While the Boss ME-80 doesn’t have anything in terms of extras to really blow expectations out of the water, it includes some nice and handy features. The onboard looper works well and has 38 seconds of loop time, which is enough time to do some basic jamming over some chords. And speaking of jamming, the AUX input on the back of the ME-80 is nice, since it allows you to plug in an iPhone/metronome/mp3 player/any other music playing device and jam along with your music (this is fun and a feature we would actually use). The USB output lets you take patch editing over to your computer, in BOSS's Tone Studio software. Cool, but not necessary since editing patches is actually very easy and actually quite fun on the unit itself (no complicated menus to go through - just fun knobs!). One idiosyncrasy to be aware of is that if you plug anything into the headphones jack, the speaker simulator is automatically enabled. This is great for solo practice in your headphones, but note that that’s the only way to actually switch it on.
Washburn is an EXCELLENT brand. I have owned an N4, 2 N2's, and their latest, cheapest Nuno model for my daughter. My daughter's guitar is amazing for the price I wish I had such quality for my starter guitar. I would put my N4 up against ANY guitar- period. Plus, whenever I have contacted the company, they have top notch customer service. I know this isn't about amps, but I wrote them about an issue I had with my Randall amp ( a division of Washburn). Without me asking, they mailed me an amp part with an apology. Top notch.
Single coil pickups utilize a single magnet. They also typically have a lower output than humbucking pickups, which means they aren’t capable of producing as much distortion as a humbucker equipped guitar. However, because they’re not intended to be used with extreme levels of distortion they have a very rich and musical voice when played with lower amounts of gain.

If the Complete Technique book is good for quick starts, this would be the bullet train. Another Hal Leonard selection, this is a trim 48 pages for teaching you how to hold a guitar for the first time. Tuning up, easy chords, and strumming. If you got a guitar on Friday, use this to put together your first three-chord jam by Monday. Will it sound good? No, no, it will not. But you’ll have started, which is key. Some of the other books on this list are dense with both concepts and pages, which might delay your starting. Don’t let that happen.
Fender California Series Classic This acoustic guitar series will make you swoon with its original Fender body shapes, fully painted tops of solid Sitka spruce and matching Stratocaster-style headstocks. But the California Series Classic models don’t only have the looks; they also have the sound and tonal quality to match. We don’t expect anything less from Fender, and this lineup surely delivers.
According to the official information Guitar Tricks has more than double the number of song lessons than any other guitar learning site. It goes on to say that there are more than 600 but I feel that the number could be even higher by now because new songs are added regularly. The songs available on Guitar Tricks are the ones that I want to learn, oldies and modern songs from major artists like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eagles, Blink-182, Extreme, Good Charlotte and many more. Check out this list of Guitar Tricks Artists. Did I mention that lots of songs have a beginner and an advanced level lesson? I just love that the advanced level songs are taught based on the original arrangement and not some vague resemblance used to avoid copyright issues. This is because Guitar Tricks has licenses for teaching the original songs.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.

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• Don’t always blame the frets: Buzzing doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fret problem. Some guitar players set their bridges for super-low action in their quest for speed, and that can makes frets buzz. For beginners unfamiliar with how accurately tuned strings sound or more experienced players exploring dropped and open tunings for the first time, buzzing can also be a buzz kill. Low tunings like dropped D and open D and open C may prompt guitars with normal action to buzz due to the slack in the strings unless a guitar is set up properly to accommodate such tunings.
Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE, is an English musician, singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009 In the mid-1960s, Clapton left the Yardbirds to play blues with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers. Immediately ...more on Wikipedia
When Leo and the boys at the big “F” ranch developed the Tele, they put a big slab of steel under the bridge-pickup coil. This reflected the magnetic field up and toward the strings. In the words of Seymour Duncan’s Evan Skopp, this gives it more “crack”—which, if you’re addicted to twang, is a good thing. The better news is that you can attach a plate (sometimes called an elevator plate, because of how it elevates the magnetic field toward the strings) to any single coil whose pole-piece magnets are exposed at the back.
Never buy a guitar for its looks alone. You must buy a guitar only once you have started learning and know your fingerstyle and the genre of songs you will be playing. Most of the guitars last for more than a decade. This is the reason, you must keep all these tips in mind before buying a guitar. Look for the style of your playing before you buy a guitar. A few guitars have a thicker neck which may or may not be comfortable to you. In each brand of guitars, different layouts and designs are available. Look for the series and the design that provide you comfort while playing the guitar.

It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.


Takamine has been known for their high quality and highly affordable guitars for years. Their GD51CE comes in just under $500, and is a cutaway dreadnought. It is my top pick if you are looking for the best cutaway acoustic guitar under $500. It has a slim neck for great playability, something that beginners and experts both love. It has a spruce top with rosewood back and sides. You will also be able to amplify this guitar, as it is an acoustic electric. It comes in natural or sunburst finishes. Owners describe it’s sound as loud and balanced, which is expected of a dreadnought cutaway. You can’t go wrong either, as it has an onboard tuner. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
Guitar distortion is obtained and shaped at various points in the signal processing chain, including multiple stages of preamp distortion, power valve distortion, output and power transformer distortion, and guitar speaker distortion. Much of the distortion character or voicing is controlled by the frequency response before and after each distortion stage. This dependency of distortion voicing on frequency response can be heard in the effect that a wah pedal has on the subsequent distortion stage, or by using tone controls built into the guitar, the preamp or an EQ pedal to favor the bass or treble components of the guitar pickup signal prior to the first distortion stage. Some guitarists place an equalizer pedal after the distortion effect, to emphasize or de-emphasize different frequencies in the distorted signal.
The roots of effects pedal usage can be traced back to early into the history of the electric guitar, but two people immediately come to mind who really pushed its usage out there:  Roger Mayer and Jimi Hendrix.  We’ve come a long way since those early days and it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the insane amount of options out there.  From good old standbys to newer boutique options, it can be a chore to know what effects pedals could be right for you.

Speaking of versatility, pedals aren't the only type of multi effects units that you'll find here. There are also rack-mounted models like the Rocktron VooDu Valve Online Guitar Multi Effects Processor and the Line 6 POD HD PRO X Guitar Multi Effects. Looking for a case to store your multi effects pedal when it's time to pack up after the show? Check out the Gator G-MULTIFX - Medium Guitar Effects Pedal Bag and the Boss BOSS Bag L2 for starters. There's lots to see here, and it's worth taking the time to have a close look!

The Gibson Les Paul was the result of a design collaboration between Gibson Guitar Corporation and the late jazz guitarist and electronics inventor Les Paul. In 1950, with the introduction of the radically innovative Fender Telecaster to the musical market, solid-body electric guitars became a public craze (hollow-body electric guitars have more acoustic resonance but are, therefore, more prone to amplifier feedback and have less natural note duration “sustain”.) In reaction, Gibson Guitar president Ted McCarty brought guitarist Les Paul into the company as a consultant. Les Paul was a respected innovator who had been experimenting with guitar design for years to benefit his own music. In fact, he had hand-built a solid-body prototype called “The Log”, a design widely considered the first solid-body Spanish guitar ever built, as opposed to the “Hawaiian”, or lap-steel guitar. This guitar is known as “The Log” because the solid core is a pine block whose width and depth are a little more than the width of the fretboard; conventional hollow guitar sides were added for shape (Image 2), a design similar to the popular Gibson ES-335 semi-hollowbody guitar introduced in 1958. Although numerous other prototypes and limited-production solid-body models by other makers have since surfaced, it is known that in 1945–1946, Les Paul had approached Gibson with “The Log” prototype, but his solid body design was rejected.[8][9]


DESIGN AND PLANNING It is best to pre-plan your design concept so you can correct any mistakes on paper before you get to the wood and can't go back. Sketch out some design concepts on paper then, once you have decided on something,lay out a couple of pieces of poster board to draw the body shape out on. You can let you imagination go wild or if you perfer stay with a more traditional design. For this particular guitar I built, I chose to go with a PRS style body design. To get the measurment correct, I pulled a picture of the guitar I was modeling it after from a guitar catalog that was taken straight on and not from the side. I then scaled up the guitar by marking out a grid on the picture and transposed it to some poster board that I had drew a larger grid on. I knew that the pickup rings measured 3 1/2" by 1 1/2" and thats what I used to scale the picture up and get the proportions correct. Another method is to project the image on a wall and trace it to the poster board if you happen to have a projector but I like to draw my template out freehand. You don't have to use this method for the design if you want to come up with you own unique style. Just make sure that take all the parts that will go on to your guitar into consideration first like the neck postition, pick ups and knobs.
When considering the guitar from a historical perspective, the musical instrument used is as important as the musical language and style of the particular period. As an example: It is impossible to play a historically informed de Visee or Corbetta (baroque guitarist-composers) on a modern classical guitar. The reason is that the baroque guitar used courses, which are two strings close together (in unison), that are plucked together. This gives baroque guitars an unmistakable sound characteristic and tonal texture that is an integral part of an interpretation. Additionally the sound aesthetic of the baroque guitar (with its strong overtone presence) is very different from modern classical type guitars, as is shown below.

As mentioned above, the Martin DSR2 comes with an all-solid wood body, with traditional solid spruce as its top. In conjunction with the solid sapele back and sides, this configuration produces premium level Martin dreadnought tones, albeit with stripped down aesthetics. The neck is as familiar as it gets, with its 1.75" nut width and 25.4" scale length.
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.
This is a wide range of electric guitar series that have a stylish body and deliver high-quality sound. Cort guitars are fabricated by South Korean manufactures and have been on the market since 1973. Those who are keen on the appearance of the guitar can opt for this brand of electric guitar. This is an electric guitar that is available at an affordable price range between 10,000 to 40,000 INR.
I purchased this as a replacement for my acoustic guitar of 15 years. I couldn't be more pleased with the purchase. The construction is excellent without gaps or excess glue around joints. The top is solid sitka spruce which is a very attractive feature at any price point let alone $200. The aesthetics on the DG800 are simple and the design on the head stock is painted and will rub off with time. However that has no bearing on the overall fit and finish of this guitar, both of which are excellent for a <$1000 guitar.

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While experimenting with the Vortex for this article, I was impressed by quite how well the ambient mics seemed to turn a close-miked guitar sound into something that sounded like it was on a record, but the downside of this approach for most home recordists will be that the Vortex is not easy to recreate in a smaller studio — so I thought I'd pass on some ways I found to make it more manageable on a smaller scale. One problem most small studios have is that they don't have large numbers of screens, but in practice I found that I was able to get decent results by putting the guitar cab in the corner of the room and using one or both of the room boundaries in place of the screens. Visconti's trick of aiming ambient mics at the studio glass also turned out to be handy to increase the apparent distance of the farther ambient mic.

The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.
Honestly, a couple of years back I never looked at Fender for acoustic guitars because everyone was always talking about Taylors, Gibsons, Martins, Takamines, Paul Reed Smiths etc. Despite being a very good electric guitar company not to mention the inventor of the no. 1 guitar in the world, the strat, everyone always looked Fender, alongside with Ibanez and Washburn (good electric guitar brands) as bad acoustic manufacturers. I was one of them too. For me, Washburn and Ibanez might be a good budget acoustic guitar manufacturer but they don't deserve to be high in this 'top acoustic guitar brands' list. But for Fender, these past few months my mindset about them changed. I never realized how authentic and good sounding fender acoustics were way back then but I'm happy now that I changed my mind about them. I love them now. It's not about having vintage acoustics, or having high end prices. Fender don't set their prices as high as taylor, martin or gibson but they must not be judged ...more
My dad has an old Norma classical 6 string from the 70s.I've been told it was a cheap brand and not especially remarkable,but his is still holding up and still sounds good.It had to have a neck repair many years ago,but still plays well.I'm not sure what the tone woods are.The neck,back and sides are dark,like mahogany,the top is very orange and kind of ugly.
A now affordable alternative to the Tri-Axis and other Mesa Boogie Amps, the Studio Preamp contained all of the versatility one would expect from a Boogie. This 2-space machine is based on the classic Mesa Boogie Mark IIC+ amplifier, but in the popular rack-mountable form of the late 1980s. It features 5 preamp tubes and a blackface circuit, so it’s perfect for those chasing after a Fender-esque clean or 90’s mid-gain lead tone. And like most Mesa’s, you’ll get a convenient EQ for those final tweaks.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
I suspect this has been done by someone but I can't find any such tests in my quick internet search. Seems to me this is the only way to really settle the debate; the differences may be too small to hear, but regardless if there is differences then the tone is being affected by the instrument. In that case the wood and body design is making the string vibrate differently, which is what the pickup...picks up.

We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
The Effect:Distortion is one of the most popular and desired guitar pedal effects, especially among rock, hard-rock and metal players, The Kinks, Jimmy Hendrix, Metallica, to name a few. Prior to the introduction of effect pedals on the market, Distortion was mostly achieved by forcing an overwhelming amount of electricity passing through a guitar amp’s valves. Nowadays this is no longer necessary. Arguably one of the most famous and newbie friendly option and at the same time prime example for a distortion pedal is the classic Electro-Harmonix SOULFOOD.
Early forms of the talk box, such as the Heil Talk Box, first appeared in Country Music circles in Nashville in the 1940',s 1950's, and 1960's, by artist like swing band pedal steel player Alvino Rey, Link Wray ("Rumble"), Bill West, a Country Music steel guitar player and husband of Dottie West, and Pete Drake, a Nashville mainstay on the pedal steel guitar and friend of Bill West. Drake used it on his 1964 album Forever, in what came to be called his "talking steel guitar." The device used the guitar amplifier's output to drive a speaker horn that pushed air into a tube held in the player's mouth, which filters and thereby shapes the sound leading to a unique effect. The singer and guitarist Peter Frampton made this effect famous with hit songs such as "Do You Feel Like We Do" and "Show Me the Way," as did Joe Walsh on "Rocky Mountain Way." On Van Halen's cover of "You Really Got Me" Eddie Van Halen uses a talk box after the guitar solo to make a sound similar to a person having sex. Newer devices, such as Danelectro's Free Speech pedal, use a microphone and vocoder-like circuit to modulate the frequency response of the guitar signal. Some Talk Boxes include: The Dunlop Heil Talk Box, Rocktron Banshee, and Peter Frampton's own company,Framptone.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.

In 2003 Fender offered Telecasters with a humbucking/single coil pickup arrangement or two humbucking pickups featuring Enforcer humbucking pickups, and S-1 switching. These models were discontinued in 2007. As of 2008, all American Standard Telecasters came with a redesigned Tele bridge with vintage-style bent steel saddles. In March 2012 the American Standard Telecaster was been updated with Custom Shop pickups (Broadcaster in the bridge, Twisted in the neck); the body is now contoured for reduced weight and more comfort.
The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.

PRS recently started using quite an old idea (first suggested to us by guitar/amp technician Brinsley Schwarz). You simply add, in series, a resistor between the pickup ‘tap’ wire and ground. This mod, “doesn’t completely cancel the slug coil,” explains Smith, “it sort of three-quarters coil cancels. It allows some of the other [slug] coil through. It’s also slightly hum- cancelling.”


Capacitors used in guitar circuits aren’t polarised, so it doesn’t matter which way round you fit the legs - we normally go with the printed side facing out from the pot. They’re measured in microfarads (uF) and will be marked with a number. You can experiment with different values and materials for different results, but if in doubt, just swap it for what you already have.
Lastly, we have the M-100FM. This guitar features a body that is similar that Super Strat style Ibanez is known for, packed with a great set of pickups. This is a mid range guitar, but one that is very capable compared to its immediate competition. If you need an axe that looks good and plays good as well, ESP LTD M Series M-100FM is the ESP for you.

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What about Derek Trucks? Mark Knopfler? Trey Anastacio? Chuck Berry? Even Eddie Van Halen deserves some credit–more than John Mayer does for guitar playing. John Mayer's fame as a guitarist piggybacks on his commercial success, which is a result of targeting a demographic of 13 year old girls. He's no doubt a skilled guitar player, but over-rated as a guitarist relative to guys like Van Halen, Knopfler, etc.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, bass and harmonica for 46 years - and I don't find a $4,300 Martin D 41 to be affordable (Guitar Center price). I play a Taylor 402ce and a dozen other instruments. I believe Taylor is the best instrument for the price..Alvarez Yairi guitars are very good too. Martin and Gibson make fine guitars but they are overpriced. I have a Chinese Maple Guild that sounds fine but the fretwork is amateurish. A Chinese Takamine New Yorker is very well constructed and sounds great.

There is no real rule on what fretsize is best – it is purely personal preference.  To find out what size is right for you or for a specific guitar and application, you may have to try similar guitars with different fretsizes.  I have heard many differing opinions on fretsize over the years; some say tall wire is too bumpy for sliding into position or that tall wire causes them to play sharp (from overly pressing down the strings, these players are used to feeling fingerboard surface under their finger tips).  Some say that fretwire below a certain height is difficult to bend on.  Bending and fretting hand slurring techniques are easier when the string can be addressed towards the middle of the ball end of the fingertip so that it may be pushed and pulled from the side rather than fretted from directly on top by the lower part of the fingertip. Some folks like a low fretwire as it feels very smooth to them and they don’t do a lot of slurring techniques.

Decide between an active and passive DI. The most obvious difference between the two is that an active DI requires a power supply for you to operate, while passive DIs do not. Beyond that, due to differences in design, each of these has strong suits that should be taken into consideration. For example, the transformers used in passive DIs are more resistant to the hum created by ground loops, making these ideal for on-stage performing.[8][9] Additionally:
If you can afford to start on an amp in the sub-$200 segment, you will see an instant upgrade in the amount of power as well as additional features. In this category you are looking at very good practice rigs, although as power is still pretty low they may not be suitable for more than small casual performances. This is the first category where you will find both amp heads and tube amps, although the choice of these is very, very limited. One of the best amps you can grab for under $200 is the Marshall Code 25W. This combo provides a solid tone, 25 watts of power and plenty of amp voices and effects to play around with.
The product also has an original feature, called ISF, advertised to “give you infinite sound possibilities, from the USA to the UK” by using pre-set bass, mid, and treble setting that the user can select between. Some customers remarked that the feature doesn’t seem to make much of a difference, but praise the tone quality and good functionality of the product nevertheless.  
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Being one of the reputed organizations, operating in this domain, we are engaged in manufacturing and supplying a quality range of Gigmaker Electric Guitar. We only use high grade components and latest technology while designing these guitars. The offered range is widely appreciated all over the nation for its salient attributes. With our quality range, we
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
Three acoustic guitars were offered in 1971. These were glued-neck models with roughly Martin-shaped heads and pickguards slightly larger and squarer than a Martin. All had spruce tops (presumably plywood), mahogany bodies and necks, rosewood fingerboards and dot inlays. These appear to be Japanese, not Brazilian Gianninis. The bridges are glued on, with screw-adjustable saddles and pins. The U3012 Auditorium was a Spanish-shaped steel-string and cost $89.50 plus the cost of a case. The U3013 Grand Auditorium was a dreadnought costing $105. The U3014 Twelve String cost $120.
I don’t mean to be unfair to the effect (and theoretically, this should be an article devoid of opinion). Flanging is impressive stuff. It’s just that, used heavily—where it best shows off its massive harmonics-plinking capabilities—it can become too imposing a sound for a guitarist to easily play with, which relinquishes it to the realm of background effects and early-’80s electro-pop. Still, plug in and send your brain to space and back.

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I've been coming in since they opened, and it's been crazy cool to watch this little corner shop grow into a major Seattle contender. That's really saying something, as there are some really incredible locally-owned guitar shops in the Greater Seattle Area. As has been mentioned, the service is the selling point. The entire staff are very, very cool people who are perfectly happy to talk shop without trying to push you on a sale. There's a lot of regulars, and combined with the student roster, it definitely has it's own little built in community. Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop. Kyle, the tech, is an expert. The other guys all do good work as well. This is my go-to shop for basically everything guitar-shop related. And I'm very picky.

Capacitors (often referred to as "caps") have several uses in electric guitars, the most common of which is in the tone control, where it combines with the potentiometer to form a low-pass filter, shorting all frequencies above the adjustable cut-off frequency to ground.[12][13] Another common use is a small capacitor in parallel with the volume control, to prevent the loss of higher frequencies as the volume pot is turned down. This capacitor is commonly known as "treble bleed cap" and is sometimes accompanied by a series or parallel resistor to limit the amount of treble being retained and match it to the pot's taper.[14]


Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
One of the factors bassists keep in mind when selecting a combo amp or an amp head is the amount of "headroom" that the amplifier will provide them, given their intended performance venue and music genre. "Headroom" refers to the amount by which the signal-handling capabilities of an audio system exceed a designated nominal level.[20] Headroom can be thought of as a safety zone allowing transient audio peaks to exceed the nominal level without damaging the system or the audio signal, e.g., via clipping. In loud music genres and in genres where bassists seek a clean, clear bass tone, bassists seek to avoid power amplifier clipping, so they typically choose amplifiers which provide enough headroom to avoid power amp clipping. Headroom has been defined as a "...safety zone or wiggle room".[21]"[H]aving enough headroom is essential for solid-state equipment like bass amplifiers and power amplifiers. If you lack this, you can expect a harsh mid range tone, a lack of dynamics and possibly blown speakers".[21] Having enough headroom is also important for bassists seeking to retain a "clean" sound even in loud, high-volume performance settings.
In the ’80s, with the advent of new digital effects units, the “refrigerator racks” appeared on the scene—custom rigs built for the studio and touring pros of the day. Effects loops in guitar amps also became commonplace—allowing guitarists to insert line-level effects after the distortion generating preamp stages of their amps, and before the power amp stage—a big tonal improvement when using time-based effects like delay and reverb.
Though Dennis Hartnett took good care of his ViVi-Tone instruments (mandola NMM 10809, mandocello NMM 10810, and this guitar), all three show signs of extensive use. Indentations on the bar-armature and wear to the screw-ends of the posts on the guitar pickup indicate that Hartnett also used the instrument for electric-only amplification, in addition to the electric/acoustic set up in which he left it. Hartnett's guitar is preserved with an amplifier (NMM 10812) by Webster Electric Company of Racine, Wisconsin, and an accompanying foot pedal.
Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.

A Vibe or Univibe pedal reproduces the sound of a rotating speaker by synchronizing volume oscillation, frequency-specific volume oscillation, vibrato (pitch wavering), phase shifting, and chorusing in relation to a non-rotating speaker. The modulation speed can be ramped up or down, with separate speeds for the bass and treble frequencies, to simulate the sound of a rotating bass speaker and a rotating horn. This effect is simultaneously a volume-oriented effect, an equalization-oriented effect, and a time-based effect. Furthermore, this effect is typically related to chorus. Some vibe pedals also include an overdrive effect, which allows the performer to add "tube"-style distortion. This effect is the most closely related to a rotary speaker. Some Vibe-only pedals include:
By the early ’80s, MTI was importing Westone guitars from Matsumoku, which had made its earlier Univox guitars (and the competitive Westbury guitars offered by Unicord). Wes-tone guitars continued to be distributed by MTI until ’84, when St. Louis Music, now a partner in the Matsumoku operation, took over the brand name and phased out its older Electra brand (also made by Matsumoku) in favor of Electra-Westone and then Westone. But that’s another story…
The Fender Super-Champ X2 HD is a true champion when it comes to versatility and quality, combining old school tube technology with modern amp voicing and digital effects, all in a compact and portable 15W amplifier head. With a single 12AX7 preamp tube and two 6V6 power amp tubes, you can't lump this amp with conventional amp modelers, but you also can't group it with traditional tube amps because it does let you choose from 16 amp voicings that cover everything from clean Tweed tones to high-gain metal. In addition, the amp comes with 15 effects that include variations of reverb, tremolo, modulation and delay. With its low watt rating, the Super-Champ X2 HD is ideal for practice and recording, while being loud and portable enough for small venue gigs. Finally all these features are made available in a compact and more importantly - affordable package.
The Squire Affinity Telecaster has an alder body, maple neck and fingerboard. It features two single-coil pickups with three-way switching. The tuners and hardware are solid and durable. The guitar is the cheapest telecaster in the telecaster series, but it’s still a decent build guitar. The guitar plays and feels nice. An excellent guitar for the beginner and intermediate telecaster fanatics.

If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
For an experienced guitarist, the choice of amplifier is personal and a major part of the guitarist’s sound. But most of our panelists thought that, for a beginner, it’s most important for an amp to offer a variety of good sounds so that they can find what works for them and make adjustments as their style and taste evolve. As Ken Rosser put it, “If a kid’s starting out and they’re really into Pantera, they’ll love an amp that gives them that sound, but next year they might discover Eric Clapton and want a different sound.”

Distortion is usually generated by three distinct sources: the power amp, the preamp and the speakers. Many players overlook power amp distortion when trying an amp, but the power amp section is the source of what guitarists describe as low-end chunk and balls. Audition the power amp by turning the master volume way up and turning down the gain. The sound should be lively, with a crisp attack that jiggles your trousers.
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
Several concert sound subwoofer manufacturers suggest that their subs can be used for bass instrument amplification. Meyer Sound suggests that its 650-R2 Concert Series Subwoofer, a 14-square-foot (1.3 m2) enclosure with two 18-inch drivers, can be used for bass instrument amplification.[23] While performers who use concert sound subwoofers for onstage monitoring may like the powerful sub-bass sound that they get onstage, sound engineers may find the use of large subwoofers (e.g., two 18" drivers) for onstage instrument monitoring to be problematic, because it may interfere with the "Front of House" sub-bass sound.
The Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Collection Electric Guitar is a GREAT GUITAR for $169.00 (The average selling price at the time of this review). The pickups, tune-o-matic bridge and stop piece are the same ones used in Epiphone's more expensive guitars, and are similar to what's used in much more expensive Gibsons. Although the tone adjustments have been simplified to a toggle between the three pickup combinations and an overall tone control for both pickups, this is not as big a deal as many might make of it. Given the vast array of other things that influence electric guitar sound -- strings, amp choice and settings, effects pedals and so forth -- the guitar sounds great as is.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Engelmann Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Shape Shifter - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
In the end I decided to go with the .033μ. Everything larger sounded too wooly to me on the neck pickup. If I didn’t play much EBow, I might even consider the .022μ. But you might make a different choice, especially if you were using brighter pickups. You won’t know for sure till you try it out with your instrument, amp, and hands, but I hope this gives you some idea of what to expect.

Bass chorus effects use a cycling, variable delay time that is short so that individual repetitions are not heard. The result is a thick, "swirling" sound that suggests multiple instruments playing in unison (chorus) that are slightly out of tune. Bass chorus effects were more common in the late 1980s, when manufacturers such as Peavey included chorus effects in its bass amplifiers. In the 1990s and 2000s, more sophisticated bass chorus effects devices were created which only apply the swirling chorus effect to the higher parts of the bass tone, leaving the instrument's low fundamental untouched.[5]
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.
Most delay pedals have controls for the number of repeats (called “feedback”), the volume of the repeats and the time between each repeat. Some pedals have what’s called “tap tempo”, where you can tap your foot on the pedal and the delay unit will match the speed of the effect to your foot, allowing you to match the delay time to the tempo of a song. Delay pedals are often used to thicken up heavy lead guitar sounds, or to subtly add more to a simple rhythm guitar part.
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Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.
The Marshall JMP Super Bass is a 100 watt amp. Lemmy, bassist/lead singer of Motörhead, used numerous of these amps to drive cabinets with four 12" speakers and others with four 15" speakers. His amps were labelled named “Killer,” “No Remorse,” and “Murder One".[5] The Peavey Mark IV is a large, solid-state amp providing 300 watts at 2 ohms; the Mark IV was known for its affordable price and its reliability.[6]
I own several guitars ranging from 700 dollars to 2000 dollars so I knew not to get my expectations up when purchasing a 100 dollar. I bought this as a gift for someone to learn on but when it arrived, I could not believe the quality of guitar this is. The tuning keys are high quality, the neck and fret board are high quality. It holds its tune as good as my Ovation and Ibanez acoustics as well as my 2000 dollar PRS guitar. Very easy to press the strings. Surely I thought this would be the difference maker from my more expensive guitars but it's actually easier to play. The pickup is a little more brighter sounding than on more expensive guitars but it's nothing you can't fix with your settings.

Epiphone finds it right to imitate Gibson for their guitars. Now owned by Gibson, the brand still brags about its Gibson-like style, especially when it comes to Les Pauls, SGs, Flying Vs., Explorers, and other Gibson classics. For greenhorns, the Epiphone Les Paul Standard comes in as the best choice offering quality specs in an affordable range. From then onward, you can get your hands on the Les Paul PlusTop PRO and the Les Paul Custom PRO without burdening your pocket.


it is four solders on a guitar on say a les paul needs electricty so two wires pass the electricity through the other two wires are for your pickups the pickups electricity goes through the wires of them , into a potentiometer which is the technical name for the thing under the knob (or two depending on the guitars wiring) .... than into the 3 way and than finally passes out of the guitar and into an amp , pedal or tuner
To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!
Based both in Japan and the USA, this Japanese manufacturer produces guitars under different brand names: "ESP Standard," "ESP Custom Shop," "LTD Guitars and Basses," "Navigator," "Edwards Guitar and Basses," and "Grass Roots." Hisatake Shibuya opened his "Electric Sound Product" store in 1975 where he used to sell guitar spare parts. He then started to build his own parts and became a Kramer and Schecter subcontractor. His first signature guitar went to George Lynch (the Kamikaze), while the powerful Gibson Explorer copy designed for metal heads and adopted by a certain James Hetfield (Metallica) became almost as popular as its owner in the late 1980's and early 1990's.
The plectrum, or flat pick, is another key piece of essential equipment. For electric guitars, it tends to be a thin piece of plastic, metal, shell or other material shaped like a teardrop or a triangle. There are also thumb picks mounted on rings and finger picks on the player's fingertips; you'll see electric guitarists using both of these as well as a standard pick. 

Made most famous with the release of Bon Jovi’s 1986 Top 10 hit song, “Wanted Dead or Alive,” Richie Sambora’s double neck Ovation became one of the world’s most instantly recognizable guitar models. The all-new acoustic/electric Richie Sambora Signature Series Elite Double Neck model features a Sitka Spruce top in Gloss Black, Ebony fingerboard inlaid with mother of pearl stars, Teak/Paduk/Walnut/Mesquite inlaid rosette/epaulettes, gold hardware, a mother of pearl star inlay on the body and finished with Sambora’s signature in gold on the headstock.


At first this may seem trivial, but a little experimentation reveals that each effect reacts very differently depending on how the original signal has been altered by previous effects in the signal chain. Initially, this can seem rather frustrating; a pedal that sounds awesome on its own can turn your sound into a real mess when combined thoughtlessly with other effects. I’m going to go into the basics of signal flow and cover the fundamentals of setting up a great sounding pedal board. As you would expect, there isn’t any one “correct” way of doing things. You may find that changing the order gives you a completely unique sound, and that’s great. However, if you’re sorting it all out for the first time, this is a good way to start ordering your pedalboard.
Edit: After reading everyone's comments I've decided to let the technician give my strat a first time setup and I'll try to absorb any information I can in order to be able to do it myself one day. I realize many of you have some pretty cool guitar shops that'll do a free setup so I'll try to negotiate something. I'll be sure to record the condition of the guitar itself before the setup in case the technician chips it or scratches it. I'll also check out Dan Erlewine's books like the guitarist below suggested. Thank you all for your advice, I really do appreciate it and I hope to be as wise as you all are when it comes to guitars someday.
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Add bite or presence by boosting between 2kHz and 6kHz, depending on the tone you're after. Little over 4-5kHz is produced by a guitar speaker, though going for a brighter DI'd clean sound is quite legitimate for artistic reasons. Similar-sounding electric guitars that may be conflicting within a mix can be separated to a limited extent by adding bite at different frequencies, though choosing two different-sounding guitars and/or amp sounds and examining the arrangement carefully usually works better. As a rule, single-coil guitars are best for cutting through a busy mix without taking up too much space, while humbucking pickups create a thicker sound which may be beneficial in recordings where there is only one guitar part.

That really depends on what you are going for. There are good arguments for before everything and right after the tuner, but also for after the distortion and before your modulation pedals. If you put yours right after the tuner in the front of your chain, you can equalize your guitar tone before it hits anything and adjust your pedals accordingly.
With expiration of the Fender patent on the Stratocaster-style vibrato, various improvements on this type of internal, multi-spring vibrato system are now available. Floyd Rose introduced one of the first improvements on the vibrato system in many years when, in the late 1970s, he experimented with "locking" nuts and bridges that prevent the guitar from losing tuning, even under heavy vibrato bar use.
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