In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.
In 1954, Fender introduced the Fender Stratocaster, or "Strat". It was positioned as a deluxe model and offered various product improvements and innovations over the Telecaster. These innovations included an ash or alder double-cutaway body design for badge assembly with an integrated vibrato mechanism (called a synchronized tremolo by Fender, thus beginning a confusion of the terms that still continues), three single-coil pickups, and body comfort contours. Leo Fender is also credited with developing the first commercially successful electric bass called the Fender Precision Bass, introduced in 1951.
Gibson 2012 SG Special '70s Tribute Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$649.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 SG Faded Electric Guitar, Left-Handed (with Gig Bag)   New from$659.00In Stockor 12 payments of $54.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2017 Les Paul Standard Electric Guitar, Left Handed (with Case)   New from$2,299.00In Stockor 12 payments of $191.59 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2019 LP Junior Tribute DC Electric Guitar, Left Handed, (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping See All Left-Handed Electric Guitars
There are literally hundreds of potential models we could show you, including a wide range from Martin themselves. But, as an example, we’ve chosen to share this rather attractive number called the Martin 00-18V. This guitar is a great demonstration of the top end of the price range, and features a host of show-stopping additions. Martin has great pedigree in the world of acoustic guitars – more on that later – and the Songwriter Deluxe is a great yardstick against which other dreadnoughts can be measured.
Gibson lost the trademark for Les Paul in Finland. According to the court, “Les Paul” has become a common noun for guitars of a certain type. The lawsuit began when Gibson suedMusamaailma, which produces Tokai guitars, for trademark violation. However, several witnesses testified that the term “Les Paul” denotes character in a guitar rather than a particular guitar model. The court also found it aggravating that Gibson had used Les Paul in the plural form and that the importer of Gibson guitars had used Les Paul as a common noun. The court decision will become effective, as Gibson is not going to appeal.[48]
A Delay or Echo pedal creates a copy of an incoming sound and slightly time-delays it, creating either a "slap" (single repetition) or an echo (multiple repetitions) effect. Delay pedals may use either analog or digital technology. Analog delays often are less flexible and not as "perfect" sounding as digital delays, but some guitarists argue that analog effects produce "warmer" tones. Early delay devices actually used magnetic tape to produce the time delay effect. U2's guitarist, The Edge, is known for his extensive use of delay effects. Some common Delay pedals are:

In late 1966, Peter Green had the job of replacing Eric Clapton in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Mayall told his producer, "He might not be better [than Clapton] now. But you wait… he's going to be the best." Soon, with the original Fleetwood Mac, he was Britain's most progressive blues guitarist, with a Chicago-informed aggression heightened by the melodic adventure on albums like 1969's Then Play On. Green soon entered a dark age of mental and health problems, returning in the Nineties with more subdued but recognizable gifts.
The guitar is hand-made by Martin's top luthiers, using exotic cocobolo wood for the back and sides, mixed with a more conventional solid sitka spruce top. As expected from a high-end instrument, this guitar features impressive visual appointments, most notable of which is its ivoroid binding, beautiful rosette and fretboard inlays. While its price tag and looks may push you to just hide this guitar in the closet, know that this instrument is built to make music in the road or in the studio. Martin employed modern bracing and construction techniques to ensure the guitar stays reliable, beautiful and great sounding for a long time. Those that are lucky enough to own this guitar have themselves a treasure that they can pass down to the next generation of players.

Packing almost the entire tonal essence of 80's arena rock n' roll into one bar-shaped unit, with a glassy and transparent, BBD-style chorus, a crushing hot rod Marshall-stack crunch distortion, a natural-sounding delay, and a spacious reverb. Turn on every module on the bar, with a little tweaking, you've got yourself THE EPIC lead tone, which is dynamic, responsive to your hands, with long sustain, and cuts through the mix like a knife through butter. A built-in cab simulator for getting a real guitar cabinet sound straight from the PA system; Max delay time: 500ms It is the ultimate tool for road touring gigs. Aluminum-alloy, metal casing, stable and strong; compact size. Grab it! Plug it! Tweak it! Rock it! LED indicator shows the working state; Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center negative,.


Yamaha F-310 Acoustic Dreadnought guitar in very good-excellent used condition no cracks or issues it looks great and the neck angle is excellent as well so as a result this guitar plays well with good fingerboard action with plenty of room on the saddle to lower action even more in future years if ever needed. Frets look good at 90-% with no ruts on fingerboard noted, truss rod is working fine, nut is 1-11/16ths. Yamaha specs (all of the F310 are made like this). It has 20 frets and a slim taper neck,The top is spruce, laminated, with natural finish. The sides and back are made of Meranti Indonesian Mahogany type wood , fingerboard and bridge are made Indian Rosewood, and the neck is of Nato. It's a full dreadnought guitar style, and just looks great.this one is in exceptional used condition better than average. Sound is good with nice volume and its tone is getting mature,,nice tone. No Cracks no issues no repairs and looks to have a bone nut and saddle this helps it have such a mature natural tone, Its sounds better than other F310’s Ive played I like this guitar and its price is right. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
This guitar is one of the most popular choices for those looking for a quality acoustic guitar under $500. It comes in a dreadnought size or concert (smaller body) size. It also comes in a variety of colors (10 at time of writing). Some of the features of this acoustic are: Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, new scalloped bracing. Owners describe the sound of this guitar as full, bright, and balanced. It will surely bring a smile to your face as you strum chords for hours while learning new songs. See all the available color choices for this guitar here.
I like the pseudo PTB scheme where the tone cap (I prefer .033 or .022mF) is attached to lug 3 of the pot and to ground. Lug 2 is connected to the Volume pot’s lug 1 and there’s an additional small cap (0.001mF or smaller) connected between tone pot lug 1 and Vol pot lug 2. Assume both pots are Log types: with tone at 7.5 (ie halfway along the pot’s sweep) there is no appreciable treble cut, and the volume pot gives a pretty even tone throughout its range. With tone pot higher than 7.5 bass is cut as you roll back the volume, with tone pot lower than 7.5 treble is cut. Minimum bass setting – vol approx 3, tone full up. Minimum treble setting vol full up, tone full down. I have this in most of my guitars and love it.
“The tremolo tail assembly was engineered specifically for the Spectrum ‘5.’ The bridge is an integral part of the whole assembly and is, of course, universally adjustable. The marvel of it all, however, is that the tremolo does not exert any friction (hence no wear and tear) on the strings. The tremolo action causes the whole bridge assembly to move smoothly back and forth.
National Dobro’s involvement with electrics began, indirectly, with experiments conducted by George Beauchamp, who designed his first “electro” guitar in 1931, while actually still with the National company (not yet merged with Dobro). This was a wood-bodied “frying pan” with a pickup probably designed in conjunction with Paul Barth and Harry Watson, another National employee.
When discussing the science of tone, it’s safe to assume that we all know how electric guitars work. Pickups are electro-magnets that sense string vibrations and produce a signal that ultimately blares out of the amplifier. Of course, we all know that myriad other factors influence the sound, as well. Body shape, wood choice, string selection, pedal effects, rack effects, humidity, amount of people in the room, and the guitar player’s recent fight with his girlfriend are just some of the items that can alter a guitar tone from performance to performance.
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.
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You couldn’t call it a pedal, but Fender’s tube reverb, in its original or reissued form, has always been considered one of the best spring reverb units around, and can be added at the front end of any amp (although this isn’t ideal if your overdrive sound comes from a channel-switching overdrive preamp placed after the reverb). Other amp makers in the USA and the UK also offered stand-alone reverbs, plenty of which can sound totally fabulous. Fender was actually a little slow getting onboard reverb into its amplifiers, though, and makers such as Gibson and Ampeg offered combos with fantastic sounding built-in reverb in the early ’60s.

Finally moving over to the flipside, there is a certain issue with the amplifier which I’m not quite able to understand. Don’t get me wrong, it is a very good 10 Amp Amplifier from Hollinger, but somehow you get this buzzing noise when you set it in full volume. At a lower volume however, it sounds just fine. Even the distortion button works well, and helps you work up some pretty cool effects. All other accessories work fine, and aid your growth as a fresh learner.
The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.
The vast majority of bass amps in the 2010s can be powered solely by AC mains power, obtained by plugging the amp into a wall socket. Inexpensive practice amps may have the AC mains plug hardwired into the unit. Middle-priced to high-priced amplifiers typically have a removable cable and plug, as used with PC computer towers. The benefits of having a removable cable and plug is that if the cable becomes worn or damaged, a new cable can easily be replaced by a layperson. If a hardwired AC mains cable and plug becomes worn or damaged, a qualified technician or electrician will typically be required to replace the cable and plug. Most amps are designed to work for a single voltage. A small number of expensive bass amps designed for touring professionals have user-selectable voltage, which enables a bassist to play with same amp in North America and Europe. A small number of small combo amps can run on both AC mains power and battery power. This enables bassists to play outside where there is no access to power (e.g., for busking on the street). Amps that are battery powered may have a 12 volt input, enabling the unit to be connected to a car battery with alligator clips.
I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.
 Great, low priced, vintage project Les Paul "copy" guitar. Guitar as photo'd only. Multi-pieced Mahogany, double bound body with a carved top. Bound rosewood fret board with simulated mother of pearl "block" style fret markers and dot side markers. Frets still in good "playable" condition. Good neck profile. Missing nut and tuning machines on headstock. Pick-ups function but guitar will need to be rewired to work properly and missing toggle will need to be replaced.  Bridge needs work and it has a Gibson style stop tail piece. No gig-bag or case included. Would make a great vintage, Japanese, project / player guitar.
Another great thing about this guitar is the Min-ETune system that offers 16 tuning presets. This not only makes it super quick to tune your guitar for everyday use, it’s also great if you need to tune your guitar up or down. It saves you a lot of work and time! It’s also a feature that makes these electric guitars for beginners who don’t know how to tune their guitar, and even if they of course can use a tuner this is still a faster option.
Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 

The E-18 and EM-18 were basically the same guitar differing only in electronics. The E-18 featured two DiMarzio humbucking pickups, a DiMarzio PAF at the neck and a DiMarzio Super Distortion at the bridge. In addition to the regular controls, the E-18 had mini-toggle phase switch. Production of the E-18 began in April of ’79 and about 5,307 (about 1,320 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.


One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson's Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[27] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his "App" guitar to either company.[28] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[29] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[30] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.
OLD Morris looks to be equal in all respects to our Yairi CY116, exotic wood construction with very nice old woods and excellent workmanship - fit & f instance they make the fit & finish is amazingly nice on the Terada factory made Morris. If your not familiar with Terada they are responsible for some of the finest Japanese guitars on the planet for instance Ibanez George Benson GB10's and all that high end line, most of Ibanez's Artists, and several other top of the line Japanese legends and they know how to make exceptional guitars and this Morris Classical is no different it sounds beautiful and has the vibe that is if you love the looks and feel of a well seasoned fully broken in 40 year patina and your OK with the top finger drag wear your going to love this vintage beauty yes it has plenty of vibe bit it sounds deep and rich too. Nice meaty neck plays easily with great action and with absolutely no cracks oh it has minor doinks and scratches here & there but nothing horrible this guitar qualifies for a VERY GOOD JVG rating overall vintage excellent but with the wear as seen the neck is still pretty slick no major abrasions and the fingerboard is nice too. Yes this is a very nice Ole Classical that has another lifetime of wonderful service to its new owner. I think you will be very pleased. Any questions just drop me an email to JVGuitars@gmail.com . Thanks for looking Joe.
The Hughes & Kettner Tube Meister 36 is a distinct looking tube amplifier head that's packed with features. For something that's compact, this amp can do quite a lot of what bigger amps can in terms of functionality, including having three channels that let you switch between clean, crunch and lead and a full set of complementary controls to tweak each channel to your liking. Another interesting feature of this amp is its TSC (Tube Safety Control), which automatically keeps the tube in bias and monitors them to extend their use. Finally, this amp head comes with a built-in Red box DI, so you can plug the amp head straight to any PA system or recording console without any problem. The people also installed a power attenuator into the amp, which lets you lower the rating to just 1 Watt for quiet practice. Wrapping up its features is the built-in reverb, which compliments the amp instead of distracting users.
StepFilter ('Filter' category): I'm a huge fan of Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn processor. When I play with groups like Air Liquide, it's the only gear I take other than the guitar, and of course a MIDI cable to sync it from the band's MIDI master clock. You can get many of the same effects from Cubase's StepFilter.The StepFilter offers synchronised filter effects that recall Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn signal processor. StepFilter is basically a tempo‑sync'ed dual step‑sequencer, each with 16 steps, and there's a total of eight patterns. One sequencer controls filter cutoff and the other resonance. The filter response morphs from low‑pass to high‑pass, with a stop along the way for band‑pass. You can also copy a pattern, paste it into a different pattern, and create variations. All of these parameters, including pattern selection, can be used with VST host automation control. If you're into electronic guitar effects, you really should check this out — but also try the Tranceformer ('Modulation' category) and Chopper ('Other' category), which are similar, although Chopper works on amplitude, and Tranceformer syncs a ring modulator's carrier frequency to the project tempo'
Here we have a well made in Japan kinda rare to see these vintage Fender Japanese acoustics now days... interesting well built and is still beauty ..its all mahogany body & neck are very well constructed , offering good cross braced body ala D-18/28 seems to be awfully similar?..to my vintage Yamaha FG180 or 200 Nippon Gakki.....that is to say pretty darn nice!.. almost the same guitar but for the Fender's more stylistic headstock top shape that differs from the vintage Yamaha... this was clearly built for Fender as there import in those days Japan offered more competitive pricing to us manufactures to produce there line...this offering is really quite a nice guitar in its own right... so now its nicely aged well over the years..nice ring tone to it now, its very good overall condition, but sometime in its past history it received a doink to the binding on the back side lower bout a binding touch up repair has been done ...to the back lower bout and is about a foot long area -replaced ..its on the back bottom like I said so its really out of sight and is out of mind the remainder of bindings are otherwise 100% very nice beautiful actually nice looking tortious style..the rest the body has a few nicks or scars not to bad looking though a real vintage Vibe to it with no major cracks or warpage the bridge & top are tight and flat so its a very sound playing instrument, 1 changed tuner. The minor abraiions had been lacquer filled to preserve the original finish integrity ..we just built up low spots with matching lacquer to level off to prevent further degradation pealing or chipping those areas have been french polished built up and then excess has been removed elsewhere leaving only the low spots filled then we polished to gloss and well it looks ... pretty darn GOOD now.. she's preserved & fully ready for another 30 years of play... this example has a NICE NECK and she plays great....Worth preserving?...I think so See pics please... This guitar has no abrasions wood cracks or issues at all just a vintage guitar thats surprisingly such a fine player...action is good not too high at all and it still has room to lower the saddle or nut even more you so the neck set is very good for many years no worries..its a nice sounding & playing 25 years old vintage Japanese guitar...and is overall a nice looking vintage example..stays in tune nicely and is a joy to play... nice vintage Japanese guitar this guitar is JVG Rated: 8.5/10 very good used guitar as described ...still after 25 years it looks & plays good. Interested in this beauty let me know..Thanks for looking, Joe JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come stay tuned!.

Once CNC (computer numeric control) equipment was introduced into guitar factories starting in the late 1980s and continuing on into the 1990s, it became far less of an issue where a guitar was made. Many of the CNC machines were made in Japan. In some cases the difference between an American-made guitar versus a Japanese-made guitar versus a Korean-made guitar was little more than where the machine was located. To make a guitar in the USA involved putting a Japanese-made CNC machine on a boat and sending it to the US whereupon it could be programmed in the USA and then American or other wood could be fed into the machine, which would spit out components made to tolerances within a few thousandths of an inch of the programming. By contrast a Japanese-made guitar would be produced by leaving the CNC machine in Japan, programming it with a disc done in the USA, and then importing wood to be put into the machine which would spit out components to the same specifications as those which would be made by a similar machine in the USA. A Korean-made guitar could be remarkably similar since the Japanese-made CNC machine could be sent to Korea whereupon the same process could be done there. By 1990 the quantity of guitars made in Japan was nowhere near what it had been earlier, but Korean production was in high gear. While some Japanese instruments have come to be viewed as quite desirable and collectible, I have seen little evidence of such activity with respect to Korean instruments, but the fact remains that the better-quality Korean guitars are remarkably good and most certainly are suitable for use on stage or in the studio.

"Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired


-Would be nice to edit the string colors, add training modes telling you which finger to hit the note with, how many times to play through a sequence (so you learn/memorize the song, vs just respond to the game - i.e is the chorus sequence repeated 4 times before moving onto the next part of the song?),indicating strumming patterns to help with timing (newbies tend to down pick everything and just pick faster when the notes are closer vs switching to an up-down strum) etc.
As a teacher I use a strat because it’s relatable, comfortable, and clean/clear tones. The gibson doesn’t have warmer overtones. That’s not a thing. It has weaker overtones, so a stronger fundamental. That’s why it sounds warmer/duller, and the fender sounds more lively/brighter, because the fender (longer scale) have more overtones to ring louder. That lets you hear mistakes more easily, and is helpful to improve more quickly.

The enormous world of electric guitars can seem daunting to navigate. While there is no best or worst guitar, there are guitars that have been ingrained into our collective headspace. There are also guitars that have pushed boundaries and become staples of the modern musical landscape. Putting aside the latest in guitar tech or rare vintage gems, let’s take a look at models that have time and time again satisfied and inspired players of all tastes and from all walks of life. Here are five of the most popular electric guitars in the world.
Now, to answer your question I would have to point out a series of popular brands and what they are popular for. After that, you make a decision on which one is best for you. You might see where I’m going with this. There is no single best guitar brand the same way there is no single best car brand. But we do have the Ferraris and Lamborghinis, as well as the Toyotas and Nissans of the guitar world!

Very useful. Today I gave life to a Strat, adding a SD lil´59 in the neck, a noiseless single coil in the middle and a SD hot rails in the bridge. I used a H-S-H diagram from SD website with one volume and one tone pots (500k Alpha pots). I will add a second tone pot later on with a push/pull pot to split the little humbuckers in single coils. The guitar sounds huge now!
The solid body guitar is a rock ‘n’ roll machine at its core, but appears in all genres of music and is more popular than hollow body or semi-hollow body guitars due to its wider variety of tones and improved volume and feedback characteristics. Some, like the Les Paul, have arched tops like hollow and semi-hollow models. But the majority are flat-bodied, including Gibson Flying Vs, Explorers and SGs, and classic Epiphones, like the Wilshire.
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