Chords are an essential component of playing the guitar. When you first start out, it’s best to make a habit of learning one or two new chords a week, and with each chord you learn, practice playing it with the previous chords you’ve learned. Not only does this help you commit the chords to memory, it helps you learn how to move from chord to chord smoothly, so you can start applying your new chord vocabulary to playing actual songs. After all, isn’t that why we all start playing in the first place?

The Gruhn Guitars repair shop has been world renowned for decades for its unrivaled expertise, skill, and respectful repair practices. Though our full-time staff of luthiers primarily focuses on repairing and restoring the instruments we make available for sale, beginning in 2016 we are also pleased to offer our repair services to loyal customers as an extended benefit of buying an instrument from Gruhn Guitars. Instruments purchased from Gruhn Guitars will be moved to the front of our repair queue and will be repaired at a discounted labor rate. As a sign of our appreciation for your business, Gruhn Guitars is here to help you for years to come to keep your instrument in the same prime working order as when it was listed for sale at the shop.
I believe its an 80's model it has some wear n tear but makes it look good and ventig. But there is nothing on it but the bently sign on the headstock.its jet black has a bridge not string through. Two hummbuckers I guess. A treble and rhythm switch up by the neck on the top. It is a 22 fret with pearl inlays. Someone shoot me an email n ill send picks of it. Just want to know what I got my hands on.
So, I was looking for a single-ended amp. Say what you will about class A/B amps (and, to be fair, most of the great recorded tones in rock history are class A/B push-pull amps), some of them don’t really get singing until they’re too loud for the bedroom or studio. Sometimes you just need to hear that cranked tone without getting the knock from the neighbors. To quickly recap:

While I’m on the subject of guitar myths... Many sellers of vintage Japanese guitars have been throwing around the term “lawsuit guitar”, although not usually in reference to Kents. In 1977 the Norlin Company, which owned Gibson at the time, sued Elger Guitars, which was the U.S. distributing arm of Hoshino Gakki of Japan. The suit claimed that Hoshino-made Ibanez guitars too-closely copied the headstock design of Gibson. Just the headstock. By the time the suit was brought out, Hoshino had already changed to a headstock more closely resembling what was on Guild guitars of the time. So it was pretty easy for Elger Guitars/Hoshino to promise not to copy the Gibson headstock anymore.

JAZZ :Al Di Meola , John McLaughlin ,Wes Montgomery ,Pat Metheny ,John Scofield,Django Reinhardt ,Larry carlton ,Joe Pass,Herb Ellis ,Eddie Lang , and again I still have in mind at least 10 more jazz guitar players that jazz is the hardest and more complex guitar composition and it is an awesome style or kind of music to play just because not everybody play can play jazz.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.

The solid body guitar is a rock ‘n’ roll machine at its core, but appears in all genres of music and is more popular than hollow body or semi-hollow body guitars due to its wider variety of tones and improved volume and feedback characteristics. Some, like the Les Paul, have arched tops like hollow and semi-hollow models. But the majority are flat-bodied, including Gibson Flying Vs, Explorers and SGs, and classic Epiphones, like the Wilshire.
The focus has always been to start with sound and top it off with a bold, boutique-inspired appearance. When Michael Kelly launched, we, in fact, only offered mandolins and acoustic basses. These two markets had been under served and consumers could not buy a great sounding instrument without breaking the bank. The Michael Kelly Dragonfly collection of both acoustic basses and mandolins quickly became popular and hard to get. Musicians were drawn to their decidedly custom appearance and then fell in love with their sound and performance.
It comes with two 6.5-inch speakers, delving out 100 W each for a total of 200. Now, the small woofer diameter might make these units work less-than-perfect for rendering stomach-churning bass noise, but ZT Amplifiers never intended for them to be used as such. Instead, they are supposed to deliver loud and clear enough sounds in the treble and mid ranges to make the guitarist hold its own even when a loud drummer is present.    

The Fender Stratocaster, or Strat® (as it's been referred to affectionately for decades), has become a favorite for players of all genres. Introduced in 1954, the Stratocaster ushered in a new era of guitar design and has been instrumental in the development of modern music as we know it. Like its older cousin, the Telecaster, it features single-coil pickups. But rather than just pickups at the neck and bridge, it has a middle pickup and five-way selector that allows for even further in-between tonal variations. Along with being the first solid-body electric to have three pickups, it was also the first to have a self-contained vibrato system.
Despite what appears now to a somewhat dated design (all the quasi-organic shapes inspired by Alembic at the time are tough to love with the passage of time), Martin’s 18 Series electrics are actually quite comfortable and yield a versatile number of useful sounds. The neck profile is quite round, not unlike many acoustics, but very easy to play. The frets are small and squarish, which makes them a bit awkward for blues-style bending.
Rocksmith displays six horizontal lines at the bottom of the screen that represent the guitar's six strings—E, A, D, G, B, and E—and show you which ones to play. The game color-codes them to try and make it a little easier to comprehend all this visual information at once, but there's no way around it—it takes quite a bit of practice and memorization to get used to this. You really need to practice to the point that you know intuitively which color belongs to which string. Otherwise you'll always be looking down to pick out which string you should be playing, and will never be able to keep up with the song.
The solid body electric guitar was a major design advance introduced by Leo Fender in the early 1950s. The solid body guitar helped remedy the feedback problems of hollowbody instruments. They were also easier to make, which led to mass market production. Fender introduced the iconic Telecaster and Stratocaster. Soon Gibson also introduced their first electric guitars in a partnership with Les Paul to produce what would become the equally iconic Gibson Les Paul.
I think Matts’ advice is good, (old guitar strings can be helpfull for “fishing”) but if you change your p’ups and switching often an accessible control cavity is a great thing, just be sure to drop all pots and such into the body and drill through the potentiometer holes so you know where to place template and assure router bit won’t hit anything dangling in the body.
While you can learn on any of these, we recommend a solid-body guitar, which includes all the models featured on this page. The main advantage of a solid body guitar for beginners is that they are easier to control in front of an amplifier. By this we mean you are unlikely to experienced squealing feedback from the amp, which can be a big annoyance when it happens all the time. Solid body guitars are often simpler to hold as well, as hollow models tend to be a bit bigger in size.
I've contacted them once before and they are SO eager to please. None of those steps is an issue for them at all. I don't condone buying out of China but that is a pretty sure fire way of squeezing the best quality guitar out of an otherwise shithouse marketplace. If you just order and wait, they are just going to pick one off the shelf, and that's not what you want. You need to push them to make your guitar.
The AC15C1X is a modern take on the venerable AC15, with improved reliability and built-in effects. Vox's familiar clean and overdriven tone is ever present, courtesy of its three 12AX7 preamp tubes and two EL84 power tubes that drive a 12" Celestion Alnico Blue speaker - a speaker that many Rock and Blues players prefer. The amp has a dedicated Top Boost input for those who want Vox' distinct jangly tone. Finally, it comes with tremolo and reverb effect to add space and texture to your guitar tone.
T5 (2005) – Abbreviation stands for Thinline 5-way. “5-way” refers to the five position pickup selector switch mounted on the top of the guitar which activates different combinations of components in the T5’s pickup system. When hooked up to an amplification system, it’s capable of producing a variety of acoustic and electric tones in a single guitar.
James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music". Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, ...more on Wikipedia
yea, i’ve looked on a lot of websites. The way the 5-way switch is explained here helps a lot. Actually, the Dimarzio site has the closest wiring schematic that I’ve seen. I tried it and I got 2 out of the 5 positions to work. The problem is that all 3 pickups are running on both the working settings, just the bridge is more defined on the one setting and the neck is more defined on the other.
In this buying guide, you’ll learn the essentials of what effects pedals do and which ones to look for depending on the kind of tone you want to experiment with. Here’s the quick overview: effects pedals (also called “stompboxes”) are electronic devices that connect in-line with your guitar and amp to change the signal going through them. Some work with analog circuits and some are digital, but they’re all powerful tools for shaping your sound in endlessly creative ways.
Whether it costs $100 or $1000, the build quality should feel worthy of the money. Naturally with budget models you will find more laminated woods compared the solid woods and exotic materials used in expensive guitars. However, a good model will have laminates that are put together securely and cleanly, with no excess glue or rough spots. Even a good budget guitar will look and feel great.
The first pedal-operated flanger designed for use as a guitar effect was designed by Jim Gamble of Tycobrahe Sound Company in Hermosa Beach, CA, during the mid 1970s. Last made in 1977, the existing "Pedalflangers" appear occasionally on eBay and sell for several hundred dollars. A modern "clone" of the Tycobrahe Pedalflanger is sold by Chicago Iron.Famous users of this Flanger effect include Randy Rhoads and Eddie Van Halen, coincidentally they both used the MXR M-117R flanger and Eddie Van Halen even has his own signature model now.

Then, one weekend his combo got the biggest gig of its career – opening for Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra. Charlie was hot that night, and Dorsey took notice. In one of those rare coincidences, Dorsey’s guitar player had just quit, and the next day Kaman was offered the job. Which path does the son of a construction foreman pursue? The uncertain, fleeting glory of the entertainment industry, or the unknown possibilities of putting craft in the air?
Hi, it seems like the problem lies in your hands and not in the guitar itself. If you are a beginner, you must start slowly and build up strength in your hands. A good way is to simply buy a "stress ball" or other hand exerciser. A "Gripmaster" one that lets you work each finger individually, which can be very useful, they are available for about $20 at most music stores.
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 

The first electric instrument amplifiers were not designed for use with electric guitars. The earliest examples were portable PA systems, which appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes allowed the production of economical built-in power supplies that could be plugged into wall sockets, instead of heavy multiple battery packs, since rechargeable batteries would not become lightweight until many decades later. While guitar amplifiers from the beginning were used to amplify acoustic guitar, electronic amplification of guitar was first widely popularized by the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively employed the amplified lap steel Hawaiian guitar.[2]

The name Epiphone stands above all for very good, less expensive alternatives to the unfortunately always quite expensive Gibson guitars. Gibson tries to offer good alternatives to their Gibson branded Instruments through its subsidiary Epiphone. Les Paul, SG, Explorer and other models. Todays Epiphone program includes electrical, half- and full-resonance guitars, basses, acoustic and electro-acoustic instruments, banjos and mandolins. Epiphone stands on the one hand for innovative ideas in guitar manufacturing and on the other for successful replicas of instrument classics that are affordable for everyone.


Back in the good ol’ days, guitarists had to crank their amplifiers to eleven in order to obtain a nice and creamy distortion. Today, this is no longer the case. Thanks to overdrive pedals, you can basically drive every clean amp into overdrive – at any volume – and choose the amount of gain and shape the tone precisely as desired. The overdriven or crunch sounds are commonly used for rock, to slightly get that “breakup” clean tone or to play blues licks and solos. During the last two decades, guitarists found out that overdrive pedals are also perfect for boosting the crunch channel of their amps into total distortion – a technique often used during guitar solos, to give the sound that extra weight and girth – or, as with the famous Tubescreamer, to tighten up the bass response of the amplifier gain channel. The Boss SD-1 is a very popular choice for overdrive pedals, capable of great sounds. The legendary TS9 by Ibanez is also worth a mention – even considering that it’s available in Mini and Deluxe formats. And while we’re at it, why not give the Harley Benton Ultimate Drive a try? This little screamer can boost your amp into full overdrive at a very competitive price.
The reason for their order boils down to the evolution of the stringed instrument.  By adding a string or two, shortening the neck, and arranging them in a Perfect 4th Interval you can increase the speed of playing and reduce strain on the hands and wrists.  Other interval layouts were toyed with but had some harmonic problems that couldn't be ignored.

Much of this is probably thanks to an outdated a pedal with a two-function switch that is labeled “Chorus” and “Vibrato.” These words will trigger a sigh of awe and wonder from many a guitarist because, of course, they are the labels on the mode switch of the famous Univox Uni-Vibe. This pedal is a good place to start because it was one of the first of the transistorized effects of this type to become widely available, and it occupies a patch of ground all its own in the world of things that go “swoosh”. That said, and despite the name and switch labeling, the Uni-Vibe is more akin to a four-stage phaser than what we today consider to be a chorus pedal, even if that’s the label on its most-loved setting. The deception is forgivable when you remember that the Uni-Vibe’s intention was to reproduce the chorus-type sound—or “chorale” sound, as it was often labeled—produced by a Leslie rotating speaker cabinet used with a Hammond organ. Also, the unit existed before there was much categorization of such things: it was a guitar effects footpedal, it had its own sound… and that was all anyone needed to know. The Uni-Vibe—and the better clones that have followed it down the years—is based around a discrete transistorized circuit with four sets of light bulbs and light cells and a low frequency oscillator (LFO) which does the shifting work to move the peaks and notches. Unlike the drawing-board phaser discussed above, however, the frequencies of each stage of the Uni-Vibe are set differently, so it could be argued that there is indeed more of a chorusing of the sound.
Taylor’s 214ce Grand Auditorium acoustic guitar has undergone a few changes over the years. One of the latest improvements added in 2017 concerns the wood used for the body. Because of the restrictions on the importation of rosewood, Taylor no longer uses it for their 200 series of guitars, which the 214ce is a part of. Instead, the company used the next best wood for a great, balanced tonal response: Hawaiian koa.
Because any acoustic guitar can be made into an acoustic-electric, from what I’ve seen — and this is simply an observation, not a blanket statement — most of these sacrifice both quality of guitar and quality of pickup to sell affordable instruments in the name of convenience. So for the introductory acoustic player, here is my advice: Skip the acoustic-electric section and find a plain ol’ acoustic guitar that you like. When the time is right, plenty of companies make a variety of pickups designed for acoustic guitars, which will give you more options when selecting a method of amplifying your acoustic.
There are a lot of different kinds of guitars (acoustic, semi-acoustic, electric, steel etc.) but some companies make a wide variety. Here's a list. . Fender (Mine) . Ibanez (Mine too) . Epiphone (Also Gibson plus the kids version is Maestro) . Dean . Some good acoustic companies are . Alvarez (Also mine) . Crescent . You can visit the websites for these companies. Hope I could help!
Two other Spanish guitars were available in 1954 which were not shown in the Teisco history photo, the J-2 and the TN-54. These are pretty much a mystery. The J-2 was likely a two-pickup companion to the J-1, although by a few years later, both these models had become double-cutaways. Whether that was the case with the J-2 from the beginning is unknown, but unlikely. The description of the TN-54 is completely unknown.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
I use a cheap zoom effects box (actually because it has a fabulous digital tuner built-in) and if I want to play at home I plug that into the stereo. Don't have it any louder than you would a CD etc .. (ok maybe a bit ;-) ) gives you the flexibility of all the effects sounds plus because it's stereo (assuming you hve the speakers a few feet apart) you get that feeling of it being "large" when really it's not that loud.
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The Gibson ES-335 certainly had an alluring appeal in the mid 1900’s, and it’s easy to see why. With a beautiful Arched top, lovely smooth curves and a tone that can knock your socks off, and a beautiful white binding, these truly are beautiful guitars. Whether you want to play some classic blues, or dip into some catchy jazz, this guitar is sure to impress.
It looks cheaper the more I examine it... super easy to play though. the truss adjustment bolt is far enough back from the sound hole that I could only reach it with the longer end of the crappy allen wrench I found, and then the tiny end I had left couldn't really leverage. I'll have a few more of those (better ones) once I clean my place though. The saddle barely pops out from the bridge but the bridge has this weird curve that makes the string angle like normal to the pins. Just poked my hand in and its not even X-braced. I'm sorta confused. It's different.

As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.
And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!
The Roland Blues Cube Artist looks and sounds the part of a vintage tweed tube era amplifier, but the innards tell a different story, being a solid-state amp with Roland's Tube Logic technology. And for something with tube amp modeling and USB direct recording, the amp comes with a streamlined set of features, having just two channels, clean and crunch, both of which have boost switches. Interestingly, this more traditional setup helped the amp score high points from users who want a pedal friendly amp that has the feel of tube without its usual drawbacks. Giving it a bit of an edge over older amps, is its built-in power attenuator that lets you lower the power rating from 80W down to 0.5W. For a bit of tone experimentation, the amp comes with a "dual tone" switch for blending the two channels in a way that's musically pleasing. Roland also equipped this amp with tremolo and reverb that complements its simple setup. Finally, the Blues Cube Artist lets you expand your tonal palette via its swappable "tone capsule", which is an analog component that you actually switch out to give the amp a different sound. There are currently three available tone capsules, two of which are artist signatures from Eric Johnson and Robben Ford, and the third one being Roland's own rendition of the Blues sound.
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
In the ’80s, with the advent of new digital effects units, the “refrigerator racks” appeared on the scene—custom rigs built for the studio and touring pros of the day. Effects loops in guitar amps also became commonplace—allowing guitarists to insert line-level effects after the distortion generating preamp stages of their amps, and before the power amp stage—a big tonal improvement when using time-based effects like delay and reverb.
Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
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The Line 6 POD Farm program is famous for its amp simulation, however many users have realized that the quality of its modeled effects are equally superb. Some even use the POD Farm strictly for its effects! It has a huge collection of FX - up to 94 - and it modeled some of the most popular stompboxes including the MXR Phase 90, ProCo Rat, Uni-Vibe, Arbiter Fuzz Face and Big Muff Pi. It also includes modeled versions of old analog devices like the EP-1 Echoplex. Setting up is a breeze with its simple carousel-style interface, which lets you visualize your signal chain. Current Retail Price $49.00
It has great quality hardware and amazing sound because of the pickups. There are no flaws or nicks in the finish of the body. It needs to be set up though which can be difficult initially. Once you set up, you will be able to see its performance in action. The great thing about this guitar is that even though it is the cheapest electric guitar, it looks quite expensive to an observer.

Unlike Andrew, before Rocksmith 2014 Carl had never played anything other than a toy-guitar controller. The lessons made it easy to learn the basics—from just holding the instrument properly, to playing basic notes and fingering techniques—all without the pressure of a human guitar instructor's waning patience. Since this was my first experience playing a real guitar, I was eager to learn and didn't mind that the notes scroll horizontally across the screen instead of Guitar Hero and Rock Band's vertical scrolling.

Electric guitars were originally designed by acoustic guitar makers and instrument manufacturers. Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow-bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. The first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp, the general manager of the National Guitar Corporation, with Paul Barth, who was vice president.[3] The maple body prototype for the one-piece cast aluminium "frying pan" was built by Harry Watson, factory superintendent of the National Guitar Corporation.[3] Commercial production began in late summer of 1932 by the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (Electro-Patent-Instrument Company), in Los Angeles,[4][5] a partnership of Beauchamp, Adolph Rickenbacker (originally Rickenbacher), and Paul Barth.[6] In 1934, the company was renamed the Rickenbacker Electro Stringed Instrument Company. In that year Beauchamp applied for a United States patent for an Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument and the patent was later issued in 1937.[7][8][9][10]
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