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ESP Guitars makes seven types, the Eclipse series, James Hetfield Truckster, and Kirk Hammett KH-3 from ESP, the LTD EC series and Truckster, the Edwards E-LP series, and the Navigator N-LP series, which are based on the Les Paul design. Certain EC models have 24-fret necks and active electronics using EMG pickups instead of the standard passive pickups and 22 frets found in the traditional Les Paul. The Edwards and Navigator lines are made in Japan, and available only on the Japanese market; they come standard with Gotoh hardware and Seymour Duncan pickups (EMG pickups in a few models), and unlike the EC and Eclipse series guitars, which are updated variants on the Les Paul, these are made to be as close to the Gibson 1959 Les Paul design as possible, in the vein of the late 1970s and 1980s “lawsuit” model guitars from Tokai, Burny, and Greco, complete with Gibson style headstocks.

The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product
Cool guitar! You really don’t see many of these anymore. You are correct that it’s similar to the Washburn Wing series, specifically the Washburn Eagle from the late ’70s and early ’80s. In fact, aside from different fretboard inlays and brand names on the headstocks, when you compare the two they’re nearly identical. If this connection seems odd, the occurrence of very similar guitars with different brand names is more common that many of us would think.
I'll start off by saying I am a novice guitar player. I've been playing off and on for 30 years, but more off than on. I've been playing on a hand-me-down Yamaha acoustic that was once a great guitar, but through many years of moving, poor storage and not doing anything other than the occasional set of new strings, that Yamaha just did not play well. One reason I was so off and on is that I could never get a clean sound from the Yamaha. I just thought I was not capable of learning guitar. Then, about a year ago, I tried out a friend's Fender acoustic and, after apologizing in advance for my poor playing ability, found that the same chords I struggled with on the Yamaha sounded crisp and clean on my friend's Fender, and I didn't have to make my fingers bleed
Indeed, the Adamas was not the only technological exploration conducted by Ovation. In 1973, as the threat of copying loomed, Ovation decided to manufacture its own inexpensive “copies.” Launching a full-out research effort Ovation came up with new bowl materials, a new way to make tops, and a new neck construction based on more technology used on the helicopter side.
The RG (Roadstar) is one of the most famous Superstrat guitars on the market and remains a hugely popular model in all price categories. However, they also produce other collections such as the streamlined S Series (standing for ‘Saber’) and the relaxed Talman collection. Also look out for the Iceman – an edgy original Ibanez design, famously used by Paul Stanley from Kiss.
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.
Very nice. I'd love to hear it. 12 strings seem to emphasize the difference among guitars, the 335-12, the Firebird 12, etc. I like the sound of the Rick, but playability is an issue, you might go through three or four before one feels right, then they are so easy to pull out of tune. But you've got a totally unique variety one of a kind variety there.
The Fender Mustang II V2 40w Guitar Amplifier Combo is an extremely versatile modelling amplifier that comes complete with 8 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets. So, you’ve got a huge amount of different sounds to play with! It’s like having 18 amplifiers in one easy to carry box all pumping out through a powerful 1 x 12” fender Special Design speaker – great for gigs and studio use!
The pre-amplifier section of a guitar amplifier serves to amplify a weak instrument signal to a level that can drive the power amplifier. It often also contains circuitry to shape the tone of the instrument, including equalization and gain controls. Often multiple cascading gain/clipping stages are employed to generate distortion. Because the first component in a valve amplifier is a valve gain stage, the output level of the preceding elements of the signal chain has a strong influence on the distortion created by that stage. The output level of the guitar's pickups, the setting of the guitar's volume knob, how hard the strings are plucked, and the use of volume-boosting effects pedals can drive this stage harder and create more distortion.
Sturdily constructed with a solid basswood body, bolted maple neck and rosewood fretboard, this black electric guitar has an attractive glossy finish. The list of add-ons include a high quality Hollinger BC-08 practice Amplifier (10 Amp), string-winder cable, strap, gig bag and pitch-pipe picks. The intonation as well as playability of the Davison full size electric guitar has been enhanced owing to its single, high quality humbucker pickup, chrome bridge system and diecast tuners. Last but not the least, the practice amp is suitably equipped with a headphones jack for noise-free practice sessions, as well as an overdrive mode for cool distortions!

Some versions of the TG-64 had the same floating-table vibrato system as on the SD-4L; my guess would be that these were earlier versions, although one can’t place too much faith in dating Japanese guitars by hardware appointments. Others had the more typical Japanese version of the Bigsby vibrato. This guitar was sold in the United States in ’65 as the Teisco Del Rey Model ET-320, but by ’66 had been dropped from the line.
A functionally solid-body electric guitar was designed and built in 1940 by Les Paul from an Epiphone acoustic archtop. His "log guitar" (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Epiphone hollow-body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid-body Gibson Les Paul introduced in 1952. However, the feedback associated with hollow-bodied electric guitars was understood long before Paul's "log" was created in 1940; Gage Brewer's Ro-Pat-In of 1932 had a top so heavily reinforced that it essentially functioned as a solid-body instrument.[2] In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company, making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him.

The best way to get this sound out of an Octavia is by using the neck pickup on the guitar and by experimenting with the tone knob to get a more pronounced octave effect. Some other famous Hendrix tunes using the Octavia are “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” from Band of Gypsies. If you want to put together a Jimi Hendrix pedal board, the Octavia is a must. There are many great reissues of this pedal on the market, but if you get a chance, like fuzzes, try a few of them next to each other. Even a few of the same pedal, as they often sound very different. One may have more of an octave effect, or be warmer sounding etc. This is due to the use of the transistors that can often have slightly different values that can make big tonal changes.
This is a great local shop.  I bought a new Floyd Rose bridge for one of my electric guitars and brought it to Franklin Guitar to be installed and set up.  I got the guitar back within 2 days and it plays so well that I brought them my other guitar for a set up the next day.  Again, within 2 days I had it back and it plays exactly like the other one...awesome.  I had both guitars set up for a little more than half of what another shop quoted me just to install and set up the new bridge on the one.  High quality work at a fair price in a reasonable time...I won't go any where else to have my guitars worked on.  They also have a good inventory of guitars and amps for sale to fit any budget.
By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
With electric specifically, it's important to ask what genre's of music do you want to play and who are your influences. A humbucker pick-up found in Les Pauls and SGs sound MUCH different than single-coils found in Stratocasters and Telecasters. If you like the sound of your guitar heroes, chances are you will like playing through similar gear. Again, go with my BUDGET, FEEL and SOUND trifecta!
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
The 2008 Les Paul Standard is outfitted with locking tuners from Grover, which deliver ease of use through a standard tuner and positive locking mechanism that securely locks each string in place. Simply insert each string through the string hole, turn the dial on the bottom of the tuner to lock the string, and begin tuning. Each string can be tuned to pitch in less than one complete revolution of the post. These Grover machine heads feature completely sealed components with an improved 18:1 tuning ratio.
Yet another acoustic steel guitar for the right handed guitarists. It has 6 strings and mostly comes in tobacco sunburst without a case. The perfect design makes it suitable for use by beginner guitarists. The sides and the back are made of meranti, with a spruce top. It is quite cost effective, with prices ranging from around INR 8,500 depending on available offers. More about Yamaha F310 TBS can be found on the following website link.

Your budget – When it comes to the best electric guitars or really any real instrument in general, you’re going to have to pay a decent amount of money if you want a quality investment. Although we did find a few budget-friendly guitars to take a look at below, a lot of these will near the half-a-thousand mark and beyond. It all depends on you, of course. Do you want a beginner and starter electric guitar to begin those shredding adventures? Or perhaps the best of the best that the most famous artists use? Perhaps you’ll end up saving more than you already have as you’re reading this — it may be worth it to wait a bit longer.
The Effect: Volume pedals are a simple, yet frequently essential piece of equipment for many musicians out there. This device’s function is quite self-explanatory – it allows the user to control the level of the sound output, allowing them to increase or decrease the volume of the instrument. Additionally, many of these products can also operate as expression pedals, or a control for some of the other effects on your pedalboard. These gizmos are typically known for being strong and sturdy pieces of gear, as they should since they get stomped on quite a lot. If you are looking for a proven solution, go for the Boss FV-500H, if not, check out our Best Volume Pedal reviews to find your perfect match.
Great guitar this is my 2nd one fist one i purchesd in 2010. Had to pown it I was realy upset about it but nothing i could do. I was so happy to find another one here on Amzon!!! Only thing it did not come with A pick card as addvertized. Thats why iam giveing it 4 in stead of 5 stars. Case that comes with it is realy cheep you would think the money invested the would at least give you a padded soft case.I have orderd a hard shell Gator case for it it will be here in 2 days. This is why it gets 3 stars. Iam a pro. Guritist and song writer,singer. Guitar it self gets 5 stars
The RockJam RJEG02 is coming from the hills of RockJam’s successful 15 years of producing some of the best and highly selling brands in the market. This full size, quality guitar contains a whammy bar, a guitar strap, a 10-watt amp, spare strings, electric guitar picks and a gig bag—making it a complete package suitable for the beginner and professional electric guitar player.

Higher-cost amps for professionals with an XLR DI out jack may also have a "ground lift" switch (to be used in case of a humming ground loop), a DI out level control knob, and a switch which determines whether the DI out signal to the PA or recording mixing board is pre- or post- the amp's internal preamplifier and equalization circuitry. The pre-/post- switch enables a bassist to decide whether to send the audio engineer just the signal from her bass, or to send the signal once it has been pre-amped and equalized by her amp settings. Some higher-cost amps may have a parametric equalizer (or a semi-parametric equalizer) for some frequency ranges (typically the middle frequency range), which can be used to modify the bass tone to suit different styles or performance venues. Some bass amps have a 15 or 20 dB pad which can be used to attenuate "hot" signals, such as basses with an internal preamplifier (depending on the model of amplifier, some brands may provide two inputs (high and low gain) instead of providing a "pad". This pad can be turned on using a button. Some bass amps have an even stronger pad, a 40 dB pad.


Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.

For beginning electric guitarists—or experienced players who want something inexpensive and portable—we think the Fender Champion 20 is the ideal amplifier. We researched 24 models, then put the 10 most popular to the test for 20 hours with two professional instructors, a guitar student, and our Wirecutter West Coast musical instrument testing team. With a colossal variety of sounds, plus built-in effects and intuitive controls, the Fender Champion 20 was a nearly unanimous top pick.


Semi-hollow body electric guitars are basically a middle ground between a solid body electric and a fully hollow body electric guitar. Jazz, country, and rock guitarists alike may gravitate towards semi-hollow body electric guitars for several reasons. One of the main reasons is that semi-hollow body guitars still produce that rich, resonant sound of a hollow instrument, but they typically have a solid or sometimes chambered center block in between the top and back. This design helps fight off that unwanted body-resonant feedback we spoke about before while even adding some extra sustain. Gibson offers a wide selection of semi-hollow body electric guitars, which include the iconic Gibson ES-335. Guitar brands such as Gretsch and Ibanez are also widely recognized for their semi-hollow body electric guitars.
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