There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
A sub-brand under the same umbrella as German brand, Behringer, Bugera has been flying under the radar for some time – though they make some surprisingly clever amplifiers. The BC15 is one such amp. Styled like its predecessors from the ’50s and ’60s, this vintage-inspired amp benefits from a single 12AX7 vacuum tube giving it a lot more warmth and character than for which you’ll pay. And don’t let its size fool you, either – while it only has a single 8″ speaker, it offers up a whopping 30 watts, making for a surprisingly loud little machine. For the price, it’s seriously difficult to do better than this.
Launch price: $4,200 / £3,235 | Body: Mahogany with carved figured maple top | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.594" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 58/15 LT Treble humbucker, 58/15 LT Bass humbucker | Controls: 2x volume, 2x tone (with push-pull coil-splits), 3-way selector switch | Hardware: PRS two-piece bridge, Phase III locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: McCarty Sunburst, McCarty Tobacco Sunburst, Orange Tiger, Trampas Green, Violet, Antique White, Black, Black Gold Burst, Blood Orange, Champagne Gold Metallic, Charcoal Burst, Emerald, Faded Whale Blue, Fire Red Burst, Frost Green Metallic, Gold Top, Gray Black
An effect made popular by guitarists like Hendrix, Jerry Cantrell, Slash and many more, the Wah-Wah effect is a pedal-controlled Q filter. The ultra-recognisable vocal-like effect is obtained by having a Q parameter going back and forth, thus “opening” your guitar voice or narrowing it down removing treble frequencies. Words cannot really describe it, and since its inception the Wah was featured on countless records. The Dunlop Crybaby is by far the most popular wah pedal, built with trusty analog circuitry. Despite Dunlop’s fame, many other manufacturers built beautiful pedals that have left their mark in music history due to their slightly different sound, such as the VOX 84x series, the Fulltone, and the super modern optical Morley Wah.
I hope the list is somewhat correct on peoples lists although it is just an opinion! and just a small thought and insight on angus young he might not make the top 50 for me he plays just a few chords and everything sounds the same, he is with a unique voice and a band who was made by bon scot that put ac/dc on the map!! I know of no really good guitar player that names angus young as their inspiration or was influenced by angus young it is just that his work was too simple!!
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With two decades of experience and thousands of local customers served I found myself unemployed/downsized in 2010 asking myself what I wanted to do next. After some searching I understood that I really enjoy the interaction that takes place in the local store between the customer and the shopkeeper. I know that we can offer the same prices as the big stores and hopefully make the experience more enjoyable.
Chorus is the sound at the beginning of the Guns ‘n’ Roses song Paradise City. It is a gentle, shimmering effect that is good for arpeggiated chords and adding that little extra to a lead tone (such as in the solo for Smells like Teen Spirit by Nirvana). However, we recommend using it sparingly as it can sound dated and old fashioned if over used (unless, of course, old-school is what you’re going for). Common controls include level (the volume of the effect), tone (affects the EQ of the chorus effect), rate (how quickly the note shimmers) and depth (how large and prominent the shimmering is).
The Mustang bass debuted in 1966 as (along with the Coronado) Fender's first shortscale bass, however the Competition finishes were not seen until 1969. It was effectively the same instrument, with sports stripes, and initially a matching coloured headstock. The competition colours were Red, Orange and Blue (although blue was officially called Burgundy). Have a closer look at this 1969 Fender and check out the soundclips through various vintage amplifiers.
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.

Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.

All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.


Clearly if you need a Gibson but have to count your pennies Epiphone should be your top choice. However, Some people don’t realize that Epiphone was once a competitor with Gibson, and even today some of their semi-hollow and hollow-body guitars are worth mentioning with the top brands out there. The Dot is well known as an affordable version of the Gibson ES-335, but there are also guitars like the Casino, Wildkat, Sheraton and Broadway.
Mahogany is a durable wood, often described as dense and that is used in the construction of guitars. The main advantage of purchasing an instrument made from this material is the fact that it highlights the unit’s bass and midrange. Therefore, if you are into mellower tones, this is the material that you should pay attention to. The resulting guitars made from this material are usually brown.
It should also be mentioned, that LX does not just stand for U.S. made. Originally LX was an indicator for an Ovation guitar that included several new features that were not available on previous guitar models. Back in 2007 Ovation explained on its website, that the new features included the new OP-Preamp, an advanced neck system (lightweight dual-action truss rod, carbon fibre stabilizers), a patented pick-up (made of 6 elements), inlaid epaulets, scalloped bracing as well as a new hard composite Lyrachord GS body.[25] Back then, no such thing as an AX model line existed (the first AX models appeared on the Ovation-website in 2010). Based on the website’s history the LX features must have been introduced in 2004.
On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.

This open-C tuning gives the initial harmonic series when a C-string is struck.[4] The C-C-G-C-E-G tuning uses the harmonic sequence (overtones) of the note C. When an open-note C-string is struck, its harmonic sequence begins with the notes (C,C,G,C,E,G,B♭,C).[3][4] This overtone-series tuning was modified by Mick Ralphs, who used a high C rather than the high G for "Can't Get Enough" on Bad Company. Ralphs said, "It needs the open C to have that ring," and "it never really sounds right in standard tuning".[5]
Valve Amp or Solid State Amp? There's no right or wrong here, but, for tone alone, valve amps are way better. If you can afford a valve amp, just go ahead and buy one! They're the amps all the great bands ever used - from Beatles and Rolling Stones to Arctic Monkeys and Radiohead, 99% of all professional musicians simply prefer valve amps, like the Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod Deluxe III. But there's nothing wrong with solid state amps - the audience at a gig wouldn't be able to tell the difference.

Still not ready to give up, in ’87 Ovation contracted with a Korean manufacturer to bring in a Celebrity line of solidbody electrics. These were Strat-style guitars again, with bolt-on necks, pointy/droopy six-in-line headstocks (with a bi-level carved relief along the bottom, per style), two-octave rosewood fingerboards, triangular flag inlays, and a double-locking vibrato system. We’re not sure what the pickup brand was, but there are models with two XK-110 single-coils and one XK-120 humbucker, plastic-covered with no exposed poles.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.

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While recording AC/DC's Back In Black, Tony Platt used a pair of condenser mics to pick up different speaker cones and give a wider sound to each guitar: "I developed a technique for recording guitars with two microphones roughly pointing at different speakers, which can be spread out in the stereo mix so it's not just a series of mono point sources. It makes for a more open-sounding guitar. That sound suited their particular technique, which involved Angus and Malcolm playing the same chords but with different inversions to get a very big unison guitar sound."
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.

Guitar combo amplifiers were at first used with bass guitars and electric pianos, but these instruments produce a wider frequency range and need a full-range speaker system. Much more amplifier power is required to reproduce low-frequency sound, especially at high volume. Reproducing low frequencies also requires a suitable woofer or subwoofer speaker and enclosure, with bass cabinets often being larger in size than a cabinet for mid-range or high-range sounds. As well, the open-back cabinets used on many electric guitar amps, while effective for electric guitar, do not have good bass reproduction.


The Kaman Corporation soon diversified, branching off into nuclear weapons testing, commercial helicopter flight, the development and testing of chemicals, and helicopter bearings production. But in the early 1960s, financial problems due to the failure of their commercial flight division forced them to consider expanding into new markets, such as entertainment and leisure. Charles Kaman, still an avid guitar player, became interested in the making of guitars.[2][6]
The case raised concerns for musicians who lack documentation of vintage instruments made of traditional, non-sustainable materials.[50][51] However, officials from the Justice Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have stated that musicians who unknowingly possess instruments made from illegal wood would not be treated as criminals.[52]
The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
I have played all sorts of guitars, Guild, Gibson, Epi, Lowden, Fender etc etc. Walden for a beginner/intermediate are far beyond anything you can get for the same money. Exceptional sounding and great build quality, and because no-one has heard of them you can pick them up for half the price or any of the "named" brands if you get a good used one. I have had my hands on 3 in recent years, I got them for less than £100 each - one for £50 and it held its own with anything else I had that cost nearly £1k new. I would recommend them absolutely.
I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.

Guild began in New York in 1953 but eventually moved to Rhode Island. Fender purchased Guild in 1995. Fender seemed only interested in Guild as a brand of acoustic guitars. The classic Guild electric guitars were not being made at first. But then some of the classic electric models were re-introduced. Cordoba Music Group (makers of classical guitars) purchased Guild and sells both electric and acoustic models based on the old designs.
The Yamaha FG830 uses a well-engineered combination of woods to create a solid body and neck suitable for pro-level performance. You simply cannot go wrong with this guitar; the workmanship of this guitar is a cut above other acoustics in its class. Owners love the gorgeous dreadnought sound, describing it as rich, resonant, and well-rounded. One satisfied customer boasted that in a room full of acoustics, his Yamaha would “float to the top” of the din.

First of all, let’s clear up some minor confusion over the name. It has been variously reported, including by me, that the name “Teisco” stands for the name of a company in Tokyo; however this is not the case. Teisco was simply the name chosen by one of the company’s founders, Mr. Atswo Kaneko. There was another prominent company called the Tokyo Sound Co., Ltd. which was responsible for making Guyatone guitars, another major early Japanese brand, some of which came to the United States as Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen & Jacobson and others. However, neither of these companies or their guitars had anything to do with the Teisco brand.


I am leaning toward Justin and keep watching Marty I jumped way ahead into intervals and in the middle of the presentation it clicked. He knows his stuff. As a newcomer I want to see a bit of the whole picture as I learn basics. PS senior .Found this review very good of top sites and subscribers. AndyGuitar claims on Amazon to be the number one you tube guitar teacher. Not college educated like Justin, J Kehew or Marty Swartz . I will check these others out. Thanks for the review. I would have missed some. So many flooding You Tube
For acoustic players, the Rogue Beginner Acoustic Dreadnought guitar with Accessory Pack comes highly rated. Included within this pack is Rogue's exceptionally crafted beginner acoustic dreadnought, along with a Musician's Gear Tubular Guitar Stand and premium Pearloid Celluloid pick, an Ernie Ball polish cloth, and 12 80/10 Bronze acoustic guitar strings. Overall, it's a worthy yet affordable pack for any budding guitarist.
The Marshall MG series are also strong contenders, a lot of players use them and they’re ideal for the kind of music you like. You see them in a lot of studios. Not a tube amp and all that, but perfectly serviceable and they have some onboard effects, which can be fun. I used a mic’d MG50 when I played in Kenny’s Castaways for a year or so in the house band, and people said I sounded great. Amp cost me $280 on sale I think. I found the sound of the MG superior to the Line6, but not so much that I’d pay a lot more money for it. If I had a gig where I needed options and didn’t already own the effects I needed, I’d have no problem using the Line6.
Examples of these first Supros can be seen in two catalogs from 1936, by Canadian distributor Peate and the Bronson Music & Sales Corporation, the latter probably originating slightly later than the Peate book. Both show laps identical to the Supro frying pan. Peate offered the Spanish guitar and mandolin. In the Bronson catalog, the Supro frying pan is known as the Bronson Singing Electric “For The Artist.” Bronson also sold electric Spanish and tenor guitars and an electric mandolin, other early Supro electrics.
Those who appreciate a more vintage design will love the Schecter S-II CUSTOM. It’s an original design which borrowed a lot of ideas from Gibson’s legendary SG series. Pickups are also in line with the overall theme, and they sound pretty great. There’s balance in the tone, the kind you don’t really expect to get from a Schecter. It definitely took me by surprise, a very pleasant surprise.
For years, Seymour Duncan has provided guitarists with first-rate, handmade pickups and parts that are anything but stock. All of our products are designed and customized to suit the needs of specific musical styles and the musicians thereof. If you’ve got a guitar that doesn’t have a good-quality set of pickups and seems to lack that “extra something” in the tone department, investing in a set of pickups is your first stop.
That would work, of course, but the result would be very different. You’d have minimum cut in the center position, with treble cuts of differing size in either direction, depending on the caps’ values. I’m not sure that would be particularly useful — the activity would be the same in either direction up to the point where the value of the greater cap kicks in. (I suppose one advantage would be that you could leap quickly to two “preset” values by turning the pot to minimum or maximum, as if you’d installed to caps on a DPDT switch, as seen here.) Or course, you’d have to worry about centering the pot, unless you could can find a part with a center detente. The resonant peaks, and therefore the overall tone, differ from standard. HOW exactly they differ is one of the things that I’m going to explore. 🙂
With Apple including their Guitar Amp Pro plug‑in in Logic, Sonar coming bundled with Native Instruments' Guitar Rig, and Ableton adding their new Overdrive plug‑in to Live, guitar‑slinging Cubase 5 users might initially feel a bit left out. But you don't have to, because you can assemble some pretty amazing 'guitar racks' in Cubase: it's just that Cubase takes a more à la carte approach, where you need to draw on the existing effects as if they were stomp-boxes. A VST audio channel in Cubase offers inserts for up to eight series effects, including an amp simulator, so you actually have more options than with many pedalboard setups. Furthermore, you can add some quality 'studio effects', like the new Reverence reverb, as send effects. So think of Cubase as 'virtualising' a pedalboard, then bringing it into the studio so that its output can go to studio rack processors.

omg guitar playing isnt just about speed and technically skill. its about style and uniqueness of sound, as shown by tom morello and jack white. most of those metal guitarist, with quite a few exceptions ill admit (tony iommi, john petrucci, randy rhoads & van halen, and joe satriani & steve vai), sound EXACTLY THE SAME. i think you need to expand YOUR musical taste.
OK, so you're ready to try your hand at the electric guitar, but where do you start? A good place to start is with an electric guitar that's specifically geared toward beginners. And although many guitars cost over $1,000, there's no need to shell out that much dough for a student model/novice instrument. To help you sort through all the options, we put together a list of the best beginner electric guitars worth buying right now. So whether you’re looking to become a shredding metalhead, a cool jazz player or an all-American country star, one of these electric guitars will have you well on your way.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
In terms of the Teisco brand, the moving force was Jack Westheimer and his W.M.I. company in Chicago. According to published accounts, Westheimer began importing Teisco-made Kingstons in around 1961, although these were not promoted in the trade press until the beginning of ’64. It was this connection that would make Teisco the dominant powerhouse it was to become.

Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.
Pickguards were white pearloid, or sometimes tortoiseshell, the neck used a string tree, and the all-around makeup of the guitar was bigger than later iterations — thicker necks, bigger and heavier bodies, larger fret markers. One obvious differentiator is the logo on the headstock; the earlier models, and even a few released as they moved into Phase Two, had a raised plastic “Univox” logo on the headstock.
The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.
Ate you guys just starting, or just bored? Curious is all, its seems that the ?s and statements alike are from beginners, which all of us started out with, there are many pro sites that will give you better advice. Advice at least boogie gave good support. Another thing is always wipe your strings down Everytime you finish playing. The slinky's are easy to play but rust very quickly and lose tone. GHS has a decent set of steings, but it's like anything else you get what you pay for. Come on guys ur talking about strings that are $4.
A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.
 Everybody needs to start somewhere. However, where you start often decides where you end up. For example, if you buy a bad guitar when you start playing, you are a lot more likely to stop playing, and if it happens, you wouldn't be buying any more guitars. We believe guitar manufacturers have a sort of duty to make and supply reliable guitars for beginners. Guitars at beginners' level are as important as high-end guitars for pro. This is where Smash comes in.

The kind of interface that you want should connect to your PC and the DAW (digital audio workstation) software installed on it so that you can record your playing. The Guitarport didn’t allow for recording without buying additional software that cost as much as the device; the device is essentially obsolete now but still supported. Years later I upgraded to their Toneport UX2, meant for recording and DAW compatibility. The accompanying Podfarm 2 software is quite good. The UX1 costs half as much with the same software if you don’t want or need 2 inputs (microphone or instrument). Presonus sells an interface that is quite popular, for less than $99


Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.
For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
Bridge craft USA musical instruments presents the exceptionally designed Glen Burton GA204BCO Acoustic Electric Cutaway Guitar in Black by Glen Burton. Perfect for the beginner or the expert, the full package comes with Strings, Picks, Gig Bag, Strap, Digital Clip-On Tuner, Truss Rod and a 10 Watt Amplifier . This excellent Acoustic Guitar also includes: Flame top; Basswood back and sides Catalpa Neck and Bridge; Rosewood Fingerboard Steel String; Sealed Gear Tuners EQ: Active 4 Band 7545 .
On December 22, 1969, the Gibson parent company Chicago Musical Instruments was taken over by the South American brewing conglomerate ECL. Gibson remained under the control of CMI until 1974 when it became a subsidiary of Norlin Musical Instruments. Norlin Musical Instruments was a member of Norlin Industries which was named for ECL president Norton Stevens and CMI president Arnold Berlin. This began an era characterized by corporate mismanagement and decreasing product quality.
Other early phase shifters used field effect transistors (FETs) to control each phasing stage in place of the light bulbs in the ’Vibe, and certainly later units employed opamps with variable resistors (six TL072 dual opamps or similar in the MXR Phase 100, for example). Electro-Harmonix’s sweet little Small Stone, on the other hand, has a more unusual design that employs five CA3094 type Operational Transconductance Amplifiers (OTAs). The results are similar, but subtly different. Many phasers—such as MXR’s Phase 45 and Phase 90, and E-H’s Small Stone—carry nothing but a speed control, plus a “Color” switch in the case of the latter. Others have Depth, Mix and Resonance controls. The latter appears on many units with internal feedback loops (the Small Stone and most phasers before it lack this circuitry), and allows the player tweak the degree to which the portion of the signal fed back enhances the frequency peaks.
Martin’s re-entry into electric manufacturing is related to the association of Richard (Dick) Boak with the C.F. Martin company. Dick Boak, with dreams of being a luthier and constantly working on guitar projects on his own, joined Martin in 1976 as a draftsman. In 1977 Boak was assigned to the project of designing an electric guitar for Martin. This resulted in the development of the E-18, EM-18 and EB-18 guitars and bass. The first prototypes of this new electric guitar series were produced in 1978, ten years after the demise of the GT-70/75, and production commenced in 1979 with guitar serial number 1000.

I think it's OK to find out what the knobs are supposed to do, so you know roughly what to expect, but I would thoroughly recommend just sitting for half an hour and playing around with all of them, just seeing what sounds you can get. You'd be amazed what tonal variety you can get from moving the volume knob before you go anywhere near the tone knobs.
Hum cancelling: hum cancellation is caused by reverse polarity, reverse winding keeps a revrse polarity pickup in phase with a non reverse polarity pickup. To reverse the direction of the winding, simply swap wires, using hot as the ground and ground as the hot. Polarity can be changed on many pickups. If the pickup has bar magnets, simply flip them over. If the pickup uses alnico polepiece AND has the new plastic bobbins such as is common on Fenders, the polepieces can be pushed out with a screwdriver and reinserted "upside down". If the bobbin is fiber DO NOT attempt to flip the polepieces; the wire is wrapped directly around the polepieces and will almost certainly be damaged.
Effects units are available in a variety of formats or form factors. Stompboxes are primarily used units in live performance and (in some cases) studio recordings. Rackmount devices saw a heavy usage during the later 20th century, due to their advanced processing power and desirable tones. However, by the 21st century, with the advant of digital Plug-Ins and more powerful Stompboxes for live usage, the need and practicality of rackmounted effects units went down, and as such, prices of rack effects have diminished due to lower usage.[5] An effects unit can consist of analog or digital circuitry or a combination of the two. During a live performance, the effect is plugged into the electrical "signal" path of the instrument. In the studio, the instrument or other sound-source's auxiliary output is patched into the effect.[6][7] Form factors are part of a studio or musician's outboard gear.[8]

Unicord, a gear distributor in the early ‘60s working out of New York, was the first iteration of Univox. When it acquired the Amplifier Corporation of America, or ACA, sometime in the early-to-mid ‘60s, it began to market tube amps that carried the name “Univox.” However, there are no reference materials to be found – at least in the annals of the internet – that detail these earliest Univox amps.
“But I was recently talking to a guy at Yamaha who told me the total global revenue from musical equipment sales sold round the world doesn’t add up to one-thousandth of Apple’s AAPL, -1.42%   daily turnover. It’s a small specialist market,” Hook said. “Gibson guitars are expensive and they have been taken over by so many cheap copies. That’s what has caused a lot of harm to such a luxury product.”
In 2003 Fender offered Telecasters with a humbucking/single coil pickup arrangement or two humbucking pickups featuring Enforcer humbucking pickups, and S-1 switching. These models were discontinued in 2007. As of 2008, all American Standard Telecasters came with a redesigned Tele bridge with vintage-style bent steel saddles. In March 2012 the American Standard Telecaster was been updated with Custom Shop pickups (Broadcaster in the bridge, Twisted in the neck); the body is now contoured for reduced weight and more comfort.
Launch price: £849/€850/$999 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 116 | Connections: Input jack, main output (L/MONO, R) jacks, SEND1 jack, RETURN1 jack, SEND2 jack, RETURN2 jack: 1/4-inch phone type - Sub output (L, R) connectors: XLR type - Phones jack: Stereo 1/4-inch phone type - CTL4, 5/EXP2 jack, CTL6, 7/EXP3 jack, AMP CTL1, 2 jack: 1/4-inch TRS phone type - USB port: USB B type - DC IN jack - MIDI (IN, OUT) connectors | Power: AC adaptor

An excerpt: “Scorned, laughed at, jeered, chided, and derided. The concept of the solidbody electric guitar was subject to such utter disdain in some corners that it’s almost hard to believe it ever came to be at all. The ridicule and mockery would have been enough to send a less self-confident inventor running for the hills. Given our more than 55 years of perspective, though, we know it just had to be; a world without the solidbody guitar? Moreover, without the Gibson Les Paul? Unthinkable ...”
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Efficiency – also called sensitivity this is measured in dB at a distance of one metre. This has more to do with how loud a speaker sounds than its power rating. A Jensen P10R, for example, is rated at 95dB; a Celestion G12 65 at 97dB and an EVM12L at 100dB. The numbers don’t look that different, but the difference in terms of perceived volume is truly staggering.
SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
Gibson guitars have a shorter 24.75-inch scale length, giving them a looser feel and a somewhat warmer tone. They feature resonant tonewoods, typically mahogany for the body and neck. The neck is set in place and glued instead of bolted. Les Paul-style instruments have carved tops made from another tonewood such as maple, but other instruments such as the SG have flat tops like the Strat. If something goes wrong with this kind of guitar you may be able to repair it yourself, but issues like broken necks and headstocks require work done by a professional luthier.
Thanks, guys....well, I don't think I'll be able to play any Agiles but I'll try and get my hands on some Epi's and give them a whirl. How are the stock pickups on both? Definitely in need of a swap? I had an Epi Les Paul an eon ago and don't recall liking the stock pickups, but I was also in highschool then and knew nothing about tone. Also, a quick look at Ebay indicates that any Epi SG in a color other than black or cherry will be hard to come by...

The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.
When Electric Guitars first hit the music market way back in the early fifties, they weren’t easily accepted by the people. However, later electric guitars became an integral part of the music industry throughout the world. The following article describes this amazing music instrument, which unlike its conventional counter-part, works on the laws of electromagnetism.
This is also an amazing choice for kids and guitar novices. It comes in many different colors and it is quite easy to set up and tune. Once you manage to tune it, it will run for a long time. It has four tone modes and you can select one of them using a switch. It has one tone knob adjustment and one volume adjustment. It is quite easy to play and also highly comfortable.
Salas is also bullish about the guitar’s prospects. “My 10-year-old son is at school in Austin, Texas and him and his friends are rocking out to 1970s funk,” he said. “A new generation is getting into guitar and rock’n’roll. I believe there’s going to be a massive comeback and that means with that style of music the electric guitar is going to make a comeback.”
Numerous classic guitars made by the likes of Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, and Guild are worth thousands, sometimes tens of thousands; a little expensive for the average player, and often these are the preserve of investors and collectors. Early versions of the Gibson Les Paul, SG and Flying V guitars, or the Fender Stratocaster or Telecaster. But there are still very many affordable, great sounding, and exciting to play vintage guitars that offer something simply not available in a new guitar. A well-built vintage instrument, although expensive can actually be superb value for money in comparison to some of the new guitars available at that price.
Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?
Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.
Electric guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major electric guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. The most popular electric guitars have great rock sounds and the best bodies. On electric guitars, strings affect the sounds too. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new electric guitar.
EQ (Equalizer) – A frequency-based effect that allows you to boost or cut frequencies along the audio spectrum. Graphic EQ pedals such as the GE-7 and GEB-7 have faders for each frequency band that you can move up or down to boost or cut the frequency. EQ pedals can be used to tackle problem frequencies such as mid-range honk or to give a bass boost or add some high end sparkle. Alternatively you can use EQ to create interesting tones such as emulating a small radio by rolling off the bottom end and boosting the high mids.
The flanger is one of the more distinct effects out there, known for its jet-like sweeping sounds, it can also be very subtle as David Gilmour and Andy Summers have shown. It is similar to a chorus pedal in that it is a modulation time based effect. The flanger delays a copy of the original signal and mixes it in with the dry signal. The displacement of the time causes the swooshing effect. This can be done in multiple stages to produce a more dramatic flanged effect. “Originally flanging was done with tape machines” as explained here in a quote from Wikipedia. “The name “flanging” comes from the original method of creation.

The Seismic Audio SADIYG-02 is based on the iconic Telecaster electric guitar. It comes with a single-cutaway body that's crafted from paulownia, a China native wood that's known for being light. The pickguard is already set into the body when you get the package, but you'll need to solder the input jack, the volume and tone knobs, the bridge pickup and the selector switch before you start using it.
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.
It is a popular technique in which the player's thumb or index finger on the picking hand slightly catches the string after it is picked, canceling the fundamental of the string, and letting one of the overtones dominate. It is used by popular guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani who utilize the tremolo arm and high gain amps together with the pinch harmonic to produce horse-like wails from the instrument. - winner333
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of...  Click To Read More About This Product
Immediately you can see that this unit is on the larger side, measuring 25 inches (63.5 cm) across, and weighing about 11 lbs (5 kg). If you’re concerned about portability, we noticed one of the most purchased items together with the HD500X is this case, which comes highly recommended and will keep your multi-effects pedal safe during transit and storage. The Line 6 POD HD500X itself has superb build quality. It has a very nice metal chassis, and heavy duty construction. The build quality probably doesn't get much better than this in a multi-fx unit (we say it is a step above the Zoom G3X). We won’t spend a ton of time talking about the inputs/outputs and controls available on the Line 6 POD HD500X, since you can very easily discern that from photos of it. We will say that of all the multi-effects pedals on our top 5 list, this is the most robust. The inputs/outputs cover above and beyond what you probably need. You’ve got your basic inputs and outputs, USB 2.0 so you can use it as a USB interface and for DAW integration, MIDI in/out/thru, FX send and return, AUX input, balanced XLR outputs, integrated mic preamp, and more. In short, however you want to integrate the HD500X into your bedroom, music studio, or live setup, there’s a very good chance you’re covered.

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Ibanez Mikro GIO Electric Guitar in Black w/ Bag. The guitar is in good working condition does have few marks and one nick. Does not include stand just used to take pictures. Includes guitar strap and Ibanez bag. Please contact me if you have any problems with your purchased item and I would be Happy work with you to help make your Transaction a Pleasant Experience.           Please check photos carefully and use the enlarging tool. Some photos are taken with a flash and may cause the image to appear darker in some areas. Photos are an important part of the description and the condition of each item.Thanks for Looking!!           Also please verify the correct shipping address before bidding. Payment is expected within 48 hours.    

Hi, I’m John Anthony, Playing and collecting Cool Guitars is my hobby, and all of my friends and relatives know it. For the reason, I receive many queries over the phone, email and social media about Best Guitar Recommendation. Which one they should buy now, which will fit them etc. And finally, I created this GuitarListy.com and started putting my suggestions and reviews here.
Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.
Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.
To simplify the many available guitar body shapes available, we can categorize them into three shapes: double cutaway shape (eg. Stratocaster), single cutaway (eg. Les Paul), and exotic shapes (eg. Flying V). While it maybe considered superficial, having the right guitar shape will add to how enjoyable an instrument is to play and look at - which in turn inspires you to play more and better. In addition to shape, getting a good grip of basic body configurations is essential, here's a primer of the three most common:
Modulating Offset: The output of solid-state amplifiers is directly connected to 2 DC power supplies through the output transistors. The instantaneous non-symmetry within the music waveform (particularly from the bass notes) is averaged as a modulating DC offset. This modulating offset is small, but it varies the efficiency of the speaker, introducing inter-modulation distortion, amplitude modulating the music. This problem is mostly eliminated by the trend to use an active sub-bass. In valve amplifiers the output transformer isolates the speaker from the amplifier electronics. No modulating offset can be produced.
i just started using this book never having played before and am finding it totally easy to follow. the friendly narrative guides the reader through every step, explaining the most simple of terms and concepts clearly and concisely. and yes, the CD is funky and you can play along with it more or less straight away AND sound good, which keeps you motivated.
Birmingham’s Table Scraps add a grunge-y Midlands mud to the garage rock sound established by the likes of 13th Floor Elevators and The Cramps. Guitarist Scott sticks to a “three-pedal limit”, using a Death By Audio Fuzz War (“a versatile monster”), Echo Dream 2 and Boss DD-3 to jarring effect to create freaky, DC59’d melodic lead bursts. As Scott says: “Once you try 12-string everything else only sounds half as good.”
I think it's fair to say that we all have a pretty good idea of what reverb is, though there are several ways of emulating it in the studio. Early reverb chambers, plates and springs have now given way to digital solutions, which fall into two main camps: synthetic and convolution. Synthetic reverbs take an algorithmic approach, setting up multiple delays, filters and feedback paths to create a dense reverberation effect similar to what you might hear in a large room. Though these often sound a bit 'larger than life', they've been used on so many hit records that we now tend to accept their sound as being the 'correct' one for pop music production. Most can approximate the sound of rooms, halls, plates and chambers, but in comparison with a real reverberant environment, the early reflections often seem to be too pronounced. The advantage of a synthetic reverb is that the designer can give the user plenty of controls for altering the apparent room size, brightness, decay time and so on.

Description: Flat Black Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Mother Of Pearl - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome, Diecast, XLR Output - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Shape Shifter - String Instrument Finish: Flat Black
New Born has a great riff that starts at about 1:00. It is repeated a few more times during the rest of the song. To play this riff like Matthew Bellamy does, you'll need to tune down one of your strings. Click the button below to find out which string and how to tune it. Oh, and if you look closely at the video there are some clues there for how to play it!
Although I’ve spent most of my life focusing on audio journalism, I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s, and I have played lots of gigs with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles. I now play mostly double bass and ukulele; I currently play in three jazz groups in Los Angeles, and I sub regularly in a couple more groups. I also conduct more-or-less weekly jazz jam sessions at my home, where I accompany numerous guitarists of widely varying skill levels, toting all sorts of axes. Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to make product tests fair.
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It should be noted that some bridge assemblies have pre-set, non-adjustable saddle pieces. The Gibson "tune-o-matic" bridge is just one example. On these bridges you will have an overall height adjustment post on either side of the bridge. For these bridges, measure the height at the 12th fret for the low and high "E" strings and make your height adjustment for each side at the respective post. The other string heights will be defined by the bridge assembly.
EDIT: I didn't even think of scale size. I think that the difference between a few inches of string shouldn't make as much difference as some of the other factors I've described above. The conservative bet would be to get a short-scale, since that puts the frets closer together, which might make it easier for your fingers to stretch between them. (did I say that right? hmm...) If you're concerned about weight, go with a Fender or ask your Carvin rep what the weight of the guitar you're looking at is, and compare with other guitars. Lighter guitars will have a different tone than heavier guitars, but if it makes the difference between being able to play and not, then do whatever it takes! 

A range of other effects are used in various genres. "Wah-wah" and "synth" bass effects are associated with funk music. As well, since the 1960s and 1970s, bands have experimented with "fuzz bass" where the bass is distorted either by overdriving the amp or by using a distortion unit. Fuzz bass was used by psychedelic rock bands in the 1960s and early 1970s and in traditional heavy metal bands (Led Zeppelin) during the same era. Octave-generating effects, which generate an octave below the pitch being played are also used by bass players. Many bassists in modern-day hard rock and heavy metal bands use overdrive pedals specifically made for bass guitar. Since the late 1980s, bass-specific overdrive pedals have been available; these pedals maintain the low fundamental pitch. Using a regular guitar distortion pedal for bass would result in the lower frequencies being greatly lessened. Well-known overdrive effects for bass include the BOSS ODB-3 Bass Overdrive[1], Electro-Harmonix Bass Blogger[2], Tech21 Sansamp Bass Driver[3][4], the DigiTech|DigiTech XBD Bass Driver [5], and the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff.
Dyna Gakki began production in 1972 in the city of Nagano, Japan. They manufactured guitars for Fender Japan and Greco, so they couldn't have been a terrible manufacturer as Fender is very choosy about outsourcing their product. Dyna may have been a source for Japanese manufacturer Yamaki. Dyna also produced the infamous Ibanez badges for a short period of time.
B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
In Part 4 of Gibson’s Effects Explained series we’re going to look at modulation effects. This group includes phasing, flanging, chorus, vibrato and tremolo, rotary speaker effects, and octave dividers, the latter of which I have loosely grouped in here because … well, they don’t fit in overdrive or delay, do they? Later analog versions of the first three of these—phasing, flanging, and chorus—do, as a matter of fact, use much of the same technology as echo and delay units, although with chips having shorter delay times, but it makes sense to include them here because their obvious sonic characteristics are of a type with other units made from very different kinds of circuits. Most such effects were developed in an effort to add depth, dimension and movement to the guitar’s natural sound without necessarily distorting it, strictly speaking. A few noteworthy types also developed from effects that were in use on the electronic organ. This is another big category, so we’ll split it into two chunks.
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1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-220 "Strat-Style" Electric Guitar. Both original, single coil, "Spectrum" Pickups. Great, original Candy Apple, Metallic color. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Laminated maple neck. Separate ON / Off switch for each pickup. Overall Rhythm / Solo tone switch. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. No case included.

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Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.

He revolutionized music by combining two different guitar styles who were begging to be played together, blues and country. It was through this courage and confidence that Berry was able to convey his slick attitude that made everyone stop and listen. Sadly, however, even though his lyrics and performances were positively received, the artist himself did not have as positive a reception. He was said to be quite hard to get along with… but that didn’t stop his band swinging along. A sign of complete trust in what they were achieving together.

As these same makers ramped up for digital production, digital choruses naturally joined the team. The effect as produced digitally might sound broadly similar, but it is done differently than in the analog circuits. Digital chorus pedals double a signal and add delay and pitch modulation to one path, the latter wobbling below and above the pitch of the unadulterated signal, which produces an audible out-of-tuneness when the paths are blended back together. It’s hard to fault the power and range of control that digital technology affords, and this version of the effect has been hugely successful, but many guitarists still prefer the subtle, watery shimmer of the analog version. Conversely, the same ears often find the digital variety makes them a little queasy.
In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.
I think that there is a lot more that goes into getting a rich sound than just the pickup layout. AYK different pickups also have very different sounds, so if you line up an HH next to an HSH, there are going to be so many different factors that it's impossible to just point to the pickup configuration as the difference, unless they are the same make and model. From my personal experience of wanting a nice HSH many years ago, it's not worthwhile to limit yourself to that configuration because there are so few models. IMHO. Also, I don't think you mention what style of music you play at all. – JFA Jun 25 '14 at 1:59
Guitar pedals and other effects, including an early version of the wah-wah pedal used by Jimi Hendrix and the Tone Bender fuzzbox pedal, a Vox variation on the famous original Gary Hurst Tone Bender (used by Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin and Jeff Beck of the Yardbirds as well as The Beatles, Spencer Davis and others), were also marketed by Vox and later on manufactured in Italy.
We indicate and report to EMS Worldwide Express mail service that the guitar is sent with a lower declared value than the purchased price and as a gift so that there will be a possible exemption on custom clearance fees, taxes or you may need to pay a little amount but it is necessary, or the custom will open the package and revalue the guitar. Based on our experience, the custom fees in the Europe, USA, Canada, Australia and Asia are very minimal since we declared the guitar as a gift and lower purchased price in order to lessen the custom fees or even possible exemption and we have not received complaints from our valued customers regarding custom fees, taxes and tariffs.
If you pine for the days when giants scarred the earth with odes to their arena-sized wangs, then Michigan’s Greta Van Fleet are your new jam. Not only do they look like they’ve stumbled out of the pages of 70s Vogue, they also have a preternatural knack for brow-raising classic rock anthems. Guitarist Jake Kiszka is highly capable, combining Page-like pentatonic ping-pong with a bag of lead licks that channel everyone from Jefferson Airplane to Mike Campbell. 

Before diving in, it’s also worth mentioning the “crap in, crap out” rule, which dictates that any recorded track is only going to sound as good as the guitar and amp that it captures, however good your mic or skilled your engineering. You can’t expect elevated studio technique to convert junk tone or a mediocre performance to stellar sounds in the mix; the best you can hope for is to accurately capture the sound being made by your amp, and to do so with optimum depth, dynamics, and fidelity. Of course, it’s possible that the crappy, low-grade junk tone you capture from a scuzzball rig is exactly what the recording demanded (Jack White or Dan Auerbach, anyone?), but it will usually benefit the tune to capture it as powerfully as you can!


According to the Amazon page for this guitar, the item weight is 18 lbs, but that’s likely due to the inclusion of the case. There are no other reviews of this instrument, but just keep in mind that with a spruce top guitar, you’re going to have higher, clearer treble sounds than with a cedar top. Also, compared to higher-priced guitars from the Ramirez workshop, this particular model—considered an “entry” model—is a bit more affordable, which was Amalia Ramirez’s aim in reviving the 3N series.
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Electric guitars are the easier to play as compared to acoustic guitars. But only because the chords are easy to play, that much force is not required to hold the chords as well as strum the chords. So it would better if you first practice the chords and the strumming on an acoustic guitar. The song Yellow by Coldplay, mentioned below, is considered as one of the best guitar tabs for beginners.
• Wrap around: On wrap around tailpieces, what’s wrapping around is the string. Strings are slid into the tailpiece from the front and then pass over the back and top of the bridge before making their journey up the neck. This system creates less string tension. Some players report tuning and intonation issues with these tailpieces. Others swear by them.
We are still in the testing phase with this system, and our representatives are still finding out how to give you the best possible experience. Therefore, it may happen that we do not understand you (please speak clearly in either German or English only), that equipment is being tried out by other customers temporarily, or that there are problems with the connection. Please do not hesitate to give us feedback whenever anything like this happens, so that we may learn from this and improve our service.

Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.
In Part 4 of Gibson’s Effects Explained series we’re going to look at modulation effects. This group includes phasing, flanging, chorus, vibrato and tremolo, rotary speaker effects, and octave dividers, the latter of which I have loosely grouped in here because … well, they don’t fit in overdrive or delay, do they? Later analog versions of the first three of these—phasing, flanging, and chorus—do, as a matter of fact, use much of the same technology as echo and delay units, although with chips having shorter delay times, but it makes sense to include them here because their obvious sonic characteristics are of a type with other units made from very different kinds of circuits. Most such effects were developed in an effort to add depth, dimension and movement to the guitar’s natural sound without necessarily distorting it, strictly speaking. A few noteworthy types also developed from effects that were in use on the electronic organ. This is another big category, so we’ll split it into two chunks.
I’ll give your guitar a thorough inspection inside and out, letting you know what is correct and what may need attention now or in the near future. Frets, neck, action, bridge and bridge plate, truss rod, tuners, and internal bracing are some of the things that are assessed. This service is provided as a courtesy to my customers and there is no obligation or pressure to buy anything.
Starting in January 1999, Taylor guitars are made with a patented bolt-on neck; the NT neck (new technology). It differs from other necks by using a continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.[7] The standard practice is to support the fretboard up to the fourteenth fret with the unsupported portion being glued to the constantly moving soundboard. The NT neck fits into a pocket on the top of the guitar body with the desired angle being achieved by small, accurately milled neck spacers (shims). Over time, some guitars require the neck angle to be realigned (referred to as a neck reset). This process is greatly simplified by allowing the replacement of different sized neck spacers to return the neck to the required angle. Prior to 1999, Taylor Guitars had a simpler bolt-on neck. These guitar necks allow for simple adjustment later if needed. Traditional (Non-Taylor) guitars with a glued neck with a dovetail would need to be disassembled to be adjusted.[8][9]

I like the difference in character of some of the amp distortions, then you get the tome knobs of the amp, different speaker emulations with tone controls and the graphic eq. So there is a lot you can do to get the right tone. My complaint on that is that the "mixer" mode cuts the highs (since there is no amp to do so) cuts thee highs too much. If you go flat with the graphic EQ the amp emulations are always a little too dark.

This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:
Acoustic and electric archtops are identical in design with the only difference being the addition of electro-magnetic pickups and pots. Archtops can either be full-bodied or thinline. The full-bodied archtop retains good volume and acoustic resonance when played unplugged though feedback may be an issue when amplified. The thinline body minimizes feedback by sacrificing acoustic volume and resonance.
“Tone that emulates the human voice is always more accessible,” Waara continues. “Otherwise, purely electronic music would have taken over, and we wouldn’t be making guitars anymore. There are some absolutes in human DNA about wanting to feel connection and that’s probably a fuller frequency tone, that’s tone that is more reminiscent of the human voice. Or, for instance, a violin or organic instruments that have been around for hundreds of years. When we talk about guitars having an organic quality, it’s because that’s rooted in what human beings know. Which is air moving, wood vibrating, people speaking.”
There's no reason not to try an effect if you want to. Sure, some kind of effect might mask some bad habits (reverb and delay might sort off mess your timing), but distortion for example is almost like playing another instrument, and if you're into punk/rock, the sooner you try it the better. You will have to figure out ways to mute the strings and reduce string noises, which is part of the technique.

  Technology is not based on good materials and dexterity alone. It's how you finish your work that counts. It's the little details that you labour over until it's just right. It's an arduous process of creating and destroying and rebuilding until its perfect; until there's nothing left to add, and nothing left to take away. Then it's ready. Swing is well known for its attention to detail in our incredible Custom Shop models, but what you may not know, is that we make no distinction between them and our retail guitars. They all receive the same exacting standard we demand of any product that carries the name "Swing". Our attention to quality and detail costs us more than what other manufacturers consider as an adequate alternative. We do not take shortcuts with every detail because we have found that the careful, educated player can hear those shortcuts. Again, it shouldn't come as surprise though, it's really the only explanation why after only 2 years in business we rose to become #1, and have stayed there for three years and counting.
Overdrive, and its noisier cousin distortion, are effects used to ‘push’ your guitar’s signal before it reachers your amplifier. Most amplifiers have some degree of drive capability built into them so you’re most likely familiar with what they sound like. Overdrive is what pushes a clean sound to break up slightly, giving it a warmer, thicker sound. This is perfect for blues and rock playing. It also serves to add more sustain to your playing, meaning notes ring out for longer. In addition to giving a noticeable boost to your volume. Distortion is effectively a more extreme version of overdrive, in that it takes the signal you’re feeding it and makes it all degrees of nasty. You’ll typically hear distortion used in heavier guitar styles like metal and punk. Here, a liberal dollop of dirt is required to give the sound its thicker characteristic.

Tube amp distortion is created when tubes are overdriven by receiving more juice than they can handle, thus causing the signal break up. Tube-driven amplifiers are still in demand by seasoned players because of the warm, musical tones they create, and some distortion-type effects use actual tubes to replicate that sound. But most distortion effects are produced either through analog solid-state circuitry or digitally.
Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
As with other plucked instruments (such as the lute), the musician directly touches the strings (usually plucking) to produce the sound. This has important consequences: Different tone/timbre (of a single note) can be produced by plucking the string in different manners and in different positions. For example, plucking an open string will sound brighter than playing the same note(s) on a fretted position (which would have a warmer tone).
By 1947 with the release of ‘Call it Stormy Monday’ – his biggest hit, Walker preferred playing with a smaller band lineup of six members. This size of band bridged the gap between the solo rural blues players like Robert Johnson or Charley Patton and the larger big band ensembles of the 20’s and 30’s. It became popular and adopted by bands that would find success over the next few decades.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
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If you’re looking for a solid start on how you will sound without settling for a tube amplifier due to its price, maintenance and back breaking weight to carry around. The Marshall MG30FX combo amp is surely one of the best out there on capturing iconic sounds, as well as the legendary Marshall tones that other brand of amplifiers frequently emulates, adding it to their bank of amp models.
There's more to being a musician than what you do on the stage: while that's the perfect place to turn it up loud with a standard guitar amplifier, sometimes you don't want anybody but yourself to be listening in on the tunes. That's when headphone guitar amps come in handy. There's a solid variety of these little amps to choose from, so you can get yours with as few or as many features as you like. Then, all you need is your favorite set of 'phones and you're ready to rock.

If ever there was a candidate for compression, bass is it. This instrument has a wide dynamic range (even more so when slap techniques are employed), but it usually needs to sit at a very steady level in the mix. But should compression be applied during recording, to control the levels going down, or later, during the mix, to insure the best blend in the track? Well, the answer is probably both, but with potentially different approaches to squashing the signal. During recording, a Limiter might be the ticket, to control transient peaks that might overload ADCs, producing pops and spikes that can ruin a take. A classic fast VCA compressor/limiter (like the dbx 160) could be employed to handle peaks, without really reducing the player’s dynamics at this early stage. Then when mixdown rolls around, more gentle compression can be introduced (like the smooth squash of an optical compressor like the LA-2A), to tighten up the dynamics, as needed for that particular mix. Applying the right kind, and amount, of compression/limiting at all stages will assure you get nice clean recordings, that can be properly squeezed into the mix when the time comes. 
In 2009, Vox refined the Virage design with the Virage II series of guitars. This series repeated the double and single cutaway bodies of the earlier Virage series, but also included the Series 77 (with double horns emulating the Gibson SG series), the Series 55 (with resemblance to the Gibson Les Paul single cutaway), and the Series 33 (with lower cost fabrication than the 77 and 55 series). The Virage II series features a CoAxe pick-ups which resemble the earlier Three-90 features, but claimed to be lower noise. The one-piece cast MaxConnect bridge of this series is aluminium and provides both a saddle and anchor for the guitar strings.

* Advertised Price Per Month: The advertised price per month is the estimated monthly payment required to be made on your WebBank/Fingerhut Advantage Credit Account for a single item order, or if at any time your account has multiple items on it, then please see the payment chart for payment terms. The advertised price per month will not apply. See Full Cost of Ownership.


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Placing a texture-based effect such as chorus before distortion basically means that the chorus effect will be distorted rather than the distorted tone getting some chorus. That may sound kind or original and appealing to some but trust me – you do not want to waste your distortion pedal effect by distorting an already subtle effect. This very concept is extremely important in determining the correct placement of your effects.
I once had RARE rogue made in the early 90s, set up exactly like some of the best ibanez.s. Shark fin inllays, cool headstock, grover tuners, real floyd rose, etc, even the pickups used were authentic dimebuckers. Rogue made these to compete with bigger names and sold them for around $200, best guitar ever. I wish I had never sold it. I still have pics if anyone wants to see it.

In the Seventies, Clapton’s work with Derek and the Dominos and his first solo albums added a slew of masterpieces like “Layla” and “Lay Down Sally” to classic rock’s repertoire. The Eighties also saw Clapton’s music featured in movies (The Hit in 1984 and Lethal Weapon in 1987) and commercials (“After Midnight” for Michelob in 1987), while a string of albums produced by Phil Collins established Clapton as a pop/rock icon.
The next step up from a Fender Squier Bullet can be a Fender Squier Standard Strat, but if you can afford 50 dollars more you are the owner of a Fender Deluxe Stratocaster which is a really good guitar for beginners, intermediate and advanced guitar players who don’t want to spend a fortune but do want a good quality guitar which is decent enough to upgrade later on with better pickups and hardware to make it top notch. If you don’t want to spend a 1000 dollars on a real american Fender Stratocaster then this is the best alternative.
I have no idea what the set measurement is for the Authentics, and if it is any different than other guitars. Probably not. But guitars settle during their initial acclimation period and the exact bow of the neck and arch of the top can change. Actually it is almost certain to change some. There have been reports of all sorts of Martins with action reaching up near or over the maximum height within spec. But the same holds rue from brand of guitar that uses organic materials like solid wood.
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.
There are, by the way, a number of discrepancies between Japanese Teisco and American Teisco Del Rey literature from 1966. Many of the older models continued to be promoted in Japan, but not in the U.S. Virtually all guitars in U.S. literature are also seen in Japanese catalogs. This does not mean that just because W.M.I. did not promote certain models, they were not still available in America. Many may have gone to Sears as Silvertones, and it’s possible that W.M.I. still brought in guitars other than those in its catalog.

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar recorded on the both pickups setting direct in and also through a valve driven Fender reverb unit. This can be used with software amplifiers such as the free fender and marshall vst plugins on this forum (there are lots of software guitar amplifier and pedal related things worth downloading on the Guitar Amp Modelling forum) or amplifier impulse response files with your convolution reverbs like Jconv on Linux or Freeverb on Windows. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them.

The Martin F Series bit the dust in mid-’65, to be supplanted by the somewhat updated, nattier GT Series of bound archtop hollowbody electrics. The first few prototypes were dubbed the XTE Series and produced in 1965. The guitars were renamed the GT Series and swung into production in the beginning of 1966. The GT Series consisted basically of two models, the GT-70 and GT-75. These were thinlines with two f-holes, a 15th fret neck joint (actually more frets were clear of the body), bound 22-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays, and new, bound, wide-flared three-and-three headstocks with a concave curve in the pointed crown.

We're just over the £300 price tag here, but for the shredders and jazz fans out there, the Schecter C-6 Plus in Electric Magenta is a great option, whether you’re a beginner or pro player. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars, and one hell of a performer, featuring professional level appointments inspired by Schecter's  Diamond Series guitars  – this is a monster of tone, and well worth the extra investment.


The core of this guitar is its twin horn double cutaway mahogany body, which follows after the original SG. But as expected in this entry-level price range, they exchanged what's supposed to be a mahogany neck for maple with 12" radius rosewood fingerboard. Specifications remain faithful to the original, with a scale length of 24.75" and 1.68" nut width. The generic pickups installed sound surprisingly good for the price, but like many have done, the pickups can be easily swapped out for more hard hitting humbuckers to get more out of the guitar.

There was a band in Manchester called Sister Ray, who were just this scary bunch of men/reprobates. I guess word had got around that I had a knack and was a useful little guy to have around, and you only have to buy me some Coca-Cola and I was good to go. So I played with them. I started playing my first sort of shows in front of real [crowds] when I was fourteen.
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Clapton is good… not gonna argue that he is an amazing guitarist… but no where near the best guitarist of all time…. Satriani can play ANY clapton riff, solo, song, chord progression, whatever.. Clapton can’t come close to playing any of Joe’s stuff. And most of Claptons best songs are JJ Cale tunes. Cocaine, Layla, After Midnight, etc,…. etc…. Oh and Clapton put out a whole album dedicated to Robert Johnson and admitted that most of the songs are redone and reworked because “the man” Clapton couldn’t play em anywhere near as well as Mr. Johnson.
Fender are perhaps the world’s most famous electric guitar brand. Founded by Leo Fender in California in 1946, they are famed for producing the first ever mass-produced solid-body electric guitar. Since then, Fenders have been used by some of the biggest names in music, from Jimi Hendrix and Buddy Holly, to Paul McCartney and Eric Clapton. These days the company’s headquarters are in Scottsdale, Arizona, and they still produce two of the most iconic models of all time – the Stratocaster and the Telecaster.
Taylor does produce a more budget friendly line of instruments with the 200 series, which is ideal for beginners looking to capture their famous sound at a fraction of the price. Taylor also produces small bodied guitars such as the Baby, Big Baby and GS Mini, which rival their full bodied instruments at a lessened price and are perfect for kids and beginners to learn on (6).
The enormous world of electric guitars can seem daunting to navigate. While there is no best or worst guitar, there are guitars that have been ingrained into our collective headspace. There are also guitars that have pushed boundaries and become staples of the modern musical landscape. Putting aside the latest in guitar tech or rare vintage gems, let’s take a look at models that have time and time again satisfied and inspired players of all tastes and from all walks of life. Here are five of the most popular electric guitars in the world.
Placing a texture-based effect such as chorus before distortion basically means that the chorus effect will be distorted rather than the distorted tone getting some chorus. That may sound kind or original and appealing to some but trust me – you do not want to waste your distortion pedal effect by distorting an already subtle effect. This very concept is extremely important in determining the correct placement of your effects.
I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul
Unfortunately, National’s line of instruments was not well diversified and, as demand for the expensive and hard-to-manufacture tri-cone guitars began to slip, the company realized that it would need to produce instruments with a lower production cost if it was going to succeed against rival manufacturers. Dissatisfaction with what John Dopyera felt was mismanagement led him to resign from National in January 1929, and he subsequently formed the Dobro Manufacturing Corporation, later called Dobro Corporation, Ltd, and began to manufacture his own line of resonator-equipped instruments (dobros). Patent infringement disagreements between National and Dobro led to a lawsuit in 1929 with Dobro suing National for $2,000,000 in damages. Problems within National’s management as well as pressure from the deepening Great Depression led to a production slowdown at National, and this ultimately resulted in part of the company’s fractured management structure organizing support for George Beauchamp’s newest project: the development of a fully electric guitar.[5]
I moved permanently to Brazil from the USA. I brought an acoustic in a typical acoustic case. I had a vintage VOX v241 Bulldog in it’s original wood case. They both survived the counter check-in and belly load of the airplanes and transfers. My VOX Pathfinder amp was in a footlocker with other thing and made it just fine also. Yes, the plugs and voltage differences are a problem. I need to use a voltage transformer to change the 220v to 110v. I wouldn’t worry too much about shipping a Fender style guitar but any guitar with with a Gibson style neck I would worry about and want the best specialty travel guitar case I could find.

The very first production electric guitar was the Stromberg Electro, developed by Hank Kuhrmeyer and introduced in 1928. It was pretty much a kludge. It was an acoustic guitar with a magnetic pickup fitted to the soundboard... Stromberg/Kay Instruments made a resonator version of this, too. The weight of the pickup, though, destroyed the guitar's soundboard over time.


Build Your Own Effect Pedal. Mammoth Electronics makes an effort to offer our customers a very neatly packaged and personally customizable effect pedal kit. Each guitar pedal kit comes equipped with everything you need to build your own effect pedal as quickly and inexpensively as possible without sacrificing quality. These DIY guitar pedals kits are designed to make building your own effect pedal easy for everyone from the hobby builder to the manufacturer. All parts are labeled and packaged in the kit for easy identification. Enclosures are fully customizable to the user specification and specially wrapped in a protective foam for safe transit. We’ve provided a wide selection for any effect pedal kit needs you might have. From a simple boost pedals, and fuzz pedals, as well as overdrive, distortion, and compression kits. We also have a wide range of modulation kits, including delay, reverb, tremolo, and phaser effect pedal kits. If you need a quick fix or a more complex guitar pedal kit, Mammoth Electronics offers a variety of options making it effortless to build your own effect pedal with a sound quality that will make an impression. We work hard to build relationships with only the best brands for our customers. These strong relationships allow us to provide extremely competitive pricing on all of our DIY guitar pedals kits.. We’re confident you will save yourself money & time if you build your own effect pedal with Mammoth Electronics. Mammoth Electronics offers customized DIY guitar kits and effect pedal kits that allow you to experiment with, create and amplify your own taste of music, without compromising on the sound quality. With added protective layering, these kits are safe for transportation and transit. We’re passionate about helping our customers build the best effect pedal possible so please Check out our Facebook page where you can provide feedback, share tips or ask any questions you might have about your latest projects.
The Martin company is generally credited with developing the X-bracing system during the 1850s, although C. F. Martin did not apply for a patent on the new bracing system. During the 1850s, X-bracing was used by several makers, all German immigrants who knew each other, and according to historian Philip Gura there is no evidence that C. F. Martin invented the system.[2] The Martin company was the first to use X-bracing on a large scale, however.
Modeling pedals use a host of methods to make your guitar sound like it’s coming from a specific sound source. For example, there are many pedals out there that are designed to model the sound of classic amps. This allows you to plug your amp and pedal straight into a PA system or even a pair of headphones, while maintaining the characteristics of the amp the pedal is modeled after. This also helps you avoid having to carry your amp with you everywhere you go.

Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]
The neck is also made of mahogany and is hand set into the body. Looking at the fretboard, we see a standard rosewood design with white binding and classic trapezoid inlays. Epiphone went with a set of Alnico Classic humbucker pickups. These are very close to what the original Gibson solution had to offer. Classic rock and blues just flow out of these, although you are more than free to crank up the gain and blast some heavy riffs.
The 2555X Silver Jubilee reissue has the same silver vinyl covering used on the originals, and looks just as handsome. The controls are pleasingly familiar, with a simple front panel layout featuring controls for bass, mid, treble, presence, together with a preamp gain and two master volume controls - one for lead and one for rhythm. A push/pull switch on the output master volume changes channels, while another on the gain knob flips the 2555X into rhythm clip mode, changing the clean channel into something a lot more aggressive. The third rocker switch changes the output stage mode from pentode to triode, dropping the power from 100 down to around 50 watts, and softening the attack a little. The sparse rear panel also features a series effects loop, a fixed-level frequency-compensated DI output, and a jack socket for a single-button footswitch, used to change channels. Overall, the 2555X is built to last and look good for a long time, with Marshall's typically high build quality and attention to detail. Apart from its association with Slash, Joe Bonamassa, and various other high-profile users, the main reason why 2555s are so sought after is their sound. We're pleased to report that the reissue amp is tonally as accurate as it possibly could be, with perhaps a touch more gain and low-end punch than the original. The 2555X accurately reproduces the original tone - and with a few minor exceptions, the look - of the original, at a price that's very reasonable compared with the competition, especially for a UK-made product.
Okay first of all yes, John Mayer deserves to be on this list. I would've probably put him even higher. I understand if you don't agree but go listen to his Where The Light is album and get back to me on that. I think Eric Clapton should've made the list though. And, although I'm not a big fan of metal I can say as a guitarist anybody can go up and down scales and embelish notes and sound like a metal genius. The artists above put real soul into their music. I think you have an amazing list though. Many people probably would've have thought of some of the people on here… but what about Derek Trucks?
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I think it's fair to say that we all have a pretty good idea of what reverb is, though there are several ways of emulating it in the studio. Early reverb chambers, plates and springs have now given way to digital solutions, which fall into two main camps: synthetic and convolution. Synthetic reverbs take an algorithmic approach, setting up multiple delays, filters and feedback paths to create a dense reverberation effect similar to what you might hear in a large room. Though these often sound a bit 'larger than life', they've been used on so many hit records that we now tend to accept their sound as being the 'correct' one for pop music production. Most can approximate the sound of rooms, halls, plates and chambers, but in comparison with a real reverberant environment, the early reflections often seem to be too pronounced. The advantage of a synthetic reverb is that the designer can give the user plenty of controls for altering the apparent room size, brightness, decay time and so on.
The Hal Leonard Bagpipe Method is designed for anyone just learning to play the Great Highland bagpipes. This comprehensive and easy-to-use beginner's guide serves as an introduction to the bagpipe chanter. The accompanying DVD includes video lessons with demonstrations of all the examples in the book! Lessons include: the practice chanter, the Great Highland Bagpipe scale, bagpipe notation, proper technique, grace-noting, embellishments, playing and practice tips, traditional tunes, buying a bagpipe, and much more!.
Fred’s wife Lynn Shipley Sokolow served as our adult student tester. She plays double bass and banjo in the Americana quartet Sugar in the Gourd but is just starting to learn her way around the electric guitar. To evaluate the short-scale/travel guitars, I also consulted a couple of teenagers who are currently learning how to play: 15-year-old Alana Wood, who helped us on our Best Acoustic Guitar for Beginners and Best Ukulele for Beginners reviews, and 13-year-old Charles Lesser.
O WOW!...I love...Fallout 4 is a great game like the rest of the fallout series but if your a fan of the series u will be kinda of down that the choices u make don't affect the outcome of the game because they made more of a story they wanted to tell but don't lose hope still a good game and they might make a sequel to new Vegas and there just might be a Multiplayer for new Vegas 2....The world is so large and the gameplay non linear (which is good and bad), I find if I walk away from the game for a while, I have to spend a lot of time figuring out where I was and where I stashed things when I come back to it later.
Guitar FX BOX is acting just like a good collection of analog effect pedals. Just plug your guitar into the sound card input and your guitar will sing and scream. You can apply a wide range of high quality effects to guitar, voice, and other inputs real-time - I/O delay is really low, almost undetectable. This is achieved using DirectSound, WDM streaming or ASIO for fast access to the sound card hardware and special DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Besides high sound quality, Guitar FX BOX features intuitive user interface, supports presets and hot keys for quick presets changing, MIDI/Game controllers pedals, configurable tuner, metronome, file input/output. Currently included effects: Overdrive/distortion, Amp&Speaker cabinet simulator, Echo, Pitch shifter, Reverb, Wah-Wah, Chorus, Tremolo, I/O Equalizers, Dynamic compressor, Phaser and Volume swell.
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Basic guitar chords are built using the first, third, and fifth tones of the scale that corresponds with the chord you want to play. For instance, if you want to play a G major chord, you go to the G major scale and find the first, third, and fifth notes in the scale. The G major scale has one sharp (F), so the notes in the scale are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#. The first note is G, the third note is a B, and the fifth note is D. These are the notes you need to make a G major chord. If you wanted a G minor chord all you need to do is make the third note a flat. This system applies to any chord you want to build. These three note chords are called triads and make up the bulk of the beginner open positions chords you’ll use to play a lot of guitar chords songs. When you study these chord shapes, you’ll notice that the root of the note (the first note) usually appears on the lower string and is doubled on a higher string, which reinforces the key tonality.
This is a special edition by Boss, for one main reason, they’ve collaborated with Fender to design the FRV-1 (click for full review), a dominant manufacturer of guitars which everyone should have at least heard of by now.This pedal is an enhanced remake of its old classic release, the manufacturers have kept everything people loved in the original release, while adding more quality.

Everyone has an opinion on Crate amplifiers. Some guitarists are strong supporters, if for no other reason than a fond recollection of a Crate as one of their first amps. Others aren’t as impressed. While it’s true that many Crate models are geared toward beginners and intermediate guitarists, they also have plenty of pro-quality gear in their lineup.


The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.
I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.

Guitar Center Fort Worth provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Fort Worth area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Fort Worth can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Me got a Dorado resonator guitar, very nice dark walnut finish with white binding on edges. I bought it in 1985 but assume the guitar is mid-70's. Incidentally the neck has a very "japanese" feel to it. I was told by a guitar dealer that these particular instruments may have been ( at least partially) manufactured in Japan, then possibly had their resonators fitted in USA. They were DISTRIBUTED by Gretsch, in Europe at any rate. Mine is a nice guitar but not nearly as loud as most resonators.
Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
SOLD OUT: Here is another fine example of a Professional high quality Japan Crafted guitars...this one is "cross-braced" and is a Dreadnought style acoustic like a martin type exhibiting superior solid construction as well as the very high grade Mahogany body Top - Sides & Back which appears to be all-solid. The necks fretboard is a wonderful Indian Rosewood. This example is believed to be a Vintage 1986 Model. Serial # 86021355. The sound is rich and expressive and very tonefull as would be expected from a quality built instrument. The playability "action" is great EZ to play and this guitar stays in tune very well to with its quality Original Takamine sealed Chrome tuners "grover type" This guitar is professional grade and will serve you well. This guitar is not a new guitar and IS a real VINTAGE guitar and has mellowed well and its condition is rated a solid 8.5/10 very good-excellent with some natural wear -dings-scratches etc.. Overall appearance is Gorgeous! and is sure to please. SOLD .
The VOX Pathfinder 10 is one of the best cheap amps on the market today, but don’t be fooled by its budget friendly price tag – this is a powerhouse of tone. Its pricing and ease of use makes it ideal for beginner guitarists but its signature, high quality VOX sound is why it’s also relied upon by professional guitarists and studio engineers everywhere.
If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
Samick is a Korean guitar manufacturing company, that is known first for constructing their pianos using imported pieces. The corporation is capable of manufacturing more than one million guitars each year. They have an acoustic guitar with good quality which makes an exceptional sound. The company sell its guitars under its own brands such as Abilene, Silvertone, Greg Bennett, and Samick.
A lot of EBay sellers have been calling the Hagstrom solid-bodies of the time Hagstrom-Kent. They are not. If it says Hagstrom on the body, it’s a Hagstrom. If it is one of the Hagstrom guitars that was sold as a Kent, it’s a ‘Kent, made by Hagstrom’. I wonder if the sellers think they can get more for a guitar by associating the Kent name with it. I don’t see how. Perhaps the fact that there are so many Kents floating around, the sellers wanted a more familiar name to hang on the Hagstrom.

A simple, inexpensive amplifier may have only two tone controls, a passive bass and treble control. In some better quality amps, one or more midrange controls are provided. On the most expensive amps, there may be shelving equalizers for bass and treble, a number of mid-range controls (e.g., low mid, mid and high mid), and a graphic equalizer or parametric equalizer. The amplifier's master volume control restricts the amount of signal permitted through to the driver stage and the power amplifier. When using a power attenuator with a tube amplifier, the master volume no longer acts as the master volume control. Instead, the power attenuator's attenuation control controls the power delivered to the speaker, and the amplifier's master volume control determines the amount of power-tube distortion. Power-supply based power reduction is controlled by a knob on the tube power amp, variously labeled "wattage", "power", "scale", "power scale", or "power dampening".
High-end builders of today have gone back to germanium en masse for their classic fuzz tones, and most of them test their transistors to sort out the few that will do the job correctly. They put them in anything from vintage-style units—like Fulltone’s ’69, Frantone’s The Sweet, and Roger Mayer’s Classic Fuzz—to way-out updates of the breed—such as Z.Vex’s Fuzz Factory.
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.
The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.
Pressing a string against a fret reduces the vibrating length of that string to the distance between the pressure point and the bridge, thereby controlling pitch. On nearly every Western fretted instrument, the distance between frets is a semi-tone of equal temperament, assuring the easy achievement of strong sounding chords and single notes that fit our hemisphere’s usual expectations for rhythm sounds and melodies. Understanding the virtues and limitations created by the order of frets opens up the door to ways to escape their constricts, like bending strings, playing slide, using whammy bars, delving into extended technique or trying fretless instruments.

[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
Unlike acoustic guitars, solid-body electric guitars have no vibrating soundboard to amplify string vibration. Instead, solid-body instruments depend on electric pickups and an amplifier (or amp) and speaker. The solid body ensures that the amplified sound reproduces the string vibration alone, thus avoiding the wolf tones and unwanted feedback associated with amplified acoustic guitars. These guitars are generally made of hardwood covered with a hard polymer finish, often polyester or lacquer. In large production facilities, the wood is stored for three to six months in a wood-drying kiln before being cut to shape. Premium custom-built guitars are frequently made with much older, hand-selected wood.
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