If you are trying to find the best electric guitar for beginners but you lack the time to do the necessary research in order to find a quality product, this short introduction should help you out. After reading plenty of electric guitar reviews and after comparing top-notch products, we have reached the conclusion that Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is the model that you should have in mind. This device has a beautiful mahogany body and a maple top that is said to deliver an easy to distinguish classic tone. As a plus, the model comes outfitted with Alnico Classic humbucker pickups that secure a subtle and warm tone. If the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is out of stock, we recommend that you check out the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD Electric as it is a reliable alternative that you might equally enjoy.
While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.

At first it sounds kind of like a buzzsaw, but after listening to the song, people usually have a hard time getting the catchy riff out of their heads. The best part? It's one of the most fun beginner guitar songs and anyone can play it! The riff is played entirely on one string, the A string and consists of only three notes. Fun fact, the riff was supposed to be a placeholder for a horns section, but they loved the fuzzy guitar tone so much they never got around to the horns.


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Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.

Why We Liked It - If you’re looking for an electric acoustic guitar that’s just great all round, and doesn’t have a large price tag, then this Yamaha has to come into consideration. It has all of the construction features you’d expect from a solid mid-range choice, with the addition of quality hardware, and nice touches like the scalloped x-braces. For those interested in Yamahas FG series, can always look at the alternative products, the yamaha FGX700SC.


Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.
If you know what you are doing setting them up, it might not be your main guitar, but if you've ever had a guitar fail on you in front of a large crowd and you need to pick another real fast (Before the solo) for the money they beat any other guit, I've had that is not top of the line and they can really take a beating and stay in tune and super easy to work on.
It’s true that the best guitars are built from the inside out, and Vintage enjoys a well-earned reputation for building great vintage electric guitars. Working with acknowledged guitar industry guru Trevor Wilkinson, Vintage has created a fantastic line-up of Wilkinson-equipped Vintage electric guitars and basses. Using Trev’s excellent range of pickups, tuners and hardware has taken Vintage electrics to the next level.
I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?
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Cadsoft Eagle is a very popular tool with pedal builders. A basic version can be had for free. There are limitations on board size and number of layers in the free version, but these won’t come in to play for the majority of basic analog effects pedals.  Element14  includes a host of documents and tutorials.  If you get into complex designs or full professional use later,  full versions of Eagle, at time of writing cost $575, and $1640.
NO BRIAN MAY?? The guy built his OWN guitar. He sometimes added piano wire behind the guitar strings, he was technical and had soul, and is an innovator. I personally find East Bay Ray from the Dead Kennedy's marvelous. I know he doesn't belong in this list, but any musician that has their own sound like these two deserves a mention……but yes, taste is subjective anyway.
We considered more than 20 amps for this guide and gave the 10 most promising models a hands-on test. Our testing panel agreed that any of these amps would at least be good enough to get a beginner started, and that for reasons of personal taste, some players might prefer one of the ones we didn’t pick. Here are the others we tried, with a couple of notes about our panelists’ impressions.
Copyright © 2016 Sonoma Wire Works. All rights reserved. RiffWorks and the RW Logo, RiffWorld, RiffCaster, RiffLink, RiffRumble, InstantDrummer, StudioTrack and the StudioTrack iPad App Logo, the FourTrack iPhone App Logo, GuitarTone and the GuitarTone Logo, GuitarJack and the GuitarJack logo, DrummerPack, KitPack and Discrete Drums are trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. DrumCore and KitCore are registered trademarks of Sonoma Wire Works. iPod, iPhone and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Android is a trademark of Google Inc. ReWire and REX2 are technologies licensed from Propellerhead Software. VST is a trademark of Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.

It’s hard to definitively name the best guitar books. Everyone is working with a different skill set, and you’ve all built up your skills in a different way. However, all of the books below provide enough information to help you improve some aspect of your playing. They may help some of you more than others, but they all have enough helpful tips in them to justify their purchase. Our team read these and many more, and these were the titles we found most inspiring. It turns out we aren't alone in loving these books, since these books get great reviews all around, but these were the ones we found most enlightening. The fact that we were excited to practice and couldn't wait to pick up these books to learn more is ultimately the reason they made this list. We think these books will provide or build a solid foundation for anyone looking to learn the guitar in an efficient way.
If all other Telecaster models fail, the Standard Tele is a safe pick. The two Tele pickups provide a warmer tone and add more “twang” to your sound than the other pickup configurations we’ve seen. I’ve had some Telecasters get strangely noisy, with even the more expensive American models needing help from a good noise suppressor. It’s not a universal Telecaster problem, but the Tele pickups (especially the neck variation) can be susceptible to excess noise.
Semi-acoustic guitars have hollow bodies which give them a warmer and more dynamic range of sounds. They are vulnerable to unwanted feedback as the distorted sound increases the chances of feedback. That’s why we don’t see rock and metal musicians playing a semi-acoustic guitar. Many guitars have solid blocks inside for decreasing the feedback factor. Check out our list of semi-acoustic electric guitars here.
Pickups are complex devices. No matter what we do, we cannot model them with spot-on accuracy. They do have a series resistance (R6), but the L1 and C3 inductor and capacitance, respectively, but these are not real circuit components, but are a simple model placeholder for the complicated interactions that appear due to Maxwell’s equations, when we have a wire wound around magnets (see below image):
I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.
While it might seem unnecessary, an EQ pedal is a very handy effect to have. Many amps have very specific voicing that can only be adjusted so far with their tone stack. Also, many small amps have limited on board tone-shaping options. For example, the popular Fender Champ 600 or the Blackstar HT-1, which only have one knob for tone shaping. With an EQ in your chain, you can fine-tune the amp to your liking, or you can perfectly dial in a distortion or fuzz that normally won't cooperate.
High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
Let’s not beat around the bush. The accessories that come with this package (tuner, amp) aren’t the greatest. But they make do. The REAL strength of this package lies solely with the guitar. The guitar is fantastic. Super easy to play (and thus play fast), and to learn on. I’ll explain why that’s important later on. But bottom line, this is a great choice if you want a quick all-in-one package that includes a great guitar.
The "Chrome Edition" harmonica is also based upon the MS reed plates. Featuring a crystal glass comb and specially engraved chrome-plated anniversary cover plates. The bottom cover plate has the serial numbers from 1 to 1857. It is also packaged with an anniversary booklet. The "Standard Edition" model features a clear acrylic comb and the top cover plate is specially engraved.
The SD is a classic. This had a more exaggerated Jazzmaster shape than the T-60. It had a dramatically swept back lower horn, and an offset pair of waists, looking as though it’s been slightly melted. These had bolt-on necks with the elongated Strat-style head, with round logo stickers. A rectangular plastic control panel was mounted above the strings, with large thumbwheel controls and on/off rocker switches, while a large-ish pickguard was mounted under the strings. The controls on the SD-4L were especially interesting, taking their cue from the Italians, no doubt. The thumbwheels were for volume and tone, while there were a total of six rocker switches. Four of these were on/off for each of the four pickups, but in between were two more. Their function is unknown, but a good guess would be phase reversal between the front and back pairs of pickups. Both models had the rectangular fingerboard edge inlays. With “L” designations, both had vibratos. These consisted of a fairly simple bar for string attachment with a series of springs behind it, all covered with a hinged metal cover. The handle was extremely long. Pickups were the beefy tall rectangular type with metal cases and black plastic center tops with exposed pole pieces (these could be screws or squares). The SD-4L had four pickups, in two pairs, while the SD-2L had two. If I couldn’t have a Spectrum 5, I’d be looking for one of these (I am!).
One full step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as Volbeat, Mötley Crüe, Nightwish, Pantera, P.O.D., Sepultura, Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Watain, In Solitude, Agalloch, Inquisition, Drive-By Truckers, Soulfly, Children of Bodom, Symphony X, Oceansize, Death, Decrepit Birth, Dream Theater, All That Remains, Exodus, Gojira, Shadows Fall, Mastodon, Asking Alexandria on their Stand Up and Scream, Ghost, Lordi, and Kreator. Used in a vast majority of songs by musician Elliott Smith. Also used in Nirvana's songs "Come As You Are", "Lithium" and "Drain You", by Metallica in their songs "Sad but True", "Devil's Dance", their cover of "Whiskey in the Jar", some of their covers on The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited ("The Small Hours" and "Crash Course in Brain Surgery"),"Dream No More", "The Thing That Should Not Be" and in live performances of "The God That Failed" and "Seek and Destroy"; by Bullet for My Valentine in several songs on Scream Aim Fire, by blink-182 in "Adam's Song", in Doug Anthony All Stars live performances and by John Fogerty.

Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.
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The vast majority of bass amps in the 2010s can be powered solely by AC mains power, obtained by plugging the amp into a wall socket. Inexpensive practice amps may have the AC mains plug hardwired into the unit. Middle-priced to high-priced amplifiers typically have a removable cable and plug, as used with PC computer towers. The benefits of having a removable cable and plug is that if the cable becomes worn or damaged, a new cable can easily be replaced by a layperson. If a hardwired AC mains cable and plug becomes worn or damaged, a qualified technician or electrician will typically be required to replace the cable and plug. Most amps are designed to work for a single voltage. A small number of expensive bass amps designed for touring professionals have user-selectable voltage, which enables a bassist to play with same amp in North America and Europe. A small number of small combo amps can run on both AC mains power and battery power. This enables bassists to play outside where there is no access to power (e.g., for busking on the street). Amps that are battery powered may have a 12 volt input, enabling the unit to be connected to a car battery with alligator clips.
Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.
Ibanez is the most important Japanese guitar brand, and this new book tells the story of the electric guitars the company has made since the late 50s. The story tracks the fortunes of Ibanez from its early years as a copier of prime American models to later success as a creator of impressive original designs. The big break came in the late '80s with the launch of Steve Vai's JEM models and the related RG design, which have ensured Ibanez's popularity among metal and extreme rock players. Players include George Benson, Phil Collen, Allan Holdsworth, Pat Metheny, John Petrucci, Lee Ritenour, Joe Satriani, John Scofield, Mick Thompson, and more, many of whom are featured or interviewed for this book. With a gallery of full-color pictures of famous guitars and players, a reference section detailing production years and specifications, and a section covering how to interpret serial numbers. 160 pp.
During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.

One line bouncing is an "echo." Many lines bouncing randomly is "reverb." If they bounce around for more than a second, it's called reverb. If they bounce around for less than a second, it's Kosher to call it "room ambiance." If the radiating lines are in a room with no reflective walls, they wouldn't bounce back at all, and the room would be called "anechoic." By the way, my imaginary room is only two-dimensional. Real-life rooms are three dimensional.
The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.
If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.

When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.
In 1883, a german immigrant named Frederic Gretsch started a small instrument manufacturing company in Brooklyn, New York. On a trip to visit home in 1895, he died unexpectedly, leaving the company in the hands of his 15-year-old son, Fred. The company flourished for generations, especially due to the popularity of their hollow body guitars with rockabilly, blues, and jazz musicians. In 1967, however, the brand began to falter after the Gretsch family sold to then music industry giant Baldwin. In 1985, Fred W. Gretsch bought the company back from Baldwin and began restoring it to its former glory – coinciding with the rise of one of their most prolific artists, Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats. Today, their guitars, like the USA Custom Shop White Falcon pictured above, are used by a wide array of musicians from all walks of life, including Billy F. Gibbons of ZZ Top, Tim Armstrong of Rancid, Band of Skulls, and Portugal. the Man.
“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”
The M5 is extremely portable and pedalboard-friendly, measuring about 6 inches wide and tall. The construction is absolutely first rate with a heavy-duty all-metal chassis and footswitches. Line 6 absolutely does not skimp on build quality with this one. It’s also found on lots of pedalboards of pro players that we’ll talk about shortly, which speaks to it’s durability and quality. In terms of interface, it’s actually quite a simple pedal, as you can see in closeup photos of it. The inputs and outputs are rather simple. ¼” stereo in, ¼” stereo out, an expression pedal input, and an input for a 9V power supply (which comes included with it). On top of the unit you have 2 main footswitches (which not only turn an effect on and off, they are also used to scroll up and down), a small screen in the upper left corner, and 6 knobs to control different parameters of whatever effect you have selected. It does not have USB capability, balanced XLR outputs, or any of the other fancy I/O from larger multi-effects units. But then again, for its purpose it doesn’t really need all that. The M5 is intuitive, nice, and simple.
If you want to get this game, you have a few options. The game is $60 with no guitar cable included; this is the best bet for owners of the original "Rocksmith," as the cable that came with that game works here, too. If you don't have the cable, but have a guitar, the game costs $80. If you need a guitar, too, that'll run you $200 for an Epiphone Les Paul Electric Jr. guitar, plus the game and cable.
I have had very little time to play with the settings and effects, but so far it's pretty awesome! The only downsides I can find are that there is about 5ms of scilence when changing effects, but you might be able to play around that. Also, I haven't found a way to make the expression pedal affect only one effect in the chain instead of changing the overall volume, but this might just be me not understanding simple instructions.
.From its G logo cattle brand on top, to the fence rail pickguard graphic, the Chet Atkins Gretsch cowboy'd up big time with cactus, cattle, rifle and arrow inlays inscribed right into the mother of pearl. This 6120W  Reissue combines many of the most desirable features of this longtime favorite. Twin Filter-Tron pickups offer lively, hum-free performance, with master volume and tone controls for ease of operation. See pics,pricing and info here
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White
I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!

Are you a seasoned player looking to upgrade you instrument or a beginner starting to learn the ropes and tricks of playing a guitar? Well, in this article we have prepared a comprehensive guide on how to select the best electric guitar as per you needs and the list of the best electric guitars available in India. The guitar is a complex musical instrument with some basic components, a wide range of features and different constructions, so it is important to have some basic idea about these features so that you can make an informed choice.


Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo
Hawaiians were still available, but no information was available to me except on the EG-TW which was an eight-string double-neck with three telescoping legs. Each neck had two pickups, a selector switch, volume and tone control. Also offered was a curious instrument called a “Harp Guitar,” which was some sort of three-legged Hawaiian console with four electronic pedals!
When you are shopping for effects pedals, a good feature to look for is true bypass. Your overall signal path is vulnerable to noise and impurities introduced by the circuitry of anything between your guitar and your output device (such as your amplifier/speaker). Pedals without true bypass, or ones with buffered circuitry, will contribute to some signal degradation as your signal passes along the path because the signal is routed directly through the pedal circuitry. Pedals that have true bypass direct your signal around the pedal’s circuitry, or bypass it, when you switch the pedal off, thereby maintaining the integrity and cleanliness of the signal. Your amplified guitar will sound more robust as a result and you won’t be required to crank up your volume as much to compensate for lost signal. The only disadvantage of pedals with true bypass is that sometimes, when you're playing with distorted or high-gain amplifier tones, you might notice switching noise when you switch the pedal off and on.

What is electric guitar tone? Tone is the sound of your guitar. Listen to B.B. King. His tone is rich and thick. You know it when you hear it. A lot of guitar players use pedals and effects to create that tone. Some of you may not be able to afford all those fancy effects. The good news is, you can make use of your hands and the controls on your guitar to create a myriad of tonal possibilities. Robert shows you how to use these components in this electric guitar tone tips guide by showing you 3 incredibly useful and powerful tricks for tuning up your tone. Your volume and tone controls, your controls knobs, and the switch between your guitar pickups can be beneficial in providing lots of tone.


This bass guitar amplifier features a 20-watt amplifier and an 8-inch driver. It reproduces frequencies from 70 Hz ~ 10 KHz with a total harmonic distortion of 0.5% (typical). It also has a built-in, switchable active compressor. It features a 3-band EQ, with the bass EQ centered at 100 Hz, mid-range EQ at 800 Hz, and a treble EQ at 6 KHz. It features a 3.5mm line output with an impedance of 1 kilohm, for directing the output signal to a mixer, recorder, or another amp. The 3.5mm stereo headphone output will defeat the internal speaker for quiet practicing.
Also called tuners or machine heads, these geared mechanisms, usually mounted on the guitar's headstock, hold the strings in place and allow tuning the instrument by adjusting string tension. Most modern tuners have enclosed, permanently lubricated mechanisms. Strings are held in place on posts that are attached to knobs, which are turned to adjust string tension allowing the guitar to be tuned. Some tuners are designed to lock in place. This provides more tuning stability, and helps prevent strings from slipping loose from the tuner. It also makes changing your strings a little easier.
If you know that you want to use your mini amp to reduce the audio footprint of your jam sessions as much as possible, you’ll pretty much have your pick of the litter among miniature models. That’s because even the most powerful of these amps can produce viable tone at a very low volume, as manufacturers know that this demographic needs the ability to play quietly. If you want to maintain a certain degree of audio fidelity and flexibility, you might need to aim for one of the slightly larger mini amps out there. Models with at least five, and preferably 10 watts will be the best for generating a realistic and presentable guitar tone. Some of these are even nice enough that you could use them to perform at any venue capable of miking the amp itself.
Fast forward to 2018 and ESP is still going strong, with a huge range of speedy guitars tailored for heavy rock and metal, including several 7- and 8-string models. ESP offers a range of popular models in the budget market (under its LTD subsidiary) as well as high-end guitars, played by some of the biggest names in heavy metal – Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield and Stephen Carpenter to name a few.
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.

The inlays are the little shapes that are installed in the instruments neck/fretboard. Inlays do not make a significant difference in the sound of the instrument. They come in various shapes and materials. Inlays allow a player to quickly see where certain positions are located on the fretboard. They are also a great way to decorate, or personalize an instrument. Choose among our existing inlays designs, or send us a drawing of your own designs. Some popular inlay designs are band logos, initials, corporate brand logos, or tribal designs.
Electronic crackling is a very common problem in electric guitars. Most likely, electronic crackling has very little to do with wiring. Usually the reason your guitar is crackling when you adjust the volume or tone knobs is because the pots are bad or dirty. Before you go and replace the pots on your electric guitar, I would try to use some Deoxit cleaner to see if the pots are just dirty.
The original electric guitars were hollow. Well, scratch that — the original Electric Spanish guitars were hollow (stick with us for the third installment of “Fundamentals of Guitar Anatomy” on pickups. The first pickup was made for a lap steel guitar!) Gibson took the words Electric Spanish and turned them into an acronym — ES. We commonly refer to these as hollow body guitars.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.
• Why frets come loose: Wear from string contact, fretboard drying and jarring mid-gig or during transportation can cause frets to pop loose. And if binding loses moisture, that can cause the ends of frets to rise or be exposed. These all create troubles that can wrongly be blamed on the more typical problem of fretwear, but in these cases dressing or replacement isn’t necessarily the answer. If there’s enough fret wire left, a loose fret can be reseated in its slot along the fingerboard, and a skilled luthier can often fill the gaps between the binding and the fret ends.
Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.
When you buy an acoustic guitar that you’re drawn to because of its aesthetics, you will become more motivated to play it. This is especially important for beginners who may find it tedious to do the same exercises over and over again, or who may be tempted to skip practice sessions. A good-looking guitar is something you will love playing again and again.
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Do these sites harm the artists, or do they spread the understanding of music? Do they generate more sales of music, or reduce it? Do they provide education and stimulate participation by young people in the creation of music? Do they remove the incentive for artists and publishers to faithfully reproduce official versions of TAB, lyrics, or music notation or do they encourage people to seek official versions when they find the unauthorized versions lack the detail or accuracy they demand?

We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.


There are a couple of tips that can help you out, however. First – as a new learner – you don’t need a stage-ready amplifier or even a high-end boutique amp, as they are both far too powerful and pricey for someone just picking up the hobby. Second, you should look into amplifier versatility. As a new player, it’s likely that you’re still figuring out your own style – and being able to change up your sound without the need for a bunch of extra peripherals is incredibly valuable in figuring that out.
As we discussed in our post about cheap effects pedals, price does not always indicate quality. As with buying anything, simply picking out the most expensive item isn’t the way to ensure you get the best product for your needs. Sure, you might really want to own a Ferarri, but have you ever spent any time driving one around town to pick up your groceries? Fortunately, we live in an era of truly great, yet inexpensive, guitars. There are lower-priced riffs on old classics right alongside purpose-built value axes. You don’t have to settle for that rattling pawn shop special. With a few hundred dollars you can buy a guitar that will suit all your needs and last for many years to come.
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
We will use the remaining pole to switch tone pots. Typical strat wiring has two tone controls – one for middle and one for neck pickup. We want to switch neck/middle tone control on when neck/middle pickup is on. To do this, common terminal of the second pole is connected to the common terminal on the first pole (pickup output) and neck and middle terminals of the second pole are connected to their respective pots. When neck pickup is on, the second pole will switch the output to the neck tone control as intended. What happens in position 4 (both neck and middle pickups on)? Both pots will be switched on and will be in parallel. Moving any tone pot would change the overall resistance to the tone cap and change the tone. The result is below:

Among the favorite brands of Gretsch lie the signature variants Brian Setzer and Chet Atkins models. Whereas, its Jet and Duo Jet are equally worthy. All these models are aimed explicitly at Jazz. In fact, you can think of them for Jazz as what you call Jackson for metal. For intermediate and pro players looking for affordability, its Electromatic Series is the desired option.

The RG (Roadstar) is one of the most famous Superstrat guitars on the market and remains a hugely popular model in all price categories. However, they also produce other collections such as the streamlined S Series (standing for ‘Saber’) and the relaxed Talman collection. Also look out for the Iceman – an edgy original Ibanez design, famously used by Paul Stanley from Kiss.
The GK Studio mixes traditional flamenco construction techniques, a comfortable body shape and modern Fishman electronics, resulting in an easy to play nylon-string guitar that can be plugged in for stage use. My main concern about this guitar is its slightly thinner body depth, neck and nutwidth(1.96"), but these are calculated tweaks that should make this classical guitar play and feel more akin to conventional steel-string acoustics.

no. first of all a bass guitar has 4 strings and a guitar has 6 strings second, u couldn't tune the guitar open notes a whole octave down to create the bass notes as the strings would be too loose. although you can play bass songs on a guitar but it wouldn't be as deep a bass. Actually you can. depending on the kind of way your guitar is built you can remove your guitar strings and replace them with bass strings and finally adjust the setting on your amp so you can have a rich full tone. I have a Fender Squier and made it into a bass by replacing the strings and adjusting the settings on my amp. WARNING: you NEED to know if your bridge or the place where you put the bass strings through can hold the pressure the bass string apply.


I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.
IK Multimedia are good friends of ours and we’ve watched them grow from a small plugin company to a world-beating manufacturer of amazing widgets for getting sound in and out of your iPhone or iPad. Amplitube Custom Shop is the software you need to buy their premium plugins. However, it comes with a load of amazing stuff out-of-the-box, including 9 stomp box emulations, 4 amps, 5 cabs and more.

Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.

While most instruments made by Harmony and Kay were much cheaper than Martins, Gibsons or Fenders, the upper-level, more elaborate ones actually cost more money than some lower-end and even mid-priced Gibsons and Martins. A top-of-the-line Harmony, Kay or Silvertone made by Harmony featured inlay, binding and multiple pickups, switches and knobs, and cost more than a Les Paul Junior or Special and in some cases fully as much as a Les Paul Standard. While one of these instruments in near-perfect condition today might fetch $1,000 or more, it certainly would not have been nearly as good an investment as spending less to buy a Les Paul Junior and sure enough not as good an investment as spending an equal amount to buy an original 1959 sunburst Les Paul Standard.


Three acoustic guitars were offered in 1971. These were glued-neck models with roughly Martin-shaped heads and pickguards slightly larger and squarer than a Martin. All had spruce tops (presumably plywood), mahogany bodies and necks, rosewood fingerboards and dot inlays. These appear to be Japanese, not Brazilian Gianninis. The bridges are glued on, with screw-adjustable saddles and pins. The U3012 Auditorium was a Spanish-shaped steel-string and cost $89.50 plus the cost of a case. The U3013 Grand Auditorium was a dreadnought costing $105. The U3014 Twelve String cost $120.
I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!
Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
For one thing, the signal hasn't really "left the guitar" until the strings stop vibrating completely. In electrical sense, you can only say it's "left the guitar" for a given window of time. It's not unrealistic to think that what's happening ongoing in the guitar can affect the future signal (the pickups don't simply pickup an instantaneous signal then stop abruptly)
The Quantum pickup configuration of H-S-H offers a wide variety of tones, and since this isn’t a Telecaster, having a humbucker in the neck position is especially nice, I find. That single coil in the middle should be used more as a coloring device on selector positions two and four than as a straight-ahead choice. Augment the natural fullness of the humbuckers with a little jangle from the single coil and you’re in business.
Finally, we come to our time-based (and space-based) effects group. This includes reverb and delay. Both are forms of the same effect with reverb being a much faster version of delay. All they do is take the input and "smear it out" while reducing the volume over time. Not only does this create an extremely complicated signal that other effects won't react to well, but the variances in volumes these create would further confuse the previous pedals.
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Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.


In March when the Cut interviewed Fabi Reyna, the editor-in-chief and founder of She Shreds, a magazine for female-identifying guitar players, she commented on men insisting she listen to the guitar heroes we’re all allegedly mourning. “I was talking to a dude at a big company recently and he asked me if I’d heard of this band, which was, of course, a band of all dudes,” she said. “I was like, ‘Sorry, I don’t know much about male guitar history, and I don’t really care to. Don’t tell me or ask me about these bands because I just don’t know them.’”
While Line 6 is probably the best known high-volume preset modeling amp brand, Peavey isn’t far behind – and truly rivals the offerings of Line 6, both in quality and quantity. What’s especially intriguing about this particular amp is that it allows you to choose not just the amp models and a wealth of applicable effects, but that it gives you the power to choose the type of instrument you’re plugging into it – thusly shaping the rest of the options accordingly. Whether you play guitar, acoustic guitar, or bass, this amp can change it sound to suit the instrument. And that’s a lot more than other competitors’ amps have to offer. It also features a tap tempo, USB connectivity, a headphone jack, and more.
1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson’s mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world’s greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom’s 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that’s just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic ’59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original!
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Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.


Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.
By the 1980s and 1990s, software effects became capable of replicating the analog effects used in the past. These new digital effects attempt to model the sound produced by analog effects and tube amps, with varying degrees of quality. There are many free guitar effects computer programs that can be downloaded from the Internet. Now, computers with sound cards can be used as digital guitar effects processors. Although digital and software effects offer many advantages, many guitarists still use analog effects.
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