You don't have to use plug-ins! Some synths such as the Virus TI have very flexible effects built in. You don't have to create audio effects in your sequencer. For example, I use the Access Virus synth, which features a simple delay effect, with the added bonus that all its parameters are available in the modulation matrix. One favourite trick involves routing velocity to the delay colour parameter. For parts that get brighter with increased velocity, it adds extra animation and bite if the echoes also get brighter. Unusually, the Virus also features four-way audio panning, so you can position an audio signal anywhere between the main stereo outputs and a second pair. If the second pair of outputs is routed to an external effects unit, you can play with the concept of moving a note around in a space, where its position also determines the treatment it gets. More fun can be had by modulating reverb time and colour via an LFO. The same LFO can then be used to control filter cutoff, EQ frequency and maybe wavetable position too (if your Virus is a TI). In this way, timbral changes happen at the same time as effect changes. Paul Nagle
Augustino Lo Prinzi Guitars - Augustine Lo Prinzi has made more than 10,000 guitars and just started his 49th year as a guitar maker! Renowned throughout the instrument making field, Augustino LoPrinzi's first instruments were classic guitars. As his career progressed he constructed many types of string instruments, numbering in the thousands : mandolins, lutes, violins, and steel string guitars, to list but a few. Now he is applying these years of wisdom to his first love, the classic guitar, which began his journey into instrument making.
Beatles guitarist George Harrison bought a 425 during a brief visit to the USA in 1963.[7] In February 1964, while in New York City, F.C. Hall of Rickenbacker met with the band and their manager, and gave Harrison a model 360/12 (the second electric twelve-string built by Rickenbacker).[7] This instrument became a key part of the Beatles’ sound on their LP A Hard Day’s Night and other Beatles songs through late 1964. Harrison played this guitar sporadically throughout the remainder of his life.
First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful.  My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do.  Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff.  Can't rave enough!  Definitely found my guitar store for life!  Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
We began the process by creating a 'short-list' of brands that have amps selling in the sub $1000 price range with amps that have strong enough ratings to be short-listed for any of our other electric guitar amp guides. This gave us the following 22 brands to consider: Blackstar, Boss, Bugera, California Tone Research, DV Mark, Egnater, EVH, Fender, Hughes & Kettner, Ibanez, Laney, Line 6, Marshall, Orange, Peavey, PRS, Randall, Roland, VHT, Vox, Yamaha and ZT.

Some bass amplifiers have an "overdrive" or distortion effect built into the unit. The Peavey Century 200 has an onboard "distortion" effect on the second channel. The Peavey VB-2 also has built-in overdrive. Aguilar Amplification's AG 500 bass head is a two-channel amplifier, one of which offers a "saturation" control for overdrive. A variety of BOSS combo amplifiers have a built-in "drive" effect. Gallien-Krueger's bass amp heads have a "boost" control which provides a simulated tube overdrive effect. The Behringer Ultrabass BVT5500H Bass Amplifier Head has a built-in limiter and overdrive. The LowDown LD 150 bass amp has a range of overdrive sounds, from a slight hint to heavy distortion. The CUBE-20XL BASS amp includes built-in overdrive.
Ovation Instruments is a Division of Kaman Corporation, a major supplier to the United States government of military helicopters, rescue equipment, electronic components and other aerospace products. There are eight divisions of Kaman, participating in such diverse industries as commercial transportation, nuclear sciences, space medicine, education and social sciences, oceanography and, most recently, recreation.
The biggest issue when starting out is not to get any bad habits with picking or hand/finger positioning. I'd highly recommend to find a teacher who - not necessarily on a periodical basis - would take a closer look at your progress and technique and make adjustments when needed. There are lots of bad habits that you can get and I'd rather spend some money on lessons than weeks of lifetime to undo those.
“As a general rule, the more powerful the magnet the more high frequencies you’ll get, and also the more low frequencies as well. The high frequencies don’t really need a lot of power to drive them, but the bass frequencies do. However, it’s also down to the coil windings you use and the gauge of wire. So it's not just the magnet that’s responsible for the change.”
Guitar effects pedals offer a huge range of possibilities for guitar-sound manipulation―there are literally hundreds of pedals from scores of manufacturers. If you or someone you know is not completely satisfied with the clean, unprocessed sound coming from their guitar and they want to experiment with and modify or color that sound, a great way to tweak it is with effects pedals, also called “stompboxes.” An effects pedal, depending upon its configuration, modifies the sound of a guitar through electrical circuitry or digital modeling via computer chips, either giving it subtle color or dramatic shift. All pedals include knobs on the enclosures that allow the player to adjust the intensity, speed, depth, and shape of the effect in increments, from nuanced color to ear-splitting crunch.
Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.
The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.
Almost since the birth of amplified guitars in the early 1930s, players looked for ways to enhance the sound of their electric guitars. A huge variety of guitar effects have emerged from their experiments. These include rack-mounted effects, effects built into amplifiers, and pedal effects. While rack-mounted and built-in effects are separate topics, this article focuses on stomp boxes, which are foot-switchable pedal effects designed for use during live performance.

Over the years, Muddy has famously criticized EM, but around the time of its release, he seemed to have a different attitude. Blues fans claim he always hated it but the following proves otherwise. Six months after EM, the same line-up reassembled and recorded a sequel called After The Rain (1969) that still has distortion on it but isn't as overtly psychedelic. If Muddy hadn't liked EM, he would have had enough say at Chess to dismiss a follow-up, but instead he went along with it. In fact, Pete Cosey says "I'll never forget as soon as I walked into the studio for the follow-up and Muddy saw me he threw his arms around me and said ‘Hey, how you doing, boy, play some of that stuff you played on the last album." After The Rain's songs alternate between Chicago blues and distorted guitar tracks. There's a marked difference on After The Rain with Paul Oscher (harmonica) and Otis Spann (piano) from Muddy's old band joining in and Muddy playing lead guitar on several tracks. On the Chicago blues tracks, more prominent bass and drums put the music into a rock setting, but it's Muddy's slide guitar playing that highlights them. Muddy really let's loose with some striking, tenseful slide work on tracks like "Honey Bee," "Rollin and Tumblin" and "Blues and Trouble" that just send a chill through your bones. On the other side of the album, the guitar on "Ramblin Mind" lashes and cries out in dense fuzz while on "Bottom of the Sea," the fuzzy leads seem to hang in the air along with an innovative bowed bass and harmonious organ in the background (the bowed bass is also used on the record on "I am The Blues").
In the mid-1950s, guitar distortion sounds started to evolve based on sounds created earlier in the decade by accidental damage to amps, such as in the popular early recording of the 1951 Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm song "Rocket 88", where guitarist Willie Kizart used a vacuum tube amplifier that had a speaker cone,[12][13] slightly damaged in transport.[14] Rock guitarists began intentionally "doctoring" amplifiers and speakers in order to emulate this form of distortion.[15] In 1956, guitarist Paul Burlison of the Johnny Burnette Trio deliberately dislodged a vacuum tube in his amplifier to record "The Train Kept A-Rollin" after a reviewer raved about the sound Burlison's damaged amplifier produced during a live performance. According to other sources Burlison's amp had a partially broken loudspeaker cone. Pop-oriented producers were horrified by that eerie "two-tone" sound, quite clean on trebles but strongly distorted on basses, but Burnette insisted to publish the sessions, arguing that "that guitar sounds like a nice horn section".[16]
Having perfected the modelling amp concept, Line 6 have become experts at delivering a huge variety of great sounds in a convenient, affordable package. Experiment with 12 different amp models, from classic 1960s Fender tone to the “Insane Red”, inspired by the mental Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, and sculpt your tone further with the seven built-in effects.
Today's modern rock guitar sounds tend to be "drier" (less room ambiance and reverb), and most often use the close mic technique. There's really nothing to it. Simply use the close mic, run it through the compressor, set the compressor at a 3:1 ratio and adjust the threshold so that the compressor is usually working, but not squashing the signal too much. You will be able to make most of the tone adjustments you need at the amp or guitar, and chances are you won't need to tweak the console' s equalizer at all.
After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:

Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.

Their LP models have a "mahogany" body, and the binding is very thin so I think the maple top is just vaneer. I also noticed the headstocks were not the usual LP angle. In my opinion, Epiphone wins hand down. The Strat types don't look much better in my opinion, again, sharp fret ends and awful looking headstock and logo. If you see any of their relic jobs, you'll notice that they range from passable from a distance to hideous from any range. 

As to the “where,” positioning your mic an inch or less from the grillecloth and aiming it straight at the center of the speaker cone – pointing at the dust cap, in other words – yields a bright, punchy, detailed sound that suits many requirements, but can be too harsh. At the other extreme, aiming the mic at the edge of the cone, where the cone meets the suspension (the area just inside the speaker cutout in the cab’s mounting baffle) usually results in a looser, warmer, more raw and edgy tone. Between these two positions, there’s a wealth of voices to explore, and every inch of real estate that the mic covers between dust cap and cone edge will bring a noticeable sonic shift, without touching the amp’s controls. Also, aiming the mic straight at the speaker, in other words, mounted at 90 degrees to the flat plane of the front of the amp, and aiming it off axis, at a slight angle to the speaker, will illicit different sounds, too. With an assistant helping, or the guitarist playing if that’s not you, try moving the mic around the surface of the speaker while listening for the changes in tone through monitors or headphones, or if you don’t have enough isolation between live amp and monitors, record a little in each of several positions to listen back to. Pick the position you like for the track, and go with it.
Some guitars have what is called a push-pull knob where pulling the knob will change a setting, or access a different setting. For example, some guitars have one knob when pulled will turn the bridge humbucker pickup as if into a single-coil pickup, which is known as a coil-split. Some guitars like ones from Fender have what is called the Fender S1 switching system where pushing a knob will alter the behavior of the pickup selector.
Some professional-grade amp heads, such as Ampeg's SVT400-PRO, have an audio crossover, an electronic filter that enables a bassist to split their bass signal into a low-pitched signal (which could be routed to a cabinet suited for low-pitched sounds, such as a 1x15" or 2x15" cabinet), and then send the middle and high-frequencies to a different cabinet suited to this register (e.g., a 2x10" or 4x10" cabinet with a horn-loaded tweeter). Amps with a crossover can either have a single crossover point pre-set at the factory (e.g., 100 Hz) or a knob is provided to enable the bassist to select the frequency where the bass signal is split into low and higher-pitched signal. The SVT400-PRO has a user-adjustable crossover knob. Amps with an adjustable crossover point can enable bassists to fine tune the sound of their bass sound. For example, in some halls, a bassist's usual crossover point may sound too "boomy" or rumbly; turning the crossover knob to send more of the low-pitched bass signal through the 2x10" cab may reduce this problem.
Plug one in, and you'll understand what an acoustic instrument is supposed to sound like while playing live. Unplugged they sound great as well, especially the deep bowl models. I hear from my friends that they think those rounded backs feel awkward to play while sitting down. I have a deep contour bowl, that is way more comfy playing relaxed in my couch than even my little 000-martin.
1. (n.) A sweet or agreeable succession of sounds.2. (n.) A rhythmical succession of single tones, ranging for the most part within a given key, and so related together as to form a musical whole, having the unity of what is technically called a musical thought, at once pleasing to the ear and characteristic in expression.3. (n.) The air or tune of a musical piece.
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The product also has an original feature, called ISF, advertised to “give you infinite sound possibilities, from the USA to the UK” by using pre-set bass, mid, and treble setting that the user can select between. Some customers remarked that the feature doesn’t seem to make much of a difference, but praise the tone quality and good functionality of the product nevertheless.  
: Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.
ESP is another huge brand in the realm of electric guitar, with huge bands like Metallica, The Rolling Stones, Deftones, Lamb of God, and Slayer endorsements in full swing. Any fan of this kind of acts will be very interested in starting with an ESP of their own. Like Fender and Gibson, ESP has a more affordable range known as LTD. This kit includes an electric blue H-51 guitar with 24 frets and dual humbuckers, as well as a 12 pick sampler set, gig bag, guitar stand, strap, 10-foot instrument cable, and a tuner.
To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, 5-ply top binding with pearloid outer layer, elevated tortoise pickguard with b/w binding, backstripe of two horizontal lines surrounded by two rows of diag lines (like a Style 45), bound ebony fingferboard, style 45 fingerboard snowflake inlays, trapeze tail piece, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, bound peghead, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.

Some bass amplifiers have an "overdrive" or distortion effect built into the unit. The Peavey Century 200 has an onboard "distortion" effect on the second channel. The Peavey VB-2 also has built-in overdrive. Aguilar Amplification's AG 500 bass head is a two-channel amplifier, one of which offers a "saturation" control for overdrive. A variety of BOSS combo amplifiers have a built-in "drive" effect. Gallien-Krueger's bass amp heads have a "boost" control which provides a simulated tube overdrive effect. The Behringer Ultrabass BVT5500H Bass Amplifier Head has a built-in limiter and overdrive. The LowDown LD 150 bass amp has a range of overdrive sounds, from a slight hint to heavy distortion. The CUBE-20XL BASS amp includes built-in overdrive.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more
The Vox brand was also applied to Jennings's electronic organs, most notably the Vox Continental of 1962, whose distinctive trademark "wheedling" tone was immortalised by Alan Price on the Animals' track "House of the Rising Sun". In 1962 the Vox Continental was given to The Echoes to trial on stage and use on records they cut with Bert Weedon and Dusty Springfield as well being featured on their version of "Sticks & Stones" 1963 as well many other records, and later used by Paul Revere of Paul Revere & the Raiders, as well as Ray Manzarek on most songs recorded by The Doors and by John Lennon on The Beatles' track "I'm Down", both in the studio and live at their 1965 Shea Stadium concert. Doug Ingle of Iron Butterfly used it on "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" and other songs of the group. Mike Smith of The Dave Clark Five and Rod Argent of The Zombies also made frequent use of the instrument. Peter Tork of the Monkees can be seen playing the unusual looking Vox organs several times during the Monkees TV series (1966–1968). In newer popular music, the organist Spider Webb of the UK garage band The Horrors can be seen using a Vox Continental. A famous Vox organ riff can be heard on "96 Tears" by Question Mark & the Mysterians. Benmont Tench of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers has frequently used his vintage 1965 single Continental in the studio with the band since 1976 and still uses the instrument today. Another famous signature Vox organ sound was created by Augie Meyers when playing with the Sir Douglas Quintet, as heard in the songs "Mendocino" and "She's About a Mover."

GuitarPCB.com – designs and sells printed circuit boards (PCBs) with a boutique look for classic and boutique pedal designs. Their active forum provides support for builders using the PCBs. A theme throughout their site is that you expensive boutique pedals are simply classic older designs with little or no modification, and you can easily build your own.


Kasuga produced their own house brand in Kasuga guitars. For a brief period of time the company produced Yamaha acoustic guitars. Kasuga guitars were first sold in America in 1972. Unlike many Japanese manufacturers who outsourced their guitar production in other factories outside the main maker, Kasuga produced all their products in-house. Badged guitars known to have been made by Kasuga include Conrad, Emperador, ES-S, Ganson, Heerby, Hondo, Mei Mei and Roland. Kasuga went out of business in 1996.

The guitar is built of full, all-solid maple that gives a nice clean tone and helps to avert some of the feedback prone to other fully hollow guitars. There’s a mahogany set neck to both help with longer sustain and to give you the premium fit and finish usually reserved for more expensive hollow-body instruments. The two ACH-ST humbuckers aren’t ultra-heavy metal pickups, so you won’t get a ton of snarling distortion out of the AF55, but you can push an overdrive sound to the next level if you want to. It all adds up to a sound that’s perfect for a player who’s looking to go for the jazz/blues vibe, or someone who’s looking to go for a singer/songwriter roots project. The trapezoid tailpiece also gives you a nice nod to vintage axes, too.
Each option has a unique tonal quality, some may not seem all that useful in some situations.  2 adjacent pickups that are out of phase, can sound very tinny and weak but often cut through better in the mix as they occupy a different placement in the spectrum.  Consider Brian May's (Queen) tone as some of his selections rely on 2 single coil pickups being out of phase

When you access our digital guitar tab database, not only do you have the benefit of our user-friendly browsing, but you have the option to preview the sheet music you've selected before purchase. Leave behind all doubt that you have the version of your guitar hit you've been yearning to learn. Our sheet music includes a range for all skill levels, so no matter where you are on your path down guitar playing, we will have sheet music to benefit you.


A marvelous 6 string acoustic guitar for the right handed. It has a beautiful natural satin finish, giving it awesome looks for stage performance. It is developed by cort guitars, with over 50 years of experience in musical instruments manufacture. The body back and sides are made from mahogany, whereas the top is spruce laminated. Prices range from around INR 7,600 depending on offers available, which is relatively affordable. You can get more product details by clicking on:

Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White
Harmonizers – Commonly used for vocal harmonies, these pedals can do a lot to beef up your sound. You can also use them in creative ways, like Steve Vai and Robert Fripp, who have been known to disable the main signal altogether so that their music is coming only from the pitch-shifted output. Using a modern harmonizer can be as easy as setting it to the key you’re playing in, and many even support more than one harmony at once.

Get a Luthier (or do it yourself if you have the knowledge) to change the tuners to the ones I specified, take the sharp edges off the neck, throw some extra light strings on, and do a set up and this guitar becomes a dream guitar for kids or adults for a lifetime. So while the Yamaha APXT2 may not be the best guitar for your purpose, in this price range you WILL NOT find the perfect guitar, period. At least Yamaha gave us a foundation off which to build (which you can't say for other brands) and with a little modification here and there, you will have the perfect little guitar. I bought this for my child and I find myself picking it up and playing it more than my more expensive full size guitars. It's just a pleasure having it around the house, but not so much so before I modified it. There's nothing worse than having a guitar that's just about not a toy as compared to a professional guitar. You want to make your guitar easy to tune and enjoyable to play so spend the extra bucks to make it perfect and you will have no regrets.


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Contrary to popular belief, magnetic pickups are used on both acoustic guitars and electric guitars. These pickups sit in the sound hole of a guitar, so they don’t require any drilling or permanent modification. They’re also commonly an aftermarket addition (the John Lennon signature guitar is the only exception to this trend that springs to mind).
It’s best to perform pickup adjustments while playing through a clean amp. You can more accurately hear the true tone and volume of each pickup when the signal isn’t being compressed or overdriven by a cranked amp or pedal. Listen to the tone of each pickup position, and try to balance the height of each pickup until the volume remains relatively the same when changing pickup settings.
Regarding truss rods, all vintage Martin instruments post-1934 have *non-adustable* truss rods (T rod). This means the neck better be straight, otherwise an expensive repair will be in order. To check neck straightness on a guitar, first tune the guitar to pitch. Then hold the low-E string down at the 1st and 14th frets. Note the distance between the bottom of the low-E string, and the 7th fret. You should be able to put a medium guitar pick in this space. Any more, and the neck is "bowed". Any less, and the neck is "back bowed". Repeat this with the high-E string (the same results should be seen; if not, the neck has a "twist" to it).
I have had Tracy do quite abit of work for me many times going back since the 90’s, however, now I am “on my own” living a long way from his shop. He is a super craftsman for sure and I wanted to watch how to do some minor things on my own as well as be able to help educate myself before finding someone locally to work on my guitars in the future. Great explanations and for my reference in future.
At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”
Originally this effect used 1/4″ tape going round a machine like the Echoplex. It then recorded whatever you were playing and played it back to you a set time later.Since its launch in the 1950’s tape based delay started to appear in more and more recordings. Its saturated sound and imperfect repeats gave it some stunning character that is still loved today.Now tape is dwindling so most people have moved on to emulated digital pedals. These get close to the sound of an original tape unit without any of the added maintenance.
\n\n Harmony branded some of their old acoustic guitars with the Nashville\nname. \n\n There was a Japanese company called Nashville\nMusical Instruments NMI \n\n I have an acoustic guitar with no name on the headstock, and\na label inside that reads nothing but Nashville. I tracked down the information\non it once. It's a cheap guitar from the 80’s, made overseas, imported by a US\ncompany that sells children’s toys now. I can't for the life of me remember the\nname of that company now. I was searching for it, with no luck, when I found\nyour question. \n\n There is also the Nashville Guitar Company NGC based in\nInglewood, TN \n\n
The Epiphone G-400 features a mahogany body and neck and a rosewood fingerboard. It has Alnico Classic PRO™ pickups with coil-splitting on both pickups via a push/pull control on the pickups’ volume controls which gives you a lot of tonal variety. If you want to nail it like Angus Young, Eric Clapton in his Cream days or Tony Iommi from Black Sabbath, the PRO gives you the sound of a true SG without the vintage price tag.
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Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”

Silvertone starter pack is incredibly hard to beat. The candy blue finish gives the guitar a gorgeous aesthetic that looks fully professional. The pickup selector has 5 positions, and there are two tone knobs to give even more control over the sound. Stratocaster fans will love this guitar! Also included in the set is a gig bag, small Silvertone amp, strap, 5 picks, Allan wrenches, strings, a clip-on tuner, and a tremolo bar.


This company really does nothing for me. Hideous designs, cumbersome shaped guitars and the fact that they keep milking dime bags name just makes me feel like they don't have much else. There are definitely worse brands out there like first act and daisy rock (shudders) but I've always thought dean just always sucked as a metal guitar company and b.c. rich isn't to far behind them in my opinion.
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.
Epiphone offers one for every guitarist out there and has a product lineage featuring electric, acoustic and other options. One of its famed options among the acoustic line is the Les Paul Ukulele, a true vintage piece. The guitar has been termed as the market leader in the acoustic guitar field. It comes with mahogany body facilitated by top laminated, rosewood fingerboard and maple top. The tone of the same is truly resonating.
Electri6ity is HUGE, like over 26 gigs, but it's like having Eddie Van Halen in your plugin bin once you figure out how to use it. The learning curve is steep, but there's no way I would ever be able to play guitar as well as I can program it not to mention afford the thousands of dollars worth of high-end guitars that are sampled. It also includes a very nice effects rack that is optimized for the library (although DI versions are included so you're free to run it through Amplitube or whatever you like).
Fun !...Top 5...Such a good game I love it I would defiantly reccomend this game to all console users the graphic las the entertainment is just great you can play either online or offline so that's good so many different missions to play all at different difficulty so they ain't too easy but they also ain't too hard I ate this 5 stars for everything of people like shooting games car games then go get this game coz it is all of those things it is just excellent....The graphics are amazing though but I'm going to trade it in for something I enjoy more if this is your type of game I would recommend it but I mostly play games like Diablo and wolfenstein thought I might like it but don't and I don't have anything negative to say about it because it looks and plays great just not my cup of tea
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Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!
If you're a beginner, you'll love an option like the Yamaha RBX170 Bass or the Epiphone Thunderbird IV Bass. These bass guitars offer great tone and style all at a price you can easily afford. Best of all, their durable construction will withstand all the paces an eager learner will put them through. Maybe you're already an established player and are looking for a new challenge? If that's the case, you'll love the American Deluxe Jazz Bass V 5-String Electric Bass from Fender. This beautiful five string is loaded with updated electronics and Noiseless pickups for a tight low-end response you're definitely going to appreciate. Its alder body helps to give it a wonderfully clear tone that any bassist will want to hear every time they strap in. You'll also find acoustic basses in this section such as the EAB Acoustic-Electric Bass from Dean and the stunning A5 Ultra Bass Fretless SA 5-String Acoustic-Electric Bass Guitar from Godin. These basses are perfect for performers who demand the ultimate versatility. It won't matter where you're gigging with these gorgeous basses, you'll have the freedom to play them acoustic or plug in for a louder sound that can fill larger venues. The bass has always been an unsung hero in popular music, but that doesn't mean it doesn't play a crucial note. With any of the top quality basses available here, you'll have no trouble keeping the band in the groove and having them sound tighter than ever before.
We’ve had a lot of fun looking at all of these great online guitar electric acoustics, and hope that among or top ten is your next instrument. There’s a lot to read through and consider, but we’ve been sure to make sure there’s something for everyone here, and all of the guitars come highly recommended. Read through the buyer’s guide if you’re new to electric acoustic guitars and aren’t 100% sure of what you’re comparing between electric and acoustic, and then make your purchase knowing you’ve made the right decision.
Martin began with a 000-size guitar, which had 12 frets clear of the body. They rejected the 27" scale idea, as this would have been impractical since the high string tension on a guitar would have made the instrument hard to play. Instead they used a 25.4" scale length. To accommodate Bechtel's request for 15 frets clear of the body, they squared the body's shoulders to add 1 5/16" to the clear part of the fingerboard. This allowed 14 frets clear of the body. Since they felt aesthetically the bridge should remain halfway between the center of the soundhole and the endblock, there really was no way to make the guitar have 15 frets clear. The bottom bout was reshaped slightly to match the new shape of the upper bout (note when the 000 went to 14 frets in 1934 it retained this initial OM body shape).
A vintage pickup is literally old. “Vintage-style” usually means a new pickup designed to sound like an old one. Vintage and vintage-style pickups generally have only moderate output. The term “vintage” has most often been applied to designs that originated before 1970, though as we move forward in time, so does the expiration date on “vintage.” But for now, at least, all vintage-style pickups are passive.

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Honestly, a couple of years back I never looked at Fender for acoustic guitars because everyone was always talking about Taylors, Gibsons, Martins, Takamines, Paul Reed Smiths etc. Despite being a very good electric guitar company not to mention the inventor of the no. 1 guitar in the world, the strat, everyone always looked Fender, alongside with Ibanez and Washburn (good electric guitar brands) as bad acoustic manufacturers. I was one of them too. For me, Washburn and Ibanez might be a good budget acoustic guitar manufacturer but they don't deserve to be high in this 'top acoustic guitar brands' list. But for Fender, these past few months my mindset about them changed. I never realized how authentic and good sounding fender acoustics were way back then but I'm happy now that I changed my mind about them. I love them now. It's not about having vintage acoustics, or having high end prices. Fender don't set their prices as high as taylor, martin or gibson but they must not be judged ...more
Classical guitars by Martin are equal in craftsmenship to their steel string models. But unfortunately, their sound and feel is not what classical players seem to want. Therefore they do not have the collectability of the steel string models. I group Martin classical models to include the "NY" series and gut string models made from the 1930's and later.
The Ibanez AFC95 extends the Japanese manufacturer’s reach well into the future whilst remaining true to its roots. The elegantly styled single-cutaway hollowbody is equipped with forward-thinking appointments that extends the tonal versatility of the hollowbody further than ever before. Sublime hardware includes a delightfully nimble ebony fingerboard, whilst the ebony bridge and AFC tailpiece optimise intonation and sustain superbly.
Don’t worry about getting the strumming patterns down perfect. You will develop your own strumming style in time. Just try to stay in time. If you have to strum open strings in-between chords, while you switch from one to the other, that’s OK, too. In fact, sometimes, it’s even desirable. It’s what we call ‘style’. You’re main objective right now is learning the chord fingerings, and getting your changes smooth.

The design, while nothing particularly special, is clean and beautiful, which will help it appeal to most guitarists - the dreadnought acoustic body being one of the favorite parts. Ultimately, just about anyone could pick up this guitar and get what they need out of it, which is why it makes our top pick. We could recommend it to anyone, and when you talk about the price, it becomes even more attractive, because this is a high-end guitar for mid-range money.
Another exotic tonewood is making a name for itself in the guitar industry. It’s similar in appearance and sound performance as Mahogany. It has a distinctive punch for the mid-range tones, but it emphasizes the bright trebles that can be an asset in music when you achieve pitch-perfect intonation. The Martin Road Series DRS1 Guitar sports Sapele beauty perfectly!
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The metal guitars that emerged in the 80's were simply geared towards people into metal, aesthetically geared that is, since all guitarists in every genre want guitars that are easy to play. Their main benefit was in introducing better tremolo systems - the locking nut and fine tuners on the trem so you didn't have to unlock the nut to make fine tuning adjustments. I had one on my Stratocaster, you could go nuts with the whammy bar and it would stay locked in tune.
A phaser uses a filter to sweep the frequency range of the audio input and mixes that with the original audio signal. When the signals are mixed the portions that are out of phase (or out of alignment with each other) cancel out and produce a swirling, shoowsy sound. This effect was very popular in the 1970’s and heard on countless recordings of the era in nearly every musical style.

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A functionally solid-body electric guitar was designed and built in 1940 by Les Paul from an Epiphone acoustic archtop. His "log guitar" (so called because it consisted of a simple 4x4 wood post with a neck attached to it and homemade pickups and hardware, with two detachable Epiphone hollow-body halves attached to the sides for appearance only) shares nothing in design or hardware with the solid-body Gibson Les Paul introduced in 1952. However, the feedback associated with hollow-bodied electric guitars was understood long before Paul's "log" was created in 1940; Gage Brewer's Ro-Pat-In of 1932 had a top so heavily reinforced that it essentially functioned as a solid-body instrument.[2] In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company, making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him.
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