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Schecter Guitar Research Company was founded by David Schecter in1976. This manufacturing company produces large number of electric guitars, bass guitars, and steel-string acoustic guitars, as well as offering hand-built custom instruments and a small line of guitar amplifiers. The schecter known for its schecter “c” shape body. This brand is known for its better quality of wood and handsome finishing.
Solder the electronics. The pickups you purchased should come with a schematic that shows exactly how to connect these to the controls and to the input for the guitar cord. Follow this schematic, using an ordinary electronics soldering iron to complete the job. Wrap any wiring connections with electrical tape, unless the manufacturer’s instructions suggest another method.
Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.

Drummers have their cowbells and double bass pedals, vocalists have their harmonisers and auto tune. We guitarists, however, are the luckiest: we get effects pedals. Ranging from subtle slap-back echoes to wild and crazy ring modulators; from simple boost pedals to drive your amp a little harder to insane distortion stomp boxes, we can have it all.
I have a Norma single pickup electric guitar with 1 volume and the 3 position tone switch. Someone tried to repair the wiring (w/o soldering) so it didn’t work when I found it. I did some simple wiring/soldering and got it working and the pickup sounds great but I cant figure how to wire it so the tone selector works. Any help or a diagram would be great.
ACTION: fret low E at first fret and measure the distance from the bottom of the to the top of the 15th fret. It should be 5/64". Do the same with the high E, measurement should be 3/64". Now measure the string height at the nut; underside of the string to the top of the fret. Low E and A should measure 2/64", D and G =1.5/64" and B and high E = 1/64". If string height at nut is correct, recheck string height at 12th fret with strings open. Measurement for low and high E's should be the same as measurement taken at the 15th.
After the introduction of electronic transistors in the 60s, engineers began to emulate these new and raw vacuum tube sounds with the new technology. They often used germanium transistors, which were not only cheap, but also had a sensitivity for generating bizarre fuzz tones, a quality that became a key ground for experimentation. The first mass-produced box was the Gibson Maestro FZ-1A Fuzz-Tone, which launched in 1962, right at the birth of British rock: The Fuzz-Tone was responsible for Keith Richard’s sound in 1965’s “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” transforming it from a mild Dylan-esque acoustic record into the Stone’s signature confrontational delivery.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
‘Power' Chords are used in most styles of music but are particularly useful for rock guitar; they even sound cool on acoustic (check out Nirvana's Unplugged album for an awesome example). The basic idea is that you only have to learn one chord shape, and that one shape can move around the fingerboard to make other chords. It uses no open strings, and muting the unused open strings is a very important part of the technique.
If you want to test the waters, here are the some of the best free guitar effects software packages. Aside from the limited freeware software, there are Lite or Trial versions of commercial programs which you can get for free, but with limited in features. The good thing though is that even when they lack features, they work and sound just as nice.
I've used 3 effects applications till now: Amplitube podfarm and guitar rig 5. The best software I found so far is guitar rig the sound it gives is amazing it has some pretty good presets and it has an intuitive interface I recommend trying out demos of every software to see which better suits you. I recommend guitar rig. I would suggest using a PC instead of a laptop because they're processor intensive. Anything that's part of the is series is great (i3 i5 i7). Good luck and remember to get asio4all drivers google it and get the newest drivers
Years ago companies used to manufacture rotating speaker cabinets (the most famous being the Leslie Rotary Speaker) – as they rotated the sound would change and develop, creating interesting modulation effects. Nowadays such things are considered too large and inconvenient to transport and use, so we have stomp boxes to help us emulate the sound. The most famous of these is the Dunlop Uni-Vibe, and although it doesn’t sound as close as other pedals to the real thing, it has become a famous sound in its own right. Rotary speaker effects often have controls for the speed of the effect, and can sometimes (such as in the case of the Uni-Vibe) be connected to expression pedals to control the speed on the fly. If you’re into 60’s psychedelic rock like Jimi Hendrix, this one’s a must.
A record store owner named Leo Mintz explained his observation to his friend, DJ Alan Freed.  Freed had a popular show on WJW in Cleveland Ohio and loved finding and playing new music to his large audience. Mintz told him of a new trend he saw in his record store where many teenagers from white families were coming in and buying Rhythm and Blues records.
In the Seventies, Clapton’s work with Derek and the Dominos and his first solo albums added a slew of masterpieces like “Layla” and “Lay Down Sally” to classic rock’s repertoire. The Eighties also saw Clapton’s music featured in movies (The Hit in 1984 and Lethal Weapon in 1987) and commercials (“After Midnight” for Michelob in 1987), while a string of albums produced by Phil Collins established Clapton as a pop/rock icon.
That's what I was thinking. Have you seen what those things go for when one does pop up for sale? It's nothing for those to go for close to $10k. That's insane for something non-vintage, but that's just my opinion. It's a bit excessive for what's essentially a two humbucker shredder, even if it is handmade over the course of nine years and the body is a piece of a 12th century Viking ship that's been soaked in mead for six centuries and aged to exquisiteness or whatever the fuck. I blame Misha Mansoor. He's got a bunch of guitar nerds all fucked up in the head now.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay
There aren’t really any structured lessons—like, where you’re starting at the beginning and working your way sequentially through—you have to browse through the playlists and find what’s best, but the quality of the lessons and wide variety of topics will have everything covered. JamPlay is a sampler for the website, where you’re offered a subscription service to complete courses, which explains the kind of shotgun approach to the videos made available on YouTube. But the size and breadth of the topics you can access for free still makes it a great channel.
If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.
There are a few things to look for in modestly priced amplifiers: at least a 3-band equalizer or EQ ( low, mid, and high), a clean channel and an "overdrive" channel, reverb, and possibly some sort of "presence" control. There are two types of amplifiers: tube and transistor. Many playes prefer tube-style amps, but they can be problematic technically. Just be aware of that.

In late 1960, the amp was redesigned with three, rather than two, channels, each with two inputs, and offered with an optional Top Boost, or Brilliance, circuit, which introduced an extra gain stage and separate bass and treble controls. The Top Boost feature proved popular enough that it became standard on the AC30/6 (so named for its six inputs). Its chimey high end was a signature of the Beatles’ early recordings and was later favored by guitarists like Brian May, Tom Petty, Peter Buck and The Edge, whose 1964 AC30/6 has been featured on every U2 album.


This guitar features two MP-90 pickups that can be switched on at the same time to produce sweet yet aggressive sounds. This guitar is mainly used to play country and indie music. This guitar has a radius of 9.5’’ and 22 medium jumbo frets for comfort and speed of play. It has a six saddle hard-tail bridge that allows precise settings and ease of adjusting string heights. The fingerboard is maple finished which makes for fast play. This guitar features three finishes sunburst, black transparent and vintage white.


Naturally, you must also consider the Gibson Les Paul starter pack as well. Available from the consumer friendly Epiphone range, this player package is a great introduction to one of the most popular electric guitar models in the entire world. With 22 frets, dual humbuckers, and a gorgeous aesthetic with ebony finish and silver hardware, this is a knockout in every regard. The set is rounded out with the standard fare such as an amp, picks, a cable, a strap, and a tuner.

As with other plucked instruments (such as the lute), the musician directly touches the strings (usually plucking) to produce the sound. This has important consequences: Different tone/timbre (of a single note) can be produced by plucking the string in different manners and in different positions. For example, plucking an open string will sound brighter than playing the same note(s) on a fretted position (which would have a warmer tone).


Tony Visconti is also into using ambient mics: "I'm very much a fan of the room sound, too. I always record it if it's a real heavy rock guitar with power chords and crunches and all. I'll go around the room and clap my hands and I say, 'Put the mics there, that's it.' Quite often, I'll turn the room mic towards the studio window, and you'll get a reflection of the guitar sound — not directly facing it, because you're looking for reflections." Although he states in the same interview that he'll try to use a pair of U87s for ambience if possible, he's also mentioned elsewhere using PZM mics as an alternative.

I have a shecter omen extreme 7 and found that the factor strings they put on were nice for my small fingers. I had to replace because the factor set in general needed some tweaking and they changed all the strings. Now i don't really like the strings they put on. Too small. All they had listed for the strings were 24X jumbo strings. What string set should i buy since i play Ambient, soft, but also djent metal.
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Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.

Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.
With a history dating back to 1833, Martin acoustics rank as the most historic and iconic guitars ever made. From the small-bodied parlor guitars of the 19th-century to the landmark dreadnoughts of the 1930s and beyond, Martins have and continue to define the form and sound of the instrument. Take a look here for examples every type of vintage Martin acoustic including icons like the D-28, D-35, 000-18 and many more.
Those who appreciate a more vintage design will love the Schecter S-II CUSTOM. It’s an original design which borrowed a lot of ideas from Gibson’s legendary SG series. Pickups are also in line with the overall theme, and they sound pretty great. There’s balance in the tone, the kind you don’t really expect to get from a Schecter. It definitely took me by surprise, a very pleasant surprise.

What we consider as standard size today were not so standard back in the '30s. Back then the "parlor guitar" or "blues box" was commonly used, with its compact body and mid-emphasized tone. Many artists used this instrument to shape many of the musical styles that we have today. The L-00 Standard from Gibson captures the iconic "blues box" faithfully for today's players, adding in their premium touch and modern tech that results in a true timeless museum quality instrument.


Rackmounted effects are typically built in a thin metal chassis with metal "ears" designed to be screwed into a 19-inch rack that is standard to the telecommunication, computing and music technology industries. Rackmounted effects may be one, two or three rack spaces high. When purchased from the store, rack-mounted equipment is not equipped with the rugged chassis features used on stompboxes and amps that are designed to be transported as standalone units, such as corner protectors. Rackmounted units are typically mounted in a rack, which is housed in a road case, a tough plastic case with removable front and rear covers that can be latched on during transportation to protect the knobs and switches and then removed during performances. A rackmount unit may contain electronic circuitry identical to a stompbox's, although its circuits are typically more complex. Unlike stompboxes, rackmounts usually have several different types of effects.[13]
The world is full of amps. It is so full of them in fact that it is somehow hard to choose not because there is not enough good ones, but too many of them. Which is very unfortunate, as it raises the entry level requirement for understanding what you are buying. This means that a whole lot of people get intimidated when trying to pick an amp. Like if they want a mini amp that they would want to carry with them when they go somewhere. Which is why I sat myself down the other day, bargaining all the while, and compiled a list of the best small guitar amps, for the sake of all the big musicians trying to play them. Hopefully at least some of you will find it more or less useful, since I had to categorize these according to price, sound quality, tone quality, comfort of use and even the general usefulness. What I am trying to say is, it was a lot of work.

yeah i know the GSP has 2 EQ ( well 3 if i wanted to use up a slot in the OD section ) but i use both EQs on the GSP and i prefer a external eq, that i can adjust on the spot depending on that patch, rather then going in and changing the EQ each time on that patch. I use 3 different guitars each one is totally different in sound, so the external EQ really helps.
Martin’s second major innovation, and arguably the more important, of the period 1915-1930 was the dreadnought guitar.[6] Originally devised in 1916 as a collaboration between Martin and a prominent retailer, the Oliver Ditson Co., the dreadnought body style was larger and deeper than most guitars. In 1906, the Royal Navy launched a battleship that was considerably larger than any before it. From the idea that a ship that big had nothing to fear (nought to dread), it was christened HMS Dreadnought. Martin borrowed this name for their new, large guitar. The greater volume and louder bass produced by this expansion in size was intended to make the guitar more useful as anaccompaniment instrument for singers working with the limited sound equipment of the day. Initial models produced for Ditson were fan-braced, and the instruments were poorly received[citation needed].

This legendary thinline electric guitar has been in continuous production since 1958 and has been updated for 2019. The new Gibson ES-335 Figured has the classic semi-hollow body construction with a chambered maple center block with a three-ply AAA-grade figured maple/poplar/maple top and back. Its bracing is made of quarter-sawn Adirondack spruce. The center block and bracing are both thermally engineered.

While Dave Matthews Band has no more confirmed dates on their schedule, Matthews and guitarist Tim Reynolds have a number of duo performances on the docket, including a slot at Farm Aid 2018 in Hartford, CT on September 22nd alongside Willie Nelson, Neil Young, John Mellencamp, Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, Kacey Musgraves, Margo Price, Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, and Particle Kid. Dave and Tim also just announced their return to Mexico for a concert destination event set to take place February 15th–17th, 2019.
We can visualize the operation of a potentiometer from the drawing above. Imagine a resistive track connected from terminal 1 to 3 of the pot. Terminal 2 is connected to a wiper that sweeps along the resistive track when the potentiometer shaft is rotated from 0° to 300°. This changes the resistance from terminals 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 simultaneously, while the resistance from terminal 1 to 3 remains the same. As the resistance from terminal 1 to 2 increases, the resistance from terminal 2 to 3 decreases, and vice-versa.
2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
I kind of think what I do is like producing with my feet because I do a lot of that in my own shows. Particularly when I'm playing guitar with other bands, I'm always changing reverb [settings] and modulation types and the very sorts of things that [maybe no one else realizes what's going on], but it keeps me interested. I think because I come from a time before that was possible, it's a magical thing for me.

The first edition of the Telecaster Custom was produced between 1959-1968, and featured a double-bound body. While the guitar was known as the Telecaster Custom, the decal on the headstock read “Custom Telecaster”. Later editions of the Tele Custom were popularized by Rolling Stones‘ guitarist and composer Keith Richards, featuring a Fender Wide Range humbucker in the neck position and a single-coil pickup in the bridge. The market generally refers to the guitar as the “1972 Custom”, indicating the year this model was originally released.

This list is an amateurish joke. Many guitars listed are pure cheap junk I'd toss in the garbage even if they were free. Take it from a 45-year Pro, Parker & PRS are the 2 highest quality. Fender, Ric and Gibson, along w/ brands that have stood the test of time, plus a few hand-made (custom) brands are the only ones you can seriously depend on. The rest are mostly pathetic attempts at copying a major brand and cutting the price by REALLY cutting back on quality. As they say: "You get what you pay for. "


My brother had the single-pickup (neck) version of this exact guitar c. 1969, badged as a Tempo. I wound up with it but in the ’80s I butchered it into a four-string “piccolo bass” with a sawed-down Badass II bridge, a Bigsby, a Seymour Duncan stacked-coil J-bass pickup, and a set of phase/split switches. I sent it back to him in the mid-’90s and he tossed it. Now that I’ve gotten into guitar over the past few years, I’m sorry I don’t still have it in its original condition. I don’t believe it was ever plugged into a proper tube guitar amp.


Inspirational, motivational and light background tune with beautiful and atmospheric melody. Good production audio for the slideshow, presentation, youtube, advertising, business project, motivational and successful videos, inspiring moments, bright achievements, film scores. I used electric guitar, muted guitar, piano, staccato strings, bass, drums, Glock, bright pads.

The ’55 hollowbody line consisted of no less than eleven guitars. Models included the EP-4, EP-5, EP-6, EP-7, EP-11, EP-12, EP-13, EP-14, EP-15, EP-16, and EP-23. Clearly, in these instances, the numerical designation indicates appointments, not the number of pickups. Some of these are likely to be thin-bodied archtops with no cutaways, some thinlines with a single cut, and some full-bodied archtops with a single cutaway, with either one or two pickups, and probably no vibratos.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
I first met Ralph Novak in 1980, when he was working at Subway Guitars in Berkeley, California. I'd assembled a kit Strat and it needed a refret. My monstrosity was painted Shell Pink in tribute to Strats from Fender's surf era. Little did I know what was to come of Ralph's distant future. He was the fret guru in Berkeley, and his work was astounding - the best I'd ever seen! Ironically, Vintage Guitar columnist Stephen White was also working at Subway at the time. So began our journey into luthiery madness! Fast forward to 1989.
Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
Flanger effects simulate the studio trick of repeatedly putting your thumb on a tape recorder’s reel for a second and then letting the reel (and music’s pitch) catch back up while a dry (unaffected) signal plays alongside. Flangers usually have a depth setting, which controls the intensity of the effect, and a rate control that adjusts the speed of the cycles.
Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)
The playing of (3-5 string) guitar chords is simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings, in which the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds tuning, all-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation. On the other hand, in regular tunings 6-string chords (in the keys of C, G, and D) are more difficult to play.
This Blackstar combo amp might be really inexpensive (under $80) but it’s not a cheap model, quality-wise. Ideal for house practice, this baby has two channels (Clean, Overdrive) and is also fit for traveling. The compactness and durability of the model are great for people who want to travel with their instrument and equipment. If you are a beginner who has long given up on looking at the best amplifiers at $100, you need to know where to compromise on an amp. And Blackstar seems to do the best job as compromising on some aspects to still deliver a good sounding amp that is not too expensive. With 10-watts (there is also a 15-watt model available), you can practice for hours on end and produce pretty crisp, versatile tone. Is it the best amplifier I have ever tried? Definitely not, but it sure is one hell of a good competitor in its price range and an amazing guitar practice amp.

The pickup coils are wired to the amplifier through an electrical circuit. The circuit usually also contains volume and tone controls, which allow the basic sound to be adjusted by turning knobs on the guitar body. A guitar with two pickups will have four knobs on its body: one to adjust the volume and the tone of the sound from each pickup. More complex circuits can be added to change the sound of an electric guitar in all kinds of interesting ways.
The first to go are the ultra-highs, and the lower the value of the pot, the greater the amount of signal that can escape to ground. This is why 500K pots keep your sound brighter than 250K: their higher resistance won't allow as much of the signal to bleed off. And a 1Meg-ohm pot has such high resistance that when wide open it sounds almost like having no control pot there at all.
Made famous by George Harrison in the ‘60s, the jangly Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar has become perhaps one of the most iconic 12-string electrics. With a semi-hollow body and thru-body neck, the 360/12 is able to create a unique tone that is difficult to create with other 12-string guitars. Though this model has undergone many changes and seen many iterations through the years, the newer Rick 360/12 models have a slimmer neck and are still highly-sought instruments.

The hollow body — the original electric guitar design — is completely hollow on the inside, like an acoustic guitar. Hollow-bodied guitars like the Gibson ES-150 saw use in jazz ensembles by players such as Eddie Durham and Charlie Christian, but were also adopted for country, folk and, eventually, rock and roll. If you’re looking for warm, mellow tones, the hollow body is your best bet. That isn’t to say it can’t give you some sweet, raunchy distortion. A proper hollow-body setup can pull off a great classic blues or rock sound, but they are more prone to feedback than solid body guitars.


We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
When you're learning your instrument, having Books, Sheet Music & Media on hand is absolutely invaluable. It doesn't matter if you're a first time player or an old pro, this type of literature is going to help you to enhance your skills and become a better player overall. Think of having books, sheet music & media at your disposal like having the world's most diverse roster of teachers at your disposal 24 hours a day, seven days a week. By being able to learn on your own schedule, you'll find yourself playing new chords, progressions and songs in no time. So which books, sheet music & media are right for you? Well, as you can imagine, that's just going to be a matter of skill level and personal preference. If you're looking for a serious method book that will give you a solid basis in guitar technique, be sure to check out the Hal Leonard Guitar Method Complete Edition. This book and CD combo is designed to help anyone learn to play their acoustic or electric guitar. With convenient teaching ideas and fantastic audio assistance from Greg Koch, this set will help you cover all of your bases.
Overdrive and distortion are effects that introduce harmonics to your guitar tone by pushing more volume into a circuit until it can’t handle it anymore and starts to break up. The types of sounds you can get from an overdrive or distortion range from a light boost to a full on metal crunch. Overdrive and distortion effects are great when placed after a compressor but before any of your other effects.
I think it's unreasonable at best, and more likely impossible, to say with any confidence "Model X guitar will be eaisest for everyone", because everyone's hands are different sizes, everyone's fingers are different lengths and thicknesses, some people prefer smaller or larger frets, everyone has different preferences with regard to neck profile shape, neck width, neck length, body shape, body weight, bridge design (floating vs fixed, TOM vs hardtail, etc.), not to mention pickup types (single coil vs humbucker vs P90, active vs passive) and control layouts (multiple volume/tone controls vs single master volume/tone controls, blade vs toggle pickup selectors).
The Univox/Aria Les Paul openly copied its American original, but would never be mistaken for it because it continued many characteristics typical of Japanese production at the time; a bolt-on neck with the usual narrow fingerboard, sitting relatively high on the body, zero frets, block inlays (with rounded corners) and rounded ends. The headstock was a copy of the Gibson open book. And, obviously, it didn’t have Gibson humbuckers, favoring instead a design with 12 adjustable poles in a metal cover with a narrow black insert slit in the middle, sitting on black surrounds. Controls were standard three-way with two volumes and tones. The knobs were those tall, skinny gold kind seen on many early Japanese copies. Hardware was gold-plated. These first Univox Les Paul copies survived into the early ’70s, but were probably gone by around ’74. By ’71, the model was called either the Mother or the R&B Guitar Outfit and was available in either black (U1982) or gold (U1983) finishes. Also by ’71, the Univox logo had changed from the early plastic version to the more common outlined block letter decal.
While SG Guitars kits are sold in a number of different timber varieties, if you are looking to match the original as closely as possible you will be best selecting a model constructed with a Mahogany body and Maple neck with Rosewood or Ebony fretboard. * Gibson has recently transitioned from Rosewood to Richlite due to New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species.
Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).

These 1950s models featured the thicker, more sustaining tone of Gibson’s humbucker pickups with the original units known as “Patent Applied For” (PAF) pickups. These PAFs were designed by Seth Lover while working for Gibson in 1955 (U.S. Patent 2,896,491), and debuted on Les Pauls in 1957. This innovation became a standard pick up design for Gibson, and subsequently, many other guitar companies followed suit, outfitting their electrics with copycat versions of the humbucking pickup altered to avoid infringing Gibson’s patent. Gretsch had their Filtertron pickups, and when Fender entered the humbucker market in 1972, it was with the radically different Fender Wide Range pickup. “Standard” humbuckers from other guitar manufacturers and third party replacement pickups from the likes of DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan were only offered after Gibson’s patent had expired.
We would suggest that you don’t check price tags too much when choosing your guitar. If you try a few out in a music shop you can ask them to suggest a few different guitars within your price range and then try them out only thinking about sound, looks and feeling. This way you won’t be fooled by a cheap price tag to think that a guitar can’t be any good, or the opposite, be tricked into thinking that just because a guitar is expensive it has got to be the best.
Taylor 110ce Yes, there’s already one Taylor in the list, but we just can’t resist including the Taylor 110ce dreadnought. It certainly deserves a spot here because of its noteworthy qualities, which include a thin-profile neck, shorter nut width, well-balanced tone and plenty of projection. Plugged in, the guitar produces a natural electro-acoustic sound - just the way we like it.
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So half of it is finding a happy place in terms of neck size. The other half is the setup. String height is usually adjustable, with electric guitars, which is a good thing in your case. Lower string height means you don't need to push down on the string as hard to play the notes. When you find a guitar that feels good to you but the strings are kinda hard to push down, talk to the store about having it setup and intonated with a very low string height... some people use the term "fast" action.
A common format of bass amplifier–the "combo" amp–contains the amplifier electronics and one or more speakers in a single wooden cabinet. Combo amps have been used by musicians since the 1920s, as they are convenient for transporting to rehearsals and for performances at small to mid-size venues. Combo amps range from small, low-powered "practice amps" used for individual practice, to mid- and large-size and more powerful combo amps which produce enough volume for rehearsals and small to mid-size venues (e.g., nightclubs). For larger venues, such as stadiums, bassists may use the "bass stack" approach, in which one or more separate speaker cabinets, each with one or more speakers (but not containing an amplifier) and a separate "head" containing the amplifier electronics are used. With a large "bass stack", a bassist can obtain a much higher wattage and onstage volume than a "combo" amp could provide. As with an electric guitar amp, a bass amp is not simply used to make the instrument louder; performers use the preamplifier and equalizer controls and, particularly in amps from the 1980s and 1990s onward, the onboard electronic effects, to create their preferred tone.
The product also has an original feature, called ISF, advertised to “give you infinite sound possibilities, from the USA to the UK” by using pre-set bass, mid, and treble setting that the user can select between. Some customers remarked that the feature doesn’t seem to make much of a difference, but praise the tone quality and good functionality of the product nevertheless.  
Players and rock historians alike will talk endlessly about who either created or discovered or recorded the first distorted guitar tone. They argue, pontificate, debate, and even break it down into categories of type and of geographical location. “So, do we mean distortion, overdrive, or fuzz tone?” or “Do you distinguish between North American and European ‘firsts’?” Dave Davies of the Kinks is often credited with the first appearance of a heavily distorted electric guitar sound in the British charts for ‘You Really Got Me’ in August 1964.
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.
Les Pauls are all about that heavy metal feel and heavy weight. When they were first introduced, they had two p-90 single coil pickups. Today, they use double humbucker pickups for outputting a thick, sustainable sound. Like Tele and Stratocasters, they have a single cutaway shape. Heavy rock musicians love Les Pauls. Fender offers an affordable range of Les Paul electric guitars compared to Gibson, but Epiphone by Gibson is a hot item for the beginners.
Some of the first Kents to have been imported into the U.S. were made in Sweden by Hagstrom. (Some sources, or maybe just one source quoted all over the net, states that they may have actually been Czech-made and sold by Hagstrom.) The Hagstrom HI, HII, and HIII (those are the letter H with roman numerals representing the number of pickups the guitar had) were branded Kent for sale in the U.S. and as Futurama for the U.K. They had the Kent name on the headstock and sometimes the upper bout. They were similar to Fender Stratocasters. They also made some Strat-shaped basses. There are several photos on the net showing David Bowie in his Ziggy Stardust days playing a red Hagstrom with Kent branding on the headstock.
We are still in the testing phase with this system, and our representatives are still finding out how to give you the best possible experience. Therefore, it may happen that we do not understand you (please speak clearly in either German or English only), that equipment is being tried out by other customers temporarily, or that there are problems with the connection. Please do not hesitate to give us feedback whenever anything like this happens, so that we may learn from this and improve our service.
While there are many exquisite guitars that can easily take this spot, this one hit the shelves in 2016 and is the A-grade of what Gibson has to offer!  The Gibson Les Paul Standard 2016 T Electric Guitar is a testament to Gibson’s fine craftsmanship, tone, and reputation – that’s why it’s our top pick and is the best all-round electric guitar for serious users who want the prominence and notoriety of owning a Gibson!
This is a great local shop. I bought a new Floyd Rose bridge for one of my electric guitars and brought it to Franklin Guitar to be installed and set up. I got the guitar back within 2 days and it plays so well that I brought them my other guitar for a set up the next day. Again, within 2 days I had it back and it plays exactly like the other one...awesome. I had both guitars set up for a little more than half of what another shop quoted me just to install and set up the new bridge on the one. High quality work at a fair price in a reasonable time...I won't go any where else to have my guitars worked on. They also have a good inventory of guitars and amps for sale to fit any budget.
The Destroyer is an Ibanez brand electric guitar model (originally) manufactured at the FujiGen-Gakki musical instrument factory for the Hoshino-Gakki Company. The Destroyer model was first introduced by Hoshino-Gakki in 1975 and was based on the Gibson Musical Instruments' Explorer design. The Destroyer has since undergone several design and line changes and has been available in both 6-string and bass versions.
i'll be 50 yrs old in a few days. i started playing guitar at 8. this is my 30th guitar. i started ordering various guitars from amazon a year and a half ago and have not been displeased at all with any of my orders. i get some for young people who cannot afford to get one for themselves and so have started exploring the guitars in the price range of 80 to 140 dollars. at first glance, it would seem pretty much impossible for any guitars in this price range to be of any worth, but the factories are set up to put out fine instruments now in this price range. i can't recommend this guitar highly enough to convince you what i think of it but i am astounded at the quality, playability and sound of this guitar. it has really good tuners and rings out like a
Playing Small Gigs? If you play small gigs, such as at pubs, clubs etc, small places with capacity of 200 persons or less, you won't need a massively loud amp. A 15-Watt Valve amp will be more than loud enough, such as the Fender Blues Junior or Vox AC-15. You can use louder valve amps, such as a Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod DeVille, but in most cases you won't need to set the volume more than halfway up (or less!) Valve amps sound louder than solid state amps, so even though a 15-watt valve amp is loud enough fro gigs, a 15-watt solid state amp will be only recommended for home practice. Good solid state amps include the Orange Crush 20 RT and Blackstar ID:30TVP 30W. Both are loud enough for mid-sized venues and sound superb.
Treble is really a form of gain boost that must be considered while gain-staging our signal path. With good tone, a note should ring like a bell, not slaughter like a machete, and that is accomplished by shaving some attack off the waveform and rounding off the frequency response. A bit off rollback on the tone knob takes you into the ballpark, along with your amp settings (I have a dedicated treble-cut on my AC30 that is necessary to tame my telecaster). Once I am in the ballpark, I use the volume knob to fine tune, and personally I tend to let it be from there, relying on a gain-boost pedal to lift my sound when necessary without altering the tone.

Many manufacturers abbreviate the number and size of speakers in the name of their equipment. For example, a Fender bass combo amp with two 10" speakers may be called the "Fender 210". Similarly, a Fender cabinet with two 12" speakers may be called the "Fender 212". Another abbreviation that is used is to add the wattage to the name. Thus a 500 watt Yamaha combo amp with two 12" speakers may be called the "Yamaha 212-500".
There are two distinct kinds of transistors used in fuzz pedals, germanium and silicon. In the early 1960’s silicon transistors were fairly new and very expensive and germanium was the norm. Germanium transistors are susceptible to temperature changes and noise so they can be unreliable at times. They do have a very distinct tone, they also react very well to the guitar’s volume knob by cleaning up very well. As silicon transistors became less expensive they largely replaced their germanium counterparts in pedals due to their stability. The Silicon fuzzes generally produce more gain but often don’t clean up as well.
With this in mind, rather than taking the category chronologically, let’s accept our good fortune in today having all of history’s distortion sounds at our fingertips—so next time out, we’ll look first at those which transform the guitar and amp’s natural tone least, working toward those which balls it up most. In other words, from the least synthetic to the most synthetic-sounding of the genre.

I was at a friends house and he had a couple of his guitar playing buddies over. We got to talking about guitar repair and setups and such. Then one the guys said “the guy I use is the be...st ever...”, and I was all like, “yeah I’m sure the guy you use is great, but the guy I know is better”. This went on, back and forth for a few minutes, when he blurted out, “I use the Cigainero brothers...”. I said “cool, me too” See More
Neither should you confuse acoustic-electric guitars with semi-acoustic hollow or semi-hollow instruments. Acoustic-electrics are acoustic guitars with onboard electronics that allows them to be amplified. They can be played just as well without plugging in. Semi-acoustics are electric guitars with some acoustic properties that are meant to be amplified when played.

Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
Yamaha is the most revered and leading manufacturer of full-line musical instruments. With its wide range of guitars, the company has become a best seller and is easily one of the best guitar brands in India. The C Series are the popular and affordable nylon string guitars by Yamaha suitable for beginners and young learners. The electric guitars of Yamaha available in India are of the Pacifica and RGX series. The Pacifica series offers the most value for money combining affordability with performance.
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
Unfortunately there are a few who are not too happy with with some of the default patches, they caution that the PODHD500X is not a plug-and-play unit. While you can get good tones with a bit of tweaking, you can get even better tones with more experience, so the learning curve can be a bit steep for some. For best results, you ought to research the actual gear that your favorite musicians use, along with their settings and use them as your starting points to creating your own tones. Thankfully, there are user made presets that you can also use as base for your own virtual signal chain.
This affordable signature model for Iron Maiden guitarist Adrian Smith is an exemplary classic metal guitar for the money. It features a Jackson slim D profile neck with immaculately finished frets, while the oiled maple neck a joy to motor around on. Allied to the surprisingly good build quality, this imparts a premium feel to the SDX. Tonally, the body might not quite enjoy the snap and sparkle of Smith's alder-bodied American original, but basswood is a great tonewood anyway, particularly once you're piling on the gain. The bridge humbucker is plenty powerful, with just enough detail to prevent it sliding into the woolly morass suffered by many lower-end units, and the single coils give you more than a sniff of Strat flavour, making the SDX a versatile guitar indeed considering its heavy metal association. The Floyd Rose Special bridge also does a solid job of keeping you in tune, no matter how crazy you get. A versatile guitar capable of covering many bases, and perfect for nailing your favourite Maiden tunes? What more could you need, bar the white high tops and tight strides?
The Vox AC30CH Guitar Amplifier head contains all that gorgeous AC30 tone thanks to the classic 12AX7 tubes in the preamp and EL84 tubes in the power amp,. However, you have the option of hooking upo your own cabinet to mix and match the sound, or complete your set up with Vox V212C Speaker Cabinet or even the limited edition VOX V212C Extension Guitar Speaker Cabinet, White Bronco.
More often than not a customer chooses bone as a replacement for cheap plastic nuts supplied on new guitars. It's such a good material for instruments because it's really dense – meaning vibrations travel through it faster meaning that more vibration is transferred to the rest of your instrument - essential! It's also great because it contains natural lubricants which are essential for tuning stability.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red

Whenever I can do that, it’ll be a good day. Instead, we’re looking for a the correct combination of quality and cost, just like the aforementioned guitars. Ibanez usually gives you a great guitar for what you pay, so here we’ll narrow things down a little more and look at some of the best Ibanez guitars and "honorable mentions" for our greater list.
Delay/echo effects can sound pretty good when plugged directly into an amp’s input (See Example 3, above)—hell, the Edge built a whole career out of doing just that—but if you want absolutely clean, pristine delay and echo effects with no distortion, the effects loop is the only way to go. Reverb effects should always be patched into the effects loop (See Example 4, below) unless you always play through the cleanest of clean sounding amps. Overdriven or distorted reverb just ain’t very pretty, and it can destroy any semblance of clarity or definition and smear your sound like the ketchup on a baby’s face when it’s trying to master the fine art of eating a messy pile of French fries.
Flanging can be a subtle effect, thickening the sound and imparting a spacey feeling. Or it can be extremely dramatic when cranked up, to the point of making the original signal unrecognizable. This broad range makes a flanger a fun stomp box to experiment with. Jimmy Page used a flanger to good effect on Led Zeppelin’s “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” and “Kashmir, ” as did Jimi Hendrix on “Bold as Love.”
The electric guitar ("El Gtr" in engineer shorthand) is one of the easiest instruments to record. Even a modest rig-a good guitar coupled with a decent amplifier-makes the engineer's job a cinch, offering plenty of level, a variety of easily adjustable tones, and-with most modern amps, at least-an assortment of "flavor enhancers" such as tube saturation, overdrive, and compression. In addition, the limited bandwidth of a typical electric-guitar track is ideally suited to the frequency response of affordable dynamic microphones. But that doesn't mean that using the age-old standard of miking guitar amps-a Shure SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth-is the best way to get El Gtr to stand out in a mix.
OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)
“Tone that emulates the human voice is always more accessible,” Waara continues. “Otherwise, purely electronic music would have taken over, and we wouldn’t be making guitars anymore. There are some absolutes in human DNA about wanting to feel connection and that’s probably a fuller frequency tone, that’s tone that is more reminiscent of the human voice. Or, for instance, a violin or organic instruments that have been around for hundreds of years. When we talk about guitars having an organic quality, it’s because that’s rooted in what human beings know. Which is air moving, wood vibrating, people speaking.”

For the uninitiated, effect pedals usually take the form of small-ish metal boxes which sit on the floor in front of you. These can be switched on and off using your feet. Hence, pedals. The technology contained within these pedals is designed to alter your tone in any number of ways. For example, cleaning it up and making it louder through to adding layers of shimmer, fuzz, whammy or ‘verb. Don’t worry, we’ll refer back to these terms later because they are genuine terms in the wacky world of pedals.


1961 is the sweet spot for Fender Strats IMO: the best 3-tone sunburst and tone! My 1961 Strat has been called one of the best sounding vintage Strats by Scott Freilich of Top Shelf Music, who has been working on vintage guitars since 1968. This Strat is the closest thing to that incredible Strat; this is a very rare opportunity for anyone looking for the classic vintage Strat tone without equal!
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]

But it might be the ESP LTD Series that has really vaulted this company into contention as one of the top brands, and certainly one of the best for heavy metal. These are more affordable version of USA-made ESP guitars, along with some innovative designs. The EC-1000 in particular has earned a strong reputation as more wallet-friendly alternative to the Gibson Les Paul.
Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.
A common format of bass amplifier–the "combo" amp–contains the amplifier electronics and one or more speakers in a single wooden cabinet. Combo amps have been used by musicians since the 1920s, as they are convenient for transporting to rehearsals and for performances at small to mid-size venues. Combo amps range from small, low-powered "practice amps" used for individual practice, to mid- and large-size and more powerful combo amps which produce enough volume for rehearsals and small to mid-size venues (e.g., nightclubs). For larger venues, such as stadiums, bassists may use the "bass stack" approach, in which one or more separate speaker cabinets, each with one or more speakers (but not containing an amplifier) and a separate "head" containing the amplifier electronics are used. With a large "bass stack", a bassist can obtain a much higher wattage and onstage volume than a "combo" amp could provide. As with an electric guitar amp, a bass amp is not simply used to make the instrument louder; performers use the preamplifier and equalizer controls and, particularly in amps from the 1980s and 1990s onward, the onboard electronic effects, to create their preferred tone.

top 5...Top 5!...I had recently bought a gaming console after not owning one since the ps2 so not the biggest gamer but getting into it again has been fun when there free time to waste ha overall it's a pretty good game haven't stopped playing it just need to finish it up to continue the side story...What I'm disappointed is with the actual story of the game, which for me was very predictable and disappointing...I don't get how this game gets so many appraisal which for me is a good game for sure...but far, far, far away from one of the best games ever made as many say.

Combos or extension cabs with more than one speaker might present some phasing issues when miked at a distance. Such phasing is usually heard as softness/“hollowness”/lack of low-end punch in the recorded sound – a sort of “comb filter” EQ effect like you get from a phaser or a cocked wah pedal. Some mic placements using, for example, a 2×12 speaker cab will induce time differences between the waves from one speaker hitting the mic relative to those of the other, and possibly create frequency cancellations that are deleterious to guitar tone. Even when both speakers are of the same make and model, they are likely to perform slightly differently (thanks to subtle variables of the manufacturing process) and to present ever-so-slightly different resonant frequencies, efficiencies, basic tonalities, and so forth. For all of these reasons, extra care is required when placing a microphone at a distance from any multi-speaker cab (close-miking one of the other speakers will all but eliminate such issues, but also eliminates access to the great sounds of distant miking).
Echo – There is some crossover between delay pedals and echo pedals, but as a general rule, you can think of echo effects as extended delay effects. It’s a brother of reverb pedals, producing the canyon-like echoing you would naturally hear in a wide-open space. With long enough settings, an echo pedal can even let you harmonize against your own notes as they repeat.
I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.

With its playful old school appeal, many consider the Gretsch G5024E as a fun instrument to practice and perform with. Build quality and aesthetics are often cited in reviews, with many reports of the guitar eliciting positive response from friends and audiences. There are also reports from users who are very happy with both its amplified and acoustic sound.
I have a Hohner DC. It is either a MIC or MIK. It does not have body, or neck bindings, but in every other respect is very nice. It was one of the first guitars I got when I started paly about 5 years ago. As a matter of fact, I had not played it for over a year - I recently got it out of the case, re-strung it and played it regularly for a couple weeks. I have been going over my colection looking for things I could sell off, but I decided to keep this one. 

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
Enough with the American brands, haven’t the rest of the world got something to offer? Well, Japan has come up with a few! Ibanez for example offer amazing guitars, and when they first started out the original idea was actually to offer good copies of American electric guitars! Today they have moved on to doing their own thing, and produce excellent guitars.
Not only is Mick funny, but the book is extremely useful for learning theory, efficiency, technique, playing over chords and more. Similar to Creative Guitar (recommended below), Mick is all about having you put in the work to learn what he's laying out. While you'll spend more time learning this way, it'll pay off and at the same time, teach you a great way of learning.
Speaker simulators are switchable filter sets designed to reproduce the EQ curves of a variety of speaker cabinet configurations (with varying degrees of success). The subsequent coloration is meant to replicate typical speaker sound and behavior, softening the harsh upper-midrange edges associated with amplifier distortion. Speaker simulator boxes are designed with direct  guitar-amp recording in mind, and are intended to remove the speaker cabinet and microphone link from the signal chain.

SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
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