If the wood is the foundation of the structure, of course it will contribute to how the guitar sounds. Most people who argue that wood doesn’t affect the tone say that the string cant be affected by the wood because it is suspended between the metal parts of the guitar. If this were entirely true, you wouldn’t feel vibration in the guitar body. If the body of the guitar is vibrating, then it is going to affect the vibration of the string. The foundation of a structure will affect how it reacts to vibration.

Williamson injected new life into the group, bringing an ideal balance of discipline and frenzy, best heard on the group’s 1973 disc Raw Power, the album that launched thousands of punk and post punk bands. “I’m his biggest fan,” the legendary Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr once said of Williamson. “He has the technical ability of Jimmy Page without being as studious and the swagger of Keith Richards without being sloppy. He’s both demonic and intellectual, almost how you would imagine Darth Vader to sound if he was in a band.”
The AC10 was one of the first amplifiers to bear the VOX name and has long been adored for its ability to achieve rich, articulate tube tone at very manageable volumes. For this reason, the AC10 has become a highly coveted piece of VOX history since its discontinuation in 1965. It was re-introduced in 2015 as model AC10C1 and has proven to be very popular as a quality option to the Fender Blues Jr. and Fender Princeton.
Bought a Tubemeister 18 Twelve about three years ago. Love the size, and options of this amp. Primarily use it at home. Replaced a Fender and a Marshall combo amps with this one. Really like the sound, but recently blew a power tube as well as a fuse, and capacitor as a result. Replaced the Chinese power tubes with JJ's, when professionally repaired. All seems well, but wonder about the reliability of this amp in the long run. My tech recommended changing the tubes every year or two, especially if using the power soak feature. Running it really hard by doing so. Also, read that it generates more heat inside the cab (no vents. closed back). Overall still like the amp, but after dropping $200 to repair, after spending $800 on the amp.. having second thoughts of long term reliability. Not using the power soak very much any longer, and keeping a better eye on the TSC (tube safety control)... not sure if it actually did what it is suppose to. To me... less features and simplicity could be ...more

Basic guitar chords are built using the first, third, and fifth tones of the scale that corresponds with the chord you want to play. For instance, if you want to play a G major chord, you go to the G major scale and find the first, third, and fifth notes in the scale. The G major scale has one sharp (F), so the notes in the scale are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#. The first note is G, the third note is a B, and the fifth note is D. These are the notes you need to make a G major chord. If you wanted a G minor chord all you need to do is make the third note a flat. This system applies to any chord you want to build. These three note chords are called triads and make up the bulk of the beginner open positions chords you’ll use to play a lot of guitar chords songs. When you study these chord shapes, you’ll notice that the root of the note (the first note) usually appears on the lower string and is doubled on a higher string, which reinforces the key tonality.


Fender’s arm when it comes to affordable quality guitars is the Squier. The Affinity Stratocaster is no push over. It has an ergonomically design contoured double cutaway body made of alder and has the C-shape all maple or with rosewood fingerboard neck patterned over an original Fender which contributes greatly to the guitars comfort and playabilty.
Nashville studio engineer Glen Snoddy discovered the Fuzz-Tone sound when recording Marty Robbin’s 1960 hit “Don’t Worry About Me.” Allegedly an overloaded transformer blew in a Langevin tube module, transforming Grady Martin’s bass guitar into a distorted, heavy fuzz. Some put the event down to another case of amplifier malfunction. Either way, Martin continued to use the tone throughout 1961 while Snoddy transistorized the malfunctioning circuit through trial and error, and sold it onto Gibson in 1962.
1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's a excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. We repaired a slight crack at input jack common area. Yes, someone years ago stepped on the cord. We professional glued it from the inside and it's stronger than new. All that shows is a slight line about 1 1/2" long on bottom edge. Anyway, the Rocket 2 is getting harder and harder to find. Two DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition other than slight repair is a 9 3/4 for this great 50 year old beauty. Guitar comes with period clip board case. SOLD

A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.


There was a question from Benhur about Cort. If you lived in England you may know them better. They are an Indonesian company who builds many of the lower price point guitars for the big names like G&L and Fender just to name a. Few. Lower price doesn’t always mean less quality. Cort has a following in their own skin, and many with other well known names just may not know they are playing a Cort.
Typically, players tend to place their delay and reverb effects within the effects loops of their amplifiers.  This placement is especially helpful if you get your overdrive and distortion from your amplifier instead of pedals. Otherwise you would be feeding your delay repeats and reverb ambiance into the overdrive and distortion of your amplifier, which can sound muddy and washed out.  You can also place your modulation pedals within the effects loop of your amplifier as well for a different sound.
Most players don’t use more than one modulation effect at once, so it doesn’t matter all that much if you place the phaser before the chorus or the flanger in front of the phaser. However, the one exception is tremolo, which should be placed behind other modulation pedals, as this placement will produce the most dramatic and desirable rhythmic on/off effects. Placing a tremolo pedal in an effects loop is also closer to the signal path of an amp with built-in tremolo, but my personal preference is to plug a tremolo pedal into an amp’s front end and save the effects loop for other effects.
Personally, I don't like the fender and gibson knockoffs, and squire's aren't the best brand, but I have a squire telecaster, which is actually great quality, better than I expected, and it has a slightly more drier, shaky tone that an actual tele, which is a nice feature. My friend has a squire precision bass, and upon hearing it, I honestly thought it was an actual precision bass at first, so, if you must get squire, than consider either the tele or the precision.
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.

1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!
Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
ESP is another Japanese guitar brand that makes this top 10 list with its many artist endorsements and actual user recommendations. Founded in 1975, it started as a builder of custom made parts for guitarists who want to personalize their existing instruments. Now ESP is known worldwide for their hot-rodded versions of popular guitar shapes, and other unique and eccentric designs, built to please modern rock and metal players.
pedal bass fender stratocaster electric amp left handed guitar fender telecaster gibson les paul telecaster ibanez epiphone martin guitar fuzz prs taylor guitar gretsch electro acoustic guitar les paul gibson sg marshall stratocaster fender precision bass tokai rickenbacker free fender bass fender jazz bass resonator guitar 12 string guitar fender amp fender jaguar
Heres a few no one has brought up … very under rated or possibly not well enough known …. Jeff Beck , Steve Vai , BucketHead , Ry Cooder , Eric Johnson ,Gary Moore , Ritchie Blackmore , Andy Summers ,John Petrucci ,Vivian Campbell , Paul Gilbert , Uli John Roth ,Robert Fripp ,Akira Takasaki ,Steve Howe ,MICHAEL ANGELO BATIO ,CHRIS IMPELLITTERI ,ZAKK WYLDE , Vinnie Vincent , Stevie Stevens , and my choice for best overall would definetely be Randy Rhoads…
Here we have yet another fine 1971 Yamaha FG75 made in Japan Nippon Gakki Red Label Grand concert like Gibson LGO-1 but sounds better for less New Arrival: Be sure to ask for "Clean Boy" This example is just like our other 71 FG75 Nippon Gakki but this guitar is much cleaner and is JVGuitars rated in very good + condition- Excellent vintage for a 42+ year old Vintage Red Label Nippon Gakki FG75 .. its one of the nicest we've seen, this baby makes an excellent Parlor style guitar thats fun to play because of its good action, and it sounds absolutely great... upgraded to Martin bone Nut and compensated saddle and upgraded fancy bridge pins .... for a good volume transfer and superior tone over the old plastic parts,,,, we dressed the frets as well. not a crack anywhere to be found, great vintage patina but no structural damages or abuse or neglect this instrument has been well taken care of as one can tell from its condition and playability ... this one plays very nicely and is ready to enjoy .... for a song Original Specifications: - Year(s) Sold: 1968-1974 - Top: Spruce- Back / Sides: Agathis - Neck: Nato - Fingerboard: Indian Rosewood - Bridge: N/A - Notes: Folk Guitar Classic Type - Upper Bout - 11-1/8” - Waist - 9-5/8"- Lower Bout - 14-5/8" Ok so thats what the official specs are but here is what we se and have seend with 2 other fg75;s we have had, one I had to refinish its back and when sanding off the mahogany finish it was blond flamed maple sides and back,,, as this one surely looks to be just look at that flamed back and sides this example is kind of special looking. She;s got it going on just check her out. Yamaha Nippon Gakki guitars are highly respected at being well made and of great value and after 40+ years this example has stood the test of time and is still a formidable player you can compare its sound to a much more expensive guitars tone they are simply wonders to find one this nice is RARE… get her before she’s gone. Any questions or to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest..

Unabashedly brute class, with typical German overbuilding, the Schallers shown here are the Incredible Hulk of the bunch (Fig. 17). At a hefty 272 grams, they have the might to get noticed when you fasten them to your axe. If you have a guitar with a tiny headstock, you’ll hear and feel a difference with the Schallers. Whether or not you like the change is subjective, and it depends on the makeup of the rest of your guitar.
The Telecaster has also been a long-time favorite guitar for hot-rod customizing. Several variants of the guitar appeared throughout the years with a wide assortment of pickup configurations, such as a humbucker in the neck position, three single-coil pickups and even dual humbuckers with special wiring schemes. Fender offered hot-rodded Teles with such pickup configurations, the US Fat and Nashville B-Bender Telecasters around 1998. The Deluxe Blackout Tele was also equipped with 3 single-coil pickups, a “Strat-o-Tele” selector switch and a smaller headstock than a standard Telecaster. The most common variants of the standard two-pickup solid body Telecaster are the semi-hollow Thinline, the twin-humbuckerDeluxe—and the Custom, which replaced the neck single coil-pickup with a humbucking pickup. The Custom and Deluxe were introduced during the CBS period and reissues of both designs are currently offered.
The entry point for guitar pedal self-assembly is the effects pedal kit. A lot of the work such as designing and manufacturing the circuit board, drilling the enclosure, and selecting suitable parts has already been done for you. With a little care and careful following of the instructions, there’s no reason not to have a first time success with a pedal kit.
A chorus effect alters the duplicated waveform in a more subtle, nuanced way. The altered waveform will sound much like the original, but just different enough to sound like multiple voices playing the same note or notes. As it is usually applied, chorus sounds like the same signal running through two amps with a very slight delay between them. In fact, Pat Metheny's famous chorus sound is produced in exactly this manner, using no actual chorus effect at all.
The D-55 is Guild's dreadnought, very similar in shape to the all-conquering 14-fret Martin on which it's based. However, if your used to a handful in the neck, the D-55 dreadnought makes for quite the contrast: a gloss neck, and slimmer nut accentuating the neck's overall thinness; more a D than a C profile, to invite comfortable first-position chords, aided by an impressively low action. That Adirondack bracing is doing its job, too, because string separation, definition and dynamic range are all notable and it feels loud, alive and resonant when playing soft or hard. If this guitar is anything to go by, the latest Traditional models are absolutely up there with the other big American names, offering superb quality craftsmanship and world-class tone. The D-55 is a potentially serious workhorse that has every likelihood of outlasting and outperforming any one of us as long as we can keep on picking - a sumptuous strummer.
This years new Guitar World Magazine Holiday Buyers Guide issue is full of great gear for the upcoming holiday season. The amazing new FU-Tone Design Your Own & the Titanium Bridges are featured and well worth checking out. Make sure you pickup a copy of the new Buyers Guide on news stands today and all of the beautiful women photographed don't hurt either!
It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
The aim of Audio Issues is to help interested newcomers get started in the world of audio production with easy to use practical audio production tips for beginners and advanced. If you are just starting out doing some home recording or have been engineering for a while, these quick and easy audio tips are guaranteed to be of interest and use to you.
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
"Guitarists frequently ask me to recommend a gig-worthy combo that sells for less than a thousand bucks," wrote Guitar World's Chris Gill in the May 2017 issue. "The question is never quite that simple though, as players often stipulate that they need great clean tones with plenty of headroom and that work well with pedals, a solid overdrive/distortion channel that really projects on stage, and really good reverb would be nice, too. While there are a few amps on the market that meet those requirements, the new PRS Sonzera series has jumped to the top of my list of recommendations."
The S670 QM is a speedster's guitar, with locking tuners and a razor thin "Wizard III" Maple neck, developed by Ibanez to be specifically fast and easy to play. Players with smaller hands or those who like to use their thumb to grab notes on the sixth string will find the neck particularly accommodating. So this model (and many of the Ibanez designs) score high marks for playability.
The body of a classical guitar is a resonating chamber that projects the vibrations of the body through a sound hole, allowing the acoustic guitar to be heard without amplification. The sound hole is normally a single round hole in the top of the guitar (under the strings), though some have different placement, shapes, or numbers of holes. How much air an instrument can move determines its maximum volume.
If you're in need of some assistance, you've come to the right place. At BestReviews, our goal is to help you find the perfect products to fit your individual requirements. We test items in our labs, gather feedback from existing customers, and consult experts. The result? Fair and thorough reviews that help you cut through the jargon. Read on for our full guide to electric guitars to learn all you need to know to pick the right one for your next jam session.
Good looks and playability seem to be the two biggest selling points of the Ibanez AEG10II. Many describe it as a fun instrument, thanks to its comfortably thin profile body and fast action setup. A good portion of its positive reviews are from users who after gigging with the guitar, have great things to say about its reliability and amplified sound.
Seagull Guitars is a sub-brand of Godin that utilizes their modern design and production capabilities in building classic looking instruments. The S6 Original exemplifies what the company can do, combining Godin's build quality and attention to details with old school aesthetics and playability, and it does all of this while retaining a very reasonable price tag.

I played electric guitar in a band from the age of 12 through to the age of 36, then gave it up. Now, at the age of 68 I want to get back into playing. I went into a store and tried playing and found that my fingertips really hurt! Are there any electric guitars where the metal strings don’t hurt or do I just need to “grin and bare it” until my fingertips get calloused again?
Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.

For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.


Sharlee D'Angelo (b. 1973) is the bassist for the metal band Arch Enemy, as well as the classic rock/AOR band The Night Flight Orchestra, the stoner metal band Spiritual Beggars and the blackened thrash/speed metal band Witchery. D'Angelo has also been in various bands in the past, either as a studio session player or full member. These include Mercyful Fate, Dismember and King Diamond. He switched to Ibanez in 2005. Ibanez now produces the Sharlee D'Angelo signature basses, called the SDB2 and SDB3,[11] which is tuned to D'Angelo's preferred C standard[12] (Low to High – C,F,Bb,Eb).
“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”
Normal people define cool as laid-back, excellent or highly skilled, but most guitarists define cool as Jimmy Page circa 1975 in a black velvet bellbottom suit decorated with embroidered dragons, playing a Les Paul slung down to his knees. As the musical mastermind behind Led Zeppelin, one of the greatest rock bands of all time, Page elevated the guitar riff to an art form, crafting orchestrated overdubbed parts that bludgeoned listeners like the hammer of the gods.
The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
Sometimes a guitar cab gets mic'd up differently night to night, plus every voice is unique, and every snare drum "speaks" differently (just ask a drummer). All of these minute changes and differences can and will affect the EQ decisions you'll have to make. This is why I'm such a strong believer in ear training and learning how certain parts of the frequency spectrum present themselves outside of their source-specific applications. That being said, these tips can be helpful as a place to start your search, but are not gospel by any means. So without further adieu, let's begin.

Most players will immediately think of the Jazz guitarist Charlie Christian, who brought the Gibson ES-150 to fame with the Benny Goodman Quartet.  Many top notch players realized that the tone these instruments could offer was unparalleled, and began to use them in their own illustrious careers, such as George Benson and Pat Metheny, alongside the other countless masters that wield these masterfully crafted instruments.
One question I get asked incredibly often, specially from beginner guitarists is: “What are the best guitar brands.” It’s a pretty valid question given that in just about every industry there are brands that are known to be the most desirable and most reliable (not always at the same time) and therefore, the best. However, it works a little bit differently in the guitar industry. Sound quality often goes on par with price. Reliability is measured a little differently than say, cars, as most guitar companies easily make very reliable instruments. Finally, desirability is usually based on price, looks, artist endorsement and more importantly again, sound-quality.
ACTION DEL BRACCIO È possibile regolare l'action del braccio del tremolo utilizzando una chiave a brugola da 3,0 mm sulla vite (B) del tremolo. ACCORDATURA DI PRECISIONE Dopo aver fissato il bloccacorde, utilizzare gli accordatori di precisione per eseguire le regolazioni di precisione dell'accordatura di ogni corda. Regolare tutti gli accordatori (C) al centro della rispettiva corsa prima di fissare il bloccacorde.
Gretsch aggressiveness in the entry level market is at an all time high, churning out a wide selection of affordable alternatives to many of their premium guitar models. Continuing this theme is the Gretsch G5426 Jet Club, which is essentially a more affordable stop-tail piece version of the Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby above. It features the same chambered body and high quality looks but with a basic humbucker and without a Bigsby.
The newly designed Les Paul Recording guitar was released in 1971, in many ways as an updated version of the Les Paul Professional that had debuted two years earlier in 1969. The new guitar came with a new owners manual explaining the (somewhat complicated) controls, their operation, and giving other specifications, including recommended strings, action and control settings. Compare with the broadly similar owners manual for the Les Paul Personal / Professional
The inlays are the little shapes that are installed in the instruments neck/fretboard. Inlays do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various shapes and materials. Inlays allow a player to quickly see where certain positions are located on the fretboard. They are also a great way to decorate, or personalize an instrument. Choose among our existing inlays designs, or send us a drawing of your own designs. Some popular inlay designs are band logos, initials, corporate brand logos, or tribal designs.
Gate – A dynamic effect that cuts off or lowers the volume of the output when the input is below a certain volume threshold. Once the input reaches the threshold the gate opens and allows the entire signal through. This is handy when placed in an amplifier’s effects loop for helping to eliminate hiss caused by high gain distortion when the guitarist is not playing.
Morris D-41 copy vintage 1980s Japanese high end hi class Exotic Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood tone woods body it has detailed fancy inlay perfling and in in amazing condition. Here we are proud to present to you a Classic dreadnought high quality Guitar made of vintage aged tone woods with impeccable workmanship and top quality materials fit and finish rivals the best of the best. This guitar was made by the premier custom shop builders of Japan in the Terada factory and are well known for making Ibanez's top of the line series guitars like the Artists - musician- the George Benson line as well as many others Some of the great Aria's top of line guitars and a few other makers they have the great woods and skills to make some of the finest instruments made period and this Morris is one of them. Just have a good look and you'll see for yourself. One of the finest D-41 type guitars made She's approaching 40 years old and in superb vintage condition I'm looking for dings still and don't see them it's really in sweet condition WOW it's rare to find such fine examples like this all round nice I suspect this beauty will not last long. She is currently in our JVGuitars shop for a full set up and will receive a JVG-Martin upgrade which consists of new fit Martin bone nut & compensated saddle set a full fret dressing and polishing and a beautiful resonant set of solid ebony bridge pins with brass ring and inlaid Abalone detail as well as a new set of Martin 80/20 phosphorus bronze strings and a full body polish. Just in pics soon to come. To enquirer contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com .
In 1959, with sales under pressure from the more powerful Fender Twin and from The Shadows, who requested amplifiers with more power, Vox produced what was essentially a double-powered AC15 and named it the AC30. The AC30, fitted with alnico magnet-equipped Celestion "blue" loudspeakers and later Vox's special "Top Boost" circuitry, and like the AC15 using valves (known in the US as tubes), helped to produce the sound of the British Invasion, being used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and the Yardbirds, among others. AC30s were later used by Brian May of Queen (who is known for having a wall of AC30s on stage), Paul Weller of The Jam (who also assembled a wall of AC30s), Rory Gallagher, The Edge of U2 and Radiohead guitarists Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien. The Vox AC30 has been used by many other artists including Mark Knopfler, Hank Marvin who was instrumental in getting the AC30 made, Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, John Scofield, Snowy White, Will Sergeant, Tom Petty, The Echoes, Mike Campbell, Peter Buck, Justin Hayward, Tom DeLonge, Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Noel Gallagher, Matthew Bellamy, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Dustin Kensrue, Tame Impala, and many others.
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturer which was founded in the year 1957. Ibanez was the first Japanese company to gain a foothold in exporting guitars to United States and Europe. They were the pioneer to produce the seven- strings guitars. Ibanez has produced several guitar models including the Electric Guitar Models, the Signature Models, Bass Guitar Models, and Acoustic Guitar Models etc. The Ibanez guitars are one of the best in the world.
The Gibson style guitars generally have shorter stubbier necks, with a 233/4 inch scale length, which suits some but not all. The Les Paul, the quintessential model, boasts twin humbucking pick-ups which effectively reduce noise and produce the thick, warm tone associated with Gibsons. It is difficult not to be impressed by the tradition of Les Paul guitars. No-one will ever convince me there is a better looking guitar style. For under $1000 the Epiphone Les Paul Standard will give you a little bit of the legend to take home and for many that's a good enough reason to buy one. Epiphones are cheaper factory made versions of the Gibson USA range. For those who learn on Gibson style guitars the Les Paul is what all guitars are measured against.  more...
The biggest issue when starting out is not to get any bad habits with picking or hand/finger positioning. I'd highly recommend to find a teacher who - not necessarily on a periodical basis - would take a closer look at your progress and technique and make adjustments when needed. There are lots of bad habits that you can get and I'd rather spend some money on lessons than weeks of lifetime to undo those.
This category of effects pedals does what the name implies.  It tweaks the volume of your guitar signal in some fashion.  These typically come in this spot in the pedal chain (after everything but the time-based effects) so that any change to your volume is already receiving the effects of all the pedals before it.  You’ll be altering your entire signal minus delays and reverbs.
And then of course, what’s really important, the tone, feels like it’s coming from a much more expensive guitar. Indeed, only real enthusiasts are likely to be able to easily tell the difference in sound between a Gibson Dove and the Epiphone Dove pro. If you don’t want to spend too much, then you must not overlook this guitar. If you like Epiphones as pretty as this one, you may wish to look into the Epiphone Hummingbird Pro, epiphone ej200sce or the Epiphone pr4e acousticelectric guitar player package.
If you've ever seen an electric guitar, you'll have noticed that most of them have solid bodies that are thinner (and sometimes much smaller) than those of acoustic guitars. Although most electric guitars are wooden, the material from which they're made is not critical. As George Beauchamp (pioneer of the modern electric guitar) pointed out in his patent back in the 1930s: "The body may be varied considerably in size, shape and construction, and may be constructed of various materials without departing from the spirit of the invention"; his original design suggested the body could be made from "a simple integral casting of metal such as aluminum." Early electric guitars were made from all kinds of materials, including molded Bakelite (one of the first plastics) and sheets of soldered brass.
Yamaha is likely a good place for acoustic players as well, as the company offers a number of solid entries in this category. Despite the friendly price, Yamaha consistently puts out quality instruments that feature not only sturdy construction, but sound quality good enough to give the big guys a run for their money. The FG800 is one of the best rated acoustic guitars out there, with a price tag that’s viable for just about any budget. Their acoustic guitar starter packs are great for beginners as well (5).
Nylon strings are essential for any classical instrument, and if you are planning to play classical music or Latin styles such as flamenco, a nylon string guitar is the way to go. Steel strings are more appropriate for rock, pop, blues, and pretty much everything else that doesn’t fall under the classic umbrella. You can check out our article on the best classical guitars for beginners.
Smaller combo amps may be easier to transport and set up than using separate amplifier and speaker units, and as such, they are a popular choice for many bass players. Bass players in quieter, more acoustic genres (e.g., jazz quartets which play in a wine bar or a folk music group which plays in a coffeehouse) may be able to use smaller, more modestly powered combo amps. Bassists who play in genres more associated with a high stage volume (e.g., hard rock or electric blues) may tend to use, larger, more powerful (in wattage) combo amps. While a gigging musician will typically only bring one combo amp to a show or recording session, some bassists in major touring bands have two or more combo amps on stage, with an "A/B" switching pedal used to select different amplifiers. In this way, a bassist could have a vintage tube combo amp and a modern solid state amp, and then switch between them to select a different tone for different songs.
While National blithely ignored Beauchamp’s electric experiments, their competition – Dobro – was next to enter the electric arena as early as 1933, with the introduction of the Dobro All-Electric. Basically, the All-Electric was a mahogany-bodied Model 37, most usually outfitted with a 12-fret square neck. It had a large lightning-bolt-engraved coverplate, two screen holes, three little holes under the fingerboard, a slothead, and rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. Instead of the usual resonator, this had a large metal plate where the cone assembly would normally be and a Stimson pickup mounted just in front of the bridge, curiously enough with the poles slanted from the bass side near the bridge toward the middle on the treble side.

Call of Duty: WWII Pre-order and get the Multiplayer Upgrade, includes a Weapon Unlock Token and Multiplayer 2XP* *Weapon unlock and 2XP usable in multiplayer only. 2XP limited to 4 hours of gameplay. Call of Duty® returns to its roots with Call of Duty®: WWII—a breathtaking experience that redefines World War II for a new gaming generation. Land in Normandy on D-Day and battle across Europe through iconic locations in history’s most monumental war. Experience classic Call of Duty combat, the bonds of camaraderie, and the unforgiving nature of war against a global power throwing the world into tyranny. Game Overview Call of Duty: WWII creates the definitive World War II next generation experience across three different game modes: Campaign, Multiplayer, and Co-Operative. Featuring stunning visuals, the Campaign transports players to the European theater as they engage in an all-new Call of Duty story set in iconic World War II battles. Multiplayer marks a return to original, boots-on-the ground Call of Duty gameplay. Authentic weapons and traditional run-and-gun action immerse you in a vast array of World War II–themed locations. The Co-Operative mode unleashes a new and original story in a standalone game experience full of unexpected, adrenaline-pumping moments.


The custom pickup for the AZ was developed in collaboration with Seymour Duncan. The pickups feature a moderate output through Alnico-5 magnets to keep the clarity of the fundamental tone when using a distortion sound, and to deliver a clear pick attack. From treble to bass, and from high-E string to low-E string, the overall tonal balance is evenly adjusted, and works well with various effect pedals.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
I’ve written in previous issues of Premier Guitar about how the size and shape of a guitar’s headstock affect its sustain and tone. Clearly, the mass of the tuning machines is a factor in this, as well. Having overseen the building of tens of thousands of custom guitars over the course of my career has given me cause to consider machine-head weight as a fine-tuning tool in and of itself. This kind of mod is more complex than the others I’ve presented here because it is harder to predict, and obviously more costly to dabble in because it involves replacing the existing tuners. Nevertheless, I put it out there for those of you who are willing to go to the limit of sanity in the search for a responsive instrument.
Pitchshifters change the pitch of the note played via a user-specified amount. The range of pitch deviation depends on the equipment used, but many pedals are capable of raising and lowering the pitch two octaves above and below the fundamental pitch. The amount of pitch deviation can be set or controlled via a foot pedal (which typically offers smooth, continuous pitch control). Typically, such function will be used with the original signal, resulting in a Harmonizer: the pitch is altered and combined with the original pitch to create two or more note harmonies. These harmonies are typically programmed in discrete integer multiples of the fundamental tone. When used with an expression pedal, it provides a smooth, abeit slightly digital, bend-like effect. Pitch shifters can also be used to electronically "detune" the instrument. Some examples are:
That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]
On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
Based both in Japan and the USA, this Japanese manufacturer produces guitars under different brand names: "ESP Standard," "ESP Custom Shop," "LTD Guitars and Basses," "Navigator," "Edwards Guitar and Basses," and "Grass Roots." Hisatake Shibuya opened his "Electric Sound Product" store in 1975 where he used to sell guitar spare parts. He then started to build his own parts and became a Kramer and Schecter subcontractor. His first signature guitar went to George Lynch (the Kamikaze), while the powerful Gibson Explorer copy designed for metal heads and adopted by a certain James Hetfield (Metallica) became almost as popular as its owner in the late 1980's and early 1990's.
The first thing is to adjust height. If you have the first type, you will need a flathead screwdriver. The two posts holding the bridge have flat slotted heads showing at either end. You can turn these clockwise to lower the strings or counter-clockwise to raise them. Find the string height that suits you. For an electric guitar, it will be about 1/4" off of the neck or lower. Get the strings as low as you can for comfort, but be careful that your frets don't start buzzing or that the strings are not coming into contact with pickups or any other parts. If this happens, your strings are too low. If the bridge is the second type, you will need a very narrow Allen wrench to adjust the saddles; you will find the Allen heads on either side of the saddle top.
My first guitar was an acoustic guitar made by Ibanez. At the time I got it, I was very into the acoustic-oriented bands that were dominating adult rock radio at the time, the mid-90s. You know, bands like Hootie & The Blowfish, Blues Traveler, the Goo Goo Dolls and Barenaked Ladies, for example. So this was perfect for me. I could imitate some of my current favorite acoustic guitarists and learn to play the basic chord structures of their songs. But the itch to do more grew, and I was ready to branch out into the foreign, exotic, sexy world of electric guitars. I bought one of those starter pack guitars that come with an amp, some power cords, a strap, picks, a guitar case, some kind of instructional materials, and everything you needed to transform yourself into Jimi Hendrix in a matter of days or even moments. I was all set.
In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).
I am a lawn tennis and guitar playing trainer. I am a college lawn tennis varsity player and became a coach and a trainer of beginners and advance tennis players. I am also a band player and singer performing musical folk, pop, ballad and jazz pub Shakey's Pizza Parlor and chains. I worked with Yamaha Music Corporation as an account representative.
What started out as Gibson’s daughter company that was tasked with producing affordable guitars, has grown into a giant. Not so long ago, Epiphone was the brand you turned to if you wanted a legit Les Paul but didn’t have the money for Gibson one.Today, things are vastly different. Gibson stepped up their game across the board, producing some of the absolute best guitar on the market.

I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.
Silvertones were guitars sold by Sears but manufactured by five main companies: Danelectro, Harmony, National-Dobro (Supro/Valco), Kay, and Teisco. These companies were called "jobbers" because they were contracted (jobbed out) to make guitars for Sears. They also produced guitars under their own brand names. In almost all cases the guitars manufactured for Sears were identical to models sold directly by the manufacturers with only a logo or color change.
Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements.
Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of
To me, the best practice amp hands down is the Yamaha THR10, and I have had them all. It just blows everything else away. But, it is $300 for an amp smaller than a toaster. Don't let the size fool you though, it is a killer amp. After the Yamaha, the Blackstar ID: Core series is my favorite. The ID: Core 20 or 40 is a great amp. The Yamaha and Blackstar ID: Core are both stereo for your aux input. To me this is a big deal. Many beginners are going to be playing along with backing tracks and songs, these stereo amps are awesome music playback tone. After those two amps, the Fender Mustang, Peavey Vypyr and Line 6 Spider are all about the same to me.
Cole Clark guitars are made largely using Australian indigenous timbers. Solid timber is used in preference to plywood.[2] Clark’s discovery of the best type of wood for his guitars came whilst searching in Australia in 1998. He came across Bunya Pine, and found out that it had the perfect characteristics for the sound board on an acoustic guitar. Whilst researching this type of wood, Clark also discovered that Bunya is about 18% stronger than Spruce wood, which a traditional choice when constructing a guitar. Blackwood is also another favourite material of Cole Clark’s for building their guitars (http://www.coleclarkguitars.com/technology.asp).

One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.

Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.


Buying a new guitar amp is easy. But, as you will have seen, ending up with the right amplifier for you isn’t as straightforward. Amps are not something you buy every day, so take your time, read our guide, use our categories and charts as inspiration, and ultimately you will find something that will suit you and your playing perfectly. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect amp!


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A guitar recital may include a variety of works, e.g. works written originally for the lute or vihuela by composers such as John Dowland (b. England 1563) and Luis de Narváez (b. Spain c. 1500), and also music written for the harpsichord by Domenico Scarlatti (b. Italy 1685), for the baroque lute by Sylvius Leopold Weiss (b. Germany 1687), for the baroque guitar by Robert de Visée (b. France c. 1650) or even Spanish-flavored music written for the piano by Isaac Albéniz (b. Spain 1860) and Enrique Granados (b. Spain 1867). The most important composer who did not write for the guitar but whose music is often played on it is Johann Sebastian Bach (b. Germany 1685), whose baroque lute works have proved highly adaptable to the instrument.
I was very surprised by your article on acoustic guitars and the ratings given by you. I have been playing acoustic guitars for most of my 62 years and have owned and played all of them. I cannot believe that you put Seagull guitars at the top of your list! I've played as well as owned a Seagull guitar for some time and I have found it to be constructed out of cheap materials with no regard to detail. The guitar's intonation was horrible... could never get the damn thing in tune beyond the fifth fret,which frustrated me very much. Lastly, the lack of a finish on the product lent itself to getting stains on it. With that being said,I just cannot see how you can even be on that list at all.
VintageSilvertones.com is a curated collection of electric guitars chosen for their unique tone, design, and significance in electric guitar history from approximately 1950-1980. This collection approaches electric guitars from the underdog perspective. So we carry guitars built for the masses, luthiers & manufacturers who pushed the boundaries as to what was possible in terms of not only instrument quality but tone. Design also plays an important consideration in this collection. Alternative materials, innovative tuning systems, and high quality-low cost manufacturing processes are only some of the unique qualities found on instruments at VintageSilvertones.com.
Seagull acoustic guitars are among the best values you are going find. They’re made in Canada, and there’s an attention to detail and craftsmanship here you may not expect in guitars at these price points. The Seagull Artist series is the top of the lineup. You’ll find unique tonewoods and high-quality construction techniques at an affordable price.

I agree that you should spend more on the guitar than the amp, but if you have a nice guitar and a cheap amp, you aren't giving the guitar enough width and breadth of tone capabilities to warrant spending $1500 or more on a guitar. So, if you're going to spend over $1200 on a guitar, don't buy a lousy amp. A Peavy 30 is a decent amp, but is short on breadth of tone as compared to a Fender Deluxe Reverb 22 watt. Marrying the guitar and amp is an important part of the process, they are symbiotic. My advice, as a player for over 40 years is to buy as good a guitar as you can. For beginners, a bad guitar will not get you playing, in fact, the most common reason young novices stop taking lessons is that the cheap junker they got is unplayable, even by professionals. It's hard, not fun, seems like a world of work and they quit. That's not how it's supposed to be. It's a fun thing, so get out there, get a good playable instrument and you are on your way to a lifetime of good times.


When the Fender company invented the first widely produced electric bass guitar (the Fender Precision Bass) they also developed a bass amplifier, the Fender Bassman, first produced in 1952. This was a 26-watt tube amplifier with a single 15" speaker. In 1954, the Bassman was redesigned to use four 10" speakers. This speaker cabinet was an open-back design; as such, it had poor low-frequency efficiency and was prone to blowing speakers when used for bass because of the lack of damping. Somewhat ironically, it became very popular as an electric guitar amplifier. The circuit design also underwent repeated modifications. The "5F6A" circuit introduced in 1958 is regarded as a classic amplifier design and was copied by many other manufacturers, such as Marshall.
This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.
2.  Cracked peg head.  Customer “fixed” with mystery glue and a wood screw.  Result:  Peg head and neck shaft not aligned. Fix: If the peg head can be re-broken you may be able to re-align the neck and re-glue (if it was glued with aliphatic glue you won’t be able to as the glue will not stick to itself).  The joint may have to be resurfaced and new wood may have to be inserted, possibly a spline as well.
I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).
Volume pedals are volume potientiometers set into a rocking foot treadle, so that the volume of the bass guitar can be changed by the foot. Compression pedals affect the dynamics (volume levels) of a bass signal by subtly increasing the volume of quiet notes and reducing the volume of loud notes, which smooths out or "compresses" the overall sound. Limiters, which are similar to compressors, prevent the upper volume levels (peaks) of notes from getting too loud, which can damage speakers. Noise gates remove hums and hisses that occur with distortion pedals, vintage pedals, and some electric basses.
Other unique features of this wonderful guitar are the 70’s styled headstock logo which effectively rounds out the look of this American instrument very nicely. Weighing just 7.2 pounds, the guitar is of pure single coil bliss! It sounds great as all Teles do and it plays like a dream. For every guitar lover, this is a true workhorse instrument to get.
Original Martin OMs from approximately 1929 to 1931 are extremely rare and sell for high prices. Many guitarists believe that the OM—a combination of Martin’s modified 14-fret 000 body shape, long scale (25.4″) neck, solid headstock, 1-3/4″ nut width, 4-1/8″ maximum depth at the endwedge, and 2-3/8″ string spread at the bridge—offers the most versatile combination of features available in a steel-string acoustic guitar. Today, many guitar makers (including many small shops and hand-builders) create instruments modeled on the OM pattern.[5]
Luthier Steve Lamb has been providing quality instrument repair in Fort Worth for over 30 years. Steve’s years of experience has provided musicians, collectors, students and friends the information and service necessary to keep their instruments in shape. Lamb’s Music is an authorized service/warranty center for most guitar manufacturers including – Fender, Gibson, Martin, Taylor and more.
The main advantage of the Rocktron Velocity V10 is the low price tag. It is one of the better values for beginner guitar amps out there. There is nothing particularly amazing about the Velocity V10 in its own right, but it can potentially cost less than half as much as some other beginner level amps. The Velocity V10 is capable enough to be a solid practice amp with a price that almost nothing of similar quality can match. It is a good budget option that delivers on all the actually necessary features.
There are two main types of electric guitar bridges. There is the "Tune-O-Matic"/"Roller" type, which is found on Gibson, Gretsch and Epiphone guitars. This is usually a removable long oval part sitting on adjustable posts. These posts determine the height of the strings. Another is the "Vibrato"/"Hardtail" type, which is common to Fender and Paul Reed Smith guitars. In this case, bridge and tailpiece are one; there is usually a large, rectangular plate bolted directly onto the guitar with a raised heel which holds the strings and individual string saddles acting as the bridge. These saddles determine the height of the string and can be adjusted individually to create either a flat or arched effect, depending on the type of neck your electric guitar has. According to Chicago Luthiers, "Some just have adjusters that raise and lower the whole bridge, but not the individual strings, and some have both. This applies to guitars with tremolo bars as well as those without."
“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”
Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]

to heat up the tubes in certain amplifiers , when the tubes are heated up you get a better sound and the tubes last longer is what I've been told. remember to change your tubes and have them adjusted on a yearly bases to keep the amp sounding great if you're an experienced player this really comes in handy. Get a pro to do it the first time so nothing bad happens.
I understand and concur with you totally, as a sound man, I love it when everyone is direct, it makes life so much easier. every mike you eliminate adds roughly 3 db headroom overall to the max level without feedback. But as a bassist, and a Chapman Stick player, ampless just feels too flat and lifeless for me. I recently worked a John McLaughlin and Fourth Dimension gig in Bali, Both John, and Gary Husband went direct, it was wonderful. The bassist was amped though, for the same reasons I prefer to be amped If I am playing bass. Nathan East is another who doesn’t like bass in the monitors, preferring the sound and dynamic control of having his own amp. By and large, I find that generally (with some VERY notable exceptions) people who grew up playing concerts “back in the day” prefer amps, subsequent generations of people who grew up playing with small “portable” amps (think SWR, etc.) generally don’t mind going ampless, they have pedal racks, and have the sound they want from that. They don’t miss the air moving on their strings, because they never had it.. Perhaps because I am a dinosaur, I need the feel of 6, or 8 10s behind me, (or at least 2 15s), the resonance effect it has on the strings, makes my instrument come alive and it breathes with a feeling no pedal rack can duplicate. You should see Bootsy Collins’ rig, he had 2 1x18s, 2 2x15s, and 2 4×10 boxes, and that is what he calls his “small gig rig”! I guess I grew up regarding the amp as an integral part of my instrument, without it, playing feels, well, like you don’t have an amp! Even in the studio, I run a DI into the board, but I play through an amp for my own feel. Peas.
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.
By ’71, the Univox had expanded considerably with new copy guitars. Still around from earlier were the Hi Flyer Mosrite copy, the ‘Lectra violin bass, and the Mother or Rhythm and Blues Les Paul copy. Joining them were the Badazz guitar and bass, the Effie thinline, another Coily thinline guitar and bass, and the Naked and Precisely basses. Univox acoustics are also first sighted (as far as we know) in ’71.

I’d just like to add that for about $120 new (less used) you can get a good practice amp, like a Peavey Vypyr VIP 1. This is a far better option than trying to make a laptop sound like an amp. If you’re going to do nothing but play through headphones, then the laptop is an okay idea I guess. But trying to play through the laptop speakers, or even most add-on speakers for a lap is going to sound bad compared to a small amp like the Vypyr. That amp has all of the effects built in and is just a more simple and practical solution. I’ve seen 15 watt line 6 amps go for as little as $50 used. The only way I’d use the laptop is if I were only using headphones and if the software was free. I would not spend money trying to make an amp out of a laptop. I say this not only as a guitarists, but also as an IT Professional.
By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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