There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
3) The pedal switch. Placed on the top of the pedal, pressing it with your foot turns the effect on and off. This is where the name “stomp boxes” comes from – you “stomp” the box to turn on the effect. Pedals are most commonly placed on the floor next to each other so they can be toggled with your feet while you play with your hands, but larger units are often placed in large racks on top of one another, as otherwise they would take up too much floor space.
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
The first National Dobro cast aluminum Hawaiians are probably relatively rare. They were probably only made for about a year, maybe less, from sometime in 1935 until sometime in 1936. By late ’36, the aluminum-bodied Supro laps (and the electric mandolin) had dropped from sight to be replaced by wood-bodied Hawaiians. The reason for discontinuing the aluminum steels appears to be related to the move. The aluminum castings and assembly were done in L.A. By late ’36, National Dobro had substantially relocated to Chicago (though an L.A. office was maintained until mid-’37), and it wasn’t economical to have them shipped all the way to Chicago. It was easier to make wooden bodies in Chicago, so after the move (by late 1936), National Dobro switched to wood-bodied Hawaiians.
At the top of the fingerboard, just below the headstock, is a slotted piece of material called the nut. The strings are routed through the slots in the nut and terminate at the bridge, located on the far end of the body. When the strings are plucked or strummed, they vibrate between the nut and the bridge. This vibration is where the sound of a guitar begins. How that vibration translates into sound depends on whether the guitar is acoustic or electric, as we’ll see in a moment.
I have been playing for two years. I use to play (and still have) a fender squier. Today I bought a Lyle on impuls. I wasn't planning on buying one, i just walked in and it looked so beautiful. I have a feeling it is about 10 years old or so, but the sales man didn't know much other than it was a Lyle and it had new tunning pegs on it. I got it for 150$ and i would REALLY love to know more about it. Thanks.
If you are a beginner then you probably don't know what a ‘floating tremolo' is. Have a look at Floyd Rose, who made the first models. If you are looking at a guitar that has little tuners on the bridge, then it's probably a floating tremolo. For a beginner, they are a total pain in the butt. They are very hard to tune and a real pain to change strings. The cheaper ones go out of tune a lot too. If you know why you want one, then fine, but locking tremolos on budget instruments are usually rubbish, so stay clear of those for now!
Since the Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor was announced at NAMM 2018, guitarists and bass players alike have been enjoying the functionality and unrivalled sound quality of the unit. We actually created a blog called 3 Reasons Why The BOSS GT-1000 Is Really Special, discussing 3 of the key features that make this stand out so much, but trust me when I say that there’s so many more reasons that this is easily one of the best multi-effects pedals ever made.
Emerald City Guitars is the professional’s choice for guitar repair in Seattle! A partial list of some of our more well known clients: Bill Frisell, Billy F. Gibbons, Jimmie Vaughan, The Black Crowes, Pearl Jam, Jessica Dobson & Deep Sea Diver, Telekinesis, The Walkmen, Lynval Golding, The Supersuckers, Mudhoney, Randy Hansen, Death Cab for Cutie, Clinton Fearon, KD Lang, Henry Cooper, Alien Crime Syndicate, Orbit Studios, The Lonely H, Mars Hill Church, Fleet Foxes, The Magic Mirrors… and YOU!
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.
For the acoustic guitar player, plugging in to an external amp and effects processor can be quite fun, and can add a lot of 'spice' to your playing, just by virtue of having access to a wider range of sounds. But whereas hauling an acoustic guitar with you isn't a big deal, hauling an amp and accessories with you (and finding a place to plug in) can be challenging.
I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.
On a Les Paul, adjusting the saddle position can be a little tricky while the string is tuned to pitch. Sometimes you can get a screwdriver in there and turn it, but often you need to slacken the string and move it to the side. Also note that sometimes the adjustment screws are at the back of the bridge rather than the front. I prefer adjusting the saddle while the string is slack anyway as there is a lot of stress on both the string and the saddle otherwise.
Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
You didn’t think we would forget bass amps, did you? Due to their inherent differences in design, bass guitars require a dedicated amplifier – using your old Fender Champion isn’t going to cut it. Bass amps offer more power, with some outputs reaching 1000 watts or more. Like guitar amps, bass amplifiers come in many shapes and sizes – including heads and combos – although the mid-range Hartke HD500 offers a stage-worthy 500 watts of power in a portable combo unit, with great controls and an excellent balanced tone.
After shaping your sound, is important to add some depth to it, and here’s where the ‘ambiance’ pedals find their way into your rig. The chorus effect should be used properly, without overdoing it, but can give great results: the depth and the ‘3 guitarists playing your part’ effect can work amazingly well for your music. Delay and Reverb can be used lightly, in order to enhance your sound and fill up your guitar solos with a little space (by setting up a nice spring or hall reverb settings and a dotted delay) or heavily, to achieve creative sounds where the sky is the only limit.

We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of


Two and a half steps down from standard tuning. Used in Swedish death metal by bands such as At The Gates, Dismember, Edge of Sanity, Entombed, Amon Amarth, and Arch Enemy (during the Johan Liiva era), as well as Fear Factory, Carcass, Type O Negative, Cathedral, Seventh Void, Fleshgod Apocalypse, Sepultura, Five Finger Death Punch, Soulfly, Within Temptation, Triptykon and guitarist Kirk Windstein of Crowbar and Kingdom of Sorrow.


To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.
    Kahler Tremolo bridges feature 6-way adjustable string saddles, which really allow you to dial in your string action and intonation. They have a fairly wide range-of-motion, but less than the Floyd Rose. The Kahler’s have a smoother feel compared to the Floyd Rose, and also have a convenient locking mechanism to convert the bridge into a fixed bridge.
As a lover of fuzz pedals myself I have both kinds and find uses for them, they sound different and excellent. Other famous fuzz users are Eric Johnson, David Gilmour, Joe Bonamassa, and Stevie Ray Vaughan to name a few. When shopping for a fuzz, try to play as many as you can next to each other, even of the same model. Due to the transistor values the same model pedal can sound and feel very different from pedal to pedal.
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You’ll notice that once it reaches zero sound gets very muddy very fast. That’s because we have zero resistance between the signal and the cap. To prevent this, some people put a small resistor (10K or so) between the pot and the cap. That way we won’t affect pot operation at higher settings (510K is very close to 500K) but at lower settings it will prevent it from reaching zero as we’re always adding 10K in series.
 South Korea has been one of the largest OEM guitar factories in the world since 1980's. Nonetheless, the words "Made in Korea" still invoke visions of low cost alternatives to high-end manufacturers. At Swing, our mission is to lay these stereotypes to rest, and show the world that we can produce true professional grade instruments, made by professionals, for professionals. (Of course, company is not a patriotic organization. This is a matter of manufacturer's pride and self-satisfaction that can be called "Professionalism".)
Which got me to thinking about the history of American guitar companies. Many famous brands of guitars which started production here in the USA now exist as a name being used by an unrelated company for importing guitars into this country. Other brands are still being made but ownership has passed to one of a few big guitar companies. It’s difficult to trace this history without a “score card”.
"Soft clipping" gradually flattens the peaks of a signal which creates a number of higher harmonics which share a harmonic relationship with the original tone. "Hard clipping" flattens peaks abruptly, resulting in higher power in higher harmonics.[37] As clipping increases a tone input progressively begins to resemble a square wave, which has odd number harmonics. This is generally described as sounding "harsh".
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
Fast forward a few hundred years to the world of guitar pedals. The first registered portable effect pedal for guitarists built in 1941, called the DeArmond 601 Tremolo Control, was a clumsy toaster oven-shaped unit with a heavy granite-like exterior. The tremolo effect worked by reducing the signal from the guitar several times a second through an electrolytic hydro-fluid located in a glass canister inside the unit. When activated, the main voltage motor rapidly shook the canister, causing the fluid (water, windex, and even mercury) to stir and splash against the pin and the guitar signal to ground, creating a “watery” tremolo sound.
The SG started out as a lighter alternative to the Les Paul - which Les didn't like and eventually opted out of. But what seemed like a failure turned out into a success story because many rock and metal guitar players loved the SG's sharp look, faster neck and comfortable upper fret reach. These days, the SG continues to dominate in the realm of rock and metal with modern production models like the Epiphone SG Special, which is meant to be as affordable as possible for future rock stars to learn on.

The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.
Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.
In Hamburg in 1960, Beatles guitarist John Lennon bought a Rickenbacker 325 Capri, which he used throughout the early days of The Beatles. He eventually had the guitar’s natural alder body refinished in black, and made other modifications including the fitting of a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece and regularly changing the control knobs.[7] Lennon played this guitar for The Beatles’ famous 1964 debut on The Ed Sullivan Show (as well as for their third Sullivan appearance, pre-taped the same day but broadcast two weeks later). During Lennon’s post-Beatles years in New York, this guitar was restored to its original natural wood finish and the cracked gold pickguard replaced with a white one.[7]
Now, the body size isn’t the only thing to think about. There’s also whether or not there’s a cutaway, and how this is implemented. A cutaway makes it easier for you to access the higher frets, because you can place your hand right next to them. Naturally this will reduce some of the resonance because there’s less body beside the neck, but it’s a tradeoff that a great many guitarists are happy to make if they want to be able to play those higher frets well.
Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.
A variation of the wah pedal is the auto wah. Not to be confused with a city in Canada, auto-wah effects do the same things a wah does, but without the foot treadle. Usually, you can adjust the attack time (how fast the tone shifts toward the treble) and the depth of the cycle. Some auto-wahs also let you set a constant up and down motion that's not triggered by the note. You’ll find auto-wahs included in many multi-effects processors. One of the newer developments in this area is the Talking Pedal from Electro-Harmonix. While eliminating the moving parts of traditional wahs, it produces amazing male-vocal and vowel-sound effects that harmonize with your guitar’s notes. A fuzz circuit lets you dial in more growl and grit.
Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.

2. Orange Micro Dark w/1x8 Cabinet ($288): Who doesn’t love tiny yet mighty lunchbox amps and the speakers they rest upon? The Micro Dark head uses a tube front end to push 20-watts of power and coupled with a 1x8” speaker, you’ll be able to get awesome tube tone for a fraction of the price and size of a bigger rig. This little duo is well-equipped to handle clean and overdriven tones whether you are cracking the volume on the speaker or playing through your headphones.
Mentioned below are some of the tabs for guitar, that a beginner could practice. Take the guitar and let us first learn the 4 x 4 rhythm. Strum the guitar with a plectrum in downward and upward direction in the form of - four beats in each measure and the quarter note gets one beat. That is, strum the guitar strings (chord) 'Up-Down' 4 times a then just end it coming up after the 4th downward strum. Yes! You got it right. 'Up-Down' is 1 note (that needs to be played 4 times) and 'Up' is the half note (that needs to be played once). Practice this rhythm till you get your hands on it and then practice it, changing the guitar chords.

Playability and tone are two of its most commended traits. Many describe its neck as very easy on the hands, while others describe the overall playing experience to be better than their other acoustic guitars. The TK-40D preamp gets a lot of nod from users who want to fine tune their amplified sound, while there are also many who are satisfied with its acoustic sound.


We call these boxes “phase shifters” because they split the guitar signal and shift one path out of phase by from 0 to 360 degrees through the entire range of the frequency spectrum, and blend it back with the dry path so the moving in-phase/out-of-phase relationship can be heard. When the two signals are totally out of phase—at 180 degrees (or, technically, 540 degrees or 900 degrees, etc, because the shift keeps moving)—they cancel each other out, creating what we call a “notch”. But a number of factors interact to give a phaser its characteristic “swooshing” sound. I will explain them in relatively simple terms, but in many units some pretty clever and complex electronics going into making all this happen. When a notch in the frequency response is swept across the frequency spectrum, the most dramatic sonic effect occurs at the peaks between the notches, where both paths are completely in phase, and we have a full-strength signal. Leaving it there, however, would repeatedly emphasize the same low, middle and high-frequency notes—and delete the same notes at the notches—so the phaser circuit also employs an oscillator to continually move (or “shift”) the point at which these notches and peaks occur, so that different frequencies are emphasized and de-emphasized at each pass, at a rate determined by the unit’s “speed” or “rate” knob.
Now I do all of my own adjustments and I have no plans to change that unless I run into something that's beyond me. Even if that scenario occurs, I still plan to try to learn as much as I can so that hopefully I will be able to take care of any future issues that are related. Mark did a great job for me but I feel that I do a better job adjusting my instruments to my needs.
Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.
Here we have a Faithful Recreation of the classic Martin D-18 that was well crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This is an excellent vintage Japanese guitar as it has been well taken care of all these years And has spent its years in California in the perfect climate to preserve the guitars original structural and cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still JVG rated at very good to excellent with no cracks or finish checking none – clean and still shines like glass….. its 1-11/16ths at the nut neck is a nice comfortable medium slim profile, neck is straight with correct amount of slight relief, action is good medium low and plays with ease and sound is clear and volume is good, tone is vintage sweet from its Aged tone woods. This is a true Lawsuit model as it has the direct image shape & size of the vintage Martin it copies is is a very cool D-18 guitar, its 33 years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. .
Most beginners find that during the process of learning (after a year or so) you will figure out your own sound. You will naturally be drawn to music that features guitar in it, and great guitar parts. So what usually happens is that your own musical tastes will change and with this change the type of instrument that suits your sound the best will also change. So when you’re ready to take the next step, you will have a much better idea of what you really want.

The earliest sound effects were strictly studio productions. In the mid to late 1940s, recording engineers and experimental musicians such as Les Paul began manipulating reel-to-reel recording tape to create echo effects and unusual, futuristic sounds. Microphone placement ("miking") techniques were used in spaces with specially designed acoustic properties to simulate echo chambers.[22][23][24] In 1948 DeArmond released the Trem-Trol, the first commercially available stand-alone effects unit. This device produced a tremolo by passing an instrument's electrical signal through a water-based electrolytic fluid.[25] Most stand-alone effects of the 1950s and early 60s such as the Gibson GA-VI vibrato unit and the Fender reverb box, were expensive and impractical, requiring bulky transformers and high voltages. The original stand-alone units were not especially in-demand as many effects came built into amplifiers. The first popular stand-alone was the 1958 Watkins Copicat, a relatively portable tape echo effect made famous by the British band, The Shadows.[26][27]


Featuring a sound engine derived from the bigger, premium-priced GT-100, the GT-1 contains 99 preset and 99 user patches each built from a chain of blocks that can draw from 108 effects, including 27 amp/speaker sims and a 32-second looper. The first two footswitches scroll through patches, while the third (CTL1) footswitch is used to turn an effect, or a combination of effects, on and off in a patch, or for tap tempo. Sonically, there's some great stuff here. Many of the presets are playable straight off the bat, but the wide range of effects means that you can get really creative with your own patches. As you'd expect from Boss, the modulation effects are a highlight, as well as the delays and reverbs, particularly the Tera Echo. We've heard better pitch-shifting though... While the COSM amp sims will give you an approximation of the real thing for recording, at this price, you don't get the playability and detail of high-end modelers. Likewise, the overdrives and distortions work really well when building a patch but, used as solo effects, have less of the impact of real analogue pedals. The acoustic guitar simulator is class, though. For live use, the GT-1 doesn't have the flexibility of bigger units where you can switch individual effects, although you could get 
by in a live situation with careful sequential use of your own patches and the CTL1 button.

Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.
Silvertone was the “musical” brand for the Sears, Roebuck & Company, beginning nearly a century ago. The big boom was ukuleles in the ’teens and twenties. The first Silvertone product was a hand-cranked phonograph introduced in 1915. Silvertone radios were introduced in the early 1920s. Silvertone guitars appeared in the 1930s, with electric 6-strings appearing in the early ’40s

What’s the point in having these lists anyway? There’s always going to be anger over people who were left out/included on the list when they didn’t deserve to be… And to say that any of the musicians mentioned so far aren’t talented is ridiculous, there’s no limit in the world on how much talent there is, so why does this list have to be limited to 10? Just saying…
You can get an entirely new perspective of the fretboard by starting from the C-A-G-E and D chords. This book can help create a roadmap for the guitar, where you'll be able to know each fret's note name - one of the most important things to learn when playing. If you're unsure about learning this system, do a search for the CAGED system on YouTube and see if it's something you'd be interested in.
I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.
The Fender Mustang II V2 40w Guitar Amplifier Combo is an extremely versatile modelling amplifier that comes complete with 8 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets. So, you’ve got a huge amount of different sounds to play with! It’s like having 18 amplifiers in one easy to carry box all pumping out through a powerful 1 x 12” fender Special Design speaker – great for gigs and studio use!
The sound blew away guitarists when units first popped up in guitar stores. If the dizzying harmonic swirl didn’t just make you puke, it really sent you tripping. Interestingly, many tired of it a lot quicker than they did the phaser’s subtler, less imposing “swoosh”, and consequently it’s difficult today to name a fraction as many great guitar tracks with flangers slapped all over them as with phasers. For the latter, we’ve got the Stones’s “Shattered” (or just about anything from Some Girls), the Clash’s “Lost in the Supermarket” from London Calling and loads from Sandinista, and heavier rockers from early Van Halen to recent Foo Fighters. In the flanging corner, we’ve got The Pat Travers Band’s “Boom Boom, Out Go The Lights” and… well, I’m sure there’s another somewhere. Okay, maybe the intro lick to Heart’s “Barracuda” redeems it some.
GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.

8. Fender Champion 40-watt 1x12 ($179.99): If you are looking for a great introduction into the world of Fender tone, you need to look no further than the Fender Champion 40. This solid state amp with Fender classic styling allows you access to a variety of on-board effects like Vibratone, tremolo, delay and many more. The two amp channels allow you to switch between Fender Blackface clean or a variety of different amp voicings, accessing the sounds of other Fender amp greats. The ability to add a footswitch pedal allows you to switch channels and effects with great ease at the tap of a button. There’s a reason why Fender is the go-to company for many of those in the music community.


Fender came up with the California Series lineup of acoustic guitars to celebrate its Southern California roots. Every aspect of this guitar is uniquely Fender, from the Strat-style headstock and vintage-style slot tuners to the slim-taper neck and preamp, which is the product of the collaboration between Fender and trusted electronics brand Fishman.
Lastly, we have the bread and butter of Schecter’s mid-range selection. Schecter Omen Extreme-6 is one of their oldest and most popular models to hit the market. This guitar brings a decent balance of price, performance and build quality. While it’s not as fancy as the previous models we have mentioned, as soon as you pick it up you know it’s made for serious business.
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
Any guitar luthier will tell you that the choice of wood is the single MOST IMPORTANT factor that will determine the sound of your guitar. My junk guitar had a body that was made of cheap reconstituted wood shavings instead of actual solid wood. Junk material like that means your sound will also be junk. Any note I played didn’t sustain for more than a single second and it didn’t have that boomy lush sound you normally get from acoustics.
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* The guitar comes with very light bendy strings. This is probably due to market data that tells Epiphone that the bulk of buyers for this guitar are teen Guitar Heros who think that string bending every note is an essential aspect of shredding and wailing. If you plan to put heavier strings on the guitar (like 12-51s for example) for jazz or other styles of music then you will probably need a truss rod adjustment to compensate for the added tension. If you don't know how to do this, ask someone who does. You can ruin a guitar, permanently, by being too aggressive with a truss rod adjustment.

As similar as the two instruments are, bass guitars have enough differences from electric guitars that bassists should definitely look for effects designed specifically for their instrument. By doing that, you’re getting a pedal balanced for the low-frequency dynamics of the bass, and built to help it blend better with the other instruments in the band. Many bass effects have the same purposes as guitar effects described above, including chorus, reverb, delay, phaser and tremolo.
The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.
For an overdrive pedal, turn your attention to the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Drive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal. Compact yet versatile, this pedal is great for anyone who likes a raw vintage-like overdrive, and it even makes a great boost pedal. Now, if it's a distortion pedal that you're after, take a closer look at the Electro-Harmonix Classics USA Big Muff Pi Distortion/Sustainer Guitar Effects Pedal. The Big Muff Pi is a legendary pedal in itself, and this reissue has 3 controls that let you dial in the finest harmonic distortion/sustain ever produced. From warm bass to crisp treble, you'll be blown away by what this distortion pedal can do for your hard-rocking guitar performance.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).
For example, if the note E (the open sixth string) is played over the A minor chord, then the chord would be [0 0 2 2 1 0]. This has the note E as its lowest tone instead of A. It is often written as Am/E, where the letter following the slash indicates the new bass note. However, in popular music it is usual to play inverted chords on the guitar when they are not part of the harmony, since the bass guitar can play the root pitch.

By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
The first edition of the Telecaster Custom was produced between 1959-1968, and featured a double-bound body. While the guitar was known as the Telecaster Custom, the decal on the headstock read “Custom Telecaster”. Later editions of the Tele Custom were popularized by Rolling Stones‘ guitarist and composer Keith Richards, featuring a Fender Wide Range humbucker in the neck position and a single-coil pickup in the bridge. The market generally refers to the guitar as the “1972 Custom”, indicating the year this model was originally released.

Effects can inspire you with new creative ideas, or just help you sound like your musical inspirations, go for it. I would urge you to consider a multi-effects unit like a Digitech RP series, or Line6 PodHD series. They can provide you with many options to try before you figure out exactly what you want. Many units can be had pretty cheap used, and as a bonus, most will act as a usb interface, and let you record your playing (for better or worse) to computer. – Michael Cook Apr 29 '13 at 21:39
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
This is a Supro Supreme Hawaiian Guitar Model 1400 from somewhere around 1945. I've seen an identical one that was purchased new by the original owner during that year exactly. That date appeals to my love of WWII history, of course, because it was the last year of the war. I found this one languishing in the back of a vintage guitar store in Williamsburg, Virginia, while my wife and I were on our 30th anniversary holiday trip. The guitar is covered in lovely reddish-brown "mother of toilet seat" and has a non-slip back.
A soldering iron is basically a tool that allows you to transfer heat that in turn melts the solder which is used to join two pieces of metal. The heat is supplied electrically (this wasn’t always the case) and the soldering iron itself will have an insulated handle protecting you from the heat generated. For some useful tips on best practice for soldering click here: https://guitarkitworld.com/common-mistakes-to-avoid-when-building-an-electric-guitar-kit/
Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.
Boss's MS-3 is an ingenious pedalboard solution that gives you programmable loops for three of your own pedals and a host of built-in effects - 112 to be precise. The MS-3 can switch your amp channels, adjust external effects and integrate with MIDI-equipped pedals. Then there’s the built-in tuner, noise suppressor and global EQ. It’s as if Boss looked at everything players could want from a pedalboard controller and crammed it into one compact unit. There are 200 patch memories for saving your expertly tweaked sounds, each with four effects or pedals that can be switched in or out at will, or four presets that can be instantly recalled. The MS-3 is rammed with pristine modulations, all the essential delay and reverb types, as well as a load of Boss specials, such as the dynamic Tera Echo and sequenced tremolo Slicer. Then there’s the niche yet useful effects, such as an acoustic guitar sim, Slow Gear auto fade-in and that sitar sim you never knew you wanted. The drive tones don’t live up to standalone pedals, but for most players, we’d wager those three switchable loop slots will be used for analogue drives, with the ES-3 handling modulation, delay and reverb. A genuinely exciting pedalboard development.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)

The AC10 was one of the first amplifiers to bear the VOX name and has long been adored for its ability to achieve rich, articulate tube tone at very manageable volumes. For this reason, the AC10 has become a highly coveted piece of VOX history since its discontinuation in 1965. It was re-introduced in 2015 as model AC10C1 and has proven to be very popular as a quality option to the Fender Blues Jr. and Fender Princeton.
it has 3 lateral braces after the soundhole, 1 before, so I guess so. the saddle makes it so the truss is the only set up option. The action is high right now for me, so I hope a decent allen wrench will turn it and its not an old peice'o'poo worn out latter brace deal. when I looked for a "belly" it could have just been straight tilted over I guess and not looked the same.
Correct bridge placement determines a guitar's intonation when playing fretted notes. The distance between the guitar nut and bridge is the scale length. Placing the bridge too close to the neck shortens scale length and makes fretted notes sharp. Moving the bridge too far from the neck increases scale length and creates flat fretted notes. No amount of tuning helps a guitar with a poorly positioned bridge. Any fretted note falls high or low of the desired pitch.

In this tuning, the fourth (G) string is lowered a half-step, thus recreating the intervals between the top five strings, lowered a perfect fourth. Though chords can easily and more fully be played from this tuning, it sometimes results in awkward inversions, a relatively minor problem if the five-string is played in an ensemble with a bass guitar.
When jazz guitar players improvise, they use the scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chords in a tune's chord progression. The approach to improvising has changed since the earliest eras of jazz guitar. During the Swing era, many soloists improvised "by ear" by embellishing the melody with ornaments and passing notes. However, during the bebop era, the rapid tempo and complicated chord progressions made it increasingly harder to play "by ear." Along with other improvisers, such as saxes and piano players, bebop-era jazz guitarists began to improvise over the chord changes using scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) and arpeggios.[2] Jazz guitar players tend to improvise around chord/scale relationships, rather than reworking the melody, possibly due to their familiarity with chords resulting from their comping role. A source of melodic ideas for improvisation is transcribing improvised solos from recordings. This provides jazz guitarists with a source of "licks", melodic phrases and ideas they incorporate either intact or in variations, and is an established way of learning from the previous generations of players.
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.

Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.
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I like the difference in character of some of the amp distortions, then you get the tome knobs of the amp, different speaker emulations with tone controls and the graphic eq. So there is a lot you can do to get the right tone. My complaint on that is that the "mixer" mode cuts the highs (since there is no amp to do so) cuts thee highs too much. If you go flat with the graphic EQ the amp emulations are always a little too dark.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"

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Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.
The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.
Building a rare 4005 Rickenbacker takes the hands of a master. And this master has not only built one but also created the "Jazzblaster" line of custom guitars with bodies that resemble Rickenbacker and necks inspired by Leo Fender. He also builds custom basses. "I like building beautiful things," he says. A few of his custom guitars were recently picked up to be shown to rock star royalty like Tom Petty, Lindsay Buckingham and Joe Walsh. He's played and repaired guitars. Steve Stevens, Green River Ordinance, Rocky Athans and Eric Clapton have sought out his services. He's even touched one of Jimi Hendrix's legendary axes.
I love this little guitar. it's perfect for my smaller hands to move around on the fretboard. I've been taking guitar lessons for a year and own a full size acoustic and a electric but I love that this one is both. For the price I wish it came with a stand and cable for an amp though but it's a great starter guitar for kids or a person with smaller hands. I would recommend it. it's acoustic and electric. You will need to buy an amp with a cable to use it as an electric but no cable is needed for acoustic. It even has a built in tuner, they supply the batteries.
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
An effects unit or effects pedal is an electronic or digital device that alters the sound of a musical instrument or other audio source. Common effects include distortion/overdrive, often used with electric guitar in electric blues and rock music; dynamic effects such as volume pedals and compressors, which affect loudness; filters such as wah-wah pedals and graphic equalizers, which modify frequency ranges; modulation effects, such as chorus, flangers and phasers; pitch effects such as pitch shifters; and time effects, such as reverb and delay, which create echoing sounds.[1][2]

Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
There are also companies like Eastwood Guitars that are releasing their own versions of the Hi-Flier. Available for a pretty low sum, you can get Eastwood’s recreation of a Phase 4 Hi-Flier in both right-handed and lefty configurations. If you don’t find the world of vintage guitars too appealing, but you dig the look and feel of the Hi-Flier, this might be a prime option for you.
Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.
Travis adapted the syncopated rhythms of Ragtime Piano music to the guitar – (the term syncopation refers to deliberately playing off the regular beat). Travis would pick the strings alternating the bass note on the low E and A strings. This style of finger picking was given the name ‘Travis picking’ and went on to influence Chet Atkins and Scott Moore’s ‘Rockabilly’ sound.
You would probably be better served to specify a budget, then mention the kind of music you want to learn to play and whether you want an electric or an acoustic. As general advice, within any price range probably a general-purpose guitar would be better for you than something meant for a specific purpose - e.g., no pointy lime green electrics. By general purpose I mean guitars like Strats, Les Pauls, and concert-sized acoustics. Nothing particularly fancy.

Central to Fender success aside from the guitars that carried the brand all this years are the amps they make which are pioneering themselves in giving guitar players unique set of tones and unmatched overall sound quality. This is what we can say are the indicative sign and facts on why players should get their hands on a Fender Super Champ X2 for a beginner amp.


What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.
Pickups convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating string to an electrical signal, allowing it to be amplified, processed and reproduced.[1] Pickups vary greatly in construction, size, types of materials used, as well as various electrical properties, but are generally divided into two categories – single-coil and double-coil (also known as humbucker).[2]
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.

A bass stack may use a single speaker cabinet (e.g., the huge 8x10" cabinets widely used by hard rock and metal bassists). The 8x10" cabinet is often provided as "backline" equipment at music festivals; this way, all the bassists from the different bands can use the same amplifier and speaker cabinet. This reduces the transition time between bands, because the roadies do not have to remove the previous band's bass stack and bring in the subsequent band's stack. Using one 8x10" as backline gear for an entire music festival also makes the transition easier for the audio engineer, because she can have an XLR cable plugged into the amp head's DI unit output (to get the bass amp's signal so that it can be mixed into the sound reinforcement system mix) and have a mic set up in front of the cabinet, to capture the amp and speaker cabinet's distinctive tone. The 8x10" cabinet is widely used by heavy metal music, hardcore punk and psychobilly bassists, as these genres use a loud onstage volume. Some metal bassists, such the bass player for death metal band Cannibal Corpse, use two 8x10" cabinets for large concerts in stadiums or outdoor festivals.
The vast majority of guitars use more than one pickup, and provide a switch that controls which pickup, or combination of pickups, is active at any one time. This article adds one more pickup to our circuit and shows how we can wire up a selector switch. We look at both toggle and blade style switches. This brings us to the point where we now know how to wire up a Telecaster in the standard way.
Covers all the material needed for the RGT Grade One electric guitar examination, enabling you to gain an internationally recognised qualification. The book should help you to develop all aspects of guitar playing, increase your knowledge of specialist electric guitar techniques, understand the music theory that relates to electric guitar playing and achieve your full potential as a guitarist.
{"id": "J40301", "skuOrProductId": "J40301", "categoryId":"site1AAG", "name":"Les Paul Special Vintage Edition Electric Guitar", "pageUrl":"/guitars/epiphone-les-paul-special-vintage-edition-electric-guitar", "thumbnailUrl":"https://media.musiciansfriend.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Special-Vintage-Edition-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/J40301000001000-00-120x120.jpg", "addToCartUrl":"/guitars/epiphone-les-paul-special-vintage-edition-electric-guitar", "hasFeatures":"1", "isAccessory":"0", "message":"Epiphone introduces the Les Paul Special VE (Vintage Edition) electric guitar featuring the classic Les Paul profile with a lightweight Poplar body. The Les Paul Special VE is powered by Epiphone Open Coil humbuckers and is available in beautiful “Vintage Worn” color finishes.

For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

All Epiphones come with a Limited Lifetime Warranty and Gibson’s world famous 24/7/365 Customer Service.", "value":"131.12", "priceMin":"131.12", "priceMax":"149.00", "priceSavingsMaxPrice":"0.00", "priceSavingsMaxPercent":"40", "inventory":"57", "brand":"Epiphone", "reviewStarImageUrl": "https://static.musiciansfriend.com/img/brand/mf/cmn/Sprit-Sm-Stars.png", "reviewStarRating":"4.0", "reviewStarRatingInteger":"8", "reviewHowManyReviews":"17", "usedOrNew":"used", "discontinued":"0", "onOrder":"0", "clearance":"0", "canBeSold":"1", "accessoryCategories":"site1LFMIC,site1HBA,site1LAAA", "stickerText": "Best Seller", "checksum":"93895071200", "priceVisibility": "1"}

I’m sorry you were disappointed in the videos. I guess your definition of lesson and mine differ. I would define lesson as something that teaches the viewer a new skill or provides them with information they didn’t already possess. I certainly learned a lot from Clapton talking about how he achieved that great tone, from Angus Young explaining his style, and from Slash explaining how he plays American Man.
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.

Beyond specific favoured mics, a number of engineers also mention more general principles when choosing pairs of mics for guitar recording. Jim Scott and Stephen Street both mention using a 'cheap' or 'bad' mic with a good mic (both give the SM57+U87 combination as an example). "Between the two you can find the ideal sound," remarks Jim, "and you can get brightness and fullness."
By the early 1980s, the radical experiments of early 1970s-era fusion gave way to a more radio-friendly sounds of smooth jazz. Guitarist Pat Metheny mixed the sounds of blues, country, and “world” music, along with rock and jazz, playing both a flat-top acoustic guitar and an electric guitar with a softer, more mellow tone which was sweetened with a shimmering effect known as “chorusing". During the 1980s, a neo-traditional school of jazz sought to reconnect with the past. In keeping with such an aesthetic, young guitarists of this era sought a clean and round tone, and they often played traditional hollow-body arch-top guitars without electronic effects, frequently through vacuum tube amplifiers.
My first guitar was an acoustic guitar made by Ibanez. At the time I got it, I was very into the acoustic-oriented bands that were dominating adult rock radio at the time, the mid-90s. You know, bands like Hootie & The Blowfish, Blues Traveler, the Goo Goo Dolls and Barenaked Ladies, for example. So this was perfect for me. I could imitate some of my current favorite acoustic guitarists and learn to play the basic chord structures of their songs. But the itch to do more grew, and I was ready to branch out into the foreign, exotic, sexy world of electric guitars. I bought one of those starter pack guitars that come with an amp, some power cords, a strap, picks, a guitar case, some kind of instructional materials, and everything you needed to transform yourself into Jimi Hendrix in a matter of days or even moments. I was all set.
Do you have a short budget? Then we have included the Dean Vendetta XMT model in my top 10 electric guitars review list. This is very little known guitar and you’d be forgiven if you have never heard of it before. But we can tell you with confidence that once you buy this guitar it will exceed your expectations and this is very much pocket-friendly.
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