looking for it. Others tend to go overboard in order to express themselves.
The steel-string and electric guitars characteristic to the rise of rock and roll in the post-WWII era became more widely played in North America and the English speaking world. Barrios composed many works and brought into the mainstream the characteristics of Latin American music, as did the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos. Andrés Segovia commissioned works from Spanish composers such as Federico Moreno Torroba and Joaquín Rodrigo, Italians such as Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Latin American composers such as Manuel Ponce of Mexico. Other prominent Latin American composers are Leo Brouwer of Cuba, Antonio Lauro of Venezuela and Enrique Solares of Guatemala. Julian Bream of Britain managed to get nearly every British composer from William Walton to Benjamin Britten to Peter Maxwell Davies to write significant works for guitar. Bream's collaborations with tenor Peter Pears also resulted in song cycles by Britten, Lennox Berkeley and others. There are significant works by composers such as Hans Werner Henze of Germany, Gilbert Biberian of England and Roland Chadwick of Australia.
Ah, this is an interesting subject. I could never play a Rick, nor buy back my 1966 Fender XII, so I bought a Dano, then another which I kept and could play (nut width). Then around 2000 I bought a Yamaha Pacifica 12 -the blueburst with gold hardware. I had the nut intonated, like all my other guitars (this was before Earvana which I am about to try out my first "drop in" on a new parts Strat, Epi Night Hawk and a GS Mini on layaway). The Pacifica is good tho again only 1+11/16ths " and I am ready for 1+3/4 or even better 1+7/8ths. I bought a set of Duncan Designed lipsticks for it, thinking I could easily find a neck with 1+7/8ths nut. No joy, yet, tho I have talked to a builder about one and am trying to sort out whether to do that to the Pacifica or use a really nice looking cherry stained strat body that I've had for 31 years.
Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]
The U130 Bass Amplifier pumped out 130 watts with five inputs covering two channels (high and low each) and one input that bridged both channels. Channel 1 had volume with push/pull high boost, bass, middle and treble contour controls. Channel 2 had volume, bass and treble controls. Both channels had master volumes, plus two, four or eight-ohm output. Cabinet options included the UFO215 with two Univox Pro Mag speakers in a front-loaded horn cabinet, or the U215 with two 15″ Pro Mags in a “tuned duct” reflex cab.
Our pick here is the PAC112V version, for a few reasons. First off, the solid alder body offers you the same tonewood you’ll find in a lot of higher end S-style guitars. The maple neck and diecast tuners will feel really premium in your hands, too. But the 112 series further boosts its value with two Alnico V single coil pickups and an Alnico V humbucker. The addition of the humbucker in the bridge position will open up a whole other world of tones for a budding musician, giving the option for both clean, crisp single coil sounds and thick, high-output humbucker growls.
Pickups are transducers that convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating guitar string into electrical energy by way of electromagnetic induction. It is a fundamental concept studied in physics and electronics that a changing magnetic field will generate a current through a coil of wire. The electric guitar pickup uses permanent magnets and pole pieces to form a steady magnetic field in the vicinity of each individual guitar string. An opposite magnetic polarity is induced in the metallic (steel core) guitar string when mounted above its respective pole piece and when the string moves, the otherwise steady magnetic field changes accordingly. Wire is wrapped around the poles thousands of times to form a coil within the magnetic field to pick up an induced current and voltage.
As with so very many elements in the great world of guitar, however, once the novelty wore off and we were less awestruck by the new technology—and, in many cases, came to realize that we had little use for 2 seconds, or even 500 milliseconds of delay time—many of us came to miss the warm, pliable sound of the analog pedals. Today, as with all such things, the jury is still out; plenty of great players use each type of pedal, and the music you make with the technology remains more important than the type of technology you choose to use to make music. Used in isolation, at the same delay settings, each would probably sound just a little different to a guitarist with good ears. At the back end of a pedalboard with eight or ten other effects on it and three or four running at a time, the differences are likely to be negligible—but different players have different preferences, depending on what makes them feel good about their tone.

There were few things more powerful than Stevie Ray Vaughan with a guitar in his hands. Though he was deeply entrenched in the blues idiom, he took it to an entirely new and original level. Heavily influenced by Jimi Hendrix, his triple string bends and lightning fast double stops were things of absolute beauty. While every one of his songs is an electric blues guitar masterclass, perhaps his most impressive performance is in the song “Texas Flood.”


In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.


Štěpán Rak and Kazuhito Yamashita have also generalized the use of the upstroke of the four fingers and the downstroke of the thumb (the same technique as in the rasgueado of the Flamenco: as explained above the string is hit not only with the inner, fleshy side of the fingertip but also with the outer, fingernail side) both as a free stroke and as a rest stroke.[41]
Price guides can be used by both sellers and buyers. Sellers can generally use websites to get a ballpark figure on the value of their model of guitar or bass. They can then deduct for dings, scratches, and other injuries the guitar may have sustained in its lifetime. After-market modifications, such as new pickups or repair work, can increase the value of the guitar.
Other Ovation innovations include composite tops and multiple offset sound holes on guitar tops, pioneered in the Adamas model in 1977. Kaman Music has also sold budget guitars—and even mandolins and ukuleles—based on similar design principles to the Ovation such as the Korean-built Celebrity series and the Korean or Chinese-built Applause brand.[citation needed]
Seller: atcycle (2,136) 100%, Location: Sugar Land, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 122791185383 This Used Guitar, cosmetically in general is in good used condition, it's played and everything works fine. Includes tremolo bar. The string trees have been removed for tuning stability but will be included should you wish to use them. Please use the enlarge feature and look over all pictures as this is the best way for me to show / describe the condition to you. I will have other Guitars listed. PLEASE NOTE ALL FAULTS SHOWN IN PICTURES ARE CONSIDERED PART OF THE DESCRIPTION.This Lotus "Strat" triple single coil is one of the finest examples of high quality imports which strongly competed with the big boys back in the day. Those of us who were around back then, learned that frequently these guitars had better sound and build quality than the Name Brand at that time. They were so good that the Big Name Company had them build many guitars for them! Condition: Used, Condition: There are a few signs of wear typical of an older used instrument. Missing switch button., Brand: Lotus, Body Type: Solid, MPN: Does Not Apply, Dexterity: Right-Handed, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Color: Black, Body Material: Solid Wood See More
There aren’t really any structured lessons—like, where you’re starting at the beginning and working your way sequentially through—you have to browse through the playlists and find what’s best, but the quality of the lessons and wide variety of topics will have everything covered. JamPlay is a sampler for the website, where you’re offered a subscription service to complete courses, which explains the kind of shotgun approach to the videos made available on YouTube. But the size and breadth of the topics you can access for free still makes it a great channel.
I haven't had the pleasure of owning an Andrew White yet, but I plan to. I've followed the company and Andrew for some time after noticing repeated YouTube videos featuring unique guitars with lush, exotic tones. Since then, every time I've had a question or comment it is Andrew himself that responds quickly with pleasant and enthusiastic answers. Andrew White guitars have something different to offer and Andrew himself seems to be a down to earth guy with the passion of guitar building in his heart.
It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
This deal leapt out of the page at me straight away. The Fender Squier series has been around a while and even though it’s a budget guitar, you can always rely on Fender for great quality. But what I like the most about this package is that everything you need is included (apart from a guitar stand) and the Frontman 10G amplifier has some extra features that are excellent. The amp has an input for a playback device to jam along to (like your iPad or Smart phone, or even a CD player) plus a headphone output for when the neighbours get too annoyed. A Gain control and Overdrive switch let you grunge everything up, or you can dial it back to a classic, clean Fender sound.
: I have located a semi-hollow body electric Kent guitar that has a body some what like a 335 and the neck like a fender strat. The body is a beautiful natural birdseye maple. She is in awsome shape and plays well. I have the ser# (xxx) 3 digits and I believe that it was made in Japan in the Sixty's. I have no Idea what model it is or value because I can't find out any thing about Kent guitars. I've seen Kent amps guitars & drums but no info. I welcome anything.
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.
Orville Gibson founded the company in Michigan and stayed a family business until the early 50's. Ted Mcarty ran the company from 1951 or so, and is the "father" of most successful Gibson electric guitars, the Les Paul, the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES-335 and so on.. In the late 60's Gibson was bought by the Norlin Corp, who mainly were known for making refrigerators. Most feel Gibson adopted a quanity over quality approach to guitar making during this period and 1970's to 1980's Gibson electrics are considered less desireable by most guitar collectors, and considered outright junk by many others.. Cosmetic changes to Gibson models during that period apparently reflect the poor taste of the buying public during that era... and while a 1974 Gibson SG may look ugly compared to the classic 1961 or 1968 models, please remember this was the era of ployester liesure suits and Chrysler Cordobas.. In 1986 Gibson was bought by a group who understood guitar making, and is a privately held company to this day. Gibson quality has appeared to improve steadily from 1987 to present day, but it seems to be unanimous that todays models do not approach the craftsmanship of the late 1950's when Gibson apparently peaked.
Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.
An acoustic guitar is a guitar that uses only an acoustic soundboard (the top of an acoustic guitar) to help transmit the strings energy into the air in order to produce its sound. The soundboard will add various tonal qualities due to its own mix of tonewoods and bracing, and the soundboard also has a strong effect on the loudness of the guitar. Without a soundboard, the string would just cut through the air without actually moving it much because it is large, the soundboard can push the air, creating a much louder sound. In addition, the acoustic guitar has a hollow body that resonates, increasing the efficiency of its lower frequencies.
I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.
One master's name that kept being repeated by the guitar experts was Roger Crisler of Crisler Guitar Repair in Carrollton. He's been in the business of repairing guitars for almost 40 years. Some of the best guitarists in the DFW area turn to him when their guitar is sick: Chris Watson, Bnois King, Zach Weeks, Drew Adkins, Smokin' Joe Kubek, the list just continues to grow. He's trusted, and his work is respected. "When you love what you do, it doesn't feel like a job," he says.
You are right, we will have the whole guitar amplifiers section of out website completely revamped in the next few weeks! We made vast content improvements on all other sections of GuitarFella and now it is time to work on the amps. Thanks a lot for the remark and make sure you check us out in 2-3 weeks, I guarantee you that you will like the results!
Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
Bassists who want a more powerful low end may use a subwoofer cabinet. Subwoofers are specialized for very low frequency reproduction, with typical maximum useful high frequencies of about 150 or 200 Hz, so a subwoofer cabinet must be paired with a full range speaker cabinet to obtain the full tonal range of an electric bass or upright bass. In addition, subwoofers intended for PA system use have much higher power handling requirements than do subwoofer designs for high fidelity home use. Bass guitar players who use subwoofer cabinets include performers who play with extended range basses with include notes between B0 (about 31 Hz); and C#0 (17 Hz) and bassists whose style requires a very powerful sub-bass response is an important part of the sound (e.g., funk, Latin, gospel, R & B, etc.).
Plate reverb and spring reverb were the first attempts to simulate reverb in a portable device. The plate and the spring, respectively, are made of metal and attached to a transducer. The signal is fed to the transducer, which causes the plate or spring to vibrate. Reverberations bounce around the plate or spring. A pickup at the other end, converts the spring or plate's vibrations back into an electrical signal.
2. Materials. The timbers used to make these guitars were sourced from every corner of South East Asia. These timbers were “old growth”; in plainer words, the timber was taken from established forests. The advantages of this type of wood are long term stability and strength. Further to this, many of these timbers were species that are now on the endangered list and are therefore illegal to log and/or export. Now, while we consider the cutting down of established “old growth” forest timber a crime, it would be an even bigger crime not to make the most of what is already there. Whilst the build quality of the modern Asian made guitar (i.e. China, Indonesia, Vietnam etc) is exceptional, most of the timbers used are “plantation” timbers or more overly “new growth” timbers. Though this forestation is certainly light years ahead ecologically, it tends to yield timber which is brittle and can be unstable, making many repairs, such as a broken headstock untenable.
Most models come with single-coil Hi-gain pickups as standard equipment. Many post-British invasion Rickenbacker players such as Peter Buck, Paul Weller, and Johnny Marr have used instruments with these pickups. Rickenbacker’shumbucker/dual coil pickup has a similar tone to a Gibson mini-humbuckerpickup, and comes standard on the Rickenbacker 650 C. Vintage reissue models, and some signature models, come with Toaster Top pickups, which resemble a classic two-slotted chrome toaster. Despite their slightly lower output, “Toasters” produce a brighter, cleaner sound, and are generally seen as key to obtaining the true British Invasion guitar tone, as they were original equipment of the era.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar brand, which is established in the year 1957. They provide Acoustic, Bass Guitars and Semi-Acoustic Guitars at different price segments. The company is owned by Hoshino Gakki. Their headquarters located in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. They also manufacture amplifiers, mandolins and effect units. They become one of the top ten best guitar brands in India. The price range starts from Rs. 13,299/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit Ibanez.com.
Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]
Okay, choose from the best electric guitar brands to suit your needs and look great too with this helpful guide for guitarists of all levels! Would you rather get the proven model, or trust a relatively unknown brand? This is especially true for those who are looking to buy their first instrument. With that in mind, we have compiled a list of top 10 electric guitar brands which you can trust. We will talk about each, and explain why they are the best guitar brands. On top of that, we will mention some models which we have had the chance to handle in the past.
Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.
A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.

Lastly, but not leastly, Univox offered a super amp head, the C Group, or UX Series, available with either a guitar or bass cabinet. These were promoted with a flyer that sported a muscular black model with naked torso looking for all the world like Isaac Hayes, the man behind the popular movie Shaft. The UX actually consisted of a UX-1501 Amplifier head and either a UX-1516 speaker cabinet for guitar use or a UX-1512 cabinet for bass. The amp was a mean two-channel S.O.B. with blue vinyl and handles. It was set up for lead guitar, bass or PA use, with two guitar inputs, two bass inputs and two mixer inputs. Its 140 watts were obtained with eight tubes – four 6550s, two 12AU7s and two 12AX7s. It had two volume and a master gain controls plus bass, middle, treble and presence controls. Power on and separate standby switches. Four speaker output jacks. The coolest feature was a “tunneling circuit” that allowed, near as we can tell, blending of channels, which meant you could pump up the bass on one and hyper the treble on the other, and combine them. For a little extra punch, you could throw a hi-boost switch, too. The UX-1516 guitar cabinet was a 150-watter. For bass, the UX-1512 was a 200-watt Reflex Speaker Cabinet. Cost for the guitar outfit was $1,400, for the bass outfit $1,450.
ESP is yet another brand that acquires a notable stance in the history of guitars. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, the company was known for producing high-quality, custom-shop instruments with incredible original designs. Even now, the trend goes on. Today, ESP guitars are among the preferred guitars for most professional musicians around the world. Particularly, the metal and hard rock players mark this brand as their favorite.

Sometimes called an auto-volume, these pedals work the same as the wah-wah pedal.  The effect functions based on your picking dynamics, but instead of a change in tone, you get a change in volume.  The effect will have no volume when you pick, but will then swell up to audible levels.  It masks your pick attack and simulates the sound of a bowed instrument.


There have been two documented 1970 Brazilian rosewood D-28's, which are anomalies. The first one was #265783, which was retopped with red spruce in 1993. The second one is serial number 265941. There are several D-35's with mixed woods in the 3-piece back. Like D-35 #258962, which has a Brazilian rosewood center wedge in the back. Note some post-1969 Martins have some Brazilian rosewood, in the bridge, bridgeplate, fingerboard, or peghead veneer.
Another option would be to instead buy a mobile guitar interface and download one of the many guitar apps available, but I typically don’t recommend this for beginners. These apps are very robust, and can be a little overwhelming for someone just starting out. First learn how the controls on a real amp affect your tone. Once you’ve grasped these basics (and acquired some basic guitar skills), you can think about buying some fancy apps and effects.
Gibson seems to have the features that diminish the drawbacks in the Fenders series. The USA Company comes with the humbucker pickups that reduces the noise and humming concerns and produces a warm sound. This makes Gibson mainly fit for the rock players. Unlike Fender, Gibson guitars have a shorter scale length of approximately 24.75 inches. It decreases the string tension. Thus, the easy bending produces a warmer and smooth sound, which is characteristic for the brand. You can certainly go for a Gibson guitar to enjoy a Fender guitar quality on short strings. Additionally, the use of mahogany further jazzes up its performance.
it's really hard to beat the ric sound. the 335 12's and fender 12's are cool, but really the ric has the sound we're all familiar with. that being said, everyone has different tastes and I encourage you to play as many different ones as possible. Jimmy Page used a Fender 12 on Stairway. I went rick for that early beatles sound. the neck is tiny but it's part of the instrument.
The music that Jimmy Page made was able to transport you so that you got lost in what he was playing. His solos were show-stopping and so innovative when it came to guitar-playing technique at the time. He set himself the challenge of breaking the preconceptions of what a guitar can do, so his style evolved over time. But he was always one of the greats, even when experimenting!
The best thing about the guitar is the design and usability is perfect for the beginners, who have an idea that how to play the guitar. It also comes with a bunch of instructions that makes it even easier to use. Once you learn the basics and master it you can easily upgrade to a higher level guitar. It can give the right feel that required from a guitar.
Some delay pedals also come with full looping abilities, allowing you to play detailed multi-part melodies completely by yourself. A few artists to look to for great examples of delay pedal use are Angels and Airwaves, U2 and Muse. Reverb pedals are an entirely different animal. It brings its own unique type of sustain to a note, infusing the sound with strong texture and character through its distinctive echo. Creating a sound not quite like any other effect, reverb calls to mind the energetic surfer rock of the 1960s, such as Dick Dale's version of "Misirlou." You can stay true to those vintage roots or take the effect in a new, modern direction—it's up to you. With the added dimension they bring to your tone, you'll want to use your delay and reverb effects pedals at every performance. They make a unique contribution to the sound individually and even more so when you use them as a team.
In the ’66 American Teisco Del Rey Catalog, the small, humble EP-9T was left over from before (formerly EP-9), with the quasi-Gibson style head and triangular control plate. The only thing new was the Bigsby (thus the T). In the ’66 Japanese catalog, the small thinlines were represented by the EP-2L and EP-1L. The EP-2L looks for all the world like the EP-9T, with the large rectangular pickups with black inserts, controls on the triangular lower bout plate, and a long-armed trapeze vibrato with a curved handle. The EP-1L was the same except for having a single metal-covered pickup at the neck.

The world is full of guys who will zero in on all the details they find inferior about this guitar by noting the rather obvious fact that this is not a Gibson Les Paul Standard costing $3,000.00. There are some people who will complain that this guitar has a bolt on neck. True, the set necks of the more expensive Epiphones and Gibsons are nicer. But, considering the fact that every Fender Stratocaster ever made had a bolt on neck, is this really a big deal? Would Jimi Hendrix have played "Purple Haze" better if his Strat had a set in neck? Probably not.

You can simulate any sound of three pickup guitar with two pickup guitar and vice versa, the only problem is getting it with proper wiring or customizing it. Even they will not sound the same may be close enough for your application or even better. And don't forget about potentiometers problem. The 250K potentiometer will cut some frequencies from humbuckers while 500K make singles brighter than they are by default. It may be not a problem or critical to choosing favorite tone :D
I could not afford an American or European guitar when I was 12, but Sam Ash sported a Japanese stratoslabber, with 1, 2, 3, or 4 pickups. Each extra pick up was another eight dollars! I bought the 2 pick up model for $24 and brought it home. What a square slab. The wood had the aspects of cardboard, it was probably what is called basswood. The pickups were single coil, chrome covered, and no better than a deArmond harp mike. My brother returned it, and bought a better looking tele style Japanese guitar I believe by Kent, with tin foil inserts in the pick ups. It went from Kandy apple red, to natural, to white, and finally to trunk-splatter grey with Seymour Duncan pickups and Grover tuners. I finally sold it in 2009.
So I'm babysitting this guitar for a broke person and I happen to be not so much broke and he left this guitar over here. Not that I'd take advantage of anyone, but after playing it, I wouldn't mind having it. I went through 3 pages of google and didn't really find any info on that or ebay. It's a P37. It's a dread. Looks pretty cheap judging by the ornamentation. It's painted black with decal inlays and all that classy stuff. I haven't measured it but the fretboard is really wide, the neck is really skinny and D shaped. I think it has a shorter scale length too... and the finish looks thin. It seems old because the saddle barely pokes out and the action is still rather high but then the soundboard doesn't belly out. The bridge is raised all around the saddle though, so it could just be a strange bridge setup. It is rather loud. It says "quality handcrafted guitars" under the company name in the soundhole, not sure if I believe it, but the totally different neck, action and volume level than what I'm used to, makes it pretty fun to play.
Original Stratocasters were shipped with five springs anchoring the bridge flat against the body. Some players removed the backplate covering the bridge to remove two of the springs and adjust the claw screws to allow the bridge to ‘float,’ with the pull of the strings in one direction countering the pull of the springs in the opposite direction. In this floating position, players could move the bridge-mounted tremolo arm up or down to modulate the pitch of the notes being played. Jeff Beck and Ike Turner used the Strat’s floating tremolo extensively in their playing. However, other players, such as Eric Clapton and Ronnie Wood, disliked the floating bridge’s propensity to detune guitars and inhibited the bridge’s movement with a chunk of wood wedged between the bridge block and the inside cutout of the tremolo cavity and by increasing the tension on the tremolo springs. These procedures lock the bridge in a fixed position. Some Strats have a fixed bridge in place of the tremolo assembly; these are colloquially called “hard-tails.” Luthier Galeazzo Frudua has said the floating tremolos can have stable tuning through techniques specific to a floating bridge.[8] The Stratocaster features three single coil pickups, with the output originally selected by a 3-way switch. Guitarists soon discovered that by jamming the switch in between the 1st and 2nd position, both the bridge and middle pickups could be selected, and similarly, the middle and neck pickups could be selected between the 2nd and 3rd position.[9] This trick became widespread and Fender responded with the 5-way pickup selector (a standard feature since 1977), which allowed these tonal combinations and provided better switching stability.
A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:
Welcome to the world of premium! While there are several tiers of boutique amplifier priced higher than $1000, this category is when you really start to hit the high end. Some of the most iconic guitar amps sit in this section, although all models are capable of performing on big stages and professional recording studios with pro-grade features, exceptional tones and massive power, extending into 100 watts and above. One amp you will find in this market is the legendary Peavey 6505 Plus head, which has helped shape the sound of metal over the past few decades.
hi-thanks joe -i have  installed a push pull pot to get middle and neck and all three pickups totegher-it works prefect but when not pulled it has seemed to change the sound on my normal five  selector sound and made all my normal five sounds very twangy-is this normal as when i pull the push pull pot up the extra sounds get clearer-is it becuase i have two tone caps on the push pull one on top half and one on the bottom but i thought that should not matter when the tone is at 10-thanks sean
As the crowds at Beatles shows got louder, they needed louder amps. Jennings provided Lennon and Harrison with the first AC50 piggyback units, and McCartney's AC30/T60 rig was replaced with an AC100 head and an AC100 2×15" cabinet. Lennon and Harrison eventually got their own AC100 rigs, with 4×12"/2-horn configurations. In 1966 and 1967, The Beatles had several prototype or specially-built Vox amplifiers, including hybrid tube/solid-state units from the short-lived 4- and 7-series. Harrison in particular became fond of the 730 amp and 2×12 cabinet, using them to create many the guitar sounds found on Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Lennon favoured the larger 7120 amplifier, while Harrison preferred the 730 and McCartney had its sister 430 bass amplifier.
Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).
One of the most respected guitar manufacturers in the world, Epiphone electric guitars can be found everywhere from small-town basements to the biggest arena rock stages. The reason is because of their dedication to providing high-quality instruments for musicians of all tastes and skill levels, and throughout this catalog you'll find more than enough choices to prove it. After all, everyone who has a desire to crank up and play deserves an electric guitar that looks, sounds, and performs flawless, and Epiphone has an option for every budget. It's easy to see how trusted the Epiphone name is when you consider how many best sellers and top-rated items make up this section. For that matter, all you have to do is look at the many top-recording artists who have Epiphone signature models, including metal legend Zakk Wylde, virtuoso Gary Clark, Jr., and Tommy Thayer of Kiss. Speaking of signature guitars, check out the popular Limited Edition 2014 Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar. Sporting a gorgeous Pelham Blue with a black back and a Bonamassa neck profile, this axe looks as slick as it plays. As for its sound? You can expect plenty of power in every chord you hit thanks to the Gibson USA BurstBucker-2/3 humbuckers. Now for those who prefer the lightweight feel and ringing sound of a semi-hollow, go with the Dot Electric Guitar. Equipped with dual humbuckers and a 3-way pickup selector, the Dot can go from growling snarls to crystal-clear sustain. Additionally, the two volume tone controls allow you to tailor your sound, while the smooth, 22-fret rosewood fretboard means you can play at lightning-fast speed. And this is only a taste of what Epiphone has in store for you. In fact, taking a tour through Epiphone's extensive selection of electric guitars is just as fun as playing them. From solid body electrics and hollow bodies to semi-hollows and even guitars for left-handers, the options are seemingly endless. So stick with Epiphone, and you'll have no problem finding an instrument that reflects your own discerning style.
A multi-FX unit is a single effects device that can perform several guitar effects simultaneously. Such devices generally use digital processing to simulate many of the above-mentioned effects without the need to carry several single-purpose units. In addition to the classic effects, most have amplifier/speaker simulations not found in analog units. This allows a guitarist to play directly into a recording device while simulating an amplifier and speaker of his choice.

The electronic transistor finally made it possible to cram the aural creativity[when defined as?] of the recording studio into small, highly portable stompbox units.[citation needed] Transistors replaced vacuum tubes, allowing for much more compact formats and greater stability.[citation needed] The first transistorized guitar effect was the 1962 Maestro Fuzz Tone pedal, which became a sensation after its use in the 1965 Rolling Stones hit "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[41][42]
Yea um John Mayers way misunderunstood and under rated, watch the 'where the light is live in LA' DVD(and actually watch it before you think of posting a reply) and tell me he aint an amazing guitarist, im not saying hes a god but hes definetly an amzing guitarist n i rekon he deserves a spot just for the fact that hes one of the few guitarists of this generation with some talent.
Hello. I am trying to find out more about my Hohner electric guitar. I've been trying to research it online but cannot find ANY information or reference to this particular model. Some people have told me that it may have been a prototype sample that never went into production. The only reference number I can find on the guitar is a label that says Sample by Nanyo CG300G and Made in Japan. I bought this guitar around 1980-1982 when I was 13-15 years old and it is still in mint condition. I would really love to know more about it's origin.
But we can't forget that Rocksmith 2014 is designed like any other game, and as satisfying as it is to be able to pick up a guitar and play, all I wanted to do was try and level up on some of my favorite songs. I quickly found that Foo Fighters' "Everlong" was beyond my grasp, and Oasis's "Don't Look Back in Anger" would never become my jam, but I quickly got my fix trying to nail down The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop."
The product also has an original feature, called ISF, advertised to “give you infinite sound possibilities, from the USA to the UK” by using pre-set bass, mid, and treble setting that the user can select between. Some customers remarked that the feature doesn’t seem to make much of a difference, but praise the tone quality and good functionality of the product nevertheless.  
Keep focused on one goal at a time. For example, you could spend a week or two really getting to know 5 chords (why 5? Just pick a realistic number for that window of time and go with it!). Then, in the next week or two, practice changing between those chords using different combinations. In the next week, work on your strumming or picking, using the chords and chord change combinations you've learned.
The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
Blend potentiometers (essentially two potentiometers ganged on the same shaft) allow blending together two pickups in varying degrees. The operation is the same as in a balance control found in stereo equipment – in the middle position (often marked with a detent) both pickups supply their full output, and turning the pot in either direction gradually attenuates one of the pickups while leaving the other at full output.[13][29]
Those items considered -- performance notation and computational capacity for emulation of stringed instrument sounds otherwise reinforced by the same speaker systems that amplify synthesized sounds -- the other significant factors in the realism matrix involve economics of VST production, listener preferences and, least we forget, performer or producer preferences.
Line 6 gets a bad rap amongst the guitar community, due to the fact that they apparently operate on a ‘quantity over quality’ business model. The truth is, however, their digital modeling tech has improved vastly since that reputation stuck and they definitely deserve renewed consideration. And that’s all the more true when it comes to beginning players. As you’d likely be learning how to play songs by your favorite artists, this amp with its massive array of presets (128 to be exact) will allow you to mimic your idols with little, if any, effort. And, honestly, it’ll sound pretty great. It even has a built-in tuner, metronome to keep you on time, and real drummer loops so you can get in the swing of playing live.

Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.
To build an electric guitar, start by cutting out the guitar body from a piece of wood like maple or swamp ash. Then, bolt a pre-made neck onto the body and attach the bridge. Next, install the pick-ups, volume control, and guitar cord. Finish by putting your strings on the guitar and testing out your instrument. If you want to make the process easier, you could try purchasing an electric guitar kit.

It is an obvious fact that all those great guitarists must have had a humble beginning, having started with the best beginner guitar that suits them. Some of these artists started with guitars inherited from their parent, friends and/or relatives while others ordered theirs from guitar shops. If you are a newbie yet a guitar enthusiast and you are seeking to buy one among the best guitars for beginners, then there are tips and facts you will have to put into consideration.


Joe is a musician, engineer, and producer in NYC. Over the years, as a small studio operator and freelance engineer, he's made recordings of all types from music & album production to v/o & post. He's also taught all aspects of recording and music technology at several NY audio schools, and has been writing articles for Recording magaz... Read More

hi-its the standard wiring for a strat-i have the push pull in the middle position-i have two wires going from two lugs on the push pull pot- one   giong to neck position on 5 way selector swich and the other to voloume on selector switch-when i have select     brige position when  i pull  middle pot i get neck and bridge -next position all three – middle position neck /middle .next neck middle and first position -neck=also if you put two tone  caps on one pot will it effect the pickup sound when it maxed to ten  and willit sound too bassy–thanks sean
Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
Super info. thks. Just found your site as I too, had some questions about action. I have a Martin D-28, manufacture date late 2013 and I purchased new in Feb. of 2015. It has always been humidified and kept in the case. I only really noticed the ‘high’ action when I changed to drop D tuning and I noticed amplified ‘string whip’. I estimate the height to be 4mm. I re-tuned and looked again and the action is noticeably higher than my Epiphone EJ 200 and Simon & Patrick Woodland Folk. I think, as you have said, the guitar is just getting acclimatized to it’s ‘new’ home. Play ability is still good, (although the player needs work!) but I think I will take it back to Folkways Music to have the Tech take a look. Thks. Great site, I will bookmark it!
The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.

Classical guitars by Martin are equal in craftsmenship to their steel string models. But unfortunately, their sound and feel is not what classical players seem to want. Therefore they do not have the collectability of the steel string models. I group Martin classical models to include the "NY" series and gut string models made from the 1930's and later.
Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 
Fender Kingman "C" Custom Shop Acoustic/electric in Fiesta Red, 1 of 150 worldwide. This was a limited production that came out of the custom shop in Hartford, CT. Has a Fishman pickup. Not a nick, ding or blemish will you find on this guitar, almost museum quality. Comes with original Fender case(perfect shape), Certificate of authenticity and other paperwork and allen wrench. Ships to the US only.
As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
Understanding how to read electronics schematics is the key to being a successful DIY pedal builder. A schematic will show you what components are needed for the build, as well as how these parts are hooked together to create (in this case) an effect pedal circuit. At first glance, a schematic may look like a bunch of hieroglyphics, compiled of various symbols, numbers, and letters (see below). Don’t fret! – After a bit of practice, you should develop a basic understanding of how a schematic works, and you will be putting together DIY effect pedals in no time!
The Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo also features USB connectivity allowing you to hook it up to your computer or DAW software for easy recording. If you don’t already have a DAW, you can utilise the free downloads of Fender FUSE and Ableton Live software suites to create your own music and take advantage of all the great features within the amplifier when recording. An intuitive, easy to use control panel allows you to see and change your sounds and footswitch connectivity (sold separately) ensures you can have complete control without the need for a pedalboard. A fantastic amplifier for beginners and players of all levels.
We've watched Dan Erlewine repair this 1930s Kay over the previous 3 Trade Secrets. It's time to finish it up. Elliot John-Conry of EJC Guitars ages Dan's patch of new plastic binding so it blends in with the old binding around it. About the guitar in this video: This 1930s Kay Deluxe is a fixer-upper that Dan Erlewine repaired in order to sell. Now that it's in great shape again, maybe Dan'll keep it!
As their categorical name suggests, extended chords indeed extend seventh chords by stacking one or more additional third-intervals, successively constructing ninth, eleventh, and finally thirteenth chords; thirteenth chords contain all seven notes of the diatonic scale. In closed position, extended chords contain dissonant intervals or may sound supersaturated, particularly thirteenth chords with their seven notes. Consequently, extended chords are often played with the omission of one or more tones, especially the fifth and often the third,[92][93] as already noted for seventh chords; similarly, eleventh chords often omit the ninth, and thirteenth chords the ninth or eleventh. Often, the third is raised an octave, mimicking its position in the root's sequence of harmonics.[92]
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
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AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.

This setup is the same as the first one above, however, the volume pedal has been placed near the end of the chain right before the delay and reverb effects.  This allows you to have full control of the volume of your signal right before the delay and reverb effects. This is useful for fading in a fully overdriven signal without cleaning up the signal at the lower range of the sweep.
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By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
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Well built, beautiful rich sound and stays tuned. Made in Canada by the Godin family. The slim neck and close action makes it easy to play for those with smaller hands. I have the black Songsmith and will never part with it. Many of my friends and family thought I had spent $1000 to $1500 for it and were really surprised at the price under $400. Godin makes a nice case for it and all of their guitars for around $120.00. Definitely should be in the top 10 of best acoustic guitars!
I know of two amp-and-effects modeling apps for the iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad, both of which are great and allow you to get realistic amp tones through your headphones. AmpKit and Amplitube both do a great job of simulating all the standard amp models and pedals, and they aren't very expensive. I use and prefer AmpKit myself, and between the app and the guitar-to-iPhone interface, I spent a total of $50.
One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.
In our testing, the Fender Champion 20 was the only amp that offered a wide variety of amplifier sounds and special effects while also keeping them all easy to access. Beginners can get a great sound easily and experiment with different effects without having to invest in separate effects pedals. Experienced players can get most of the sounds they want with nothing more than a guitar, an amp, and a cable.

National did not seem interested in the project, and, as we’ve seen, Beauchamp and Barth left National that year to begin Ro-Pat-In with Rickenbacker, where they used their ideas on the development of the new Electro electric Hawaiian aluminum “frying pans” and Spanish guitars. Again, some disagreement exists regarding the relative roles of Beauchamp and Rickenbacker in the development of these guitars, but, again that’s a different story. Beauchamp applied for a patent on his “frying pan” on June 8, 1933, and again on June 2, 1934, eventually receiving the patent on August 10, 1937.
“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”

The common design of a standalone stompbox is simple and, thus, hasn’t changed much: The guitar lead plugs into an input while a second lead carries the output to the amplifier. In between, a multitude of knobs, switches, and pedals modify the signal. To connect two or more boxes requires “jumper” leads, which chain the boxes together to complete a circuit of circuits, each one powered by a 9V battery. Typically, stompboxes are activated by “stomping” on an on/off bypass switch. This simple design enables tinkering: The exterior casing can be easily removed, exposing the interior for modification. To do so requires only a basic grasp of electronics, solder tools (or a solder-less breadboard circuit), and patience. Lots of patience.
Firs, I'm a tube guy - 68 Vibro Champ, 57 Deluxe, Falcon. Next, I have hand wired boutique pedals. And C, I have owned previous Zoom iterations of this pedal, my favorite is the MS100 BT. With all that said this unit is awesome!! It's all metal and a solid build. The onboard tuner is easy to get to and has more options than I expected. I love that it is stereo out and has an aux in for my iPhone backing tracks. Now the sound - the word is the started from the ground up on modeling amps, cabs and effects. I can tell you the rocks my sox. Whether I'm going through it with my SG or my Les Paul this thing screams. From trippy ambient delays and reverb to 50's rock. The acoustic guitar tones are very convincing. All this for $200 is a steal. I would ... full review
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
In addition to guitars, Gibson offers consumer electronics through its subsidiaries Gibson Innovations (Philips brand), TEAC Corporation (TEAC and Esoteric brands), Onkyo Corporation (Onkyo and Pioneer brands), Cerwin Vega and Stanton,[6] as well as professional audio equipment from KRK Systems, pianos from their wholly owned subsidiary Baldwin Piano, and music software from Cakewalk. (See section #Instruments)

Reverb creates a sense of space, but it also increases the perception of distance. If you need something to appear at the front of a mix, a short, bright reverb may be more appropriate than a long, warm reverb, which will have the effect of pushing the sound into the background. If you need to make the reverb sound 'bigger', a pre-delay (a gap between the dry and wet signals) of up to 120ms can help to do this without pushing the sound too far back, or obscuring it.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
The clipping detector stages receive inputs from the guitar preamp and the reverb recovery amp, they act in an identical manner. The 1458 op-amp is wired as a comparator with a threshold that is near the high side of the allowable voltage swing on the associated 2N3906 preamp stage. If the transistor output exceeds this voltage, the 1458 output turns on, causing the 4011 one-shot pulse stretcher circuit to fire. The one-shot circuit activates the LED, and stays on long enough that even minor clipping on the amplifier causes visible blinking.

I use a coat hanger wire to hang the body and neck from when I paint. It keeps the guitar from touching any thing and makes it easier to move from one place to another. I like to dedicate one place for painting and another for drying to avoid any free floating particales from landing on the wet paint. I use a shed for painting and hang the guitar to dry in my garage.


The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.
Sure, Marshall and Vox contributed to the sound of British rock in the Sixties and Seventies—but let us not forget the mighty Hiwatt DR103. Although it's often associated with the Who's Pete Townshend (who would test their durability night after night), it was a favorite of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, not to mention the Moody Blues, the Stones and beyond. Although the DR103 looks a bit like a Marshall, it certainly doesn't sound like one. This was the result of a vastly different design.
Desolder the 9V battery connections and attach a 9V centre-negative DC plug to the correct poles on a 3PDT switch; if you’re not sure where to start, purchase a PCB for this online or search for the correct wiring layout. Lead a live and ground wire out from your switch to your vero, and solder them in place where the 9V battery clip was previously soldered in.

It comes with a single coil pickup in the neck position and a humbucker at the bridge - switching between the two pickups gives you both a strat like sound and an LP like tone. The pickup selector is 3-way so you can play with both pickups at the same time. It sports a shorter 24.75" scale length and smaller 12" radius on the rosewood topped mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1.6875" nut width making it very playable and accessible to guitarists of all levels of experience. Many customer reviews suggest the Empire HG feels and plays like a more expensive guitar.
The GK Studio mixes traditional flamenco construction techniques, a comfortable body shape and modern Fishman electronics, resulting in an easy to play nylon-string guitar that can be plugged in for stage use. My main concern about this guitar is its slightly thinner body depth, neck and nutwidth(1.96"), but these are calculated tweaks that should make this classical guitar play and feel more akin to conventional steel-string acoustics.
Traditionally, the vast majority of professional engineers prefer to record electric guitars through a mic’d up amplifier, rather than use a DI (direct injection) box, even though specialist guitar DI units are readily available. That said, there are many pracitcal reasons to split the signal from the guitar and use a DI box in conjunction with an amp. If you find out later that the recorded amp sound doesn’t work in the mix, or you wish you hadn’t committed a particular effect ‘to tape’, the pure guitar sound can be re-amped and subsequently reprocessed without the need to discard a great take. You can route the DI’d signal through a modelling plug-in and blend that with the mic’d amp sound, too.
My live rig for years has been a multi FX floor pedal (currently, and for the past seven years, using a BOSS GT-8) running the left and right outputs into the effects RETURN of a small amp on stage and through a speaker cab simulator (lately, a “CABTONE” by Digital music Corp, at other times a Hughes & Kettner “RED BOX”) We often play as a ten piece band, with trumpet, trombone, three saxes… and here am I with a 30 watt Behringer amp with an 8 inch speaker, my BOSS GT-8 and a CABTONE direct box/speaker simulator going to the PA. Sounds great. (I’ve substituted bigger amps at times… a Tech21 Power Station… but to my ears, the Behringer sounds better.) You’re probably thinking… a 30 watt Behringer? That’s a “toy,” right? It’s enough. Well, that and the fact that the other “direct” channel is in our monitors, making for a rich 3D stereo sound on stage between the amp and the monitors. I am looking to upgrade to a multi effect processor that allows different cab simulations per patch – maybe the Eleven Rack… (I would have a hard time justifying the expense of the Fractal system) but honestly, I’ve been very happy with the setup I just described. Been happy with it the past seven years, and before that, it was different amps (actually bypassing everything but the power amp and speaker) and different floor processors (Digitech, Rocktron, BOSS…) but the same idea… one output to the board, the other to a small amp.

These pedals essentially do the same thing with overdrive being regarded as a milder effect, similar to turning a tube amp all the way up and distortion a more extreme version of the same effect. Although these are designed for electric guitar, I’ve seen acoustic players use them to great effect through an amp or PA. If done well it provides a dramatic lift to a song. The most important thing is to be familiar with the sound and volume your pedal will create before you try it live.


Absolutely love this guitar!! One great instrument for a great price. Ordering was easy and delivered before projected date. I am no professional by any means, but as I've progressed, I wanted a guitar I could grow with and play for years to come. This is it!! I've played a lot of acoustics ranging from Gibson to Taylor but absolutely love this Martin. The action is like butter and coming from the Martin collection, the sound and tone is at a minimum of FANTASTIC!! If you are looking for an outstanding piece of musical magic to add to your collection, or something to purchase to have for a lifetime without spending your life savings to obtain it, this is the one you are looking for.
When it comes to its dimensions, all interested buyers should know that it is quite sizeable on the exterior (the unit has the following external measurements 40″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 15″ (lower bout) width x 3″ height). Likewise, the bag is quite spacious on the inside (39.5″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 14.5″ (lower bout) width and 2.5″ in height).
Finally moving over to the flipside, there is a certain issue with the amplifier which I’m not quite able to understand. Don’t get me wrong, it is a very good 10 Amp Amplifier from Hollinger, but somehow you get this buzzing noise when you set it in full volume. At a lower volume however, it sounds just fine. Even the distortion button works well, and helps you work up some pretty cool effects. All other accessories work fine, and aid your growth as a fresh learner.
Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.
The 75 Watt Fender Rumble 75 Bass Combo Amp and its 150 Watt and 300 Watt counterparts can produce an overdrive effect by using the gain and blend controls, giving overdrive sounds ranging from "mellow warmth [to] heavy distorted tones".[27] The Fender SuperBassman is a 300-watt tube head which has a built-in overdrive channel. The Fender Bronco 40 includes a range of effects including modern bass overdrive, vintage overdrive and fuzz.
You're close, but not quite where you want to be with your tone.  You are officially a serious tone chaser; you've already swapped the stock burstbuckers in your awesome R9 Les Paul for something better ... but you are still only at 95-percent of the TONE you want, need, and hear in your head.  Keep seeking grasshopper, and you will find.  For only those who persist will drink from the holy grail.
The first effect in our signal chain is a pedal wah. A wah is an effect known as a filter that alters the basic tone of the guitar. When you push the pedal fully forward, the filter brightens up your guitar tone and you bring back the pedal your guitar tone gets darker. For the most variety of sound, you want all the other effects to have a shot at the sound from the Wah so the ME-80 places it as close to the guitar as possible.

An overdubbing session is ideal for air-guitar miking because there is no leakage from other instruments. I usually prefer to maintain total isolation between the two sources, placing the guitarist and amp in separate rooms. But for some production styles, the acoustic air mic can also do double duty as a distant room mic for the amp, with the ratio of pick sound to ambience determined by mic placement and amp volume. I've recorded some very hefty-sounding rock 'n' roll power chording this way, as well as a variety of vintage-style solos and rhythm parts. At the board, a low shelving or low-midrange EQ cut, combined with a subtle high-end boost around 4 to 6 kHz, will usually help these tracks jump out of the mix.

TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.


Later, around 1963, rebadged Guyatone and Teisco guitars appeared, both in the U.S. and a few in the U.K., also as Futuramas. That was the beginning of several years of Guyatone-made Kents. The Teiscos seemed to be part of the 1963-64 freshman-class only. After starting with an initial group of both Guyatone and Teisco guitars, the importer seemed to settle on Guyatone as a main supplier.

A seasoned guitarist, however, makes use of restraint at the high end of the spectrum. What to an amateur sounds muffled and buried by the drums is actually the guitar sitting in its proper place in the mix, assuming the role of a rhythm instrument. When it is time for the guitar to jump forward, in a lead part for example, power and contrast can be now gained by unleashing a bit more treble. Here you can use your pickup selector, tone knob, volume knob (which also functions as a mild treble cut as it is rolled back), or a pedal such as an equalizer or overdrive.


Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.

But for all its light weight, this classical guitar shows off a stunning cedar top and rosewood fretboard. The inlay is just as elegant, and to keep the guitar’s profile looking good, the neck has a 3-ply construction style to prevent warping. The guitar has a matte finish, which gives it an “old-school” appearance, and the matte finish is great for photo sessions: no glare.

An incredible acoustic baby right handed guitar, natural in color without a case. It has a solid wood and Nato fret board that constitutes of 19 frets. It also has an awesome mid range boost, has adjustable truss rods, is light in weight, and is easy to operate, making it suitable for an entry level guitarist. The prices are relatively fair, ranging from INR 9,990. You can get more details on the product by clicking on the following link:

Sure, your pickups pick up the sound, and your amp amplifies it, but even before they get to handle it, your precious tone has already been formed by the interaction of string and wood. Pluck a string, and you set into motion a transference of vibrational energy from the strings into the wood of the body and neck (via different coupling elements such as bridge saddles, nut, and frets). The spectrum of sounds kicked out by this acoustic interaction is the biggest determining factor at the heart of the sound that eventually reaches the listener’s ear, however you delay, spin, or distort it along the way. Let’s look at the characteristic voices of a few tone woods, and see how they contribute to our guitar’s sound.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
The first popular humbucker was introduced by Gibson in 1955, and the world of music was never the same again. In general, the humbucker offers a thick, rich tone, with a medium to high output, which is why they are staple of heavy rock and metal (although equally popular in jazz music). You will find that humbuckers are used by everyone from Eddie van Halen and Dave Mustaine, to Jimmy Page and Dimebag Darrell. Humbuckers feature two coils wired out of phase with each other, and – as the name suggests – are used to eliminate the unpleasant 60-cycle hum that plagues many single-coil pickups. Gibson’s ’57 Classic Plus is a legend in the world of humbuckers, although be sure to check out our humbucker page for more excellent models.

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The first burst of interest in Explorer-style guitars in the 1970s, led by players such as Rick Derringer and Sammy Hagar, was followed by a hiatus at the end of the decade when guitarists followed an Alembic-style lead. However, natural-finished neck-through guitars with sophisticated electronics didn’t cut it with the heavy metal bands that became more popular in the early 1980s with the New Wave of British Heavy Metal and the subsequent American response, chiefly out of Los Angeles. Poofy hair and skin-tight spandex begged for guitars with in-your-face style. The radical Explorer shape was perfect for making the right kind of personal stage statement. Manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon. Baby Deans, Ibanez, Aria, Cort… Even Gibson offered Explorers in cool custom graphics.
It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.
The shadows are his home and keeping Gotham's citizens safe is his sustenance. Darkness envelops his every move and his legend lives in the whispers of each passerby. Known by many names — the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, Batman — this man lives to protect. But by pitting himself against the criminals of a city, he has only made his laundry list of powerful enemies grow. One after another, a new and nefarious threat has risen up and one after another Batman succeeded in bringing them down. But what happens when those menacing masterminds join forces? Who will rescue Gotham when a deadly roster of depraved lunatics gangs up on the shadowed warrior? Who will save us all? The finale to the legendary Arkham series explodes onto your screen in the most adrenaline-pumping storyline yet. The Scarecrow has returned to Gotham City and he has united a terrifying team of super villains, including Penguin, Two-Face and Harley Quinn. For the first time in the franchise, you get to step behind the wheel of the iconic Batmobile as you harness the power of Batman and scramble to outwit the wicked gang after your blood. Tear through the streets and soar across the skyline in heart-pounding gameplay that will suck you in and force you to ask yourself if you have what it takes to save Gotham. Do you have it within you to be the hero the city needs? Or will the villains of Gotham overtake the Dark Knight once and for all?
I love reading interviews with engineers and producers, but the more of them I read, the more I come up against the basic problem that my brain is like a sieve. I'm forever thinking to myself "I really must remember that technique", but unless I dash off and use it right away the knowledge just skips out of my ear and heads for the hills, probably glad to be free. And even if I vaguely remember reading a fascinating passage about de-essing nose-flutes, I'm damned if I can recall where I read it or who recommended it.

There are lots of adjustment points built into modern electric guitars. And unless you know what you're doing (and why), these adjustments can tempt you to mess around with your guitar and make things worse instead of better. With this book, you can avoid that trap. You'll find step-by-step instructions for setting up your guitar, replacing strings, changing string gauges, dealing with common electronics problems, and more.
The controls are fairly conventional – one tone and one volume control, each located at the end of a neck, plus a neck selector switch. The switch is mounted on a plastic “bridge” that spans both necks. Each neck features Valco’s usual plastic nut and combination bridge/tailpiece, and the fretboards are similar to ones found on a variety of Valco steels.

I have had some truly “nightmare” scenarios with repair people in my time, and you must beware of these folks who love to take your money, but who can totally botch a repair job on a nice guitar! It’s happened often enough to me to make me be very careful whenever I am “trying out” a new repair shop for guitar-related problems. Due to this, I often like to start with bringing them some relatively un-complicated guitar repair problems such as fret jobs and wiring problems, but even these have sometimes turned into nightmares. Today for example, I brought of all things, 3 Lap Steels and one semi-hollow guitar for repairs, but unfortunately the store’s repair guy was not there. We had a good communication though, and they made sure I wrote down the repairs I felt were needed, with a separate sheet for each instrument, and said that he’d be calling me with any questions regarding the guitars and their repairs before tearing into them!


DADGAD was developed by Davey Graham in the early 1960s when he was travelling in Morocco, to more easily play along with Oud music Among the first to use this tuning were the folk-blues guitarists of the 60s like Bert Jansch, John Rebourn, Martin Carthy, and John Martyn. It was many years later in the 1970s that it became established for accompanists of traditional music, predominantly Scottish and Irish. Due to this popularity it is sometimes referred to as "Celtic" tuning, although this is misleading given it's origin and it's primary early use in a quite different field of music. Often vocalized as "Dad-Gad", DADGAD it is now common in Celtic music. In rock music, has been used in Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir".[8] Pierre Bensusan is another noted exponent of this tuning. The post-metal group Russian Circles also employ this tuning, and also plays it in the form of all the notes becoming a half-step down: D♭-A♭-d♭-g♭-a♭-d♭'. Three down-tuned variations are used by the band Sevendust: A Drop C variation, or C-G-c-f-g-c'. (used on the song "Unraveling"), a Drop B variation, or B'-F♯-B-e-f♯-b, and a Drop A# variation, or A♯'-F-A♯-d♯-f-a♯. Neighboring tunings D-A-d-e-a-e' and C-G-c-d-g-a have been used by Martin Carthy. Also D-A-d-a-a-d', was used by Dave Wakeling on the English Beat's 1983 "Save It For Later".
So far I’ve only tried this on breadboard, though I plan to deploy it in a new “parts” guitar I’m assembling. So far it sounds … really good. A lot like a ToneStyler, actually, but with fewer parts and handpicked values. The only tricky thing was finding a good pot value where all the action wasn’t bunched up at one end of the knob’s range. A reverse-log pot worked best for me—I got nice results with both a C500K and C1M.
Phrase sampler: Like a loop pedal, a phrase sampler will store loops or phrases of even greater length. The more expensive and sophisticated phrase samplers will save multiple phrases or loops, drum and bass, rhythm guitar, or practice solos. Some have USB connectivity and can hook up to your computer for uploading, so you never lose a loop or phrase.
Seller: atcycle (2,136) 100%, Location: Sugar Land, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 122791185383 This Used Guitar, cosmetically in general is in good used condition, it's played and everything works fine. Includes tremolo bar. The string trees have been removed for tuning stability but will be included should you wish to use them. Please use the enlarge feature and look over all pictures as this is the best way for me to show / describe the condition to you. I will have other Guitars listed. PLEASE NOTE ALL FAULTS SHOWN IN PICTURES ARE CONSIDERED PART OF THE DESCRIPTION.This Lotus "Strat" triple single coil is one of the finest examples of high quality imports which strongly competed with the big boys back in the day. Those of us who were around back then, learned that frequently these guitars had better sound and build quality than the Name Brand at that time. They were so good that the Big Name Company had them build many guitars for them! Condition: Used, Condition: There are a few signs of wear typical of an older used instrument. Missing switch button., Brand: Lotus, Body Type: Solid, MPN: Does Not Apply, Dexterity: Right-Handed, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Color: Black, Body Material: Solid Wood See More
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
This list kind of blows. There are no greatest guitarists. And I hate how people think guitar is sickly limited to rock guys who in the whole scheme of things are pretty amateur. How about Eric clapton? Heck if Charlie Christian or django rhinehardt had never started playing solos guitar would still be a strict rhythm instrument playing crotchets to emphasise the beat. He had 2 fingers and did more for the guitar than anyone on this list? Especially Tom Morello? How about pat methany, wes Montgomery, pat martino, tal farlow, JOHN MCLAUGHLIN, george benson? Listen to any of those guys and it will completely redefine your thoughts on the guitar. It can so easily be intelligent and soulful simultaneously…
Other Archtone owners may notice a slightly different model number, but with the exception of a tenor version, the only difference is the finish. The H1213 (your model) was finished with a shaded-brown sunburst, the H1214 was ivory-colored with a flame effect, and the H1215 was a sunburst with a grained effect. In excellent condition, this model is worth between $200 and $250 today. But in the average condition yours appears to be, it’s worth between $100 and $150.
Compared to the previously mentioned good guitar brands, ESP (Electric Sound Products) guitars are relative newcomers to the scene. The Japanese company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and they produce mostly electric guitars and basses. The company became very popular among metal guitar players, however they are versatile enough to be used for any style.
The middle S (Position 3) by itself also works very well for chord strumming, and it also responds very well if slapping is something you like to do (A single coil in the middle is literally the textbook choice: Single coils typically have more bite and will bring life to the pops, and it's position will ensure the slaps aren't too boomy (like a neck pickup would be) or too tinny/nasally (like a bridge pickup would be)).
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Les Paul Custom Plus Bullseye Solidbody Electric Guitar at a Glance: Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Totally solid mahogany body and hard maple neck deliver freakish sustain Premium hardware put this Les Paul in a class all of its own Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Turn up the heat with a pair of the most outrageously amp ...
Epiphone are a well respected subsidiary of Gibson, and have been making musical instruments since their founding in what is now Turkey, Europe, in 1873. After being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone are now best known for manufacturing affordable versions of some of the most iconic guitar models around, including the Les Paul and SG. However they do make a couple of original models, such as the Casino, which was famously used by the Beatles.
It is rare for any brand, let alone an entire company, to stay in business this long and their longevity speaks volumes to the exceptional quality of their instruments. Although they did dabble in electric guitars and basses for a short time, today the company is dedicated to making the finest acoustic guitars possible just as they were over 180 years ago.
Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type, still widely regarded as the tone machine. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.
Launch price: $299 / £199 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico V bridge humbucker 2x Alnico V single coils | Controls: Volume, tone (with push-pull coil-split), 5-way selector switch | Hardware: Vintage-style vibrato with block saddle | Left-handed: Yes (Pacifica 112J) | Finish: Natural Satin, Old Violin Sunburst, Raspberry Red, Sonic Blue, Black, Silver Metallic
80/20 Bronze strings are a mixture of Bronze and Zinc.  They are also referred to as Bronze/Brass strings and are extremely common, much like Phosphor Bronze.  One of the main differences is this variety produces a very bright tone that enhances articulation and pick attack.   This effect can be lost very quickly depending on how much the player sweats and how often they clean their strings.  This choice can be a little more demanding on the wallet, due to having to change them more often.
The questions I get asked in response to people reading my stuff on guitar wiring often relate to the 5-way pickup selector switch so I thought I’d write a brief explanation of how it works. Understanding how the 5-way switch on your guitar works is key to successful guitar wiring. Knowing what goes on inside the switch may sound like a simple, maybe trivial, detail but it’s something we all need to understand and it’s not as easy as it first seems.
Fender is a guitar pioneer. Its history of making quality guitars stretches back decades. The Fender Modern Player Telecaster Thinline Deluxe is another classic by Fender. This guitar offers both sweet and aggressive tones thanks to its two MP-90 pickups. With its 9.5-inch radius, this guitar is incredibly comfortable to play. There are 22 medium-sized frets and a six-saddle hard-tail bridge. This guitar is easy to tune and stays in tune.
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We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]
When I first hooked it up, I was annoyed. It took maybe two days to get used to the colors flying at me and what color is what string. I also found it odd that there was no timing indication with the notes (is it a quarter note, or a half note?, gradually, I've learned to tell by the spacing), which is especially akward in the beginning when you only play occasional notes in the song. I 've also found (as have most people I've played it with), that for whatever reason, we tend to miss seeing the blue notes (4th string) a lot (tends to blend into the background) and to a lesser extent the orange notes (3rd string).
The name has a long and involved history that is interwoven with that of the resonator guitar. Originally coined by the Dopyera brothers when they formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company, in time it came to commonly mean a resonator guitar, or specifically one with a single inverted resonator. This particular design was introduced by the Dopyeras’ new company, in competition to the already patented Tricone and biscuit designs owned and produced by the National String Instrument Corporation.
Double-neck (or, less commonly, "twin-neck") guitars enable guitarists to play both guitar and bass guitar or, more commonly, both a six-string and a twelve-string. In the mid-1960s, one of the first players to use this type of guitar was Paul Revere & the Raiders' guitarist Drake Levin. Another early user was John McLaughlin. The double-neck guitar was popularized by Jimmy Page, who used a custom-made, cherry-finished Gibson EDS-1275 to perform "Stairway to Heaven", "The Song Remains the Same" and "The Rain Song", although for the recording of "Stairway to Heaven" he used a Fender Telecaster and a Fender XII electric twelve-string. Mike Rutherford of Genesis and Mike + the Mechanics is also famous for his use of a double-neck guitar during live shows. Don Felder of the Eagles used the Gibson EDS-1275 during the Hotel California tour. Muse guitarist and vocalist Matthew Bellamy uses a silver Manson double-neck on his band's Resistance Tour. Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson is also known for using double-neck guitars in the live performance of several songs. In performances of the song "Xanadu" during the band's 2015 R40 anniversary tour, Lifeson played a white Gibson EDS-1275 double-neck guitar with six-string and twelve-string necks, while bassist Geddy Lee performed with a double-neck Rickenbacker guitar with four-string bass and twelve-string guitar necks.
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