This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.
For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.

No reference materials are available to me for this early Unicord period of Univox amplifiers, but there was undoubtedly a line. These American-made amps featured tubes and use high-end Jensen speakers. The Univox logo was on the upper right corner of the grille on a large piece of plastic. The cabinet was covered in charcoal-flecked tolex with white beading, with a grey grillcloth. Front-mounted controls included two inputs, volume, tone, tremolo with speed and intensity, plus footswitch jack with footswitch. The jewel light on these early Univox amps was a little red square.

Half a step down from standard, used by bands such as Emmure, TesseracT and Meshuggah in their earlier days, Jeff Loomis (now formerly of Nevermore), Cannibal Corpse mid-career, ERRA, Hypocrisy on End of Disclosure, Adema, American Head Charge, Sonata Arctica in their album Unia, Mushroomhead, Korn in Neidermeyer's Mind demo album, Revocation, Dir En Grey since "Dum Spiro Spero," After The Burial on Forging a Future Self album, Chad Kroeger of Nickelback on the song "This Means War" (Ryan Peake used a six-string), Slayer (on War Zone and Here Comes the Pain from God Hates Us All), and Trivium on Silence in the Snow, The Sin and the Sentence, and all live performances of songs previously written on standard tuned seven string guitars.

Where do you people get off not even mentioning BC Rich. They have a fine selection of Guitars, they use some of the best woods you can ask for, very good electronics, and Kerry King of Slayer fame will only play BC Rich, that in itself should be enough said. On top of that the body styles that they have to choose from is far more innovative and original than anything that Ibanez could ever dream of producing. Fender and Gibson are in fact the most well known guitars in the world but frankly the body styles are outdated and worn. They believe in staying with what works but wheres the originality? Im sorry if I offend but BC Rich til death. I have never seen anyone come up with anything as wild and as evil looking as the worlock models. I mean the nickname for a guitar is an axe but so far only BC Rich guitwrs look like somthing you can take into battle, and the sound is like the very voice of Satan himself. And shame on you all to forget about Dean Guitars, They were used and endorsed by the God of Metal shreddiing himself Dimebag Darrell Abbott. The man died on stage with one in his hands. RIP Brotger and Goddspeed. give repect where respect is due.
The legendary ES-335 is a widely used element in practically every genre imaginable. Often equipped with double humbuckers, the ES-335’s semi-hollow body delivers a warm, woody sound. And when players like Larry Carlton or B.B. King get their hands on one, the sound can be likened closer to silk or butter. Despite being closely associated with blues artists like King, the ES-335 isn’t just a blues guitar. You can find them in the hands of just about anyone in any genre—from rocker Dave Grohl to Latino sensation Trini Lopez.

:I purchased a Dorado Model 5990 in 1972 new and it was DISTRIBUTED by Gretch, made in Japan. This is a low price "starter" guitar that equals many higher priced brands. I can let it sit for weeks and it stays in tune. Age has mellowed the sound and it plays as well as any fender, Gibson, or even Gretch, of equal construction all things considered.
Loose frets are especially problematic in certain old guitars, but are generally very easy to fix. You'll be amazed at the difference you can make with just a few tools, a bit of knowledge, and a little time. Fixing loose frets can eliminate fret buzz, remove sharp fret ends, and greatly improve the tone of any guitar. If your luthier bill will be greater than the value of your guitar, definitely time to have a go yourself!
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."

It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.
Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.
The brand’s biggest boom through the fifties and sixties was largely down to the birth of rock n’ roll. Thanks to their excellent hollow and semi-hollow models, Gretsch guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.

Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic Bass - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Tortoise - Frets: 22 - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 32" (81cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP2 - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural


Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
I'm unsure if this company existed or not, but since many major electronics manufacturers jumped into the electric guitar market in the 1970s, it seems reasonable that Hitachi could have ventured briefly into guitar production. A seller of the badged guitar "Splender" claims it was made by this company. Yet another seller claims the badge Slendon was made by this company.
An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.
Pre-1929: All size 1 and larger guitars, from any year, have 6" long pyramid bridges. All size 2 or 2 1/2 Martins have 5 3/4" to 5 7/8" long pyramid bridges. Most pyramid bridges before 1900 are roughly 7/8" wide, and most after 1900 are 1" wide. The average length of the wings on most pyramid bridges is roughly 1 3/8" During the 1880's and 1890's, however, there is more variation, as much as from 1 1/4" to 1 1/2" On the earlier 7/8" wide bridges, the wings have a very long, narrow, elegant appearance, with a gentle curve to the inside angles of the pyramids, that looks nothing at all like the harsh angles found on many copies. There is no difference between the dimensions of ivory and ebony bridges from the same period.

Since guitar players are automatically cool, that means cool guitar players are the coolest of the cool. In this issue, we exalt this elite class of cold—the players who even we would sell our wives and first born just to have some of their mojo rub off on us. Some of them are pioneers who paved a bold, daring path to define new styles of cool, while others are simply the kind of guitarists we want to be when we never grow up (which is part of being cool).

I love them both, have a Strat and Les Paul. they are such different animals. Each has it’s place in my music, each has a special sound. Used to own a Tele which I just didn’t enjoy playing so much, so traded in for the Les Paul. I later bought a modified Tele with humbuckers (I know it’s a sin) but damn it sounds so good, for heavy power chords, more like a PRS sound. I’ve been playing 27 years now and am a composer / songwriter. Played in lots of bands, and during my live work I have to say I prefer my Strat. It’s lighter than the Gibson, and contours nicely to my body. With a good valve amp and the right strings I can get some lovely fat sounds out of it. I use the Gibson mostly in the studio. When I moved countries, I needed a cheap electric to tide me over until my stuff got sent over. I picked up a $100 Mitchel (Made in China). The setup was awful, totally unplayable, so set it up properly, and to be honest it plays like a dream. The neck is amazing for a $100 guitar, and with some new pickups the sound is great too. The upshot here is that it doesn’t really matter what guitar you use to make music on, as long as you enjoy the instrument, a cheap guitar can go a long way. I find the discussions about which is better kind of like guys comparing their crown jewels, it’s purely academic and what matters is how you use the thing 😉

Fender Montara acoustic electric with HSC. Part of the California series made in the early 90's. BEAUTIFUL guitar! See pics. I would describe it as being in excellent condition for its age. Of course there are some minor signs of use upon very close inspection but nothing that jumps out. (2 small dings are shown in pics) All electronics work, could probably use some new strings. If you have any questions please ask!
Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.
Another example is Ovation, the company that almost single-handedly created the acoustic/electric category and radically altered views about how acoustic guitars should be constructed. No matter how hard they tried, Ovation’s repeated attempts to enter the solidbody electric area have failed. Instead, Ovation finally purchased Hamer. However, Ovation’s marketing failures do not mean it hasn’t made some pretty interesting – even innovative – electric guitars over the years, and these represent one of few areas in guitar collecting where you can find excellent, historically significant instruments, often at remarkably reasonable prices. Here’s the scoop on Ovation electrics (touching only briefly on acoustic/electrics).
The frets are those thin metal bars running down the neck, which act as note separators, allowing you to play individual notes and chords. Most guitars will feature 22 frets, although those more rock and metal-inclined will sometimes offer 24, allowing you to reach higher notes. As a beginner it shouldn’t really bother you whether you have 21, 22, or 24 frets. It’s only as you grow into the instrument you’ll find what works best for you.
This guitar follows traditional Martin specs with a 25.4" scale length and a 1.75" nut width, and they also gave the neck and ebony fretboard a worn-in feel that makes the guitar play extremely well right out of the case that it comes with. On top of its true to form vintage sound, playability and looks, the OM-28 E Retro is equipped with the extremely versatile Fishman F1 Aura Plus, which offers three acoustic voicings modeled from actual Martin Museum guitars. If you play various musical styles and you're looking for a be-all and end-all acoustic guitar, you will be blown away by the OM-28 E Retro.

Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.
If you’ve decided to make the neck from scratch, rather than purchasing it, you will want to cut that at this point. Make sure you are following specifications for how it will need to connect to the body. It’s best to cut the basic shape first and then refine.  You also need to hollow out space for the truss rod. Finally, for a rosewood fretboard, you will need to laminate the board to the neck.
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.
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It’s little wonder that Fretboard SE is such a popular guitar book. It focuses on the practical application of learning guitar and relies less on intellectual theory. That is not to say that a guitarist attempting to improve their skills from this book won’t be challenged and introduced to a unique system. It is just to say that the system it introduces is different than you may be used to if you’ve read other books or tried learning guitar from another method. This book teaches around the "CAGED" method. That is, the book will attempt to explain the fretboard layout to you and how to navigate it by focusing on the five basic chord shapes and the root notes in those chords. As you might have guessed, the chords the method teaches are C, A, G, E, and D, thus the name. For a more detailed explanation check out this article from Premier Guitar.
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
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