This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!
Being the go-to instrument of popular guitarists like Hank Williams Sr. Neil Young and Jimmy Page (just to name a few), the current production model D-28 continues the Martin Legacy in terms of build and sound quality. Finally, all these features are provided without the inherent maintenance issues and crazy price tags of actual vintage models. If you're looking for a true traditional acoustic then your best bet is to go for the Martin D-28. The MSRP is $3299 but you can get it online for around $2,629.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
Stacking the C-major scale with thirds creates a chord progression  Play (help·info), traditionally enumerated with the Roman numerals I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viio. Its major-key sub-progression C-F-G (I-IV-V) is conventional in popular music. In this progression, the minor triads ii-iii-vi appear in the relative minor key (Am)'s corresponding chord progression.
For beginning electric guitarists—or experienced players who want something inexpensive and portable—we think the Fender Champion 20 is the ideal amplifier. We researched 24 models, then put the 10 most popular to the test for 20 hours with two professional instructors, a guitar student, and our Wirecutter West Coast musical instrument testing team. With a colossal variety of sounds, plus built-in effects and intuitive controls, the Fender Champion 20 was a nearly unanimous top pick.

Double-coil or "humbucker" pickups were invented as a way to reduce or counter the unwanted ambient hum sounds (known as 60-cycle hum). Humbuckers have two coils of opposite magnetic and electric polarity to produce a differential signal. Electromagnetic noise that hits both coils equally tries to drive the pickup signal toward positive on one coil and toward negative on the other, which cancels out the noise. The two coils are wired in phase, so their signal adds together. This high combined inductance of the two coils leads to the richer, "fatter" tone associated with humbucking pickups.


The only reason why anyone likes Ibanez is because it's cheap. When you're ready to buy a real axe, get a Jackson. Ibanez is not a "shredder" brand, it is a budget brand, just like Carvin. Jackson has it all: great sound, great feel, great looks, great for shredding! I'll admit because Rich makes some interesting looking guitars, but Jacksons are still cooler (if you've ever seen a Kelly, I'm sure you'll agree). Jackson For the Win!
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
The downside of going electric is that now you have to think about a soundboard, or at least an amp. And no self-respecting guitarist can live without a few pedals to tweak the sound. I mean you only need a volume pedal to control the level, a tuner might be nice, chorus is always appreciate, a nice delay pedal wouldn’t be bad, and you might need a clean boost for those solos. Then again, you might just want to plug straight into the soundboard and just enjoy that amplified acoustic sound.
Jacob - it really depends on several factors: how much money you have to spend, type of music you like to play, electric or acoustic. You can get started with a $100 acoustic of various branding with decent quality or a basic Squier Strat for $100-150 if you want electric for many styles. Epiphone makes Les Paul and SG models for $100 and up for a little more rock and roll edge - its all a choice of your style.
In addition to building world-class custom basses and guitars, our luthiers also perform a wide variety of guitar repairs, restorations, modifications and upgrades. Whether you have an electric guitar, acoustic guitar or a bass, new or old, feel free to bring it by the shop for a free assessment. We have the experience, skill and equipment to provide maximum playability.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.

If you do want to use single pedals then BOSS compact pedals come with a buffer circuit that converts your high impedance input into a low impedance output. For a more detailed discussion on the topic of single pedal buffers check out Steve Henderson’s excellent article here: https://www.rolandcorp.com.au/blog/buffered-effects-true-bypass-and-boss-pedals-by-steve-henderson

Instead of a Tremolo bridge, the Telecaster has what we call an “ashtray” bridge.  This name came about from the original metal covering over the bridge that players decided to remove and use as an ashtray!  Underneath that cover was where the magic was happening.  Instead of six saddles, the original ashtray bridges had three that, in conjunction with its single coil pickup and larger metal surface, created a “twangy” sound that was perfect for any country chicken picker.

It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.
Though the line between the two is easily smudged, where multi-effects processors create a broad spectrum of effects, modeling processors can recreate the sound of particular instruments and amplifiers, like a Gibson Les Paul played through a stack of Marshall amplifiers, or a Fender Stratocaster played through a Fender Deluxe Reverb amplifier. A modeling processor offers you the ability to make your guitar and amp combination sound like whatever guitar and amplifier sound you want—even if you don’t own either guitar or amplifier. You are limited only by the number of models programmed into the modeling processor when you plug your guitar into one.
In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
In 2013, Gibson introduced the Government Series of Les Paul, SG, Flying V, Explorer and ES-335 guitars which were constructed solely of tonewood the US government seized but later returned to Gibson after the resolution of the company's Lacey Act violation in 2011. The guitars were finished in "government grey" and also featured decorations which intended to draw attention to the issue of government. A year later in 2014, Gibson released the Government Series II[77] of guitars, which were essentially the same as the first series, only finished in a new color: "government tan".
Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
Most reviewers are simply floored by how good the Roland Blues Cube Artist sounds right off the bat, with many commending its organic tube-like tone for being so life-like. It's vintage aesthetics and familiar controls also gets a lot of thumbs up, especially from experienced players who are in it for the sound, and not for the bells and whistles. It should also be mentioned that there are many reports of it working well with different types of guitars and pickup configurations.
There is one drawback though, rather than signal that they might want a little more gain, too many players simply grab their volume knobs without warning. (the “sandbagging” I referred to previously), or kick in an overdrive pedal they “forgot” to check during SC. What sounds good for them onstage can send the audience running with bloody ears, Techs running for the backup cab cables, and lawyers sharpening their fangs. A little gain in their monitor, becomes multiplied by the power of the FOH. Sometimes it is a thought to let them blow out an amp speaker, rather than a bank of FOH speakers!
I've had it for a few months and have been using it at shows. It has become erratic. The patch I use most often occasionally oscillates. It's like microphonic feedback (not guitar sustaining feedback). The output level seems to change on it's own as well. I will say I found an amazing sound with the marshall 800 emulation but the inconsistency makes it unusable live. It is possible it's not the unit but a power supply problem or connection, but I have not seem the power go off and other devices on the same power supply work fine. I have ordered the digitech 360xp since I had used that brand for 15 years or more with no issue.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: 3-Color Sunburst
There was a second single-cutaway version, also called the TRG-1, with a thick waist and vaguely tubby Tele shape. It had a different grill shape and a slightly more rounded version of the Bizarro Strat head, but otherwise it was the same. There was also a version of the double-cutaway guitar with a vibrato. This was a small, metal-covered tailpiece with three springs in the housing and a handle that screwed into a hole in the cover.
The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: HoneyBurst, Green
An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable ...”
The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
Large-diaphragm models are popular, with Neumann mics particularly favoured. The famous U87 studio workhorse is probably the most commonly mentioned, but it's by no means the only contender. Eddie Kramer, Steve Albini and John Leckie single out its predecessor, the U67, for example, while both of the earlier U47 models (valve and FET) receive name checks from people such as Steven Street, Glenn Kolotkin, Butch Vig and Bruce Botnick (note that U47s were marketed under both Neumann and Telefunken brand-names, but they're essentially the same mics). Neumann aren't the only game in town, though: AKG's C414B-ULS is probably joint most popular large-diaphragm model alongside the U87.
While fan-braced modern classical Torres and post-Torres style instruments coexisted with traditional ladder-braced guitars at the beginning of the 20th century, the traditional forms eventually fell away. Some attribute this to the popularity of Segovia, considering him "the catalyst for change toward the Spanish design and the so-called 'modern' school in the 1920s and beyond."[5] The styles of music performed on ladder-braced guitars were becoming more and more unfashionable; and, e.g. in Germany, musicians were in part turning towards folk music (Schrammel-music and the Contraguitar), but this only remained localized in Germany and Austria and became unfashionable again. On the other hand, Segovia was playing in concerts around the world, popularizing his modern classical guitar, as well as a new style of music in the 1920s: Spanish romantic-modern style with guitar works by Moreno Torroba, de Falla, etc. Some people consider it to have been this influence of Segovia which led to the domination of the Torres instrument. Factories all over the world began producing them in large numbers.
Some multi-effects processors have other onboard features. Yes, you can run your guitar sound through scores of effects, but many processors even offer modeling that allows you to replicate scores of digitally modeled guitar sounds with a huge range of pedal effects and also recreate the tones of classic combo amplifier and head/cabinet sounds. In addition, some processors give you the ability to loop and delay; some have drum patterns, built-in tuners, recording software, presets as well as user-programmable effects, built-in expression pedals and phrase trainers that record a passage you can play back at varying speeds for learning and practice. Many multi-effects processors now have USB connectivity and you will also find that almost all have ¼” (instrument cable connectors) and XLR (microphone connectors) inputs and outputs. Unlike simple effects pedals, all these features are packed into one compact unit.
As obvious as it sounds, a tuner (or tuning pedal) is fundamental for your rig. It can also act as a mute switch for changing guitars between songs. These days there are many smartphone apps for tuning your guitar – as well as clip-on tuners – but when you need precision and a clear visual indication of the pitch of your strings, nothing beats a good old tuning pedal. The Boss TU-3 is a classic tuning pedal with lots of useful settings – alternatively, you can check out the CPT-20 by Harley Benton which features true bypass connections and a super large LCD display. Need a smaller footprint? Try the Mooer Baby Tuner!
The guitar starts off with a basswood body, carved into the familiar Stratocaster double cutaway. Even the pickguard resembles that of a Strat, although the controls are different, with the Adrian Smith SDX just having two knobs for adjusting master tone and volume. While the neck still looks like a Strat, it is meant for fast and comfortable play, with its compound radius maple fretboard, 25.5" scale length, 1.6875" nut width and 22 jumbo frets. Giving this guitar its versatile tones are two single coils for the neck and middle position, along with a humbucker on the bridge, all of which are designed by Jackson with the approval of the Adrian himself.
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.
The first design was an Early Telecaster model, called Squier, with a single mic. The main contribution Leo Fender did, was the bode and neck removal separetly. In previous models, when the guitar need repairs, the complete instrument needed to be sent, while, after Leo fender design, the plate could be unscrew and sent to the shop only the damaged part.

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I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
Ring modulator: A ring modulator produces a resonant, metallic sound by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave generated by the device's internal oscillator. The original sound wave is suppressed and replaced by a "ring" of inharmonic higher and lower pitches or "sidebands".[70][78] A notable use of ring modulation is the guitar in the Black Sabbath song "Paranoid".[79]
Need a portable pedalboard for fly dates? Tech 21 has the answer in the form of the Fly Rig 5: a small but perfectly functional pedalboard, powered by an auto-switching adaptor, so it can be used anywhere in the world. What you get is the equivalent of five stompboxes. The SansAmp is at the heart of the Fly Rig. Stomp on its footswitch and its six mini control knobs light up blue. You get level and drive knobs, three-band EQ and a spring reverb emulation based on the Boost RVB pedal. In front of the SansAmp, you get the Plexi section, based on Tech 21's Hot-Rod Plexi pedal. One footswitch emulates the natural overdrive and distortion of a late-60s Marshall, with sound dialled in with level, tone and drive controls. A second 'Hot' footswitch brings in up to 21dB of boost and can be used independently of the Plexi distortion. Last in the signal chain is the DLA, a delay with tap tempo. The Fly Rig 5 is an extremely functional unit that contains arguably the most essential effects - you can plug it into a guitar amp or straight into a PA or mixing desk. It's also a life-saver should your equipment go down at the last minute, as well as being the answer to the prayers of guitarists who need to travel light.
it has 3 lateral braces after the soundhole, 1 before, so I guess so. the saddle makes it so the truss is the only set up option. The action is high right now for me, so I hope a decent allen wrench will turn it and its not an old peice'o'poo worn out latter brace deal. when I looked for a "belly" it could have just been straight tilted over I guess and not looked the same.
• Trapeze: Although the trapeze tailpiece was original equipment on the very first runs ofGibson Les Pauls, they are mostly the province of hollowbody and semi-hollowbody guitars, ranging from the L-5-CES to the Epiphone Regent. Early ES models also came with trapeze tailpieces. These devices attach to the heel of the guitar’s body and have slots for strings to pass through. Once the strings are installed and tightened to proper tension, the tension suspends the tailpiece in air — providing the appellation trapeze. The principle behind trapeze tailpieces is that they dampen the natural resonance of the strings less than stop tailpieces. These tailpieces also transmit the string tension to the guitar’s side, rather than its belly. The downside is they are the hardest tailpieces to string, since strings tend to drop out of their slots until they are at tension. In that respect, they take some getting used to.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39

Notch filters (also called band-stop filters or band-rejection filters) are sometimes used with double basses. Notch filters are filters that allow most frequencies to pass through unaltered, while attenuating those in a specific range to very low levels. Notch filters are used in instrument amplifiers and preamplifiers for acoustic instruments such as acoustic guitar, mandolin, and bass instrument amplifiers to reduce or prevent feedback. While most notch filters are set manually by the user, there are also automatic notch filters which detect the onset of feedback and notch out the frequency before damaging feedback begins.

What we're looking at here is a standard Les Paul body made of mahogany and finished with an attractive vintage sunburst pattern. There's also a gorgeous heritage cherry sunburst and a straight ebony finish option as well. It features a pair of 700T humbuckers, one at the bridge and one at the neck position. These are pretty basic in nature, but their performance is more than good enough even for more experienced players and important recordings.

The Tube Screamer pedal has a long list of iconic users including Stevie Ray Vaughn, Gary Moore, John Mayer, Joe Bonamassa, The Edge and many more. As such, it is only expected for a company like Ibanez to take advantage of its popularity to extend their reach in the amplifier market - resulting in the creation of the Tube Screamer Amp (TSA) series. The Ibanez TSA15H leads the series in terms of ratings, with its compact yet versatile head profile while having the same combination of tube amplification and built-in tube screamer circuitry. At its core are two 12AX7 preamp tubes and two 6V6 power amp tubes, a standard configuration that sounds good on its own. Its standout feature is the implementation of a Tube Screamer circuit, which comes complete with the same controls as the iconic green pedal it is based on.


The final spot in our top 5 list goes to the DigiTech RP500, the second-largest of the DigiTech RP line of multi-effects pedals, but definitely the most popular out of the lineup. Like Boss and Line 6, DigiTech is no stranger to making very good guitar effects. Their parent company Harman also owns Lexicon, famed for their top-of-the-line reverb sounds, which DigiTech very much benefits from. The DigiTech RP500 is a multi-effect unit with amp modeling, a looper, USB connection, and an onboard expression pedal. Out of the 5 pedals on this list, it draws the most comparisons to the Zoom G3X and the Boss ME-80 (both in terms of price and features). Throughout this review we’ll make sure to cover how it stacks up against those.
The obvious first step is too loosen the truss rod, however, after inspection I learn the truss rod is already completely loose. In order to straighten the neck we opt for a heavier gauge string which places more tension on the neck, pulling it straight. The heavier gauge is necessary to render the neck flat, without it string buzz is overwhelming.
Add a maple top to the mahogany body, as do a great many Les Paul models, and a blend of characteristics comes forward. The mahogany’s depth and richness remain, but the maple provides added snap, clarity, and definition. It also tightens up the lows and adds more cut to the highs. For many players this sonic evolution is highly desirable, whereas others might prefer the smoothness of the pure-mahogany design.
Generally speaking, the amp market tends to be less fueled than other categories by the year-to-year cycle of new product hype that kicks off at the annual NAMM show in January. While there are always hot new models and brands (Quilter amps being a good recent example), amp sales on Reverb are largely dominated by tried-and-true favorites and good deals on used gear.
There are a couple of tricks you can try. One is to get an allen key wrench that is SLIGHTLY too large and take a small file to it to taper all six sides slightly. The other trick, which I use sometimes on Stratocaster saddle height screws, is to use a suitably-sized Torx wrench. They're already tapered, and since they're six-sided-star shaped, they grip the corners really well, even if there's a bit of crud stuck in the screw.
The basic sound of the amplified electric bass or double bass can be modified by electronic bass effects. Since the bass typically plays an accompaniment, beat keeping role as a rhythm section instrument in many styles of music, preamplifiers ("preamps"), compression, limiters, and equalization (modifying the bass and treble frequencies) are the most widely used effect units for bass. The types of pedals commonly used for electric guitar (distortion, phaser, flanger, etc.) are less commonly used for bass, at least in bands or styles where the bassist mainly plays a rhythm section role. In styles of music where the bass is also used as a soloing instrument (certain genres of heavy metal, progressive rock and jazz fusion), bassists may use a wider range of effects units. Jazz fusion bassists who play fretless bass may use chorus effect and reverb for their solos.
Here's another guitar many people feel is a great value. This Pacifica features an agathis body, maple neck, and rosewood fretboard, with two single coil pickups, and one humbucker. The consensus is the guitar is reasonably well made, and the quality of the wood tends to be high. Those who go on to become serious guitarists might want to consider upgrading the electronics of the Pacifica HSS.
In this modern world of in-ear monitors and digital consoles, both guitarists’ amps face the back wall of the stage rather than forward toward the audience. This allows them to crank their amps as loud as they need to achieve their signature Skynyrd-like drive without blowing out the Front of House engineer or the first three rows of the arena they’re performing in.
The way that cabinet manufacturers state the power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet (or an individual speaker) can also be confusing. An important figure for a speaker cabinet's power handling capabilities is its rated wattage-handling capabilities as "RMS". For example, a bass speaker cabinet's back panel may state that it has a power handling capacity of 500 watts RMS. This means that the speaker can handle an average power, from a power amplifier, of 500 watts. The speaker can also handle occasional peaks or "transient" bursts of higher wattages, so long as these are brief. Where is becomes confusing is that some manufacturers also list "peak power", also called "maximum power", "max power" or "burst power". Peak power is the power-handling ability of the speaker for very short bursts of high-wattage signal. The RMS figure is much more important than the "peak power" or "max power" figure. To add to the confusion, some manufacturers state the "program power" capabilities of their speaker cabinet, which can be a vague and less defined term. Reputable, major manufacturers state the RMS output and/or power-handling capabilities of their gear.
The Fender Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed in 1954 by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has manufactured the Stratocaster continuously from 1954 to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top “horn” shape for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most often copied electric guitar shapes.[2][3] “Stratocaster” and “Strat” are trademark terms belonging to Fender.

 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.
Having tried out this technique, I have to say that it's something of a revelation to hear the enormous range of radically different sounds it makes available. When you start inverting the phase of a mic, it sounds like the most extreme EQ you've ever heard, which means that you can substantially reinvent guitar sounds at mixdown without using any heavy processing. For even more sonic mileage, you can also take a leaf out of John Leckie's book and process each of the three mic signals independently.
Here we have old "3-hole" this is another great Japanese Vintage Guitar! this one is over 40 years old wow! ...its wonderfully aged woods contribute to its rich great sound... this example is one of the greatest Martin style Copies from one of the finest "law Suit" Acoustic instrument builders of Japan Yamaha Nippon Gakki...This model is the very popular FG-140 RED LABEL ....JUST IN!...so more info soon to come please see the detailed pics of this guitar for a link to many more pictures ( 40 ) or more from every angle Very good- excellent condition If your wondering why we call this one "3-hole" is because someone in its past life had an electric pickup of some type and it came to us with 3 tinny holes in the top... we have since filled the 3-tiny holes one on upper treble bout and 2 below the rosewood bridge... we filled & clear coated so its all solid and is very hard to see but are their also a fine hairline crack threw the finish exists at the bottom of the neck the original owner said its been their more than 20 years and has not changed and is solid...if wanted after sale for free at your request fill sand it and fill with lacquer and sand and buff smooth I expect that would do the trick to cosmetically improve the look of that but its really fine as is... What is rare about this oldie but goodie its all original and even has the original gold lined Yamaha logo Hard shell case in pretty respectable shape too...see the extra pics ( I will have a link to those pics posted later ) for those details... Great sound and pretty EZ to play too I just Cleaned it to remove the grime but leave all the original patina and also dehydrated the woods and she drank it up and after drying we finished it of with a fresh coat of wax finish was applied the woods still shine like a shinny new dime.. great old guitar.. JVG Rated in Very good Original Vintage condition with its share of natural play ware visible upon closest inspection of the neck width is 1-3/4 @ nut and the action is set good at 3-16ths @ 12th fret.. the fretboard and frets still playing well no need for a refret some fret indentations yes but its still plays just fine at 80+%, top has aged naturally with nice Patina now and has several fine finish cracks etc..same as a well loved and played 40+ year old Martin would have at several thousand dollars less than a 40+ year old martin. This guitar has been restrung with New Martin Marquis Strings and sounds great...This one you have the option of buying an original vintage Yamaha Hard Shell Case..these cases are rare and hard to find now the handle was warn and has a replacement quick fix and it works perfectly...just $69.00 additional .
For many guitarists, the only thing better than a Gibson Les Paul is a vintage Gibson Les Paul. From stunning museum-quality pieces from the '50s to road warrior axes from the Norlin era of Gibson production in the '70s, there are fresh Les Pauls added to this page every day including Les Paul Standards, Customs, Juniors, and more. Whether you're a veteran Gibson collector or a new inductee to the ranks of Les Paul fandom, you can find your next vintage LP here.

You'd mentioned that the bridge pickup is substantially louder on Telecasters than the neck. I have an American Standard so the relationship between the two might not be identical but I was able to make the volume levels comparable by raising my neck pickup substantially so that only about a half inch of space remained between the string and the pickup. They're now about equal volume and if anything the front pickup sounds better and more defined as a result.

Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.

Ibanez is the most important Japanese guitar brand, and this new book tells the story of the electric guitars the company has made since the late 50s. The story tracks the fortunes of Ibanez from its early years as a copier of prime American models to later success as a creator of impressive original designs. The big break came in the late '80s with the launch of Steve Vai's JEM models and the related RG design, which have ensured Ibanez's popularity among metal and extreme rock players. Players include George Benson, Phil Collen, Allan Holdsworth, Pat Metheny, John Petrucci, Lee Ritenour, Joe Satriani, John Scofield, Mick Thompson, and more, many of whom are featured or interviewed for this book. With a gallery of full-color pictures of famous guitars and players, a reference section detailing production years and specifications, and a section covering how to interpret serial numbers. 160 pp.
The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
Also called tuners or machine heads, these geared mechanisms, usually mounted on the guitar's headstock, hold the strings in place and allow tuning the instrument by adjusting string tension. Most modern tuners have enclosed, permanently lubricated mechanisms. Strings are held in place on posts that are attached to knobs, which are turned to adjust string tension allowing the guitar to be tuned. Some tuners are designed to lock in place. This provides more tuning stability, and helps prevent strings from slipping loose from the tuner. It also makes changing your strings a little easier.
In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, Brian May and Randall Woolf.

Early forms of the talk box, such as the Heil Talk Box, first appeared in Country Music circles in Nashville in the 1940',s 1950's, and 1960's, by artist like swing band pedal steel player Alvino Rey, Link Wray ("Rumble"), Bill West, a Country Music steel guitar player and husband of Dottie West, and Pete Drake, a Nashville mainstay on the pedal steel guitar and friend of Bill West. Drake used it on his 1964 album Forever, in what came to be called his "talking steel guitar." The device used the guitar amplifier's output to drive a speaker horn that pushed air into a tube held in the player's mouth, which filters and thereby shapes the sound leading to a unique effect. The singer and guitarist Peter Frampton made this effect famous with hit songs such as "Do You Feel Like We Do" and "Show Me the Way," as did Joe Walsh on "Rocky Mountain Way." On Van Halen's cover of "You Really Got Me" Eddie Van Halen uses a talk box after the guitar solo to make a sound similar to a person having sex. Newer devices, such as Danelectro's Free Speech pedal, use a microphone and vocoder-like circuit to modulate the frequency response of the guitar signal. Some Talk Boxes include: The Dunlop Heil Talk Box, Rocktron Banshee, and Peter Frampton's own company,Framptone.


Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Fort Worth, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.
Technically, distortion is defined as being any change to the original signal other than in level. However, we tend not to think of processes such as EQ and compression as distortion, and the term is more commonly used to describe processes that change the waveform in some radical and often level-dependent way. These include guitar overdrive, fuzz, and simply overdriving analogue circuitry or tape to achieve 'warmth'. In the analogue domain, heavy overdrive distortion is usually created by adding a lot of gain to the signal to provoke deliberate overloading in a specific part of the circuit. Such high levels of gain invariably bring up the level of hum and background noise, so it may be helpful to gate the source. Though overdriving analogue circuitry is the traditional way of creating intentional distortion, we now have many digital simulations, as well as some new and entirely digital sound-mangling algorithms.
Electro-acoustic guitars are commonly referred to as semi-acoustic guitars. Electro-acoustic guitars have pickups that are specifically designed to reproduce the subtle nuances of the acoustic guitar timbre. Electro-acoustic pickups are designed to sound neutral with little alteration to the acoustic tone. The Ovation range of Electro-acoustic guitars have under-the-saddle piezo pickups and a synthetic bowl-back design. The synthetic bowl-back ensures a tough construction that stands up to the rigours of the road while offering less feedback at high volumes. Ovation were the first company to provide on-board Equalization and this is now a standard feature. The Taylor Electro-acoustic range uses the traditional all-wood construction and the necks of these guitars have a reputation for superb action and playability. Yamaha, Maton and many other companies manufacture Electro-acoustic guitars and the buyer is advised to test as many models and makes as they can while taking note of the unplugged and amplified sound.
Number of Effects: All multi-effects units have a number of effects to choose from; that’s the entire point of them! However, make sure the pedal you go with has plenty of selection that will meet your needs. Typically, the more effects there are to choose from, the better. Chances are over time you’ll narrow the selection down to a few of your favorite ones. The top 5 multi-effects pedals on this list all have plenty of effects to choose from (the lowest has around 40, and a few have 100s).
Taylor 214ce A ‘best acoustic guitar’ list would be incomplete without a Taylor in it. This Grand Auditorium guitar with a cutaway from Taylor projects plenty of volume and has a bright and defined tone that many fingerstyle players love. If you’ve always wanted a Taylor, this one with a solid top will surely stick with you for many years to come.

MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.


Except if, like George Gruhn, you know better. The 71-year-old Nashville dealer has sold guitars to Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Paul McCartney and Taylor Swift. Walking through NAMM with Gruhn is like shadowing Bill Belichick at the NFL Scouting Combine. There is great love for the product and great skepticism. What others might see as a boom — the seemingly endless line of manufacturers showcasing instruments — Gruhn sees as two trains on a collision course.
Acoustic guitars were always subjected to various limitations. Since the body of the guitar is its own source of sound amplification, we had to find other ways to get the sound out there. One of the most popular ways was to put a microphone in front of the instrument. This is a method that is still heavily used today, although it's cumbersome and inconvenient in a lot of applications.

Now check both the open and the 12th fret notes again. You’ll have to tune the open string again because by moving the saddle, the tension of the string will have changed and so will need to be retuned. Once you have correctly moved the saddle so that both the open string and the 12th fret are in tune, you can move on to the A string. Repeat until all of the strings have been done. Note that on this particular guitar, the (thick) E, A and D saddles could not be moved far enough forward to intonate correctly, so I had to swap their orientation to give a bit more distance.
The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.
One step up is the combination of a treble cut and a bass cut, with a single knob to select between them, like the one in the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff (Figure 2). The knob selects a blend of highs left over from the bass cut side and lows left over from the treble cut side. If you make the cut frequencies of the treble and bass sides far apart, you get a persistent midrange scoop, as in the original Big Muff. You can also have the bass and treble sides overlap in the middle and get a midrange hump in response. The near-endless variations you can get by tinkering with the relative values of the parts and the need for only one knob make this a favorite in effects.
Fender: Fender guitars are the best example of the old saying “Keep it simple”. They aren’t futuristic, there’s nothing unique about them, they are kinda too simple, their craftsmanship isn’t astronomical but when it’s about outright ruggedness rarely any other guitar comes close to them. Leo Fender designed the Fender guitars to be reliable working man guitars and they still hold true to that quality of theirs. I’m pretty sure if someone buys a good quality Fender guitar (especially the Tele) pretty much his sons, grandsons will still be able to play on that.
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
Guitar amp and FX plug-ins are very advanced nowadays to the point that you can actually record “clean” by plugging your guitar straight into a mixer or interface, and add a plugin like Guitar Rig, Amplitube or Waves GTR as an insert. You will hear this effect as you play but without any risk of feedback, since no mics are live in the room. This approach also means you can tweak and change any aspect of the sound post-recording since the raw recording is actually completely dry.
Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.

Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.


A vintage pickup is literally old. “Vintage-style” usually means a new pickup designed to sound like an old one. Vintage and vintage-style pickups generally have only moderate output. The term “vintage” has most often been applied to designs that originated before 1970, though as we move forward in time, so does the expiration date on “vintage.” But for now, at least, all vintage-style pickups are passive.


To produce Music and create the melody man has invented some musical instruments. In this process he has created the Guitar. Guitar is the instrument in which by the vibrations of the strings we can amplify the music. It’s an instrument having “a long, fretted neck, flat wooden soundboard, ribs, and a flat back, most often with incurved sides”. The melody produced by Guitar is also depends on the better finishing of its parts and strong pickups. That’s why it’s a vital task to select the best quality of guitar.
Not all stompboxes and rackmounted electronic devices designed for musicians are effects. Strobe tuner and regular electronic tuner pedals indicate whether a guitar string is too sharp or flat.[105] Stompbox-format tuner pedals route the electric signal for the instrument through the unit via a 1/4" patch cable. These pedal-style tuners usually have an output so that the signal can be plugged into a guitar amp to produce sound. Rackmount power conditioner devices deliver a voltage of the proper level and characteristics to enable equipment to function properly (e.g., by providing transient impulse protection). A rackmounted wireless receiver unit is used to enable a guitarist or bassist to move around on stage without being connected to a cable. A footswitch pedal such as the "A/B" pedal routes a guitar signal to an amplifier or enables a performer to switch between two guitars, or between two amplifiers.
Legend has it that funkadelic's "Maggot Brain," the 10-minute solo that turned the late Eddie Hazel into an instant guitar icon, was born when George Clinton told him to imagine hearing his mother just died – and then learning that she was, in fact, alive. Hazel, who died of liver failure in 1992 at age 42, brought a thrilling mix of lysergic vision and groove power to all of his work, inspiring followers like J Mascis, Mike McCready and Lenny Kravitz. "That solo – Lord have mercy!" says Kravitz of "Maggot Brain." "He was absolutely stunning."
I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.
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Norma branded guitars all came from the import/distribution company Strum and Drum located in Wheeling, Illinois.  Lots of people think Norma came from Norma Jean (Marilyn Monroe), but actually the Norma name came from the owner of the company, Norman Sackheim!  Norman and his son Ron began to import Japanese guitars around 1965, and continued into the mid 70s.  Initially all Norma guitars were made at the Tombo factory in Japan, but by 67 there were at least 8 different suppliers of Norma guitars!Build quality and construction really varied greatly with Norma guitars, but Norman and Ron did have a good eye for unique designs and many Norma guitars featured some of the coolest shapes of the 60s!  Just like this 4 pickup monster!  What I always liked about Norma guitars were the cool features like neat inlays and interesting pickups.  These darn things just had style!While I was in Japan in 2013, I met with the Japanese buyer of Norma guitars.  A close friend of the Sackheims, this gentleman travelled Japan during the 60s and searched out cool guitars to supply to Strum and Drum.  It was a unique arrangement, and it was simply fascinating to listen about the old days of Japanese guitar production.  When you peruse Norma catalogs, you’ll often see models come and go quickly.  And there were always lots to choose from, year to year.
So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.

The 700-series guitars had removeable (loseable) bridge covers. Many of them for sale now are missing those covers and the vibrato arm. There are fewer 800s missing those vibrato arms. If I ever get a 700-series missing the cover and bar, I'll take a look under the bridge and see if any wood was removed. Maybe I can replace the bridge and tailpiece.
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
Typical modern Telecasters (such as the American Standard version) incorporate several details different from the classic form. They typically feature 22 frets (rather than 21) and truss rod adjustment is made at the headstock end, rather than the body end, which had required removal of the neck on the original (the Custom Shop Bajo Sexto Baritone Tele was the only Telecaster featuring a two-octave 24-fret neck). The 3-saddle bridge of the original has been replaced with a 6-saddle version, allowing independent length and height adjustment for each string. The long saddle bridge screws allow a wide range of saddle bridge positions for intonation tuning. The stamped metal bridge plate has been replaced with a plain, flat plate, and the bridge grounding cover (which, while helping with the shielding, impedes players who like to mute strings at the bridge with the side of the palm, and makes it impossible to pick near the saddles to produce the characteristic Telecaster ‘twang’) has been discontinued for most models. Also different from the original is the wiring: The 3-way toggle switch selects neck pickup only in the first position, neck and bridge pickups together in the second position, and bridge pickup only in the third position. The first knob adjusts the master volume; the second is a master tone control affecting all the pickups.
The Martin D-28 is a modern recreation of the dreadnoughts that came from Martin's "golden era", which falls between 1930 to 1940. Since vintage D-28 specimens that were built in the '30s were being sold for more than 30 grand, the company decided to give today's guitarists a chance to own one at a more reasonable price point. Carrying with it the same premium all-solid build that include a solid Sitka spruce top, solid east Indian rosewood back and sides, solid mahogany neck and solid ebony fretboard - you can expect this acoustic guitar to sound as Martin-y as possible.

In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.

The Takamine brand helps prevent big brand manufacturers from setting their prices too high - by showing them that great guitars can be produced at reasonable prices. On top of their bang per buck reputation, Takamine is considered as the pioneer of installing built-in pickups into acoustics, something that is now a common configuration offered by majority of guitar builders. The Takamine P3NY showcases how impressive tonewoods and electronics can be implemented without ridiculously jacking up the price.
The fretted instrument market is in many ways an excellent leading edge indicator of world economic conditions as a whole. China is not only rapidly advancing in the fretted instrument market but in all areas of manufacturing. Furniture factories in North Carolina are closing due to competition with imported Chinese products of equal quality for far less money. Numerous other industries are moving offshore. As you have all noticed the price of gasoline has risen dramatically in recent months. It should be noted that China now consumes approximately an equal amount of petroleum to Japan. This was certainly not the case five years ago. If OPEC and other producers pump the same amount of oil as they used to, but China emerges as a new player consuming this much fuel, it should come as no surprise that prices will go up. China now is a major importer of fuel, wood and agricultural products. Commodity prices in general are rapidly rising. China is not only becoming a world leader in manufacturing but it is becoming one of the world's leading consumers of all sorts of raw materials and commodities. While the per capita income in China and the per capita consumption of fuel is much lower than in the USA, their population is well over a billion people. At the rate they are going it will not be long before they consume fully as much fuel and other raw material as we do and have an economy which could rival the annual GNP of the USA. Not only are they an economic and manufacturing powerhouse, but they have a huge army. As their manufacturing capability increases not only quantitatively but qualitatively they become more and more of a super power. While the USA may have won the cold war with Russia, at the rate things are going as much as American consumers may benefit from inexpensive but high quality-guitars, furniture and other products from China, we may find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of no longer being the only world super power.
There are two common types of 5-way selector switches in the guitar world – the Fender type and the “import” type. Both types are functionally identical but differ in physical layout. It’s easy to see which type you’re dealing with. The Fender-type switches viewed from below have two rows of 4 contacts, either side of the circular body of the switch. The import-type switches have a single row of 8 contacts in a line.
That wraps it up folks! We hope you found some inspiration from our chart and managed to get a little closer to finding your best guitar for jazz. Now it’s simply a matter of reading some reviews, watching some videos and making a decision! Don’t forget, if this is your first guitar, you’ll need to buy a good amplifier to go with it. If you liked our stuff, you can subscribe to our newsletter for more sensational guitar deals.

12-string acoustic guitars have six string courses, each with two strings that are tuned to produce a chiming, chorus effect. Usually, the string pairs in the bass courses are tuned an octave apart while all treble strings are tuned in unison. Some guitarists prefer tuning the second string in the third course (G) in unison while others opt to tune it an octave higher for bell-like ringing tones.
From shopping for a first electric guitar to setting customized action, this do-it-yourself playerÕs primer for owning and maintaining an electric guitar explains the ins and outs of: choosing the right guitar; cleaning, tools and basic maintenance; personalizing and improving on a "factory setup"; trouble-shooting; basic guitar electronics; setups of the pros; and much more. Written by Dan Erlewine, author of the bestselling Guitar Player Repair Guide and the popular "Repairs" column in Guitar Player magazine, this book also includes a plastic sheet with specialized guitar tools you can snap-out!
It’s as simple as it gets: On/Off, Tone and a “clean-to-drive” Volume switch that becomes dirtier at higher volumes. Anything else you will need stomp-boxes, which this amp pairs well with thanks to its no-frills concept. Just do yourself the favour and invest in high-end pedals – otherwise you will ruin the amp’s exquisite tone with unsuitable digital effects.

SOLD OUT: is a faithful D-28 design copy by Takamine Japan , discontinued production decades ago its Beautiful its near mint What more do I need to say besides this one will go quickly! Just in to be processed and pictured it's all original and in TOP condition! Contact Joe to buy this beauty at: jvguitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come do not hesitate your going to love this guitar.


It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
Hi Teo, both amps are great for beginners. I have both personally, so I know that the Vox is great for classic British tones and some heavy Rock n Roll distortion, however, if you want a more heavy metal sound the Orange would suit that better as the overdrive is very powerful. It comes down to personal preference really so I suggest you try both out! -Lee

Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.


The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
XM DLX2 is one of two Deluxe models in the highly acclaimed XM series from Washburn. The other one is XM DLX2F. XM DLX2 comes with a solid, double-cut body made of basswood back and maple top. Top is a two-piece and it features the characteristic XM series contour. As all models in this series are, XM DLX2 is made primarily for players of heavy metal and shred styles. Strong pickups, super fast neck and 24-fret fingerboard indicate this. Bridge section features a tune-o-matic bridge with string-through-body construction and black plating. In it`s front, Washburn installs a pair of open-coil humbuckers. Master volume, master tone and a three-way toggle pickup switch comprise the controls unit. 24-fret fingerboard is made of rosewood and it`s installed on top of a set in maple neck.
I've had a Sunburst pattern Ventura when I was a teenager.. it was a nice guitar and played well. recently i saw a really well made Oscar Schmidt gs-1 . not expensive at all. My main guitar for many years was a Gibson howard roberts "artist" dove style. wine red and mother of pearl inlay and gold plated. I eventually sold it to a lady in alaska that plays a lot of blue grass and pop. I got full money out of it. I had it 25 years, so it was vintage by now.
While production and distribution of guitars under the Ibanez brand began much earlier, the company gained notoriety outside its native Japan when it started importing Ibanez guitars to the United States in the mid-1960s. These first efforts were funky-looking creations which sold at the low end of the guitar market, primarily in department stores. But the company's products continued to move up the quality ladder until the company was perceived as a legitimate market force, selling what were essentially copies of other companies' designs in the mid-1970s. A patent lawsuit from Gibson ended the sales of those copies, but Ibanez had by then gained a foothold in the guitar market globally. (more...)
Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.

Steel-string Acoustic Guitar The steel-string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar that descends from the classical guitar, but is strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. The most common shape is the dreadnought (originally developed by C.F. Martin & Company), which incorporates a deep soundbox and a smaller and less pronounced upper bout, giving it a wedge-shaped appearance. Other popular body styles include the larger jumbo body shape, as well as the smaller auditorium (000) body style and even smaller grand concert (00) body style. Check out the Martin Ed Sheeran X Signature Acoustic Electric for a smaller body type with a punchy sound.

X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.


This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
To make it simple, we chose a four-chord song: The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop." At first run-through, the game asked Andrew to play only one note every few seconds. As he successfully hit those, it added more and more until he was playing almost every note. On the next run through, the AI suddenly threw in two-note power chords. Once he mastered those, the game leveled up again, asking him to play every chord of the real guitar track that Johnny Ramone would have played. Finally, we unlocked Master Mode, which challenged us to play the song from memory. Only the measures appeared on the screen—no notes.
In 1952 the pickup selection circuit was modified by Fender to incorporate a real tone control. Between 1953 and 1967 the neck could be selected alone with a pre-set bassy sound and no tone control, in the middle switch the neck could be selected alone with the tone control and finally the bridge could be selected with the tone control. Although this provided the player with a proper tone control, this assembly did away with any sort of pickup combination. Eventually from late 1967 Fender again modified the circuit for the final time to give the Telecaster a more traditional twin pickup switching system: neck pickup alone with tone control in the first position, both pickups together with the tone control in the middle position and in the third position the bridge pickup alone with the tone control.[2]
By the turn of the century, new-metal grinders and post-grunge plodders had given loud guitars a bad reputation. Then Jack White hit the reset button. With each savage riff, he reconnected hard rock and roots music and showed that a blues-based band could escape what he calls "note-pushing Stratocaster white-blues bullshit." And he didn't let his analog leanings prevent him from ingenious use of a DigiTech Whammy pedal – the secret behind the faux-bass thunder of "Seven Nation Army" and the screaming leads of songs like "Ball and Biscuit."

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Built-in mics aren’t necessarily the budget option as they can be seen on some high-end guitars. They’re extremely helpful when you need volume but not so much where the acoustics of your setting, say in a concert hall, carries sound projection for you. However, the internal mic can raise problems for the performer as they’re prone to producing unwanted feedback. Multi-blend pickup and preamp systems allow you the flexibility to switching out from the mic when it proves to be problematic. However, if you’re going to install one yourself, look for one with a high feedback resistance of exceptional quality.

Many guitar and bass bodies are made from Mahogany. There are 49 types of Mahogany, but many are practically extinct because of the wood’s popularity for furniture and musical instruments, and the types used today are not the same as the Mahogany used in guitars in the 1940s or 1950s. Mahogany gives a warm timbre with a lot of bottom end. Les Paul type guitars often combine a mahogany body with a maple top for a total that is balanced overall.
While we have touched on the characteristics of single coil and humbucking pickups, to truly cover guitar electronics check out -‘Guitar Electronics for Musicians’ by Donald Brosnac which details the history of guitar pickups and goes into great detail about the mechanics of guitar pickups). It’s fairly heavy going for anyone new to the topic but also very interesting at the same time.
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Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.
The Epiphone Les Paul SL guitar (seen here in a Vintage Sunburst finish) is a great option for beginner guitarists out there as well as those in need of a high quality, budget friendly guitar that actually sounds and feels great. This is one of our best cheap electric guitars thanks to the fact you get a Les Paul style guitar packed with ceramic single coil pickups capable of spanning a range of different genres for under £100.

Often forgotten when it comes to in-depth reviews, the best acoustic electric guitar can be pretty tricky to find. Guitarists often know what they’re looking for when it comes to a standard electric or acoustic guitar, but there are some additional things to look out for when it comes to the fusion of the two. On a bit of a budget? Check out the top acoustic electric guitars under $1000 here. Perhaps you are a beginner, if so - check out the top electro-acoustic guitars under 300 bucks! Want something more luxurious? Try an acoustic electric for under 700 bucks.

Floor model Bugera 1960 infinium 150 watt all tube head. This amp never left the store until the closing sale when it was purchased by me. I have the shipping box, and all original packaging. Store owner had this in December of 2017, and used only as a store model. I gave it a thorough look, and checked everything out, and its all good. Do the research on these. They are very loud, and have had great reviews! Tube setup is auto bias ( so you dont have to send it to a certified tech to change out your tubes) three way switch to accommodate your speaker cabs in ohms. Really nice bang for the buck right here. I will accept any reasonable offer. Any questions please message me. Continental Us sales only.
The Ibanez GRX20ZBKN is part of the GIO series developed for players who want Ibanez quality in a more affordable package. The guitar is suitable for all types of music, but often a favorite of rock, metal and shred lovers. It features an alder body and a maple neck which feels sleek and fast. Great for moving quickly up and down the neck for those fast riffs and licks. A solid good looking low budget guitar for the beginner and intermediate.
Neck-through guitars feature a (usually laminated) neck that, unsurprisingly, extends through the entire length of the body, with ‘wings’ or ‘fins’ glued onto the sides of the body. This gives even more stability to the neck and even more sustain and resonance when played. Neck repairs are, again more difficult and costly. However, the increase in stability means these repairs are much less likely to be needed.

The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar Bass has major “cool” factor, and the sound holds out, too. With a P-bass style single in the neck position, and a J-bass style single in the bridge position, you’ll actually get the best of both worlds in terms of tonal options on the pickups. You have a choice between basswood (on the sunburst and crimson models) and agathis (on the black model), so there isn’t anything special about the woods they’re using in these basses. But the slim, fast-action, C contour of the maple neck will give you a nice, smooth J-bass feel that plays well above this guitar’s pay grade.
One possible way of dealing with the g string tuning issue (my experience has involved the low e more than anything) is to wind the string on the peg so that the winding goes up from the bottom of the peg, not v.v as it is done at factory. This reduces the angle at which the string sits relative to the nut and neck, potentially reducing the problem caused by the friction this angle creates when it contacts the nut. It will likely have a significant impact on the string staying in tune over time and you don't have to worry about filing the nut. A little nut lube might help too.
Recent amplifiers may include digital technology similar to effects pedals, up to the ability to model or emulate a variety of classic amplifiers. Some modeling systems also emulate the tonal characteristics of different speaker configurations, cabinets, and microphones. Nearly all amp and speaker cabinet modeling is done digitally, using computer techniques (e.g., Digital Signal Processing or DSP circuitry and software).
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