Some guitars incorporate a “blend” of both magnetic and piezo pickups, and others may have one of these options with an internal mic. All nylon string guitars with the option of pickups will always have piezo pickups and/or a built-in mic because there’s no way to sense vibrations from nylon – a non-magnetic material. But, many acoustic electric guitars have steel strings, so what options can you expect with these?
Electric guitars are full of options, with various pickups, bridges, fret sizes, neck radii, tone woods, tuners and so on all having an impact on how an instrument plays and sounds. But stripping things down to the absolute basics, there are three types of electric guitars: solid bodies, hollow bodies and semi-hollow bodies. And they’re ideally suited for different playing approaches.
The solid body guitar is a rock ‘n’ roll machine at its core, but appears in all genres of music and is more popular than hollow body or semi-hollow body guitars due to its wider variety of tones and improved volume and feedback characteristics. Some, like the Les Paul, have arched tops like hollow and semi-hollow models. But the majority are flat-bodied, including Gibson Flying Vs, Explorers and SGs, and classic Epiphones, like the Wilshire.
What our panelists didn’t like about the Spider Classic 15 is the weird operation of its controls. Because Line 6 uses digital processing to model not only the basic sound of different amplifiers but also the way all of their controls work, whenever you switch amp sounds, the operation of the tone controls shifts radically. Thus, when you go to turn the treble down just a smidge, the sound of the amp changes quite a bit, and you have to spend some time experimenting to find the treble setting you want—or even get it back to how it sounded before you touched it. It also automatically adds reverb and perhaps a bit of chorus effect whenever you switch to the Clean sound; to shut off this effect, you actually have to use the effect knobs to turn the effect on, then turn it off again.
The Professionals - just like the Standards before them - are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles - which makes this Strat one of the best electric guitars available. The major difference between these new styles, however, is the new single-coil pickups. The basic premise lies in using different rod magnets for the treble and bass sides of the pickups from a choice of Alnico 2, 3 and 5. All the Strat pickups use 42 gauge Formvar wire and are calibrated for their positions, plus the centre pickup is RWRP so the parallel mixes are hum-cancelling. The new neck shape here isn't hugely different from the ubiquitous modern 'C' of the previous Standards; it's marginally deeper back- to-front with a subtly fuller shoulder. Plugging in, this is a modern, clean-voiced Strat that almost sounds like it's been 'produced' to maximise its Strat-i-ness. Where are you going to take it? We find ourselves driving in a slightly different way, pulling back the tones a little to lose some of that edge for rougher tones, while the treble bleed cap keeps things bright as we knock back the volume and hit the pop/funk button.
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The strings fitted to the guitar also have an influence on tone. Rock musicians often[when?] prefer the lightest gauge of roundwound string, which is easier to bend, while jazz musicians go for heavier, flatwound strings, which have a rich, dark sound. Steel, nickel, and cobalt are common string materials, and each gives a slightly different tone color.
I have a almost identical one in front of me, but mine has 3 pickups. It has the same color white guard and sunburst pattern. The back of the guitar has the redish sunburst pattern on the neck like yours but also has the red on the main body, unlike yours that has a colored neck and solid color back. I can’t find a picture of a 3 pickup that is like this. Any info would be nice to know.
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive
James Valentine of Maroon 5 has a strong idea of what he wants in a guitar and so, along with the craftsmen at Music Man, has created his dream machine. Valentine's desire was for a guitar that blends innovation and a modern vibe, with a reassuringly classic appeal - a bit Gibson semi, a bit Fender Tele perhaps. So, with that in mind, an ash body - in this instance finished in what Valentine calls 'Trans Buttermilk' ('Trans Maroon' is, of course, available, too) - has been mated to a nutty-looking roasted maple neck. This is delightfully figured and comes with Music Man's proprietary wax and oil finish for a tactile but drag-free experience. Build and finish are, as always, dead on. Pickups and controls are interesting: while both pickups are standard humbucking size, the bridge unit is actually single coil, its pole pieces slanted like a Tele or Strat across the chrome cover. Controls are simple, but with a couple of neat twists in the form of push-push pots on both controls - an active boost of up to 20dB on the volume, and a coil-split for the neck humbucker on the tone. We like the 'hidden' nature of these sonic extras, because it adds genuine usability but keeps things uncluttered and intuitive. The Valentine looks familiar but just different enough, feels great sitting or standing, boasts a real player's neck, and its palette of tones - delivered in a fuss-free manner by a clever control and switching setup - is simply superb. Of the hundreds of models that have sought to blend humbucking and single coil tones, this has to be one of the best electric guitars.
Looping – These pedals are miniature recorders that capture a passage, which you can then play back as much as you like. Many looper pedals also allow you to layer multiple recordings, and advanced models support extra features like built-in rhythms, mic and other instrument inputs, MIDI, USB and more. It’s worth noting that all the power of a looper pedal does come with a steep learning curve, so be sure that you’re experienced enough to handle one of these bad boys before you bring home one of your own.
well it does not effect the strings electronically. however. each pickup depending on its position on the guitar is designed to pick up a specific range of tones. the pickup closes to the neck is meant to pick up the bass range whereas the one closest to the bridge is meant to pick up the treble(higher) end of the tonal spectrum. all that aside when you actually move the switch it might have a reverberation throughout your guitar because the switch is just really hard or stiff. it might need to be broken in no worries there.
Two-hand tapping AKA Emmett Chapman technique involves both hands tapping single notes (less often) or chordal (more often) instances. Even if you’re experienced tapper of one or more approaches, two-hand tapping is a whole new world. Keep in mind your pick hand will need time to develop compared to your fret hand, which by default has had a massive head start on fretting notes.

When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.
When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.
The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar's sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.

When we talk about instruments, sometimes the guitar gets all the credit. Of course guitars are great, but an electric guitar on its own—even a hollow-body—is only so loud. For giving one of the world's favorite instruments its voice, guitar amplifiers deserve a little love too. These amps and speakers are the powerhouses of your audio setup, turning your guitar's output from a simple electric current into those familiar sounds.
It’s best to perform pickup adjustments while playing through a clean amp. You can more accurately hear the true tone and volume of each pickup when the signal isn’t being compressed or overdriven by a cranked amp or pedal. Listen to the tone of each pickup position, and try to balance the height of each pickup until the volume remains relatively the same when changing pickup settings.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.

Like most things involved with creative pursuits like making music, there isn’t a steadfast right or wrong way to do things, but if you encountered any of the problems above you’re definitely doing things wrong (unless you play in a German nihilist industrial noise band, in which case, go nuts). This article will help you avoid those scenarios by describing some of the basic rules and suggestions for placing different effects in the ideal order in your rig’s signal chain and how to achieve the best possible tones when using several stomp boxes together. If you’ve ever wondered how to put together your own pedal board, this info will give you a good start toward obtaining the best sound and most versatility out of your rig.


Many users describe it by phrases like "great value for the money", "great beginner guitar", and "great quality for the price". And while most of the raves are from beginners, there were experienced guitarists who shared their positive sentiments, specifically pointing to its build quality and playability. And while many cheap guitars are plagued with mass production setup inconsistencies, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II gets a lot of kudos from users who found that it plays nicely right out of the box.
Relatively new to the amplifier world, Paul Reed Smith is building some of the most interest amps out there. After tapping legendary amp builder Doug Sewell to head design, the company has produced a range of boutique-quality amps for a fraction of the price. The Sonzera 20 is a reliable amp that is incredibly versatile, with a full tube sound similar to American amps from the ’60s.
Other high-quality specifications include a bone nut, a molded metal jack plate that is curved and makes plugging and unplugging a guitar cable hassle-free, retooled knobs, fretwire that is slightly smaller than what you’d find on most PRS electric guitars, and PRS’s double action truss rod (accessible from the front of the headstock for ease of use).
Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!
That day, I learned about the array of amazing things you could do with effects pedals. Sure, guitar is about your hands, but you also have to play with your feet. You have to know when a song needs more distortion, and when a song needs a jangly chorus with reverb. Without effects pedals, you’re painting with only primary colors, you’re singing in only a major key, movie-acting with one emotion. Guitar pedals open up a world for you in music. Of course wonderful music has been made in the time before such magical machines existed, and great music will continue to be made without them as well. They’re just tools after all. But what glorious tools they can be.
Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names[5] and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul. Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible. Gibson was at the forefront of innovation in acoustic guitars, especially in the big band era of the 1930s; the Gibson Super 400 was widely imitated. In 1952, Gibson introduced its first solid-body electric guitar, the Les Paul, which became its most popular guitar to date— designed by Ted McCarty and Les Paul.
Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Dean - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Metallic Cherry, Metallic Black, Transparent Red
To find which Ernie Ball strings are right for you, the key is experimentation. Figure out which strings sound best to your ear, feel best on your fingers, and most importantly enable you to create the music you want. When you are ready to buy, head over to one of the 5,500 music stores that carry Ernie Ball products. You can discover these stores by visiting our Store Locator.

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ theatrically coiffed guitarist has several grueling jobs, among them holding down the trio’s entire melodic structure and holding his own against one of the most dynamic frontwomen of our time. His signature see-saw call-and-response lines leave plenty of room for tension and release, war cries, and tears, and the kind of grand, clanging chords that’ll turpentine your ears clean.


"Guitarists frequently ask me to recommend a gig-worthy combo that sells for less than a thousand bucks," wrote Guitar World's Chris Gill in the May 2017 issue. "The question is never quite that simple though, as players often stipulate that they need great clean tones with plenty of headroom and that work well with pedals, a solid overdrive/distortion channel that really projects on stage, and really good reverb would be nice, too. While there are a few amps on the market that meet those requirements, the new PRS Sonzera series has jumped to the top of my list of recommendations."


As technology for manipulating VSTs improves - such as piano roll editors replacing step sequencers and more advanced GUI's allowing faster access to more expressive voicing collections -- and as increased processing power eventually paves the way for simulated rather than sampled guitar sounds -- guitar VSTs will inevitably play an ever increasing role in music production and musical enjoyment. They will never be guitars, never offer the original expressive inspiration of a guitar strapped over the shoulder, powering a wall of sound or launching delicately nuanced resonances through waves of wood-fired warmth in the serene, silent air of a snow-covered mountain cabin, but it's a safe bet guitar VSTs will become just as much a force in music as pitch correction and lip syncing have become major players in the large-venue live performance business -- and in amateur musicians' collections of creative panacea for the stress and toil of daily life.
Most Humbuckers are wired in anti-phase, where the opposing polarity of the localised magnetic fields cancel each others out at selective points, creating a lower bandwidth region in the high frequency domain. Less bandwidth = lower noise. If done correctly, with carefully designed pickups, it will not affect the tone, but traditionally it did, because Hillbilly wannabe technicians made the things on their knees.
If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.
This open-C tuning gives the initial harmonic series when a C-string is struck.[4] The C-C-G-C-E-G tuning uses the harmonic sequence (overtones) of the note C. When an open-note C-string is struck, its harmonic sequence begins with the notes (C,C,G,C,E,G,B♭,C).[3][4] This overtone-series tuning was modified by Mick Ralphs, who used a high C rather than the high G for "Can't Get Enough" on Bad Company. Ralphs said, "It needs the open C to have that ring," and "it never really sounds right in standard tuning".[5]

Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.


I was a guitarist for almost 18 years now I am a session musician. For me choosing the best string gauge is one of the most important things a guitarist should know. During those early years our band tends to play on Heavy metal music and if you are using those lighter string gauge its ineffective for those kind of genres. So at that point I have been using .011 or .013 string gauges to gain fat tones and huge sustain. But however as years goes by we tend to play lighter music so I am using .09 and .010 string gauges. For me using those heavier strings for a long time will cause damage in your wrist, after acquiring a carpal tunnel syndrome I have used lighter strings in my guitar.
The Fender Bassbreaker 15 Amplifier Head presents a budget friendly option for those in need of great tone. You have 15 watts of pure power to channel here as well as a studio friendly Power Amp Mute so you can record straight into a desk - a great feature for those in need of a powerful stage and studio amplifier. This is a professional grade amplifier head that features 3 very unique tonal options and overdrive levels to provide you with a whole host of lush fender tones that range from glass like cleans to vintage overdrive. Perfectly paired with the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab.
As of 2012 Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees. The company maintains two factories: One in El Cajon, California and the other, 40 miles away in Tecate, Mexico where the entry-level guitars of the Taylor line (the Baby, Big Baby, GS mini, and 100-200 series) are made along with the Taylor guitar cases. In early 2011, the company opened a distribution warehouse in the Netherlands. Also that same year, the company, along with Madinter Trade, S.L., partnered to purchase the Crelicam ebony mill in Cameroon. [6]
Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
Blue Book Publications: Blue Book Publications publishes a number of print guides for musical instruments, and it also maintains a subscription-based website. The website is divided into electric guitars, acoustic guitars, and guitar amplifiers in addition to other instruments. Unlike Used Price, you will have to register for a paid membership with this site to get the information you need to self-appraise your guitar. You can access the prices online or purchase print editions to be mailed to you.
A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
Fuzz pedals take distortion, and further distort the tone resulting in a sound that can really only be described as fuzz. This effect was originally achieved by accident, often due to broken speakers or electrical components in a guitar amp. Many contemporary blues-rock guitarists continue to use this effect due to its in-your-face tone. A fuzz effect can also be heard in Jimi Hendrix’s rendition of the “Star Spangled Banner.”
I'm only 3 months into this journey to become a musician, so a beginner, but absolutely love everything about this guitar. I messed around in the early 90's on old electric while in college, but never learned chords or any songs. When my wife acquired her old Sears-quality kids guitar from her Mom, I put new strings for something to mess around with on the weekends. Several weeks later, I got a cheap First Act electric for $25. Several weeks later a nice Takamine acoustic as the ears "learned" the notes and chords better. While switching from this quality acoustic guitar to the First Act, it was clearly apparent the First Act was a piece of junk. Notes and chords were just not clear and just not enjoyable to play. Well, this Epiphone is an awesome step forward combined with the Marshall amp. While I want to progress to blues scales in time, I've purposely focused on the major and minor chords and seamless transition between them. This guitar expresses the notes of chords so clearly. What I love most is the ability to slightly modify major chords like from Dmaj to Dsus4 and have it translate so clear as an example. Prior I never used the effects on my Marshall because it just sounded like a mess, but this guitar solves that issue. After a whole weekend of use, it felt like a big leap forward just because of quality. The fretboard layout helped refine the chords I've learned so far, so all strings were clear. Really helped practicing bending, hammer-ons and pull offs too. At any rate, for the money, it's hard to beat. I suspect that if this journey continues a more expensive guitar may be warranted in a few years, but as others have said, this will always be a quality practice instrument. Especially considering we spend every other weekend at our beach bungalow and it is nice not having to transport every time.
This category of effects pedals does what the name implies.  It tweaks the volume of your guitar signal in some fashion.  These typically come in this spot in the pedal chain (after everything but the time-based effects) so that any change to your volume is already receiving the effects of all the pedals before it.  You’ll be altering your entire signal minus delays and reverbs.
For this particular setup, I used a Fender Stratocaster. George used those quite frequently. They used a Tweed Champ. Now, these were being used quite a bit around that time. Eric Clapton was using them on Layla, and word is that when Clapton was playing on All Things Must Pass, he had his Champ there, and I know for a fact that George had a collection of tweed amps.
I have a Montclair guitar, it sounds like I have an original but I have some questions. I purcahsed this quitar about 40 years ago. It is a dark brown archtop, with two cutaways and a pick guard like in the picture. On the top of neck the only says Montclair, strait across, and on the back it says "steel reinforced neck". On the inside the only number is L 6089.
This POD 2.0 comes with the unit, power cord, and the live stage footswitch! CAT cable to interface between the POD and FBV foot switch included. Everything is in very good condition! Pictures are part of the description, if you have any questions feel free to message me for more details! From Line 6 web page The industry standard for direct recording in the studio, POD ® 2.0 delivers the tones heard on hit records everywhere. For practice, it's the ultimate way to get inspiring, stage-perfected tones with headphones. In the studio, you can become more productive and creative. You can instantly get the sounds you need! Absolutely No International Shipping Whatsoever, only buy if you live in the mainland USA, No shipping overseas.
We're proud to say that our best assets at Guitar Center Forth Worth are our people. When you come in for a visit, you'll find that our staff aren't just friendly folk - they're also experienced musicians. We know our way around all our new and used instruments and accessories, which is why we've earned the trust of Texan guitar slingers from the famous to the casual. If you're into percussion, you'll also love our impressive vintage drum collection here at Cowtown. Drop by for a face-to-face chat about all we can do for you, or feel free to give us a call at 817-423-3800.
Martin is a famous America-based company known for is a variety of impressive electric and acoustic guitars. Their guitars are predominantly manufactured in Pennsylvania and Nazareth. The history of Martin guitars dates back to 1833. From then on, Martin has managed to maintain classiness and quality in their guitars to satiate the thirst of pro players in America.
Fender is the world’s leading guitar and amplifier manufacturing company, serving the industry since 1946. It is one of the best guitar brands in India for electric guitars. The Solid-body, Spanish-styled electric Telecaster guitar and Stratocaster are some of the most popular electric guitars today. Fender has made a mark in the Indian guitar industry with its high quality products. The price varies from mid budget to high budget. It markets under the brand names of Fender, Squier, Charvel, Gretsch, Jackson and EVH also.
The late 60s and 70s produced even more bizarre and berserk creations. The birth of Mayfield and Mullen’s VOX King Wah pedal sealed its place in guitar history during overbearingly long, Clapton-esque guitar solos. The 1978 Pro Co RAT, whose design was a re-imagining of the Arbiter Fuzz Face, arose partly from error: A botched resistor band created a harsher, clipped audio waveform. Its use has supported nearly all “alternative” rock genres in the last 30 years: 80s punk, American indie rock, Grunge (the RAT played a crucial part in Cobain’s quiet-loud-quiet-loud composition), not to mention Britpop and grindcore.
Last Update Sept 22nd, 2018 Electric guitars are those that have an amplification feature. You can connect your guitar to a power source and amplify the sound produced onto a loud speaker. They are normally a perfect choice for stage performances and bands. Below are brief reviews of 10 best electric guitars in India, which are among the best in Indian market. These best electric guitars were curated by our experts according to their popularity, reviews and ratings by people across India.

While the HSS Bullet Stratocaster isn’t available in a left-handed model, the similar, somewhat more costly Affinity Series Stratocaster is available in a left-handed version. This guitar differs from our top pick in that it uses slightly higher quality of parts and has a higher quality finish (based on our experience with the Affinity Series Jazzmaster); it has a single-coil pickup instead of a humbucker in the bridge position (which will be noisier and also brighter-sounding); and it has a vibrato bar.


Third, the amp should be easy to use: If the controls are hard to figure out, they’ll likely frustrate those who’d rather spend their time playing than trying to figure out how their amp works. Also, every guitarist will at some point have to use someone else’s amp, so starting with an amp that has a fairly common control set will help you learn to dial in your sound when using an unfamiliar amp.
The 5-position switch controls which pickups are activated. On a standard Strat, the position closest to the neck activates only the neck position pickup. The position next to that activates both the middle pickup and the neck pickup. The middle position activates only the middle pickup. The next position activates both the middle pickup and the bridge position pickup. The last position activates only the bridge position pickup.
If you feel you’re ready for a new and better axe or are keen on starting your musical journey with an awesome electric guitar, check out the models we’ve reviewed below. All of these electric guitars have become fast favorites since they were released to the music-loving public. We’re sure you’ll find one or two that would meet all of your requirements and fit your budget.
Compression: A "limiter" is envisioned as a circuit which prevents the output signal from exceeding a certain limit. If it did this by clipping, it would cause distortion, but if it can do it cleanly by just progressively reducing the amplification of the incoming signal, then it may properly be called a compressor. A compressor reduces the overall dynamic range by "compressing" the gain of high amplitude signals while maintaining the design gain for lower amplitude signals.
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.

The Fender Deluxe Players Stratocaster Electric Guitar gives you classic Strat sound and feel in a beautiful package. This luxurious model is upgraded with American-made Vintage Noiseless pickups, medium-jumbo frets, and a 12" neck radius. As a result, it sounds fantastic and plays easy. It also is equipped with a push-button pickup switch (in addition to the usual toggle) that gives you 7 pickup combinations. Other deluxe features include a vintage-style synchronized tremolo, vintage-style tuners and gold-plated hardware throughout.
In addition to the alignment problem, there are other problems with using a simple text editor. For example, you'll have to align all the notes of a chord yourself... it's not easy to insert a new passage... if you make a mistake you can't just move the note... and to your system, it's just another text file. If you want to programmatic help to simplify your work, or if you want extra power (such as song playback, chord charts, and scale generation): use a TAB program.
Two full steps down from normal tuning. Used by bands such as Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss, Sleep, Spiritual Beggars, In Flames (until Clayman), The Black Dahlia Murder, Asking Alexandria on Reckless and Relentless, Bring Me The Horizon, Architects, First Signs of Frost, Dismember, Dethklok, Immolation, High on Fire, Cold, Dream Theater, Arch Enemy (since the Angela Gossow era), Entombed, Amaranthe, Nails, Cataract, and The Smashing Pumpkins.
Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.
Alder used to be very popular in the 1950s and 1960s, and many Fender guitars from that era are made from Alder. Today it is a bit more expensive of a wood, relatively, and isn’t as common. It is lightweight, has beautiful grain patterns, and gives a warm sound with plenty of highs. An instrument made from Alder is likely to have less midrange and bass than instruments made from other types of wood.
Fender made some pretty big waves when they announced their latest line of Mustang amplifiers – primarily because of their sound-shaping abilities. You see, the brand’s modeling amp line has 17 preprogrammed amp models to choose from, as well as an auxiliary input so you can play along to your favorite tunes, and a wealth of included effects. The real highlights of this particular amp, however, can be found outside of the amp itself. You see, it includes a smartphone app that will let you shape the sound of the amp easily and remotely. Better still, the amp comes with its own recording software, so you can capture your songs at your leisure. For something so inexpensive, this amp packs a serious wallop.

I once did a setup on one that belonged to a friend but it was really wrecked so it wasn't perhaps a fair representation. It seemed to be well built though and the neck was nice enough. The tone was decent too although not exciting - exactly what you'd expect from such a guitar. Overall I'd say it was better than the cheaper squiers (SEs, Affinities etc).
The Martin F Series bit the dust in mid-’65, to be supplanted by the somewhat updated, nattier GT Series of bound archtop hollowbody electrics. The first few prototypes were dubbed the XTE Series and produced in 1965. The guitars were renamed the GT Series and swung into production in the beginning of 1966. The GT Series consisted basically of two models, the GT-70 and GT-75. These were thinlines with two f-holes, a 15th fret neck joint (actually more frets were clear of the body), bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays, and new, bound, wide-flared three-and-three headstocks with a concave curve in the pointed crown.
Examples of these first Supros can be seen in two catalogs from 1936, by Canadian distributor Peate and the Bronson Music & Sales Corporation, the latter probably originating slightly later than the Peate book. Both show laps identical to the Supro frying pan. Peate offered the Spanish guitar and mandolin. In the Bronson catalog, the Supro frying pan is known as the Bronson Singing Electric “For The Artist.” Bronson also sold electric Spanish and tenor guitars and an electric mandolin, other early Supro electrics.

Ibanez started off as a Japanese music company particularly focused towards producing copies of favorite guitars in America. Today, they have surpassed most firms by offering best quality products on their own. Being specifically directed towards the hard rock and metal players, Ibanez ensures to have something for players belonging to every genre.
Some guitarists design or modify their own pedals. Others use a combination of off-the-shelf effects. Kurt Cobain stomped on Electro-Harmonix Big Muff and ProCo Rat pedals to create his classic loud-soft-loud, "Nevermind"-era sounds. John Mayer kicked off his 2003 hit, "Bigger Than My Body," with see-sawing, arpeggiated sounds from his Roger Linn AdrenaLinn III pedal. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of different stomp boxes. Although there's a certain amount of gray area and overlap, pedal effects can all be divided into four general categories:
Next, squirt your cable and rub it using a clean cloth. To cleanse the amplifier and guitar inputs, compress an area of the clean magazine around a Q-tip. Next, apply a bit of contact cleaner to the cloth, and push it in and out of the inputs to all your guitar gear such as effects pedals, amps, guitar. A point to take note here is that you should use a fresh new section of the cloth for each jack input.
The electric guitar setup routine is as important to your sound as any component on your instrument. In addition, if you learn how to setup your guitar correctly you can save some money by not running down to the local guitar shop, and paying them to do it. I want to preface that I am not an expert on the building of guitars. I did not go to the "Fender/Gibson school of Luthier excellence". I am however someone that's built a dozen electric guitars, and have setup everyone of them. Additionally I've setup probably fifty more guitars, including acoustics, for friends, and friends of friends, who found out I've got some practical experience in the matter.
There isn't a shredder on the planet who doesn't remember their first electric guitar. In fact, it's for that exact reason why your first electric guitar should built with meticulous attention to every detail. In this section, you'll find an impressive range of beginner electric guitars that were designed with your ambitions in mind, so you can enjoy sharpening your skills on that same special instrument for many years to come. Everyone who has a passion for playing music deserves to hone their craft on an electric guitar that is a perfect balance of playability, beauty and tone. But that sentiment especially applies to beginners, so they can build the confidence necessary to continue on with the instrument. Thankfully, all of the most well-known guitar brands specialize in their own beginner electric guitar models. From Ibanez and Epiphone to ESP and Dean, these companies take great pride in nurturing the skills of future pluckers, strummers and shredders. Squier is no stranger to the world of beginner guitars, and their Vintage Modified Jaguar HH electric guitar is everything a budding up-and-comer could ask for. Featuring a 24'' scale fast action neck, and a set of Duncan Designed pickups for a multitude of humbucking tones, the Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar is an updated sunburst classic that looks and plays like a dream. Another big-seller is the Epiphone Les Paul 100 electric guitar. Consisting of open-coil humbuckers and a genuine Les Paul sound, this axe contains superb electronics and a solid tone, while the tune-o-matic bridge ensures you that this beauty will stay tune through an abundance of practicing. It's incredible to think that at one moment in time, Jimmy Page had difficulty forming an open chord, or that Eddie Van Halen had trouble with hammer-ons. But even the greatest guitar players had to start somewhere, just like you. Every guitar player improves with time, and when you have a beginner electric guitar that's constructed by professionals, the learning stages feel will less like a duty, and more like the start of an exciting adventure.

But is the Fender Deluxe really as good as the name suggests? We certainly think it is! Even though it would be easy to just write it off as an electric guitar for country music, it’s actually really versatile and can be used for any other genre as far as we’re concerned. This is thanks to two vintage noiseless pickup configurations, one on the neck and one on the bridge, and a strat pickup in the middle.

I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.

I bought this guitar about 1 month ago. I am a small girl 5'2". I just strap this thing on and walk around the house playing. The pickup sounds freaking great hooked up to my Marshall amp. I have several other guitars including a Taylor 210ce which I also love. But this guitar is great for traveling, camp fires, and just plain old jammin. I chose this over the baby Taylor because the Martin had a full heel on the neck where's the taylor baby did not. It also sounded better when I play both the Taylor and the lx1e side by side. I thought that the Martin had a better "feel" to is as well when holding it. It is a travel guitar so it doesn't balance as well when you are standing with the guitar strap but I don't mind that at all. I love this little guy
when FINALLY picking up he was running down the stairs leaving early, i barely caught him so didn't get a chance to play it before taking it home, or would have had a chance to address this disappointment. there were dead frets all over the high strings. he clearly didn't perform the service that i paid for. a year later that vintage les paul is still in the same unplayable condition and needs a full service by a real luthier.  
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]

Before being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone was one of the most popular guitar brands in the market. It competed with highly renowned guitar brands, including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being a more affordable brand of Gibson guitars. They’re great for playing tunes from the 60s. Epiphone produce cost-effective versions or alternatives of Gibson Guitars. Many musicians claim that Epiphones were their first ever instrument. Epiphones tend to be very popular in the entry level market. Epiphones are great for people who are just starting and want a good brand name for their first guitar. So, if you’re looking for a cost effective entry level guitar, Epiphone would be your best choice.
The reason: The dynamic range of music can exceed 60db (power ratio 1:1,000,000). Transients within the music can exceed 20db (power ratio 1:100). Therefore amps under 60Watts and ‘Single Ended Class A’ will not be discussed in this text. Valve amplifiers are used for applications such as guitar amplifiers, satellite transponders such as DirecTV and GPS systems, audiophile stereo amplifiers, military applications (such as target acquisition and radar) and very high power radio and UHF television transmitters
These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.

As a new learner, the biggest reason for you wanting to begin with a full-sized guitar as opposed to a slender Stratocaster or a stylish Les Paul, has to do with your love for classic heavy rock tones. In this day and age, when you have scores of guitars with dizzying combinations of single-coil and humbucker pickups, along with complex toggle options, the Davison Full Size Black Electric Guitar keeps it really straight and simple. This is one of the few electric guitars that I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing straight out of the box, with hardly any setting required. And lest I skip the most important purchasing criteria here, you are not just buying a 39” electric guitar but a full-fledged Davison Guitar Beginner Starter Package. So you have a lot more going for that hundred bucks you spend, with a cool gig bag, strap, guitar picks as well as a compact amplifier and cable.
Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.
Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .

Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black


CF Martin & Co: When CF Martin & Co first started business, America only had 24 states in its union and Andrew Jackson had begun his second term as president. CF Martin & Co has seen two world wars, and huge economic peaks and troughs. The history of this guitar company is unlike any other, it’s the world’s oldest surviving guitar company in the world and the reason for so is they indeed make excellent guitars. When you own a Martin guitar you don’t just own a guitar, you own a small part of history.
Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.

You wont be sorry with this harness, full size volume pot , push pull tone pot/switch both with good throw torque, great solder connects and a quality, all hardware was intact , just remove replace, I did have to carefully bend the lugs on the input switch to get it to seat properly in my Epiphone but other than that minor obstacle all went well, no hum or noise and the toggle feels solid, man Epiphone put some straight up junk electronics in my guitar so this was a great upgrade, thanks Kmise you got a new customer..will order another for my Jackson Kelly..


The key to capturing any kind of ambient tracks is a good reverberant space, although a narrow or dead room can also work, as long as there is sufficient distance between the guitarist and the amp. I usually put the air mic at least ten feet from the amp, positioned off-axis, or in an omnidirectional pattern to pick up as much reflected sound as possible. Placing a baffle between the guitarist and the amp will increase the apparent room size, as will making the amp sound pass through a doorway or turn a corner into another room.

20 pages, black and white with color front cover. In the middle of 1981, Rosetti took over distribution of the Gibson line in the UK. Rosetti were a very big name in Britain, having distributed Epiphone since at least 1963, as well as Hagstrom and others. This catalogue was produced at the tail end of 1981, and introduces a number of models to the UK, such as the MV-II, MV-X guitars and the Victory basses, the GGC-700 and the Flying V bass. Some of these models were so short-lived that they were actually never included in US brochures. The cover image (reproduced in part here) showed some of the earliest demonstration models, including a Victory with a highly unusual white scratchplate.
The 1934-’35 Dobro Hawaiian had the relief sections around a round central bridge/pickup “cover” with a Dobro “lyre” logo between the pickup and the neck. The more-or-less rounded lower bout (cutout at the butt) culminated in two little pointed shoulders, which then tape into the neck, giving it an almost “Spanish” look if you squint and ignore the cast designs. The tapered head had two cutouts in the middle and a triple-stepped top extended on the bass side. The principal difference between this earliest Dobro and the one shown in Gruhn/Carter is the tailpiece, which was a curved, cast-in affair, unlike the rectangular tail on the later version. Also, the side relief panels are painted black, with the whole thing clear-coated to seal it. On this first Dobro electric lap there is no volume control. The jack is on the but, in the bottom cutout, next to the strap button.
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