Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.
I have a Dover, it was my great uncle’s guitar. It has seen better days but considering its age its in pretty good shape. Some one did some custom wiring inside so I had to replace the pots. One of the pickups was glued back together but it wasn’t done properly so now it doesn’t quite sit right. The plastic cracked at most of the corners where the screws hold the pick ups down.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.
Vox quickly grew. In 1964 Tom Jennings, to raise capital for JMI's expansion, sold controlling interest in JMI to the Royston Group, a British holding company, and sold American rights to the California-based Thomas Organ Company. Displeased with the direction his old company was taking, he left the company in 1967, which was around the same time that Marshall overtook Vox as the dominant force in the British guitar amplifier market. While Royston's Vox Sound Equipment division set up new operations in the Kent town of Erith, Tom Jennings set up a new company in his old Dartford location, joined later by Dick Denney. Jennings Electronic Industries operated for several years, making an updated and rebadged version of the AC30 along with other amplifiers, as well as a new range of organs.
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There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.
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The Effie was also joined by the Coily U1825 guitar and U1835 bass. These were essentially the same except the Coily guitar had a Bigsby-style vibrato, roller bridge with flip-up mute, and a pair of chrome-covered screw-and-staple humbuckers, typical of early-’70s Arias. The Coily bass had similar four-pole screw-and-staple pickups and a fancy trapeze tail with a diamond design on it. These were available in orange sunburst, red and jade green. The guitar cost $122.50, the bass $135.
I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.
Fender is well known for producing excellent quality musical instruments. Not just today, instead it always has topped the list of best guitar brands as an icon in the music history of America. It produces a brighter tone, accompanying single coil pickups rather than the humbuckers. The single coil pickups are specially designed in a way scratching through the mix with the glorious sound to produce the characteristic tone. The unique part of Fender guitars may cause issues with humming.
Another unusual bass amp is Ashdown's B-Social combo amp, which the company calls a "desktop amp".[10] The 75 watt combo amp has two 5" speakers, which provide stereo sound. While some keyboard amplifiers and electric guitar amplifiers provide stereo sound through two speakers, this is a rare feature on a bass amp. The B-Social provides Micro USB and Bluetooth 4.0 connections for hooking it up to a desktop computer. The amp is versatile enough to be used for playing bass, playing recorded music or streaming music as a home entertainment centre, or for amplifying video game sound effects.[11] The amp has a special socket for connecting amp and cabinet simulation and effects unit apps which can be downloaded on iPhones and iPads. The amp was called "B-Social" because it has a second input, so that a bassist can jam with another performer. The B-Social's USB audio interface can be connected to Digital Audio Workstations for sound recording.[12]
The body is very much the same, composed of a chambered basswood topped by an elegantly contoured laminate maple top - complete with the easily identifiable Gretsch style pickguard. The neck specifications also follow the Pro Jet Bigsby, with a shorter than usual 24.6" scale maple neck, 12" radius rosewood fingerboard, and 1.6875" nut width. It has a total of 22 medium jumbo frets with Neo Classic thumbnail inlays serving as fret markers. Because its not a Filter'tron pickup, the sound of this guitar will be subtly different, but apparently good enough for the many users that have rated this guitar highly and even recommend it.

The Supro brand name was introduced by the National-Dobro Corporation to sell its less expensive electric instruments. The first Supro Spanish and Hawaiian guitars appeared in 1936, and the brand would thrive until the bankruptcy of Valco in 1968. (The modern Supro line of amps bears no relationship to the original brand name). By the end of the 1930s, a pattern was established that would last for the next 30 years: Supro guitars and amps would generally be more affordable than their closest National counterparts, but built to similar quality and sometimes incorporating features not found in any National. Supro instruments were sold through a much less exclusive network of dealers than National, and as a result they have acquired a name recognition that surpasses their “superior” siblings.

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Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana
A reverb pedal basically gives an echo effect and gives your guitar more weight. Think of the sound you hear when you walk into a church or cave – a big expansive sound that reverberates off the walls. In addition, if you want to completely oversaturate your sound with reverb to sound like you’re in a massive cave, you can turn the reverb up all the way and engage it when the song calls for it.
The Kremona “Sofia” model is handmade in Bulgaria as well with a fantastic support staff to answer any questions, so if you have concerns about items made in China, you can lay those concerns aside. The top is cedar, with an authentic bone nut and saddle, and solid African sapele back and sides complete the look for a very pleasing appearance and sound.
I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.
My first electric was one of these (1962, I was 14) . My mother bought it by mail order, probably from the Bell's catalogue. I remember coming home from school every day for what seemed like weeks hoping it had arrived! It was very crudely made with a plywood body (mine was in a red finish). The neck was wide and flat (think that was ply too!) and the action appalling! I remember the original strings were copper wound and left you with green fingertips! I remember the price was around 14 pounds, quite a lot at the time! Even at that age I wasn't impressed for long and soon traded it in for a Hofner Clubman. Wish I still had it now though!
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
If you’re looking for a solid start on how you will sound without settling for a tube amplifier due to its price, maintenance and back breaking weight to carry around. The Marshall MG30FX combo amp is surely one of the best out there on capturing iconic sounds, as well as the legendary Marshall tones that other brand of amplifiers frequently emulates, adding it to their bank of amp models.
Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
The traditional method of getting the sound of the guitar to an audience is to place a Shure SM57® in front of the speaker on the amp’s cabinet. While this certainly sounds awesome and is a tried-and-true method for most applications, the advent of personal monitoring systems like Shure’s PSM 900® led to guitarists being dissatisfied with the sound they were hearing in their in-ears. With the microphone method you are hearing the microphone, not necessarily the amp. This reality was the inspiration behind the creation of the Radial JDX 48™.
Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.
Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
As far as using the tone knob, it’s all about personal preference, and the quality of the electronics in the guitar (and the amp). Players of less expensive guitars often find that the tone of the guitar becomes “muddy” or “stuffy” very quickly as they turn down tone (or volume), and so they keep the guitar “wide open” with all knobs on their “10” setting. At the least, many players avoid going below “5” on the tone dial, keeping the majority of the midrange frequencies that define the real character of the guitar’s tone.
The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
As a general rule, I'll set up the 57 right against the amp's grill cloth, pointing it directly in to the speaker (sometimes at a slight angle from the outer rim of the speaker pointing toward the center). I'll usually place a condensor about two to three feet in front of the amp (at the same level as the amp) and point it at one of the speakers, and if I have another condensor available, I'll place it about five or six feet away, in front of the amp. I'll also raise the "far" mic to a height of approximately five or six feet off the ground.
Each option has a unique tonal quality, some may not seem all that useful in some situations.  2 adjacent pickups that are out of phase, can sound very tinny and weak but often cut through better in the mix as they occupy a different placement in the spectrum.  Consider Brian May's (Queen) tone as some of his selections rely on 2 single coil pickups being out of phase
Its ok to put diffrent brand pickups in, i have a guitar with an iron gear hammer head at the bridge for heavy riffing and a slash signiture at the neck for sweet blues solos. I had it wired diffrent though, 1 master tone 2 volumes and a blend knob, with the 3 way switch in the middle i was getting too much hammer head due to its out put being higher, so the blend knob allows me to fine tune the mix of the pickups.
So fun...I like...I liked it I liked it a lot but the only thing was it took me awhile to get the email that was supposed to get so that is a kind of backed me up on the game but I'm doing good now though so that is good good good good good good good...The fact that the studio is making Mortal Kombat asked on the next generation console is showing you how much they want to improve on disfranchise if they made it for last GEN consoles as well done they would have not done a justice that it deserves besides the DLC being 30 bucks which is a big downfall for me see nest Jayston predator are one of my all-time favorite colors of all time I just wanted them still good game
The Fender Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed in 1954 by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has manufactured the Stratocaster continuously from 1954 to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top “horn” shape for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most often copied electric guitar shapes.[2][3] “Stratocaster” and “Strat” are trademark terms belonging to Fender.
The best place to start is with a small tube amp. This kind of amp is far less forgiving, leaving you nowhere to hide. It sounds counter-intuitive, I know. You’re looking for the best choice and here I am telling you one that will make things more difficult. But think of it as tough love – forcing you to confront your technique and learn the right way to play a chord or scale progression.
New: A brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable). Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store, unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging, such as an unprinted box or plastic bag. See the seller's listing for full details. See all condition definitions- opens in a new window or tab ... Read moreabout the condition
John Mayer: features a select alder body, a thick C-shape maple neck with African rosewood fingerboard and 21 Jim Dunlop 6105 narrow-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and a trio of “Big Dipper” single-coils with a special “Scooped” midrange voicing and 5-way pickup switching. Available in a variety of finishes, including black with 3-ply mint green pickguard and gold hardware, 3-tone sunburst and olympic white with brown shell pickguard and as a limited-edition version with a cypress mica finish, white vintage amp knobs and a 3-ply parchment pickguard. In 2010, Fender also released a limited 500 run of John’s personal BLACK1 strat.

The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.
Non Locking Tremolo TRÉMOLO FAT/SAT INSTALACIÓN DE LA PALANCA DEL TRÉMOLO La palanca del trémolo se puede poner y quitar muy fácilmente. Introduzca la palanca en el orificio de la placa base del trémolo. Tire hacia arriba de la palanca para extraerla. AJUSTE DE LA PALANCA DEL TRÉMOLO (SAT PRO) Para ajustar la altura de la palanca, retire la tapa de los muelles del trémolo en la parte posterior de la guitarra y, con una llave Allen de 3 mm, gire el tornillo de...
As music professionals, we're all familiar with guitarists and the rows of pedals they set up on stage at every gig. They're definitely on to something when it comes to effects on-the-fly, but when you're setting up a studio or pro audio rig, there's a simpler solution: multi effects processors. These full-sized units bring a ton of versatility to the table (or, more accurately speaking, the rack) and they can play a crucial role in shaping your own signature sound.
Confusion sometimes revolves around the distinctions between overdrives, distortions and fuzzes, but in theory each should do approximately what it says on the box—even if some also do a little of the other breeds’ jobs along the way. In the case of overdrive pedals, the intention is often twofold: either to provide a gain boost to “overdrive” a tube amp into distortion, or to approximate the mildly distorted sound of a slightly overdriven tube amp. In practice, most do a little of both. Crank the average overdrive toward the max and it usually coughs up an element of self-generated distortion, which can easily be heard when DI’d into a mixing desk set to well below overload levels; generate enough distortion, and things can also sound a little fuzzy. Despite the gray areas, however, there are definitely distinctions between the types. It all makes some sense if you think in terms of the degree of clipping achieved by the pedal, with overdrives generally being soft-clipping devices and distortions being hard-clipping devices.
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.
In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
This is sort of a corollary to the DI+Amp suggestion. While effects on bass aren’t as common as with guitar parts, some bassists will come in with these big rigs of effect boxes, and want to record “their sound”, which often is clearly overprocessed for the song. Rather than argue the point, let the player hear the sound he’s used to during tracking, but be sure to also grab a nice clean signal, prior to all the effects, usually straight off the bass via a DI. That way, if your concerns prove all too true come mixdown, you can turn to the dry track, and recreate those favored effects to a more appropriate degree, with studio tools. Even if the effected bass sounds good to you, many pedals and MI effect boxes are noisy, and you might have to recreate the sound anyway, to avoid problematic buzz or hiss from the player’s cool-but-dirty toys.

Every amp will have a preamp and a power amp. These are often referred to as the preamp stage and power stage. The preamp picks up the signal from the guitar and boosts it so other parts of the preamp can manipulate it (this is where EQ and gain kick in). The power amp then takes that modified signal and boosts it to a level where the speakers can push it out. You will run into these terms most often with tube amps, as different tubes are installed in each of these stages.
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]

For a more neutral experience, we bring you ESP E-II Horizon FR. This is one of ESP’s top tier models which packs a set of high output Seymour Duncans. Build quality is top notch, and so is the performance. We tested this guitar some time ago, with a number of us having the chance to play it for several days. Anyone who picked it up was in love it at the end of the day. It’s just that good.


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Yeah there is no double about it the Epiphone Special 11 is unreal value for money and even though I have over the years filled my Den with guitars some worth a lot of money the Epiphone Special 11 is my go to guitar. I just cannot fault, great tuners, pickups and basically the only guitar I have that stays in tune 90% plus of the time. It is also the lightest of my guitar collection weighing in at about 5.5lbs. For $299 Australian they are an absolute steal. If I could only have one guitar I would go to this Epiphone Les Paul Special 11 ever time.
Ibanez is a Japanese brand of guitars that have long been associated with progressive, jazz, and metal music. They offer a wide range of styles and models for all different playing types, and they have been around since the late 1950’s. Like Fender guitars, they have the wider string spacing, and the guitars often feature a whammy bar. Occasionally models incorporate a Floyd Rose Locking Tremolo system which secures the tuning of the strings.

You are sure to find a Gibson in any guitar brand comparison list that you come across. This guitar manufacturer is the oldest producer of solid-body electric guitars. The first guitar was manufactured by Les Paul himself, and the company's signature model is, in fact, also a Les Paul model. It was the first company to introduce the double coil pick ups or the legendary 'humbucker' for rock music. The guitars by Gibson made rock and roll possible. Like Fender, Gibson is also a universally popular guitar brand whose guitars are known for their high treble and melodious tones. The company also has a bass series. It has remained consistent as far as styles and designs are concerned. Other famous electric guitars from Gibson include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird, and classic acoustics include models like the Hummingbird.


• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.
In 1952 the pickup selection circuit was modified by Fender to incorporate a real tone control. Between 1953 and 1967 the neck could be selected alone with a pre-set bassy sound and no tone control, in the middle switch the neck could be selected alone with the tone control and finally the bridge could be selected with the tone control. Although this provided the player with a proper tone control, this assembly did away with any sort of pickup combination. Eventually from late 1967 Fender again modified the circuit for the final time to give the Telecaster a more traditional twin pickup switching system: neck pickup alone with tone control in the first position, both pickups together with the tone control in the middle position and in the third position the bridge pickup alone with the tone control.[2]
A humbucker pickup is electrically equivalent to two single-coil pickups wired together in series. Coil splitting involves shorting one of the coils to ground, essentially turning the humbucker into a single-coil pickup (not a perfect replica, though, as the magnetic circuits of the two pickup types are different). This is usually done with a DPDT switch, but can also be done with a push-pull pot. Some manufacturers have used a pot to vary the amount of signal shorted to ground from one coil, thus producing a range of tones between a humbucker and a single-coil. Coil splitting results in a sound that's brighter and has less output than a full humbucker. It also eliminates the humbucker's noise-cancelling properties. This modification requires the start and end of both coils to be exposed, which is more commonly available on aftermarket than stock pickups.[17][18]

While you're doing your strumming and picking lay that part of your hand on the strings by the bridge of your guitar. This will mute or partially silence the strings. On an electric guitar going through an amp, this can become a percussion instrument. The trick is to use it for a percussion effect and then raise that hand up when you want to let the strings rings er.. ring.


By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]

Every guitarist seeks to produce an expressive and distinctive tone. Unfortunately, figuring out what kind of gear you need can be a baffling proposition. Here are the three main equipment categories that comprise your music-making rig: your electric guitar, guitar amps, and effects pedals and units. These components all work together to create your sound. And because you can swap out equipment and change settings, the creative possibilities are virtually limitless.
The TG-64 was definitely a boss guitar, but even cooler was the TRG-1 transistorized guitar, also introduced in ’64. This guitar did Nat Daniels one better and, instead of putting the amp in the case, put a transistorized amp and speaker in the guitar! To be fair, Danelectro did produce some guitars with a miniature tube amp built-in, but it’s not known if these ever made it to production status. But the TRG-1 is a remarkable guitar available in a confusing number of variations.
I've been playing guitar for several years now so I have played a wide variety of instruments. Of course bigger companies such as Martin or Taylor are going to be higher up in the ratings because they produce very expensive guitars and their name has been widely spread. My first ever Yamaha six string, which after three years is still my favorite guitar, is amazing. Its deep and rich tones makes it a blast to play. I can find myself playing any genre for hours because of how reliable and durable it is. They are very well priced for there quality and I would label Yamaha as being the working mans guitar.

If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?

If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.


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Solid body guitars offer a fantastic platform for builders, allowing them to craft the wood into literally any shape. Naturally you’ll probably want to opt for a guitar with a single-cutaway Les Paul or Telecaster style shape, or a double-cutaway shape like a Stratocaster, Yamaha Pacifica, or Ibanez’s RG. However, the more extroverted beginner can check out some cool styles that always catch the attention, such as V or Z shaped guitars, or anything from Dean Guitars – especially if you want an eye-catching paint job!


When you hit a string it will vibrate. It will continue to vibrate until the energy put into it is expended. Where does that energy go? Well, it is expended through movement. That movement is what the pickup "sees" and translates into sound. In a world where 100 % of the initial energy imparted by the strum to the string was expended through movement, wood doesn't matter.

There is clearly a great deal that the guitarist can do for the sound by changing guitars, strings and amps, but from the perspective of the recording engineer it's also important to think about how the guitar cab is interacting with the room it's in. For example, Roy Thomas Baker mentions that he sometimes sets up the same guitar cab in different rooms because of the effect on the sound. Even if you're restricted to one room, a number of producers suggest trying out different positions of the amp in the room. Tony Visconti: "It's not so much that you're miking a guitar — you're miking a guitar in a room. I had a cellist in here recently, and I moved her until I got a good sound. Once I put her in one particular corner, her cello just sang — the room just filled up with the low end, and the sound exploded! A person who hasn't had years of experience might not have thought of doing that, but I could tell there was something lacking when she was in the centre of the room. That's mic technique. It's not so much the instrument; the room is very much part of the sound."


Stompboxes are small plastic or metal chassis which usually lie on the floor or in a pedalboard to be operated by the user's feet. Pedals are often rectangle-shaped, but there are a range of other shapes (e.g., the circle-shaped Fuzz Face). Typical simple stompboxes have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers ("pots" or "knobs") for controlling the effect, and a single LED that indicates if the effect is on. A typical distortion or overdrive pedal's three potentiometers, for example, control the level or intensity of the distortion effect, the tone of the effected signal and the volume (level) of the effected signal. Depending on the type of pedal, the potentiometers may control different parameters of the effect. For a chorus effect, for example, the knobs may control the depth and speed of the effect. Complex stompboxes may have multiple footswitches, many knobs, additional switches or buttons that are operated with the fingers, and an alphanumeric LED display that indicates the status of the effect with short acronyms (e.g., DIST for "distortion").[5][9] Some pedals have two knobs stacked on top of each other, enabling the unit to provide two knobs per single knob space.
According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.
To cut to the chase, we can say that a changing magnetic field generates or "induces" electricity. It's also true that a changing electric field generates magnetism. If you feed electricity through a coil of wire, you generate a magnetic field around it. That's how you can make a magnet controlled by electricity—better known as an electromagnet. Electricity and magnetism are really two different aspects of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black
This preamp can also offer a gain control. Essentially, it’s what drives the power levels of the signals to the amp, but it can also boost volume. If the preamp doesn’t have a gain control, it can be assumed that it’s already factory-set to a certain level of gain. One way around the lack of a gain control is to use the volume control on the main amp. Either way, it’s very helpful when you find you need to compete in a multi-instrument band when you feel like you’re being drowned out or you’re experiencing unwanted feedback when you do try to vie for being heard.
Here just in is a well crafted Japanese made Orville by Gibson J200 this is not a Gibson but is a copy of the Gibby by Orville Japan... So this would have been a sanctioned build and not the Lawsuit setting them apart from other makers like Alvarez and Ibanez and Aria and a few others in fact Orville is Mr. Gibson's first name Orville Gibson so This is NOT a Gibson but a very professionally built version of the J200 its an excellent high quality copy Beautifully crafted workmanship and amazing woods... must see... previous owner love this one so much they also had it professionally customized with its Grovers and logo in MOP... plays absolutely excellent with its low easy to play string action, and notice its old Gibson correct bridge with the ABR-1 type adjustable bridge for precise intonation adjustments over the 60's Gibson correct nylon saddles... nice touch... Its spruce top is really nicely grained and figured with beautiful Patina of the real vintage gibby.

Guitar amplifiers can also modify the instrument's tone by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequencies, using equalizer controls, which function the same way as the bass and treble knobs on a home hi-fi stereo, and by adding electronic effects; distortion (also called "overdrive") and reverb are commonly available as built-in features. The input of modern guitar amplifiers is a 1/4" jack, which is fed a signal from an electro-magnetic pickup (from an electric guitar) or a piezoelectric pickup (usually from an acoustic guitar) using a patch cord, or a wireless transmitter. For electric guitar players, their choice of guitar amp and the settings they use on the amplifier are a key part of their signature tone or sound. Some guitar players are longtime users of a specific amp brand or model. Guitarists may also use external effects pedals to alter the sound of their tone before the signal reaches the amplifier.


One of the most impressive guitars on this list when it comes to style is this C-1 SGR from Schecter – a respected brand in the world of rock and metal. With a design that’s heavily influenced by their premium C1 models, this affordable alternative features a solid basswood body that’s arched and contoured for great comfort, allowing unhindered access to the 24-fret maple neck.

The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.
You can use similar two-mic techniques, minus the effects, on a single amp to capture a variety of larger-than-life guitar sounds. One trick that I stumbled upon involves miking a twin-speaker amp with two mics that are close in response, but not matched (see Fig. 1). The first time I tried this, on a session with guitarist Paris Slim, I used an Electro-Voice RE20 and a Sennheiser 441.
3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.
Another thing to keep in mind is the purpose of the amplifier. And I don’t mean the actual purpose. We all know that I’m pretty sure. What I mean is what you will be using it for? Are you a beginner who wants to practice a lot in their basement before they ever take their guitar and amp into the daylight or maybe you have been playing for quite some time and want to record your music. MAYBE you have gathered all your strength and confidence (and your band) and decided to gig. All of these situations are somewhat different and various amps work for different purposes. While there are a lot of amps that do all of them together, sometimes getting an amp just for practice might be more efficient and, of course, affordable.

My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
Here, the brighter/lower-value cap is engaged when the pot’s all the way up. As you roll it back, the larger cap is introduced, producing greater capacitance and a deeper treble cut. When you arrange caps in parallel, their total capacitance is the sum of their values. For example, I tried a .0047µF cap and a .047µF, so the minimum value is .0047µF (a very modest cut) and the maximum is approximately .052µF (a very dark tone).

What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.

I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.

One of the most over looked and shockingly good guitars I have ever played in my 23 years of chopping wood. In their rich history there have been little misses, but over all Aria guitars are supreme to their competitor especially at the price point. My 1977 Aria les paul copy has at leased twice the balls as my buddy's 6 year old Gibson and tons more playability. Forget about comparing to epiphone, seriously. eBay yourself a Aria electric and you WILL be pleasantly surprised. Aria acoustics; If your reaching for a nylon, Aria makes some of the best classical guitars with a history of employing some of the most well noted artisans of the craft, such as Ryoji Matsuoka. Fine craftsmanship all around, built with quality woods and have a tendency to get better with age, laminated or not. As for steal strings, I've only played one to be honest, but this Martin 'lawsuit' was a work of art. Thank you.


Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
“Back in the fifties and sixties, you could tell what studio they had been recording in just by listening to the song,” Dr. Susan Horning Schmidt says. She is a professor at St. John’s University who has researched and written extensively about sounds and the recording process. During the period Dr. Horning Schmidt is referring to, the recording facilities were also physically bigger and bands often played together in a more live-type setting. Horning Schmidt states that “there’s a lot more space in the recording, a lot more acoustical space and dynamics.” Unfortunately, we’re losing that space with contemporary recording and production techniques.

“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.

The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
thanks for your note. We are not drawing any conclusions whether one is better than the other, just that they are different, which I think is apparent from the samples. Also, we did use only one pickup that we moved between the samples, and mounted it in the exact same location in relationship to the bridge. I would claim that the only variable that could have been controlled to a greater extent is the picking attack.
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.

Ukuleles were in highest production from 1916 to the 1930's, though still manufactured in quantity until 1965. Production quantities during some periods were as great as Martin guitars. Martin ukes are considered to be the best for craftsmenship and sound. The Koa wood models are more collectible than mahagony models. The fancier style 5 models are worth more than plainer styles 0 to 3. All sizes are collectible.
If you love effects like we do, we hope you'll find this top-50 list a useful guide to discovering the classic effect boxes that have shaped the guitar sounds of rock, metal, blues, punk and many other styles. And if you're like us, it will undoubtedly compel you to plunk down a chunk of cash for a collectible pedal or two on eBay. Don't say you weren't warned.
I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!
I have 8 guitars and 5 Gretsches and I'm currently playing this one the most. It's very bright, which if you play a Martin you might not like. Like super duper bright. No really, brighter than that. But I like it. Unplugged it's good but not very loud, so it's a nice practice guitar, but you're going to want to plug in at the coffee shop or larger.

Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.

This can all get a little tricky and can become overwhelming especially if you have never tackled this type of job before. If this is the case, I strongly suggest starting with one of the easier models in regards to wiring e.g. Telecasters are significantly easier to work on as the scratchplate will often be pre-loaded with pickups. However, if you purchase a kit guitar such as an LP or you want to upgrade your electrical components (which is often the case with an entry level kit) understanding some basics about guitar electronics is useful.


It would be great if we could be born with all our favorite music already memorized. But we're only human, so we don't get that luxury - if we want to know a song, we have to learn it! The process starts with reference materials, so don't wait to start building up a repertoire of your own favorites. Add the tablature to your collection and make sure to practice, and you'll be playing like your favorite guitar heroes soon enough.
Want to know more about how to distinguish all these guitars? Until a few years ago there wasn’t a good (or any!) English language reference book for Japanese guitars of the 1960s. But my co-author on this piece, the esteemed Frank Meyers of Drowning In Guitars, has written an excellent primer on this subject which can help demystify the confusion around a lot of these guitars. You can pick up your own copy here.
If you do have lead solder, the melting temperature is much lower, making for easier connections, but remember to wash your hands after you're done, and not to touch your face while working - lead is poisonous. With lead-free solder, the rosin lets off toxic smoke, so use a small desk fan to blow it away from you while you work, and open a window if possible.
But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.
By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.
Here's some net info you may find interesting. Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (They may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. According to an article in Vintage Guitar Magazine, importation of Hagstrom-made Kents began in 1962. Another story is that Hagstrom sold Kent-branded guitars through distributors other than Buegeleisen & Jacobson in the U.S. without permission from J&B and were forced to withdraw them after a short time. By then Hagstrom had become better-known and could sell them under their own name, anyway. At first, the idea was to keep ’em cheap and sell to the beginners and students. Later, as Japanese manufacturers proliferated and competition became hot and heavy, some of them began to copy the Fenders and Gibsons of the time. As quality began to improve, some manufacturers again began issuing thier own designs. One of the “beginners” who got a start with a Kent Polaris I was Bruce Springsteen. Alex Lifeson of Rush got started with a Kent acoustic. One of Gene Simmons first guitars was also a Kent. The BBC series “The Seven Ages of Rock”, episode 2, showed Lou Reed (R.I.P) with the Velvet Underground playing a Kent 532 Copa at Andy Warhol’s hangout. Kent created a vib then and they're still doin it today.
After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 
Type – the dielectric used in the capacitor. Polyester and polypropylene are most common, with ceramic capacitors also being popular, especially in lower-end instruments. Reissues of vintage instruments often use reproductions of vintage paper capacitors, which are also popular aftermarket replacements. Finally, audiophile-grade polypropylene film and foil capacitors are sometimes used in custom instruments, although their size can prove problematic as they're designed for use in audio amplifiers and consequently have working voltages in excess of 500 V, far higher than anything encountered inside an electric guitar.[16]
One thing to point out here. When you take the strings off a Les Paul, there is (usually) nothing holding the bridge or the tailpiece on, so be careful with this. That said, I do want to mention that while the strings were off this guitar, I took the opportunity to lower the tailpiece. I prefer the tailpiece to be lowered all the way to the body if possible. Many believe that this will give you better tone/sustain, although it's hard to prove such a thing scientifically. That said, there is very little reason for the tailpiece to be anywhere other than as low as possible anyway.
Because each of these requires duplicating your signal once or several times, you want to do it after you've added all of the other dynamic, filter-based, and gain effects. There is no sense in trying to get a distortion or equalizer pedal to react to a series of recombined signals when you can take care of that before hand. You'll get much higher quality and accurate modulation out of it this way.
By 1968 (and probably with the union of Unicord), Merson and Gulf + Western, Univox amps had begun to employ a Japanese-made chassis in Westbury-made cabinets, still with the high-quality Jensen speakers. These combined tube output with transistorized components. They were covered with a black Rhinohide vinyl and sported a silver plastic logo with stylized block letters – initial cap with a little tail off the left followed by lower case letters – typical of the earliest imported Univox guitars, on the black grillcloth.
There are two distinct kinds of transistors used in fuzz pedals, germanium and silicon. In the early 1960’s silicon transistors were fairly new and very expensive and germanium was the norm. Germanium transistors are susceptible to temperature changes and noise so they can be unreliable at times. They do have a very distinct tone, they also react very well to the guitar’s volume knob by cleaning up very well. As silicon transistors became less expensive they largely replaced their germanium counterparts in pedals due to their stability. The Silicon fuzzes generally produce more gain but often don’t clean up as well.
As this site was founded by one of the circuit board designers from GuitarPCB.com, you can be assured that all of the homework has been done for you in selecting the appropriate parts for each circuit. Many of the kits we sell are not available from any other US supplier. Currently, we only ship to the USA, however, we plan to expand to the rest of North America in the future.
Then, as the most popular version goes, a young, jack of all trades guitarist named Les Paul got tired of all that. So, he set out to create a guitar that could be heard just as much as the louder instruments. He fiddled with a lot of electronic means to boost his sound. Some worked better than others. His piece de resistance at the time would come to be known as "The Log". It looked like what you see up there on the left:
The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
I don't understand why everyone is so "Gibson is the best". They have been going downhill for years. Unless it's a custom shop job, it is hit or miss. the same with Fender. Everyone likes them because of the mystique of the players that played them over the last decades. It's a "lifestyle cult" with name recognition. If you want a guitar that plays and sounds like a Gibson of Fender is supposed to but want to be guaranteed of the quality you are receiving and spend for a fraction of the money, then get a used USA Custom Shop made Washburn. You will never look back. I say used because the Chicago custom shop has apparently closed. Anything made there from about 1993 - 2008 that looks like a competitors guitar will outmatch the competitors version every time. You will notice that it is hard to find a used custom shop Washburn around. That's because they are the guitar worlds best kept secret. The people in the know get them - at a massively reduced price - and keep them. People hang onto their USA Washurns for the most part and there i a reason for that. They are that good.
Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.
In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.
B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.
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