1. Blackstar ID:15 TVP ($229): This is one of the best combo amps on the market and with good reason: it comes with a variety of options to not only get you playing in no time. It also allows you to record very easily with a built-in USB option. You can select from six different power responses modeled after popular tube amp sounds (via Blackstar’s True Valve Power system) and even when turned down, the amp doesn’t lose its bite. The built-in multi-effects allow you to experiment with the world of effects and the Insider Software allows you to edit up to 128 user storable patches to further your sonic crafting.
Guitar from Spain is the best online store to buy the best spanish guitars online: Classical guitars, Flamenco Guitars, Acoustic Guitars and electro acoustic guitars made in Spain from the best spanish guitar makers at spanish local prices. These unique guitars will be delivered from our warehouse or from the manufacturer's bench to your door, avoiding extra costs or double margins. Because we only sell guitars from the most reputable Spanish manufacturers, you will be assured to buy only the best spanish guitars available with 2 years warranty and certified from origin. Spanish guitar brands like Alhambra Guitars, Raimundo Guitars, Ramirez Guitars, Admira Guitars, Camps Guitars, Rodriguez Guitars or Prudencio Saez Guitars are among the most reputable and best sounding guitars in the world. These guitars are manufactured in Spain, the land of the flamenco guitar and the classical guitar. At Guitar From Spain you can also buy steel stringed acoustic guitars, western guitars and electro acoustic guitars made with the same traditional craftsmanship and know how acquired through centuries of guitar making. We also have special guitars as Bandurria (Spanish mandolin), Laud (Spanish lute), Cuban tres, timple canario and special sized guitars as Cadete (guitar 3/4) Requinto (Guitar 1/2) and Senorita (Guitar 7/8). Compare our Spanish Guitars with any other "asian made guitars" at the same price and you will be amazed with the diference in quality and sound that you can get. Do not settle for imitations, buy the original, buy Guitars from Spain.

Few instruments are as versatile as the electric guitar. Widely heard in most types of music, the guitar's sound can be customized in virtually limitless ways to suit the genre and the player's individual style. Multi effects pedals put all of that personalization within your reach, allowing you to change your soundstage with the push of a button while you play. Many guitarists achieve multiple effects by chaining pedals together. This gives the ability to mix and match different effects to create unique combinations, but it can also be a source of frustration to keep track of so many pedals. A multi-effects pedal avoids this confusion by converting the mess of individual pedals into one discrete unit that's easier not only to use, but also to transport from venue to venue. Multi effects pedals can offer hundreds of onboard distortion, filter, modulation and dynamics effects to transform the sounds of your guitar. With as many or as few features as you prefer, the selection offers a multi pedal for every guitarist's needs. If simplicity is your thing, a basic stompbox can provide a handful of effects with minimal complications. On the other end of the spectrum, you can satisfy your inner technophile with a cutting-edge digital pedal featuring MIDI support and USB connectivity so you can save seemingly limitless library of effects. There are three things to look for in your ideal multi effects pedal: the range of available effects and features, the ruggedness of its construction and the available inputs and outputs. The more effects that are supported, the more the pedal has to offer to your sound. The more durable it is, the more the pedal can withstand being moved from venue to venue. And the more connection options it has, the more versatile it is for studio recording or connecting to additional stompboxes and accessories. Whether you're playing hard rock or smooth jazz, the range of tone alterations offered by a multi effects pedals enables you to deliver a personalized sound that complements your band and your musical style. There are two things that get guitarists into the history books: developing their skills to perfection and crafting their own distinct sound. With a multi effects pedal, you've got the gear you need to start shaping the tones you aspire to be remembered by.


For instance, the guitars that have a solid body are the most numerous out there. These models are as sturdy as they come, but they do not offer one plenty of resonance and sustainability. If you are interested in a design that mimics the figure of acoustic units, then you should pay attention to those guitars that have a hollow body. These products are able to deliver plenty of resonance, but they might not be of great help when it comes to feedback.
Yes, don't do it. Take her to a music store and let her play whatever they have that's within your price range, and let her take home the one she most enjoys playing. You don't need to spend a ton. I just bought a used Breedlove for a similar gift, and it was under $200 at my local music store. The key is finding one she doesn't want to set down. That's what will get her playing.
it's really hard to beat the ric sound. the 335 12's and fender 12's are cool, but really the ric has the sound we're all familiar with. that being said, everyone has different tastes and I encourage you to play as many different ones as possible. Jimmy Page used a Fender 12 on Stairway. I went rick for that early beatles sound. the neck is tiny but it's part of the instrument.
Here we have a Taylor guitar for under $500. Taylor is known for their high quality, and expensive guitars. It’s great that they are offering a lower priced model so more players can enjoy their great sounding guitars. The Big Baby is a 15/16 dreadnought sized guitar which is slightly smaller than a full sized. Perfect for those that want that dreadnought sound but want a little smaller body. The top is sitka spruce and the back and sides are sapele. Owners are saying that the guitar has a very warm and full bodied tone, and that it does not sound like a cheap guitar. This is no surprise given that it is made by Taylor. This is another great choice for those with smaller hands, as Taylor’s are known for their great necks and amazing playability. See more info including more pictures here.

A common misconception of the Lyle brand, among others, was that Norlin sued Matsumoku for copying their designs and shut them down. The actual lawsuit was indeed filed by Norlin, only not against Matsumoku but Elger/Hoshino--the American division of Ibanez--over elements of the Les Paul and SG guitar designs that Norlin/Gibson had since claimed as a trademark. The case was eventually settled out of court. Japanese companies preemptively altered the designs of their guitars in such a way that they would not be "exact" copies of Gibson guitars. The true story of the demise of the Lyle brand is largely unknown to this day.
Nicknamed - "Papa-Papa". DADDAD is common in folk music (Irish, Scottish), and for the execution of a rhythm guitar in "heavy" (alternative music) on 6th on the third string at the same time. To reach the tuning from DADGAD, Open D or Open D Minor, the G string is dropped to D so that the 3rd and 4th strings are tuned to the same pitch. DADDAD tuning is sometimes used on Dobro guitars for rock and blues. Notable users of this tuning include Billy McLaughlin and John Butler.
Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.

The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
At the onset, we decided to stick to DIY electric guitar kits that can be bought from online retailers in the mainland US, to ensure that the ones we list are accessible. We then took note of popular and highly rated kits, which for this updated required us to gather around 700 relevant user and expert reviews and ratings. All these data are then fed into the Gearank algorithm, which gave us the scores that allowed us to narrow down the list to just the top 6 kits. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
London and Tokyo’s vintage street-racing motorbikes have inspired the designers, and the guitars from the Revstar collection look and sound accordingly. The idea is to have a diverse range of guitars so that you can be sure to find one that suits you perfectly. They even claim that this guitar is so good that you will consider it to be your other half (maybe even your better half).
The Gibson-owned Epiphone Company makes around 20 models of the Les Paul, most are similar copies of Gibson-made models, although when inspected closely, the Gibson originals are most often superior in craftsmanship and materials. Made in places outside the U.S., the Epiphone Les Pauls are made from more commonly available woods using less expensive foreign labor and have less hand detailing than the Gibson models, and, as a result, sell for a lower price. Epiphone Guitar Co. has been owned by Gibson Guitars since the 1950s. Once Gibson purchased Epiphone they quickly began making lower-quality guitars based on Gibson designs.[24]
So many new guitarists, and even not so new guitarists, play with the volume and tone knobs turned all the way up all the time and then shell out lots of money for pedals when they are not satisfied with their tone before taking advantage of what the guitar can do (and it's a lot). Then of course, your amp's tone controls can refine things even more.
This tonewood isn’t a very common wood used. But, when it is used on a solid-body guitar, you’re definitely going to have access to deeper, richer, and woodier tones. However, pair it with a Cedar top and you can have bright and warm overtones. Paired with a Spruce top, you can play to get an aggressive bite on the trebles with a definite presence on the low end.
Ear Wring is a ring modulator controlled by three phase distortion oscillators and one LFO. Depending on the pitch, this can go from a gently oscillating tremelos to fuzzy, synth-like freak-outs. An optional harsh fuzz can be added to the signal before modulation. Mixed with the dry input signal and fed into an amp simulator, Ear Wring can add some meat to your guitar tone.
The JX44 Air Control™ allows up to four guitars and six amps to be used at once, as well as a built-in Radial DI, an SGI interface for longer cable runs, and an X-Amp to make the reamping process incredibly efficient. No wonder it won the Music Players ‘Wish I Had One’ award! Pair it with a Headbone amp head switcher and the JDX 48 for the ultimate in control and consistent tone night after night.
Taylor Guitars is an American guitar brand based in California. The company was founded in the mid 1970’s, and it has since grown into one of the largest and most respected acoustic guitar companies. Taylor guitars are recognized for their incredible quality, craftsmanship, and innovation, while still being an accessible guitar at a reasonable price.
On stages and in recording studios all over the globe, the Epiphone name can easily be found thanks to the incredible amount of work that's put into every instrument they design. So with that in mind, which is the right guitar value package for you? You certainly have plenty of choices, but starting with the top-rated items is a great way to speed up the decision-making process. For example, check out the Les Paul electric guitar player pack. Featuring an Electar-10 amp with overdrive, gig bag, pinch-on tuner, strap cables, picks and of course the classic Les Paul Special II in ebony, this package has it all. Plus, it also includes free online eMedia guitar lessons, so you'll be impressing family and friends with face-melting riffs in no time.
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
Not something you have to think about with an acoustic guitar, the electrics in an electro acoustic are quite important, though not as critical as with an electric guitar. You’ll want to make sure that you’re getting a good quality pickup and preamp, and then the next thing to consider will be features. Preamps often come with EQ adjustment to alter the tone slightly, and some will even come with certain effects that you can add on. Builtin tuners are a common addition too which mean you don’t need a separate tuning box.
For those other performances, we run into limits of computer memory, computer processing power and computer programmers' time (and talent). With increasing processing power available in the consumer market, simulations are in some cases surpassing storage intensive sample libraries in terms of acoustic similarity and perceptive preferences. In guitar world, though, there seem to be no VST players of the simulation variety contending for top honors against leading sample libraries - of which amplesound.net seems to be the leading collection (unless you like something Vienna Symphonic Libraries has to offer)
I'm having a few buddies over to jam this coming Sunday. I don't have a full drum kit setup at my house, so our drummer will be using djembes, bongos, etc. To make things a little more manageable I'm telling folks to bring their electric guitars and NO effects. I have a small arsenal of 15-watt tube amps, so the idea is that we'll all just play into low-wattage tube amps at low volume and see what we come up with.
An amazing electric guitar player pack that is suitable for use by beginners. It has a mahogany body, with its fret board having been made from rosewood. The neck is also made from mahogany. Most interestingly, it comes with passive fienzo pickups, and an exclusive guitar player pack with gig bags, strap, cord, tuner, and an instructional DVD. It is well design to assist the beginner to better access the frets and practice through to perfection. Prices range from INR 12,650. Find it on the link below:
Okay, it is a single-cut and dates back to a similar era, but this single-cut is very different to a Les Paul. The Pro Jet has a basswood body with an arched maple top, and like many of Gretsch’s solidbody electrics, it’s chambered, making it lighter, and, they say, more resonant. It sports a pair of Gretsch’s Black Top Filter’Tron pickups, giving you a bright snap and twang that’ll cut through any mix. In short, it’s incredible. Uncanny, even. For here we are in 2018, and yet you fret a couple of doublestops on the Pro Jet Electromatic and all of a sudden it’s like you’re the Fonz, just waiting for Richie, Joanie and Chachi to show up. The cleans are sharp and jazzy, but just take your amp into overdrive and you’re in rockabilly heaven. The tone is so hot you could grill hamburgers by wafting it in front of the speaker cone. Tex-mex shuffle, country, blues, jazz, rockabilly... You name it, and it’ll play it, retro-style. if you want the versatility and the kudos that comes with a Gretsch, it’s hard to look past that finish, that build, and that tone.

Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
Anyway, this little beast didn’t need much work. This is one of the pleasures of working on a Champ-style practice amp. They have so little in them, there’s simply not much to go wrong or fix. This one, it turned out, only needed a filter cap job, a new preamp tube and one coupling cap. Piece o’ cake. Twenty minutes of soldering and one $4.00 7F7 tube later, I had a monster little Champ-esque amplifier (actually it sounds a little more like the Gibson Skylark than a Champ, but that’s cool by me) for under $80.
Delay pedals take your original signal, a guitar chord or note for example, delays it and plays it back exactly how the pedal hears it the first time. It can either play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings or “feedback time”. Often, you’ll see Digital Delay pedals as well as Analogue Delay pedals. The major difference is that digital delay pedals will offer longer delays and a ‘cleaner’ exact sound, however guitarists often prefer the analogue sound for all the subtle nuances and slight unpredictability in sound. This comes down to personal preference but both options sound great.

If you’re new to the world of guitar pedals, it can be a little daunting if you’re thinking to yourself “which guitar effects pedals do I need?”. Maybe you’ve bought your son or daughter a new guitar for Christmas or their birthday, or you’ve decided to really get serious when it comes to changing your sound up and you want to know where to start, what guitar effects pedals do and what sounds different guitar pedals make. Either way, we’re here to help with our handy guide to guitar effects pedals, complete with sound examples.
With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:
Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.
Call of Duty: WWII Pre-order and get the Multiplayer Upgrade, includes a Weapon Unlock Token and Multiplayer 2XP* *Weapon unlock and 2XP usable in multiplayer only. 2XP limited to 4 hours of gameplay. Call of Duty® returns to its roots with Call of Duty®: WWII—a breathtaking experience that redefines World War II for a new gaming generation. Land in Normandy on D-Day and battle across Europe through iconic locations in history’s most monumental war. Experience classic Call of Duty combat, the bonds of camaraderie, and the unforgiving nature of war against a global power throwing the world into tyranny. Game Overview Call of Duty: WWII creates the definitive World War II next generation experience across three different game modes: Campaign, Multiplayer, and Co-Operative. Featuring stunning visuals, the Campaign transports players to the European theater as they engage in an all-new Call of Duty story set in iconic World War II battles. Multiplayer marks a return to original, boots-on-the ground Call of Duty gameplay. Authentic weapons and traditional run-and-gun action immerse you in a vast array of World War II–themed locations. The Co-Operative mode unleashes a new and original story in a standalone game experience full of unexpected, adrenaline-pumping moments.
Thank you Ola and David for this excellent article. The approach is totally scientific: you try to study the impact of one element of a system while keeping the rest of the settings identical (same pickups, same strings, same picking, etc.). The wood used modifies effectively the electrical spectrum composition and therefore the sound we hear. All the difficulty is that the wood is a part of a very complex system (woods combination, building type, pickups, strings, effects, amplification, restitution, etc.) and, without a solid knowledge or skills, it could be difficult to choose the right elements of the system to get what you want…

The name has a long and involved history that is interwoven with that of the resonator guitar. Originally coined by the Dopyera brothers when they formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company, in time it came to commonly mean a resonator guitar, or specifically one with a single inverted resonator. This particular design was introduced by the Dopyeras’ new company, in competition to the already patented Tricone and biscuit designs owned and produced by the National String Instrument Corporation.


That’s not to say Gibson always met expectations during its storied past. “I dreamed of having a Gibson guitar and I achieved that dream,” Hook said. “It was a hollow-bodied EB-1 [a bass guitar] but it was medium scale so it was a s--t guitar and it sounded like s--t and I had to put new strings and a new bridge on it. It still sounded duff so I copied the shape and amalgamated it with a Yamaha.”
A simple, inexpensive amplifier may have only two tone controls, a passive bass and treble control. In some better quality amps, one or more midrange controls are provided. On the most expensive amps, there may be shelving equalizers for bass and treble, a number of mid-range controls (e.g., low mid, mid and high mid), and a graphic equalizer or parametric equalizer. The amplifier's master volume control restricts the amount of signal permitted through to the driver stage and the power amplifier. When using a power attenuator with a tube amplifier, the master volume no longer acts as the master volume control. Instead, the power attenuator's attenuation control controls the power delivered to the speaker, and the amplifier's master volume control determines the amount of power-tube distortion. Power-supply based power reduction is controlled by a knob on the tube power amp, variously labeled "wattage", "power", "scale", "power scale", or "power dampening".
While some effects can create a drastic change in a signal’s sound, other effects act more like a coating that add subtle variations of texture rather than a huge makeover. Texture-adding pedals like time-based or ambient effects – such as reverb, delay/echo, vibrato, flanger, and chorus – work best when added to something much more pronounced instead of the other way around (which in a signal chain means they go towards the end).
The trusty traveler guitar:  There are many makes and models, and of those that we reviewed, some that are cheaply priced (i.e. under $150) are just that- cheap.  Traveler guitars come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and some more complex models offer foldaway design that buckle at the neck joint.  Additionally, there are acoustic electric models if you desire the flexibility of plugging in.  First, it is best to determine "why" you are seriously considering a travel guitar before getting into the research.  Answer that question for yourself first, and it could steer you away from a specific traveler guitar and toward a different size acoustic guitar body.  Also, it might re-affirm your choice.  Consider the following questions:

You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!


Read Full Review This electric guitar from Schecter has an awesomely low price for beginners out there with a genre of music in mind is to play rock and lots of heavy metal. The guitar has similarities in design with the Schecter Omen 6 series which is a higher model to the C-1 SGR, but the C-1 SGR also has the humbuckers for its pick-ups controlled by master volume, single tone control and a 3-way toggle to switch between pick-ups to get near on what the higher model can do.
MIDI connectivity has also been included, allowing you to take control of your existing synth or sampler with ease. In addition, the Helix features a 6.2 inch 800x480-pixel LCD display for easy editing, customisable scribble strips above the 12 capacitive-sensing footswitches and an expression pedal that can actually be used to edit parameters of a pedal so you don’t have to bend down and start twiddling knobs. Best of all, you can even integrate existing hardware and effects pedals in to your Helix and control them through the unit. We could talk about how this is one of the kings of the multi-effects world all day, but just watch the video below and see for yourself!
Squier affinity series, looks and sounds great, Fender & Gibson had to start somewhere, so everyone wants to be a star & copy, but everybody's hands and minds are different, don't need to be a star or copy cat to make a name, if the guitar feels good and sounds good, so be it. Be the First, off-brand- (Star),,,,, take the cheap version to new and higher heights,

After reading through Teach Yourself to Play Guitar, my opinion is that if you are giving a guitar as a gift to someone, this might be an OK book to accompany that. If you wanted to spend a bit more, or are looking for a book for yourself, I would go with the 2nd book reviewed below, the Guitar for Dummies book. It has online video and audio demos, and hearing what you should be playing helps when learning music... 😉
I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
We’ve talked about four electric guitars by now. Let us talk about the “Mini” Strat from Squier by Fender. It is a “mini” guitar because it is has a small Strat and therefore, it is literally the best choice electric guitar if you want to buy one for your child. But that does not mean adults cannot use it. If you are a beginner who just wants to practice then this is a great model for practicing your skills.
The iconic Les Paul Standard is celebrated by the world’s greatest musicians as the standard for perfection in the world of electric guitars. The new Les Paul Standard features the popular asymmetrical SlimTaper neck profile with Ultra-Modern weight relief for increased comfort and playability. Impeccable looks are highlighted by the powerful tonewood combination of mahogany back and carved maple AAA figured top. BurstBucker Pro humbuckers provide modern and classic tones, while immense tonal variety from comes from 4 push-pull knobs. Includes hardshell case.
A full step down from standard. Used by bands such as Korn, Paradise Lost, Dream Theater (on "False Awakening Suite" and "Illumination Theory" from the self-titled album), Emmure, Obscura, ReVamp, and Fear Factory (on most songs from Obsolete and Digimortal, "Drones" and "Bonescraper" from Archetype, "Moment of Impact" from Transgression, and most songs on Mechanize, The Industrialist and Genexus)
SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .
One of the key features that makes this stand out is the 7-inch high-resolution touch display which allows you to move amps, effects and set up your pedal board to exactly how you want it, sculpting the chain to your exact specifications. Want to run a reverb pedal before a distortion? Well, just move it around using the touch screen! The OLED scribble-strip and assignable colour LEDs appear above the switches and allow you to keep track of where your effects are – a great idea!
I've had it for a few months and have been using it at shows. It has become erratic. The patch I use most often occasionally oscillates. It's like microphonic feedback (not guitar sustaining feedback). The output level seems to change on it's own as well. I will say I found an amazing sound with the marshall 800 emulation but the inconsistency makes it unusable live. It is possible it's not the unit but a power supply problem or connection, but I have not seem the power go off and other devices on the same power supply work fine. I have ordered the digitech 360xp since I had used that brand for 15 years or more with no issue.

Ovation’s Electric Storm series couldn’t have hit the market at a worse time. In ’67 electric guitars sales began to slump and the market took a dive in ’68. A bunch of Japanese companies went out of business, as did one of America’s largest mass manufacturers, the newly merged Valco/Kay. The Storms were so unsuccessful it appears Ovation actually stopped importing parts in ’69, although it had enough components in stock to keep the line active until early ’73.
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
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