top 5...Top 5!...I had recently bought a gaming console after not owning one since the ps2 so not the biggest gamer but getting into it again has been fun when there free time to waste ha overall it's a pretty good game haven't stopped playing it just need to finish it up to continue the side story...What I'm disappointed is with the actual story of the game, which for me was very predictable and disappointing...I don't get how this game gets so many appraisal which for me is a good game for sure...but far, far, far away from one of the best games ever made as many say.
PRS is an American guitar company founded by luthier Paul Reed Smith in 1985. It makes some of the finest high-end electric guitars and custom shop instruments. It was extremely popular in the '90s and eventually spread to Asia, where they started the SE lineup that was more affordable and budget-friendly. However, they are not meant for beginners even though they cost less. They are used by musicians and players of all kinds of genres. The high-end models are classy and can be somewhat expensive.
This may seem like an odd value to consider, but most guitarists need to feel a certain connection to their instrument. It’s part of what makes being a guitarist different from other types of musicians; a sense of individuality as well as style. Your guitar will be a significant investment regardless of which brand you settle on, and while sound and construction are more critical factors overall, it’s important that your instrument inspires you. Different brands are known for cultivating different images; Gibson’s and Fender’s were made famous by the rock gods of yesterday, while Taylor’s unique acoustic bodies will conjure up a different vibe for a folk player. Again, this aspect speaks to your individual needs as a guitarist.
Just as it’s important that the guitar, amp and effects are performing to spec, make sure that all cables are functioning properly (it’s uncanny how many times a lead that was working fine yesterday suddenly develops a fault just before a take). It’s a good idea to ensure that spares are available. That goes for strings, too – valuable recording time can be lost just because a string has broken and no one has a spare. Some engineers will try to insist you use brand new strings when recording, but don’t be bullied into it if you prefer the warmer sound of a played-in set; that applies especially to bass, as new bass strings can introduce undesirable harmonic content into the sound.
Left Handed 1968 Fender Strat with an insanely rare Blonde Custom Color! This had to have been a special order guitar – has “Blond” written in the neck pickup cavity(see pic). I think I’ve seen one other factory left-handed Blonde Strat, but certainly not from the Hendrix era(both the white Woodstock and black Band of Gypsies Strats were from 1968).
Just as it’s important that the guitar, amp and effects are performing to spec, make sure that all cables are functioning properly (it’s uncanny how many times a lead that was working fine yesterday suddenly develops a fault just before a take). It’s a good idea to ensure that spares are available. That goes for strings, too – valuable recording time can be lost just because a string has broken and no one has a spare. Some engineers will try to insist you use brand new strings when recording, but don’t be bullied into it if you prefer the warmer sound of a played-in set; that applies especially to bass, as new bass strings can introduce undesirable harmonic content into the sound.
The focus has always been to start with sound and top it off with a bold, boutique-inspired appearance. When Michael Kelly launched, we, in fact, only offered mandolins and acoustic basses. These two markets had been under served and consumers could not buy a great sounding instrument without breaking the bank. The Michael Kelly Dragonfly collection of both acoustic basses and mandolins quickly became popular and hard to get. Musicians were drawn to their decidedly custom appearance and then fell in love with their sound and performance.
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
What would happen if four former Marshall employees got together? Well in this particular case, they formed Blackstar! Their product range includes hand-wired amps (the Artisan series) as well as products featuring different digital technologies (the ID:series). Plus, we have them to thank for the existence of the ISF system, a control that allows to switch gradually between American and British sound. In spite of the company's young life (it was founded in 2004), the brand already has many artists associated to its name like Silenoz (Dimmu Borgir) and James Dean Bradfield (Manic Street Preachers).
Electric Guitars- Vintage, new & used / Second-hand electric guitars by Kay, Teisco Del Rey Ray ET J-1, Univox & Silvertone. Cheesy Japanese, Surf Guitars. Also guitars by Ibanez, Gibson, Fender, Peavey, Martin, Zon, Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Diasonic & More. Les Pauls recording, lap steels / slide guitars, Barney Kessel style, Fender Stratocasters, Telecasters, Squire Bullet series, Peavey Falcon neck Martin Acoustics, bass guitars, Zon Legacy Elite 5 string Bass, Diasonic double single cutaway, Rickenbacker, archtop, Gretsch TW-100T Traveling Wliburys guitar, Hamer Mirage 1, Yamaha sg-2000, Fender Jag-Stang, Gibson Howard Roberts, Ibanez Artist AR-100 to name a few.
The intervals between the notes of a chromatic scale are listed in a table, in which only the emboldened intervals are discussed in this article's section on fundamental chords; those intervals and other seventh-intervals are discussed in the section on intermediate chords. The unison and octave intervals have perfect consonance. Octave intervals were popularized by the jazz playing of Wes Montgomery. The perfect-fifth interval is highly consonant, which means that the successive playing of the two notes from the perfect fifth sounds harmonious.
Terada was one of the smaller Japanese manufacturers of acoustic guitars during the period of 1960 to 1980, producing products for Epiphone, Fender Japan, Grapham, Gretch and Vesta. Terada produced some Kingston badges until 1975. Other badged guitars produced by Terada include some Burny badges and interesting Thumb guitars. Terada has been in continuous operation since 1912.

It might be a little overwhelming when you listen to the song being played by the professionals. Try not to listen to all the extra filler that these musicians put into their music and focus instead on the chord progression. Think about the chords that go into making these songs, try to memorize them, and listen to when the chord changes happen in the song.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.
Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.
Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
EQ or equalization effects work by boosting or cutting specified frequency bands within the sound signal. From treble or high-end sounds such as the sizzling sounds of a riveted cymbal to low-end sources such as the thump of a bass drum or bass guitar, EQ effects don't change the pitch but rather alter the timbre or quality of the sound. Depending on the application, EQ control can be quite precise or very simple.
Firstly, they are cheaper than their tube counterparts, which is why most beginners will end up starting on a solid-state amp. They are also much more efficient, easier to maintain (no need to change tubes), lighter to carry, and less fragile. While the tone of modern-day solid-state amps can be incredible, they don’t tend to be as fluid or responsive as tube amps. For more on solid-state amps, check out our dedicated solid-state amp page.

This question is one of those legendary analog vs. digital type debates. Many a forum war has been started around this topic. It’s typically a question asked by beginner and intermediate guitarists looking to get into effects. Given a budget, is it better to start a collection and buy a couple of individual effects, or get a single multi-fx unit? There’s not really one correct answer to this question one way or the other, since it largely matters on what your goals are.


The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.
G & L Guitars - Leo Fender founded this US Based guitar company with then-partner George Fullerton (hence the name G & L. They offer guitars similar to classic Fenders, but with some modern innovations. It is said that if Leo Fender stayed with Fender, their instruments will be upgraded to the G&L designs, which he considers as an upgrade to his classic guitar creations.
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, 5-ply top binding with pearloid outer layer, elevated tortoise pickguard with b/w binding, backstripe of two horizontal lines surrounded by two rows of diag lines (like a Style 45), bound ebony fingferboard, style 45 fingerboard snowflake inlays, trapeze tail piece, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, bound peghead, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Given the price tag, you’d expect the J-200 to be of a very high quality throughout, and we’re pleased to be able to say that it is. Every millimeter of the guitar has been expertly crafted, and nothing is an afterthought. The end result is a stunningly beautiful guitar that feels very special in your hands. No wonder everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Page has used a Super Jumbo in some form throughout history.
Pickup adjustments are also very important, and I set the height of my pickups by ear. I typically like the bass side of each pickup to be a bit lower than the treble side, so the wound strings don’t overpower the treble strings. Also, strings generate more energy and volume in the area closer to the neck, so I typically set neck pickups lower than bridge pickups.
The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
There are several kinds of bridge (located at the bottom of the guitar, where the strings are attached), but to keep things simple you’ll usually find either a fixed bridge or a tremolo bridge. Both have their pros and cons. A tremolo bridge will allow you to experiment with everything from vibrato effects right up to full-on divebombs, and can sound amazing when playing high lead solos. However, tremolo bridges can affect tuning, unless the bridge and nut locks. A fixed bridge is excellent for sustain and tuning stability, although there’s no vibrato. Again, it’s all down to personal preference.
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