I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.
Paul Reed Smith Guitars (better known as PRS) is a Maryland-based manufacturer, and relatively new in the world of guitars – founded in 1980, when they began making a series of hand-built guitars. Today they have a wide range of models, which are built in both Asia and America, as well as a full roster of artists playing their guitars; including Mike Oldfield, Dave Navarro, Carlos Santana, and Mark Tremonti.
Gibson is easily one of the most identifiable guitar brands in the world today, and even with the premium price tags of their instruments, many continue to look up to them as their dream instruments. Thankfully, the company has toned down the price a bit on some of their guitars, one of which is the J-15, which enters this list with its good balance of workhorse ready features, premium prestige and reasonable price tag.
The first “real” guitar I ever bought for myself as a teenager was an Ibanez RG much like this one, and I played that guitar for almost 10 years before buying yet another Ibanez RG. Note that this model does not have a tremolo, which means great tuning stability and fewer headaches when it comes to changing strings, tuning, and setup. However, you won’t be able to perform any crazy whammy tricks, so be sure you’re okay with that. Mahogany body, two hot humbuckers, jumbo frets, and an ultra-stable 3-piece maple neck. Hard to beat at this price point. Love it.
STORCH is a virtual instrument, designed with the participation of ambitious music producers and beat-makers. This dynamic software is influenced by the legendary brand sounds of Scott Storch and includes 300 presets, divided into 18 categories of instruments. Categories include: Stringed, Drums, Dirty Pianos, Reversed EPs, 808, Arps and more. Moreover, users can create their own original sound...
If you’ve read our full reviewof the 50s Stratocaster, you’ll know that this Classic Vibe Stratocaster is an excellent prospect for any beginner who loves the good old days of rock n’ roll! Made by Squier, this 50s-inspired electric has huge vintage appeal, with a modern feel thanks to a trio of Alnico III single-coil pickups and a smooth, modern C-shaped maple neck (with 21 medium jumbo frets).
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.

1953 "magic" spruce? Luthier Dana Bourgeois did an interview with C. F. Martin III in 1984. The interview was in preparation for an article by Eric Schoenberg and Bob Green on the history of the OM model and was published in the March 1985 issue of Guitar Player. Bourgeois was asked to sit in on the interview, and in the last two paragraphs of his recollections especially interesting: "One footnote that I do remember distinctly is that Mr. Martin said that in '52 or '53 the Martin Co. bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce in the form of government surplus of building material. Though he preferred Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-40s because all of the large stands had been decimated. Mr. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Red Adirondack Spruce than Sitka was. He could not, however, find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka." This nugget of information caught my attention because for many years I Of course, aside from the color of the tops, the anecdote does not in itself prove anything. But it at least suggests how the story might have gotten started.
This is probably the most iconic guitar effect ever – from Slash to Jimi Hendrix to Mark Tremonti to SRV, the list of players who use wah pedals is almost never ending. Originally created to emulate the muted sound possible on a trumpet, it quickly became an iconic effect in its own right. The sound is pretty self-explanatory – rock your foot back and forth of the pedal to shift the EQ from bass heavy to treble heavy and you’ll get a nice “wah wah” as you play.
The most basic, original pickup design is a single-coil pickup. It’s composed of a single magnet with fine wire wrapped around it, creating a magnetic field that captures the strings’ vibrations converting them into an electronic signal. Single-coil pickups tend to be bright and crisp sounding. The tone they produce cuts through dense band sounds well, but they are also prone to generating hum and are subject to magnetic interference. Many great artists play guitars equipped with single-coil pickups. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Mayer, Merle Travis and many others are famous for their use of single-coil tone.
These special qualities have been used for centuries to create and build various instruments with differing levels of success. Some tone woods do it better than others so, are often more vigorously sought out and because of their growing rarity (due, primarily, to over harvesting) also vary in expense, the rarest most hard to find being the most expensive, of course.
Tube enthusiasts believe that tube amps produce a "warmer" sound and a more natural "overdrive" sound. Typically, tube amps use one or more dual triodes in the preamplifier section to provide sufficient voltage gain to offset tone control losses and drive the power amplifier section. While tube technology is, in many ways, outdated, tube amps remain popular since many guitarists prefer their sound.[15]
Audiffex Guitar Pedals was one of the first professional guitar software packages, with its original version released more than a decade ago. It has since been upgraded but continues its legacy of providing stompbox effects in software form. The latest version is an all in one guitar effects software package - which includes 36 plug-ins that also works for bass, vocals and other instruments. Features include consistent interface with all effects having similar controls, modular plug-in configuration for easier and flexible routing and intuitive preset management. Current retail price: $49

Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!


Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.


In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
Silvertone was the “musical” brand for the Sears, Roebuck & Company, beginning nearly a century ago. The big boom was ukuleles in the ’teens and twenties. The first Silvertone product was a hand-cranked phonograph introduced in 1915. Silvertone radios were introduced in the early 1920s. Silvertone guitars appeared in the 1930s, with electric 6-strings appearing in the early ’40s
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Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
Williamson injected new life into the group, bringing an ideal balance of discipline and frenzy, best heard on the group’s 1973 disc Raw Power, the album that launched thousands of punk and post punk bands. “I’m his biggest fan,” the legendary Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr once said of Williamson. “He has the technical ability of Jimmy Page without being as studious and the swagger of Keith Richards without being sloppy. He’s both demonic and intellectual, almost how you would imagine Darth Vader to sound if he was in a band.”
As far as reliability goes, a guitar is actually quite simple to make reliable. Build, sound quality and playability are much more important than reliability per se, simply because if the guitar is at least half-decently made it usually turns out to be quite dependable. The biggest reliability issue would be a guitar that cannot stay in tune very long. This is something that often happens in regards to the build and material quality of acoustic guitars, but with electrics it’s something that can usually be corrected by swapping out the tuning machines to locking ones, or at least better-performing ones as well as setting the intonation and neck relief correctly.
Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
Another strong point of this guitar is its African mahogany neck that has a close to standard scale length of 25.3", making this instrument very easy to transition to when coming from regular sized guitars. Also noteworthy is its innovative split bone saddle, which allows for better intonation. Finally, the CT4B preamp gives you 3-band EQ, a volume control and a nifty built-in tuner Artists that play Takamine guitars include John Scofield, Bruce Springsteen and Bruno Mars! This is a great buy if you are looking for a premium couch & travel friendly acoustic guitar that does not cost an arm and a leg.
The search never stops for the best acoustic guitar to play during jamming sessions, recording sessions and live gigs. Every year, guitar brands keep on coming up with awesome acoustic guitars to take your playing to the next level. So what’s the latest? We have scoured through various models released in recent years all the way through 2018 and picked out 7 of the very best, chosen for their impressive build, unique tonal character, incredible value and overall winning quality. If you’re looking for the best acoustic guitar for your needs, consider this your short list.
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Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
The semi-hollow guitar is based on having a “tone block” that runs down the center of the body of the instrument.  This reduces feedback issues while still maintaining the woody tone of the true hollow body instruments that are widely used in Jazz.  This allowed the pickups to be mounted to a solid block, while the outer portions of the instrument are hollow, which are often adorned with “f-holes” much like instruments of the Violin family.  This type of build provides the resonance and tone of fully hollow instruments, while providing a resistance to feedback that allows the guitar and amplifiers to be used at a higher volume.

Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.


Brand new in ’64 was Teisco’s first double-cutaway, the Model EP-9, a small-bodied thinline hollowbody archtop. The EP-9 had a pair of pickups, mainly the oval kind with center poles. This had the old center-humped three-and-three head (no open-book dip), and the rectangular edge inlays. Controls were placed on the lower treble bout on a triangular plastic plate, with one volume and one tone, and two on/off rocker switches.

Rolling Stones best electric guitarist list should've been nicknamed the best average guitarist list. I didn't give this guy the time of day because I thought the bucket thing was to cover up how badly he sucks. Turns out it's the opposite. He's just weird. It's too bad the average person doesn't have the capacity to enjoy this type of advanced music.


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Perhaps the most popular choice though is a paper in oil capacitor. I have tried so many brands and options, and truth be told, it's very hard to notice a substantial difference and you can, unnecessarily spend a lot of money on premium ones. I received so many requests for a PIO equipped harness, so in an effort to try and whittle my findings down to a good value, tight tolerance and good sounding paper in oil capacitor, I've settled with one made by WD Music USA which are superb. Compared to other PIO caps on the market, they're a reasonable price and importantly are tight tolerance meaning the key details about how it will react with a tone pot, is accurately presented. Again, no real right or wrong here, if your budget allows you to go crazy on capacitor choices, no one can tell you not too. But truthfully, just pay attention to the tolerances, as that will tell you the most about how it will 'sound'. 
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Any guitar luthier will tell you that the choice of wood is the single MOST IMPORTANT factor that will determine the sound of your guitar. My junk guitar had a body that was made of cheap reconstituted wood shavings instead of actual solid wood. Junk material like that means your sound will also be junk. Any note I played didn’t sustain for more than a single second and it didn’t have that boomy lush sound you normally get from acoustics.
These are the settings I use as my basic rack for adding rock guitar sounds in Cubase, and you might also find it handy as a point of departure, so it's worth saving as a track preset. To do this, right‑click in the audio track containing the 'rack', and choose 'Create Track Preset' from the context menu. When the Save Track Preset dialogue box appears, simply name it and save it: now you can call up your rack for any audio track in any Cubase project!
Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.

If the fuzz is the grandaddy, the Arbiter/England Fuzz Face (introduced 1966) is the grand-poobah of the grandaddies’ social club. A handful of other fuzzes came first, but this distinctive round, smiling box is the one most guitarists point to when identifying the fuzz tone of the gods. Why? Two words: Jimi Hendrix. Apparently he died and took it up there with him. Oh, and two other words: germanium transistors. When these fuzz fans point to the Fuzz Face, however, they don’t point to just any Fuzz Face. They point to a good one. The quality of these pedals varies wildly, mainly because the tolerances of germanium transistors themselves varies wildly and sorting out the good ones was more work than the makers could afford to put in (or, perhaps, knew was necessary). Contemporary makers from Fulltone to Z.Vex to Mayer take the time and trouble to laboriously sort their germanium transistors, and it pays in spades in terms of tone and consistency.
An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
Let's face it: Big, high-powered guitar amplifiers full of sizzling tubes capable of frying an omelet are fun, and the sound of an electric guitar playing through one has been pervasive in popular music since the 1960's. They're sometimes very loud as well, and sustaining the volume levels required whilst attaining those majestic, exotic or extreme guitar tones for any appreciable length of playing time in one's house or apartment without interruption from family, neighbors or the police is generally impossible. Don't fret over it. We'll discuss a variety of solutions for the volume problem later on.
This is a guitar that feels alot like a pre-CBS Fender strat. It has all the tones. If you didn't already know, G&L stands for George and Leo. As in LEO FENDER. The headstock is a little different, but the pickups are great, not Noiseless but definitely not NOISY either. Mine is a physically heavy guitar. It sounds heavy too - in a good way. Still, I can get all the tones I need from all the pickups. I believe that the neck pickup is superior to the Mexican Made Fender Strat. The pearloid pickguard is pretty. These Indonesian made strats sound great. They're made in the same factory as the Squiers but definitely sound different.

For some performances - those well controlled performances of an orchestral guitarist, let's say - machine notation can get a lot closer to producing a true sound than it will to the variations offered by a virtuoso jazz guitarist, blues master or metal thrasher jamming outside the box. In some cases, the machine sound might already fool some of the most discerning listeners -- if the performance does not test the limits of the mechanical emulation.


Pickup(s) 3 or 2 single-coils, with the latter having a hot humbucker in the bridge position,[1] with the exception of the Acoustasonic Strat and Stratacoustic models, the only acoustic Stratocasters.[1]Most Stratocasters generally came with a pickguard; on certain high-end versions, the pickguard is absent. There are also select models that come with active electronics and HSH, HHH, HH or Hpickup configurations.Humbucker-equipped Strats are often referred to as “Fat Strats”, in reference to the fact that humbucking pickups usually tend to have more bass in the output signal than single coils, thus making the sound “fatter”.
Distortion was not an effect originally intended by amplifier manufacturers, but could often easily be achieved by "overdriving" the power supply in early tube amplifiers. In the 1950s, guitarists began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to achieve "warm" distorted sounds.[29] Among the first musicians to experiment with distortion were Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf,[29] Goree Carter,[30] Joe Hill Louis,[31][32] Ike Turner,[33] Guitar Slim,[34] and Chuck Berry.[35]
Read Full Review This electric guitar offered by Epiphone is absolutely on the budget when it comes to and looking for a markdown price decent sounding Les Paul style electric guitar. The guitar can be bought individually to pair it with an amplifier of choice or as part of the Epiphone Les Paul Special II guitar package that comes complete with a strap, guitar cable, plectrums, gig bag and a small 10 watts Electar amplifier to already begin playing right out of the box.
“He played an SG, a Les Paul, a Flying V, as well as a Stratocaster, but he always sounded like Hendrix,” Clive Brown states. “He didn’t suddenly sound like Jimmy Page because he played a Les Paul. That’s where everybody’s perception seems to go wrong. It’s the playing, and not necessarily the guitar.” In spite of an entire multi-million dollar industry revolving around selling musicians the latest gear, and in spite of thousands of axeslingers, aspiring and acclaimed alike, who readily gobble up that gear, it all seems to boil down to two implements— and we’re born with those.
A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)
A marvelous 6 string acoustic guitar for the right handed. It has a beautiful natural satin finish, giving it awesome looks for stage performance. It is developed by cort guitars, with over 50 years of experience in musical instruments manufacture. The body back and sides are made from mahogany, whereas the top is spruce laminated. Prices range from around INR 7,600 depending on offers available, which is relatively affordable. You can get more product details by clicking on:
The massive slabs of rock-candy noise that J Mascis heaved from his Fender Jazzmaster in Dinosaur Jr. contained multitudes: Black Sabbath savagery, melodic Neil Young soul, punk-rock pig slop. As his recent solo set, Several Shades of Why, showed, he can get shamelessly pretty with an acoustic, too. "I remember seeing Dinosaur play this soft, plaintive song – and then it was just completely detonated by this ravaging solo that J did," says Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore. "The whole room was incinerated."

Like trapeze tailpieces, top mounted vibrato bridges transfer the string tension to a guitar’s side, offering more natural string resonance. Embedded units like the Vibrolas found on Gibson Flying Vs transmit the tension to the guitar’s body. Through-body units do neither, employing strings to absorb the string tension. Another system, the TransTrem, developed by Steinberger in the ’80s, has locking positions that allows players to transpose their tuning to other keys.
These guitars also appeal to adults who played in their youth and would like to pick up the instrument again. Fortunately, they’ll find that high-efficiency, low-cost overseas manufacturing has created a new generation of inexpensive guitars that play and sound very much like more expensive models—something that wasn’t true 20 years ago, when few cheap guitars were worth playing. We also discovered in our Best Electric Guitar Amp for Beginners article that there are several very nice amps available for less than $100, so an adult can get back into the game for well under $300.

In a way, the Ovation story (to use Robert Frost’s famous metaphor) is one of roads not taken. Of course, as the philosopher, Hegel, so neatly noted long ago, the paths tend to join up again, and the resulting synthesis works out fine in the end. It certainly worked that way for Charlie Kaman, whose choice of paths ultimately led to the synthesis (in more ways than one!) of Ovation guitars.


I have a question you might be able to help me with. I currently have a Yamaha silent guitar both nylon and steel and want to set up a home speaker system for a small room. I use a couple of pedals with my guitar. (reverb & delay) and at present use a Yamaha THR amp for sound. This is great for practice but does not fill the room so to speak. I have a larger acoustic amp but not happy with the sound. Can I use a pair of studio monitor speakers instead and if so would I need anything else e.g. (EQ or amp)I am looking to recreate the best possible sound I can get. At present it is only through my headphones. Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated.
Setting up an electric guitar will bring out the true potential of that specific instrument. A poorly setup guitar will be harder to play due to high strings and neck bending, and will sound subpar with improper intonation. Electric guitar setup cost will cover all of these adjustments and more. For a price close to $50, your guitar will also have its neck adjusted so that the playability is as good as possible over the entire fret board. In the ideal setup scenario, the string height will be optimized so that playing is easy. The height of the strings should also provide for the best sound as they are able to ring free of the frets, allowing for the cleanest and strongest possible signal for the pickups to capture.
Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 
I was just old enough to catch the tail end, but many folks remember the days of the record store.  Large vinyl albums, huge artwork, leafing through the stacks….it was a cool time that lasted longer than the days of cassettes, 8-tracks, and CDs.  Nowadays, most music buying is relegated to the online variety.  But there was a time during the 1960s where record stores were THE place to get your music, and musical instruments!That’s right, in window displays or hanging above the stacks of vinyl, guitars like these were waiting for teenagers.  Again, just a cool time!  This Decca guitar was sold through Decca Record stores.  In early 1966, Decca Records jumped into the electric guitar frenzy.  This was around the same time when CBS has bought Fender and only a few years away from MCA buying Danelectro. Curiously enough, Decca Records was a subsidiary of MCA.Anyway, Decca and many other companies saw the potential profits of electric guitar sales and quickly tried to capitalize.  There was a whole line of guitars, amps, and accessories, all imported from Japan.  The entire instrument line was handled through Decca’s 21 branches and distributors throughout the USA, but the company seemed to concentrate on the east and west coasts.  There was also a Decca subsidiary in Canada as well.This particular guitar was made by Kawai, and featured a design that was semi-exclusive to Decca.  Kawai was producing and exporting thousands of guitar to the USA at this time, and Kawai’s prices were very competitive, but Decca decided to go with an (as of this writing) smaller, unknown Japanese company to produce the guitars.  Many of the Decca electrics featured non-adjustable truss rods and just seemed to always be on the “cheap” end.  But some of the them did sound very good.  Sometimes you’ll see some really odd Decca electrics that literally copied the Teisco look from the same time period.  There were also some cool hollow bodies with set neck designs as well as the late 60s  line of guitars, like the DMI 231 pictured below.
If you think not using any pedals makes you more “real” or “natural” of a player, you’ve got to be kidding me. Let’s think about what is physically happening when we play electric guitar. The sound is created when a guitar string is plucked by a pick, likely made from some polymer (oh wait, the “real” guys use their thumb, okay) causing it to vibrate. This vibration also creates a corresponding vibration through a magnetic field above your pickups. The pickup converts this into electric current, which passes through a simple low-pass filter tone circuit and a passive volume attenuator (we presume you’re not using an active pickup, being that you’re keeping it “real”) that does some equalization before it even gets to the cable. The standard cable consists of stranded, >99% oxygen free copper wire usually measuring between 18-24 gauge thickness, creating another filter in conjunction with the guitar circuitry based on cable capacitance.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: HoneyBurst, Green
The Fender brand is the parent company of other good guitar brands like Jackson, Charvel, and Gretsch. While all of these are owned by Fender, they each have very unique playing styles and sounds. Fender also produces their Squire series of value guitars. These guitars are entry-level instruments, with decent sound for an incredibly reasonable price.
A direct line can be drawn from “Rumble” to “My Generation,” “Anarchy in the U.K.” and “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” The song is often credited as the origin of the power chord, but it also heralded the transformation of rock from the music of youth to the soundtrack of juvenile delinquency. Several radio stations banned “Rumble” because they thought it was too sexy, raunchy and violent. Wray even dressed like a juvenile delinquent, embellishing his greasy black pompadour with a leather jacket, jeans and shades at a time when most white rock and rollers still took fashion cues from Perry Como and Bing Crosby.
The Supro Spanish Guitar was a non-cutaway archtop built by Regal with electronic components supplied by National Dobro. Except for the fairly modern block-style Supro logo, this was pretty much a typical downscale pressed-top Regal archtop guitar, with a mildly rounded headstock, neck joining the body at the 14th fret, 20-fret rosewood fingerboard, five single-dot inlays, wooden adjustable compensated bridge and a simple trapeze tailpiece. The most distinctive feature was that the guitar had no f-holes. You’ll recall that the ’35 Dobro Electric Spanish was a “conventional” archtop, most likely with f-holes (a comparable National archtop also had f-holes in the beginning, but switched to the non-f-hole design in late ’36 or ’37, following the Supro pattern). The pickguard was typical Regal made of black Ebonoid plastic. In catalog illustrations this appears to have white trim around the edge, but this was apparently company “retouching” to make the pickguard stand out better in the pictures; real examples have plain black ‘guards. The oval, covered pickup sat on a wider oval surround which also held the single volume control. This pickup was nestled down near the bridge. The tuners were Harmony Tune-Rites, with polygonal pot metal buttons. The necks on National Dobro guitars which were entirely made by other manufacturers were glued in. Slightly later, when they began making their own necks and applying them to other bodies, National Dobro Spanish guitars had bolt-on necks.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
The FX325A is one of the most popular Yamaha acoustic electric guitars especially due to its quality sound and affordable price. This model is suited for both beginners and experienced musicians. With a spruce top and Nato back and sides, this full-size dreadnought is both rich-sounding and durable, able to offer years of enriching musical experiences.
In 2004, the Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, a guitar that Gibson has used ever since as the “standard” non limited edition Slash Les Paul (this guitar is in the Gibson range all year round).[33] This guitar features a plain maple top with a Dark Tobacco Sunburst finish, and has a piezo pickup with a switch located near the tone and volume knobs .[32] In 2008, Epiphone issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard Plus Top, which was modeled after the Gibson Custom Shop model.[32] It has a solid mahogany body, flame maple top, and a Dark Tobacco Burst finish.[34]
The benefit of a compressor lies in that every note played will be at nearly the same amplitude, and therefore nearly equal in volume. This will help normalize tones that are sometimes lost in the mix because of complex overtones, and it will result in a more articulate sound. Notice that if you don’t pick all notes of an arpeggio at exactly the same pressure you will likely get a different sound for each note, especially if you are playing a tube amp. Tube amplifiers react dynamically to stronger and weaker signals it’s the allure of them and thus the non-uniformity of picking at different strengths will be exaggerated. A compressor will fix this problem and normalize all notes of the arpeggio regardless of the player’s technique and equipment, which is consequently why many soloists prefer them.
What I really want is a pelham blue or mostly-bluish-but-a-little-teal gibson sg with an ebony fretboard. the fretboard is absolutely a deal breaker. i'll probably change the pickups to WRC's so stock pickups are unimportant. Could get a used Elliot Easton, but I'd have to buy it used, sight unseen, and the trem isn't really ideal for how I tend to play, so I was hoping there was someone out there who does this. I am kinda surprised that no one does. It's one of the most iconic designs in history, why no interest in BTOs?

One of my favourite hardware effect units is the Electrix Mo-FX (sadly no longer in production). It is superbly constructed for hands-on performance and it offers full MIDI control over the panel's knobs and buttons. I use this in conjunction with the Sequentix P3 (a hardware step sequencer). Not only can the P3 generate patterns of controllers suitable for varying multiple Mo-FX parameters, but it can generate evolving or shifting patterns, courtesy of its 'accumulators'. In a nutshell, accumulators are designed to prevent your sequences becoming annoyingly repetitive: controller values (actually values directed at any internal sequencer parameter) can be added or subtracted on each pass of the pattern, with rules and limits directing the behaviour as the accumulation progresses. Digging through the Mo-FX manual quickly reveals all the MIDI Continuous Controllers you need. Usefully, you can also trigger the tap-tempo function via MIDI, and this offers a rather wonderful way of generating clock intervals. As you can decide exactly where to place your tap-tempo trigger events, and the P3 sequencer can shift or vary these events according to rules you devise, you can find clock sync intervals unseen on any other device. Paul Nagle

Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.
These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
The 110ce features a dreadnought body with modern cutaway that produces Taylor's signature open midrange and clear treble tone, it works really well with various styles of music. And since it comes with their ES2 under-saddle transducer system, this guitar is ready for the stage or for recording. While it may not be as affordable as we want it to be, the Taylor 110ce more than makes up with its quality and reliability. Mark your entry into the real world with this highly recommended acoustic-electric.
Overdrive / distortion pedals are one of the most important effects on your board and are very much a personal taste. The ones on my pedal board change all the time, I have more than a few that I really like; Analogman King Of Tone, Pete Cornish SS-3, Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss Blues Driver, Nobels ODR-1,  Zen Drive, MXR Distortion +... and I like and use all of them. Probably my all-time favourite os the King Of Tone, but on a budget, the Nobels ODR-1 is great value and runs with the very best!
Acoustic amplifiers produce an uncolored, "acoustic" sound when used with acoustic instruments with built-in transducer pickups or microphones. The amplifiers often come with a simple mixer, so that the signals from a pickup and condenser microphone can be blended. Since the early 2000s, it has become increasingly common for acoustic amplifiers to provide a range of digital effects, such as reverb and compression. As well, these amplifiers often contain feedback-suppressing devices, such as notch filters or parametric equalizers.[22]
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It’s big, it’s brawny and it’s bold—the Reverend Jetstream HB represents a ton of value for its price tag. Although it excels in rafter-shaking rock ’n’ roll tones, this offset guitar has a few nifty tricks that make it more versatile. Add to that quality construction and components, and you’re left with one of the best electric guitars under $1,000.
Maton earned international renown for their superb acoustic and electric guitars and basses, which have been played by scores of famous performers from The Easybeats to The Wiggles.[1] George Harrison owned one of their MS500 models, which were introduced in 1957 and famed British session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan owned and used a Maton ‘Cello’ guitar for many years during the peak of his career, playing it on recordings with Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Johnny Keating and his Big Band and Neil Finn from Crowded House.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
The Firebird did have some other unique features such as its banjo style tuners and mini humbuckers that produced a different sound than the full humbucker pickups Gibson typically offered.  Many notable players preferred the Firebird: Mick Taylor from the Rolling Stones used it on the album Exile on Main St.  Allen Collins would also use this axe on stage with Skynyrd alongside his Explorers.  The great Texan blues guitarist Johnny Winter was known for playing slide on his 1963 Firebird to great effect.  Dave Grohl, of Nirvana and Foo Fighters fame, used his white Firebird to create a modern rock sound.
Amp Modeling: A multi-effects pedal does not necessarily guarantee that it also includes amp modeling. Amp modeling basically means that, in addition to effects like reverb, delay, chorus, fuzz, distortion, compression, et al. it also has the ability to sound like - or model - various tube and solid-state guitar or bass amplifiers. Amps have a tremendous impact on tone, which is why brands like Marshall, Vox, Fender, Matchless, Mesa Boogie, and many others have cult followings. Copying the true character of an amp in the digital world is admittedly a tall order, and one that multi-effects pedals are not great at; even the best ones struggle. Still, they do a decent-enough job, and you should decide if you want your multi-effects pedal to include amp modeling.
Kawai Teisco was founded by Atswo Kaneko and Doryu Matsuda. The company also produced the popular Ibanez badge in the 1960s. Kawai Teisco made their own house brands Kawai, Teisco, Del Rey and Teisco Del Rey. Badged guitars produced by the Kawai Teisco factories include Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, and Winston. Possible badged guitars made by the company include: Astrotone, Demian, G-Holiday, Lafayette, Master, Orange, Tamaki and Trump.
If you want to get this game, you have a few options. The game is $60 with no guitar cable included; this is the best bet for owners of the original "Rocksmith," as the cable that came with that game works here, too. If you don't have the cable, but have a guitar, the game costs $80. If you need a guitar, too, that'll run you $200 for an Epiphone Les Paul Electric Jr. guitar, plus the game and cable.
There are two distinct kinds of transistors used in fuzz pedals, germanium and silicon. In the early 1960’s silicon transistors were fairly new and very expensive and germanium was the norm. Germanium transistors are susceptible to temperature changes and noise so they can be unreliable at times. They do have a very distinct tone, they also react very well to the guitar’s volume knob by cleaning up very well. As silicon transistors became less expensive they largely replaced their germanium counterparts in pedals due to their stability. The Silicon fuzzes generally produce more gain but often don’t clean up as well.
• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
Jimmie Vaughan: based on Jimmie’s own ’57 Stratocaster, the Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Strat reflects his deep roots, traditional style, and preferred Strat features. Noteable for it’s alder body, 3 Fender Tex-Mex single-coil pickups, an extra-hot bridge pickup, a special tinted maple 1957-type V-shaped neck with maple fretboard and medium-jumbo frets, vintage machine heads, original Fender synchronized tremolo, and custom tone control wiring. Tone, tone and more tone.
This mod revolves around the concept that adding mass to the headstock lowers its resonant frequency, while reducing mass will raise that frequency. The theory at work here is that vibration is absorbed or reflected back into the strings and body based upon this frequency. Depending upon the harmonic makeup of your particular instrument, changing this can enhance or degrade sustain and accentuate or attenuate certain harmonics. All of this is dependent not only on your guitar’s construction, but also on how large your headstock is to begin with. If all of this seems a bit hazy, that’s because it is. I don’t have a handy-dandy answer like “more mass equals more sustain” because it isn’t always true. Suffice it to say that you can make a difference in a guitar’s character by following this path. I usually go through this exercise with my builds because I have the luxury of time and the resources at hand. It’s like fine tuning a race car’s suspension settings to your liking.
Meaning of electronic: (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. or (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. Example is “electronic calculator”.
Slightly out-of-tune strings on a bass may not jump out as much as on guitar (especially in chords), but when that bass line is sitting under other parts in the mix, even slightly off-pitch notes will make their presence known, and sometimes be harder to track down (why does this song sound a little “off”?). I’d use a tuner (h/w or s/w), but I’d also always verify by ear, before hitting record, and I’d check tuning periodically as the session progresses—just as with drums, hard players can easily put the instrument out after a few energetic takes.
A very, and in my opinion (from experience), the most difficult technique to learn and one of the most versatile. From simple single string transitions (a term I use to describe it I don't know the actual term) and used in jazz to quick shredding in rock. Learning this skill was not only a task, but helped me more fully understand a lot of musical theory.
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
As the text says, the pick wasn’t exactly identical with all the samples. This would make for the differences alone: The movement of the string must not be imagined as a plain two dimensional one. In fact it’s rotating in three dimensions, while the pickup only senses that part of the movement which is perpendicular to the deck of the guitar. The vibrations direction changes all the time and does so for each frequency component (read: harmonics) independently.
While National blithely ignored Beauchamp’s electric experiments, their competition – Dobro – was next to enter the electric arena as early as 1933, with the introduction of the Dobro All-Electric. Basically, the All-Electric was a mahogany-bodied Model 37, most usually outfitted with a 12-fret square neck. It had a large lightning-bolt-engraved coverplate, two screen holes, three little holes under the fingerboard, a slothead, and rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. Instead of the usual resonator, this had a large metal plate where the cone assembly would normally be and a Stimson pickup mounted just in front of the bridge, curiously enough with the poles slanted from the bass side near the bridge toward the middle on the treble side.
Aside from what brands to choose from and finding out the right budget to spend on an amp. Initial search for a guitar amplifier generally leads beginner players on figuring out that there are actually different types of guitar amps in the market. This is where they start to care deeply enough to know which amp sounds better and what will fit their playing the best.

Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.
Clearly, when playing live rather than recording, the room you are in will create its own reverb. Live performance spaces are often prepared with a combination of acoustically absorbent and reflective materials to achieve the desired balance. Sometimes this means hi-tech purpose made fittings made of special materials. Often it's just judicious arrangement of curtains and rugs, combined with bare walls.
Epiphone Broadway Electric Guitar Make way for the Broadway, Epiphone’s big, bold and blindingly beautiful hollow body archtop guitar. The Epiphone Broadway has been a jazz club staple since the 1930s and it continues its soulful career with new appointments. The big-bodied Broadway features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, a hard maple neck, a rosewood fretboard and Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups.
Under the ’38 Avalon Hawaiian was a Supro Electric Hawaiian Guitar. This had a similar shape but was covered in “radiant crystal silver.” This was not pearloid, as is often assumed, but rather a silver paint (possibly a Duco leftover from the aluminum steels) with a crystalline additive similar to that used on Duolian finishes. The head was slightly rounded. The fingerboard was black. A handrest covered the pickup/tailpiece assembly. One volume control sat on a square plate on the treble side, reminiscent of the previously mentioned Supro Hawaiian Model in the ’38 Sorkin and ’39 Grossman books. This cost $30.
Electric guitar design and construction vary greatly in the shape of the body and the configuration of the neck, bridge, and pickups. However, some features are present on most guitars. The photo below shows the different parts of an electric guitar. The headstock (1) contains the metal machine heads (1.1), which use a worm gear for tuning. The nut (1.4)—a thin fret-like strip of metal, plastic, graphite or bone—supports the strings at the headstock end of the instrument. The frets (2.3) are thin metal strips that stop the string at the correct pitch when the player pushes a string against the fingerboard. The truss rod (1.2) is a metal rod (usually adjustable) that counters the tension of the strings to keep the neck straight. Position markers (2.2) provide the player with a reference to the playing position on the fingerboard.[18]
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