The guitar is an instrument capable of truly heavenly tones but capturing this sound in a recording is never as straight-forward as you'd think. Here at Prime Loops we've been changing strings, tweaking amps and adjusting mics to deliver only the finest tone imaginable to your DAW! We used a 1985 Gibson Les Paul electric and a Martin DC-16RGTE acoustic with Fishman, Marshall and Orange amps, recorded through an AKG C214 microphone, so STUDIO GUITARS guarantees to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand on end!
Now, as others have mentioned, there is a switch that controls which pickup (or pickups plural) you want to use at any given moment. Seeing as each pickup is placed at a different point under the strings, the vibrations are slightly different. The closer the strings are to the bridge at the bottom, the more 'narrow' and intense the vibrations get. Thus the current generated from the magnets lead to different sound characteristics.

This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.
It has always amused me that one of the great tempests in the teapot of guitardom has been the legendary “lawsuit” of the 1970s. You know, when Norlin (aka Gibson) sued Elger (aka Hoshino, aka Ibanez) in 1977 over trademark infringement based upon “copying” Gibson’s headstock design. There are tons of ironies in this story, but one of the most amusing aspects is that companies such as Gibson have been one of the most egregious copyists of its own guitars over the years. Witness the Korean-made Epiphone Firebird 500 seen here.
The Epiphone Thunderbird IV Reverse Bass is Epiphone’s most distinctive bass guitar to date. The Thunderbird features the classic reverse body styling and dual humbuckers just like the Gibson originals! The Thunderbird IV features an alder body and a 34 inch scale bolt-on maple neck with a rosewood fretboard and dot inlays, and warm and phat dual humbucking pickups.
The only guitars that I have been able to find pictures of that have the little curly thingie on the headstocks have been Kents, Kawais and some kind of no-name guitar that looks like the factory took a red Kent 820 and sprayed black around the edges to create a “redburst” finish. The example above appears to has started as a regular sunburst finish with more red and black added. The neck, headstock, pickups, and body are identical to the Kent 820 except the name ‘Kent’ doesn’t appear on the guitar anywhere. Note that the hardware on it is the same as on the 820 shown. That bridge and tailpiece configuration is a little unusual for Kent 820s. (the 820 there is mine) The bridge and tailpiece on the Kent 823 is the more common configuration.
In 1931, Martin reintroduced the dreadnought with X-bracing and two years later gave it a modified body shape to accommodate a 14-fret neck, and it quickly became their best-selling guitar. The rest of the industry soon followed[citation needed], and today the “dreadnought” size and shape is considered one of the “standard” acoustic guitar shapes, iconic for its use in a wide variety of musical genres.

Sounds great. Compact and good looking. Easy to use. Extremely versatile! Make sure you read the instructions because there are so many things you can do with this. Only drawback is that if you plan to use it live, try not to have too many effects applied because it slows down the transition timing. However, best for recording if youre trying to produce specific sounds from your instrument.
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Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
Open tunings improve the intonation of major chords by reducing the error of third intervals in equal temperaments. For example, in the open-G overtones tuning G-G-D-G-B-D, the (G,B) interval is a major third, and of course each successive pair of notes on the G- and B-strings is also a major third; similarly, the open-string minor-third (B,D) induces minor thirds among all the frets of the B-D strings. The thirds of equal temperament have audible deviations from the thirds of just intonation: Equal temperaments is used in modern music because it facilitates music in all keys, while (on a piano and other instruments) just intonation provided better-sounding major-third intervals for only a subset of keys.[65] "Sonny Landreth, Keith Richards and other open-G masters often lower the second string slightly so the major third is in tune with the overtone series. This adjustment dials out the dissonance, and makes those big one-finger major-chords come alive."[66]
From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
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