With modern recording systems, track counts aren’t usually much of a limitation any more. In addition to a mic’ed up amp or a feed from pedals into your interface, try to also capture a clean feed of the guitar signal if your amp or pedal board allows a direct output to be routed. If you record this as well as the amp / fx feed, you have another option to re-process the guitar recording in software if you decide the original feed isn’t right.
We have covered pickups here before so rather than running over old ground I suggest you read that article to get an understanding of the different types of pickups an electric guitar uses and how they work in greater detail. For the purpose of this article, however, all sound starts with your pickups. Pickups are essentially magnets, generally 6 small magnets wrapped in a very fine copper wire (over 7000 times), and can be better described as magnetic wire coils.
A multi-effects device (also called a "multi-FX" device) is a single electronics effects pedal or rack-mount device that contains many electronic effects. In the late 1990s and throughout the 2000s, multi-FX manufacturers such as Zoom and Korg produced devices that were increasingly feature-laden. Multi-FX devices combine several effects together, and most devices allow users to use preset combinations of effects, including distortion, chorus, reverb, compression, and so on. This allows musicians to have quick on-stage access to different effects combinations. Some multi-FX pedals contain modelled versions of well-known effects pedals or amplifiers.

In addition, there were other assessments. I went to Guitar Center to buy an amp. I was playing my guitar through a vintage tube amp when I noticed a man standing behind me. I said, “It sounds good.” He said “It sounds really good, are you going to buy it” as he pointed at my guitar. It was then I realized he was a customer and was interested in buying my guitar.
In the ever-changing world of jazz music, you shouldn’t be surprised to hear of some big changes to the jazz guitar market either! To reflect this we’ve tweaked our chart, removing a couple of models such as the Ibanez AF95FB and the D’Angelico EXL101, and adding five new six-strings. These comprise the faithfully reproduced Epiphone Masterbilt Zenith Classic and the thinbody LH-302T from The Loar. In the semi-hollow section, we added the Ibanez AM93AYS Artcore Expressionist and the beautiful Hagstrom Tremar Viking Deluxe, while the solid-body section saw the arrival of Fender’s Classic Player Jazzmaster Special.
As players such as Bobby Broom, Peter Bernstein, Howard Alden, Russell Malone, and Mark Whitfield revived the sounds of traditional jazz guitar, there was also a resurgence of archtop luthierie (guitar-making). By the early 1990s many small independent luthiers began making archtop guitars. In the 2000s, jazz guitar playing continues to change. Some guitarists incorporate a Latin jazz influence, acid jazz-style dance club music uses samples from Wes Montgomery, and guitarists such as Bill Frisell continue to defy categorization.
I began taking guitar lessons from Kenneth when I was 14, and right away, I noticed his ability to mold the lesson into an experience that fit 𝘮𝘺 musical interests and what I wanted to learn. Whether I wanted to learn theory, practice a certain technique or rudiment, or just have fun learning a song, Kenneth could always adapt and make the lesson interesting and enriching. This is a quality that many music teachers lack, and it’s the aspect of his teaching that kept me enticed for so long. In addition to being a great teacher, Kenneth is a passionate music fan of many different genres, and through taking lessons with him, I was exposed to many new musical concepts that opened my eyes to the world of music I was yet to discover. Though I no longer take lessons, I can say for sure that my time with Kenneth has made me a much more skilled, receptive and well rounded musician, and I am very thankful for all the things I learned.
Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.

Firmly intended to compete with Gibson's ES-335, the Starfire IV, V and VI retain plenty of Guild style, not least the more spacious cutaways and the wooden foot tune-o-matic-style bridge. Placed side-by-side with an equally new Bigsby-equipped Gibson ES-335, the Starfire V somehow looks more 'retro', more 60s. The body here is made from mahogany laminates with a distinct striped figure under the Cherry Red finish, which was introduced with the first Starfire. Then, as now, it all creates a different aesthetic to the Gibson ES-335. A major difference is the control set-up, which here augments the Gibson layout with a smaller knobbed master volume control on the treble horn, just behind the three-way toggle pickup selector. The pickups here replicate the early-60s introduced 'Anti Hum Pickups' and are period correct, along with the black plastic, chrome-tipped control knobs. It's a fairly weighty guitar for a semi, thanks to the full-length maple centre-block, and has a classic strapped-on feel. It is, of course, thinline depth and feels every bit an ES-335. It has a 'clean' sound, with low-end definition, slightly bright on the treble pickup with decent sustain and, importantly, a very respectable feedback threshold. It likes volume, and while similarly evocative of virtually all those classic styles, it's the stage version and effortlessly takes you on to early The Who, The Jam or Britpop voices, while seemingly equally at home with rootsy, strummier Americana.

From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
That said, however, the volume knob can help you conjure a variety of tonal characteristics that can come in handy provided you play with dynamics. Using a volume knob in this context can allow such cool maneuvers as having different tones for verses and choruses, or for various styles of music. To get a handle on how your guitar’s volume dial or dials can affect tone, plug in and fire up your amp until it’s growling with overdrive. Start with your guitar’s volume pot at 10 and begin rolling the dial back in increments. As you go, you’ll hear not only a decrease in loudness, but your sound will clean up and experience variations in its harmonic characteristics.
Looking for Used Gear? You may have just discovered your future. Music Go Round franchisees started out as customers of our stores. They have a love of music, they love gear and they understand the industry. Most importantly they’ve taken their passion and turned it into a business they’re proud of which is an asset to the music scene in their community. Who wouldn’t want to own a business where every day they were doing what they truly love? Sound interesting?

Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.
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Depending on your choice of guitar kit you may be required to perform a small amount (or a large amount) of work wiring the guitar. This typically involves a soldering iron and a basic understanding of guitar electronics. You will also need to be able to follow schematic diagrams of pickup configurations. It’s not a one size fits all job either, wiring up a Telecaster is different to wiring a Stratocaster and a Les Paul or hollow body is different again.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.

This should give you an idea of when the majority of the production for any one model occured (majority meaning more than 5 instruments per year). Note this does not mean a model can not exist outside of these years - it certainly can. Just these are the years recorded by Martin in their ledgers. Note this list (for the most part) does not go past 1969.


Tremolo can be a subtle effect, as heard in “Born on the Bayou”by Creedence Clearwater Revival and Gimme Shelter by The Rolling Stones, or more distinct as heard in “Crimson and Clover” by Tommy James and the Shondells and “Bones”by Radiohead. Tremolo has been around since the earliest days of the rock era, and was popular with rockabilly and surf guitarists.
Note: For additional information and history on Ibanez guitars, please check Wikipedia. For a great overall resource for Ibanez guitar questions, check out the Ibanez Collectors World website. The ICW is a gathering of Ibanez collectors who relish in the challenge of not just collecting Ibanez guitars, but of identifying old models, dating guitars by serial numbers, and generally watching the vintage guitar marketplace to understand how interest in Ibanez guitars is evolving.
Right-handed players use the fingers of the right hand to pluck the strings, with the thumb plucking from the top of a string downwards (downstroke) and the other fingers plucking from the bottom of string upwards (upstroke). The little finger in classical technique as it evolved in the 20th century is used only to ride along with the ring finger without striking the strings and to thus physiologically facilitate the ring finger's motion.
This guitar is one of the most popular choices for those looking for a quality acoustic guitar under $500. It comes in a dreadnought size or concert (smaller body) size. It also comes in a variety of colors (10 at time of writing). Some of the features of this acoustic are: Spruce top, rosewood back and sides, new scalloped bracing. Owners describe the sound of this guitar as full, bright, and balanced. It will surely bring a smile to your face as you strum chords for hours while learning new songs. See all the available color choices for this guitar here.
We answer this with a resounding, “Yes!” While electric guitars depend solely on pickups to be heard and to change or distort sound, acoustic electric guitars just provide the ability to amplify the sounds of an acoustic. The acoustic electric guitar construction is still built the same way as an acoustic but with pickups added in the design. You now have the ability to play plugged-in to amplify the natural acoustic harmonics of your tonewoods, or you can play unplugged when jammin’ it at a Summer bonfire.
The pickups are made with mismatched coils and Alnico magnets and are wax potted to eliminate the ear-splitting squeal during high-gain playing.  The pickups are independently routed through volume and tone controls and the 3-system toggle switch.  You can activate single coil pickups with the push-pull method found on each of the volume controls for coil splitting.
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The guitar player who makes his guitar sound anything but a guitar. Helicopter rudders, disc scratching, and his use of the kill switch for staccato like guitar riffs has made him probably the most innovative guitar player of our time. He is a guitarist who can take feedback, and ground hum from his own body into coherent music. Be it Rage Against The Machine, or Audioslave you can always see Morello’s signature licks shining through.
SOLD OUT Here we have a great 45 Year old Japanese Vintage 1971 Yamaha FG180 Red Label Nippon Gakki Martin like vintage tone for a fraction shes a Boomer low action plays easily WoW! ... Just in and AVAILABLE JVG- Fresh Release: I can tell you this is a real good one folks! No structural cracks or checking in finish, its a beautiful Solid Spruce Top and it is pretty flat with no noticeable bellying and its bridge is tight, action is excellent within Martin specs... This guitar received the JVGuitars SET -UP upgrade to bone nut and compensated martin saddle as well as the brifg pins upgraded to very nice Rosewood with abalone dot detail as well as a new set of Martin Marquis strings ( 12’s ) 80/20 Phosphorus bronze . The neck has a classic feel to it with an excellent vintage finish still shines like glass …excellent with a classic Martin like feel in a soft V Medium Profile and has the correct relief set to within M spec frets are still good - we leveled and dress them. We first took off the old strings and fully clean the fingerboard and re-hydrate the woods before polishing all surfaces and lubricating the excellent upgraded Ping Deluxe tuners, Not to be confused with the similar model made in Taiwan this the famous Nippon Gakki made in Japan one and this is a really good one at that folks. Never abused, well cared for, no cracks, great neck alignment to this day, action excellent, plastic tone robbing parts - GONE! Bone & Rosewood sustains better than ever…. these are know for great “ M” Like vintage tone and is in great vintage condition,
Someone is going to be very pleased. For a Song Any questions or to contact Joe to buy this contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest Joe ..
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.

Wife wants to play guitar again after a long hiatus. My full sized Takamine with fat strings is too big and heavy for her. Got her this 3/4 Yamaha and I fell in love with it. I may have to get another one for her because I've been hogging it. It has a great voice for a 3/4. The action is nice, the built in tuner is a real treat. Never had one before but it is unbelievably convenient. I don't plug it in often but I had to check out that sound too. The electronics sound decent. Can't crank it up too loud or it starts to feedback, but I'm actually sitting right on top of my small but punchy VOX amp so I can't really say how it would work for playing out. The reviews convinced me to buy this one. The best review only had one major complaint; the tuning pegs. I agree they could be better, but I don't think they are awful. I have to tweak the tuning just a little once or twice a day before I play, but it isn't like it goes out of tune when I'm playing, even when I'm beating on it hard. I think it is well worth the price and was surprised by the volume it produces. Much better than expected. If you don't find the tuning pegs worthy, I think the instrument is good enough to spend money on for an upgrade, but I don't plan to. It is solid, light weight, comfortable, nice sounding, well designed, feature rich and handy. I'm keeping it in the corner by the bed and I pick it up every chance I get. I haven't played guitar much the past few years so having a guitar at my fingertips all the time is helping me get my callouses back quickly. No matter what you play, if you lose your callouses, rebuilding them is always painful for a few weeks, but this instrument is pretty easy to play. I've gone through the process several times over the years with my Takamine. This is far less painful. Perhaps that means it will take longer, but at least I can still use my fingers to type long reviews in the meantime. No avoiding the pain regardless of what you play, but there is pain, and there is agony. This guitar hits a sweet spot somewhere in between. It's just right for young or old, big or small. (FWIW, I heard an interview with Clapton where he confessed he doesn't play much when he's not working and when he has to prepare for a tour, even he has to go through the callous building process). Well, I'm way off topic now. Again, great little guitar. Go for it.
Much like any other job or hobby, building guitar pedals requires specific tools in order to get the job done. Furthermore, before you start putting together your first build, it is vital that you have a significant understanding of how to solder circuit board electronics – otherwise you may find yourself at a loss due to faulty soldering (believe me, this is not a fun issue to troubleshoot).  If you need to practice soldering, here is a helpful video.
Anyway, this little beast didn’t need much work. This is one of the pleasures of working on a Champ-style practice amp. They have so little in them, there’s simply not much to go wrong or fix. This one, it turned out, only needed a filter cap job, a new preamp tube and one coupling cap. Piece o’ cake. Twenty minutes of soldering and one $4.00 7F7 tube later, I had a monster little Champ-esque amplifier (actually it sounds a little more like the Gibson Skylark than a Champ, but that’s cool by me) for under $80.
Clapton himself has repeatedly called Guy “the greatest living guitarist.” Hendrix literally knelt at Buddy’s feet in the late Sixties, the better to study his riffs. Guy’s secret? He combines an old-time blues feel with the technical facility of a modern guitar player. He was a youngster at the legendary Chess Records in early Sixties Chicago. Fresh up from Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy was some 20 years junior to giants like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, yet old enough and gifted enough to share the studio with them.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
What started out as Gibson’s daughter company that was tasked with producing affordable guitars, has grown into a giant. Not so long ago, Epiphone was the brand you turned to if you wanted a legit Les Paul but didn’t have the money for Gibson one.Today, things are vastly different. Gibson stepped up their game across the board, producing some of the absolute best guitar on the market.
Analog overdrive/distortion pedals work on similar principles to preamplifier distortion. Because most effects pedals are designed to operate from battery voltages, using vacuum tubes to generate distortion and overdrive is impractical; instead, most pedals use solid-state transistors, op-amps and diodes. Classic examples of overdrive/distortion pedals include the Boss OD series (overdrives), the Ibanez Tube Screamer (an overdrive), the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi (a fuzz box) and the Pro Co RAT (a distortion). Typically, "overdrive" pedals are designed to produce sounds associated with classic rock or blues, with "distortion" pedals producing the "high gain, scooped mids" sounds associated with heavy metal; fuzz boxes are designed to emulate the distinctive sound of the earliest overdrive pedals such as the Big Muff and the Fuzz Face.[citation needed]
Rule 4 - The technology further defines the order. Let's give a couple examples here. If you don't use your noise gate before your compressor, you'll increase the volume of your noise which renders your noise gate useless. If you send an impure signal like heavy distortion to a harmonizer, the harmonizer will be very inaccurate, thus you want to apply distortion to the harmonized signal and not the other way around. If you compress before using equalization, the compressor may act on frequencies you don't intend to keep in the signal, thus you should EQ first.
So frustrating!!!! That guy Dino!!!! Guitar exists in other type of music beside rock you meatheads!! Turn off Vh1′ top 100 countdown and try exploring some other types of music. If you play guitar and you think rock is the only style to be played…then I’m very sorry but you probably are absolutely terrible at the guitar. Hate to break it to you but compared to people like Django Rheinhardt and Chet Atkins….Eddie Van Halen and Steve Vai bloooooowwwwwww!!!!!!
Different types of equipment are used to amplify the electric bass and other bass instruments, depending on the performance setting, style of music, the sound desired by the bassist, the size of the venue and other factors, such as whether a bassist is an amateur or professional musician. Professional bassists are more likely to have expensive "boutique" amps and cabinets. All types of bass amps and cabinets are designed to be transportable to shows and recording studios, and as such, most have various features to protect the cabinet (e.g., metal or plastic corner protectors) and speakers (a plastic screen or metal grille) during transportation and move the equipment (a single carry handle is standard for practice amps and combo amps and two handles are sometimes provided for two-handed carrying of large cabinets, and wheels are mounted on some large combo amps and cabinets). Amplifier "heads" may be sold mounted in a wooden cabinet with a carrying handle, or they may be sold as rackmount-able components, which can be screw-mounted in a 19" road case for protection. The speaker enclosures for combo amps and speaker cabinets are typically covered in stiff vinyl, carpet, felt or other sturdy fabric, or painted.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
Guitar FX BOX does REALLY real-time DSP. Signal is sampled from sound card input, processed and then sent to the output with VERY LOW LATENCY. Unlike many other "real-time" audio programs, I/O delay with Guitar FX BOX is extremely low, virtually undetectable! This is achieved using DirectSound (or WDM streaming) for fast access to the hardware (sound card) and fast DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Through DirectSound, latency is about 20ms with most sound cards, or even less. When WDM streaming driver is used, latency can go as low as 5ms! Nevertheless, exact total i/o latency still depends on hardware/drivers.

The latest in a grand lineage of guitar-based Kings, Marcus [pictured, top] has - without exaggeration - the chops to bear that weighty association. Mentored by ‘Uncle’ Warren Haynes, he was personally tipped to us by Kenny Wayne Shepherd and leads a band of formidable players that seem able to turn on a dime from Miles Davis jazz jam to blues and searing Southern rock. 
The body was perfectly flat and the sanding sealer that was on it was great. I however in wanting a finish that was like a mirror used a enamel filler primer. The body was then shot with 6 coats of enamel black, wet sanded, and hung up to cure for 2 weeks. After curing the body was then shot over a matter of another couple of weeks with 10 coats of clear (remember that temperature and humidity have an effect ... full review
The Quantum pickup configuration of H-S-H offers a wide variety of tones, and since this isn’t a Telecaster, having a humbucker in the neck position is especially nice, I find. That single coil in the middle should be used more as a coloring device on selector positions two and four than as a straight-ahead choice. Augment the natural fullness of the humbuckers with a little jangle from the single coil and you’re in business.

I have a Palmer P 33 acoustic (hand-crafted etc), that I bought second hand about 20 years ago for £80. It still sounds and looks superb and rarely loses its tuning. (Probably better than my newer Tanglewood.) I can't find out anything about it. However, somebody out there must have made it. Surely that somebody knows something about them! Do they never go on the internet! Pete.


Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.
Hold on now, this is my story, right? Anyways, realizing that I don’t use multiple amps live, and that I tend to stick with 1 basic amp sound, this was going to be easier than I thought. The amp sound I use is more of a Fender Twin sound with a little more mids, but not as much as say, a Deluxe. The gain is something I get from my pedals (like an 805 Overdrive and a Vapor Trail Analog Delay).  I didn’t need a device for live playing that replicated dozens of amps, cabs, and microphones. My setup is simple: Good pedals plugged into a simple modeler like the Tech 21 Fly Rig 5.  It is a simple amp modeler with reverb that I can even use as a full pedalboard if mine goes down. Getting use to IEMs with a well-mixed band took a little bit of doing, but after a few gigs, I had adjusted just fine. You can change your own balance of the band in your own ears, but it is sort of like listening to a CD and playing along with it. It is not much different than what I do at home, anyway, so once I got over the ‘hangup’ of not carrying my amp (my back thanks me), and not seeing my amp behind me, it made a lot of sense. We take 50% less gear now to gigs, and the recordings (and reviews) are much, much better. My ears don’t ring for 2 days after. I can still get glorious feedback (from my pickups hearing the PA sound), and all of the little tricks I do on guitar remain in tact. The pickups on my guitar still deliver the same sound. To my ears, it is easier to mix out front, and much, much easier to balance all of the instruments without all of the stage volume. We also have a lot more room onstage to move around. 
Originally, the Californian brand created by Randall Smith in 1969 used to offer Fender mods, just like Marshall, to give the amps more gain or, in other words, more distortion. And they managed to seduce Carlos Santana and Keith Richards. The Mark series was the brand's flagship until the introduction of the Rectifier series whose name refers to their current rectifying technology (a rectifier converts AC to DC). Mesa Boogie is certainly the best-known brand after Fender and Marshall. It is still the reference among metal musicians, especially thanks to bands like Metallica and Dream Theater who tend to use Mesa products on stage and in the studio. More recently, Mesa Boogie introduced the Atlantic series that includes the TransAtlantic TA-15 and TA-30. These two amps reflect the manufacturer's interest in the "lunchbox" market.
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There’s also the line of self-tuning “robot” guitars that Gibson spent more than a decade and millions of dollars developing. In 2015, Juszkiewicz made the feature standard on most new guitars. Sales dropped so dramatically, as players and collectors questioned the added cost and value, that Gibson told dealers to slash prices. The company then abandoned making self-tuners a standard feature. You can still buy them — they call them “G Force” — but they’re now simply an add-on option.
Modelling effect – Many BOSS modelling effects use COSM or Composite Object Sound Modelling, which uses computer-processing power to digitally precisely model the electronic, mechanical, and magnetic characteristics inherent to an instrument, amplifier, or speaker, and also to create completely new sounds. Modelling effects can be dynamic or time-based – it can even make your guitar or amp sound like a completely different type of guitar or amp.
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A lot of amateur guitar players are tempted by the ‘cut’ of a high treble sound that gives their notes definition above the cacophony of the rest of the band. They become so accustomed to this sound that they lose sensitivity to its harshness. Treble becomes the ultimate weapon in their arsenal for the volume war, but to the listener, all they hear is a headache, aka bad tone.
Although I left it up to our panelists to decide what they think is most important in a beginner’s amp, we all agreed on a few parameters. First, the amp should have no glaring technical flaws—it shouldn’t produce excessive amounts of noise or hum, and it shouldn’t exhibit audible signs of distress, such as buzzes or rattles. Second, it should produce enough volume that the guitarist can jam with instruments such as piano, saxophone, and a small drum kit.

The traditional method of getting the sound of the guitar to an audience is to place a Shure SM57® in front of the speaker on the amp’s cabinet. While this certainly sounds awesome and is a tried-and-true method for most applications, the advent of personal monitoring systems like Shure’s PSM 900® led to guitarists being dissatisfied with the sound they were hearing in their in-ears. With the microphone method you are hearing the microphone, not necessarily the amp. This reality was the inspiration behind the creation of the Radial JDX 48™.


The Fender Stratocaster, or Strat® (as it's been referred to affectionately for decades), has become a favorite for players of all genres. Introduced in 1954, the Stratocaster ushered in a new era of guitar design and has been instrumental in the development of modern music as we know it. Like its older cousin, the Telecaster, it features single-coil pickups. But rather than just pickups at the neck and bridge, it has a middle pickup and five-way selector that allows for even further in-between tonal variations. Along with being the first solid-body electric to have three pickups, it was also the first to have a self-contained vibrato system.

An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
In the early 1960s the Brothers Grim became the first American group use Vox Amplifiers. Joe Benaron, CEO of Warwick Electronics Inc. / Thomas Organ Company, the United States distributor of Vox, along with Bernard Stockly (London), importer of Challenge pianos to the United States, arranged for the boys to have full use of the tall Super AC 100 Vox amps (4×12" speakers). The solid-state version of this amp (known in the USA as the "Super Beatle") was produced to cash in on the Beatles-Vox affiliation, but was not nearly as successful as the valve AC30 and AC15 models.
In this section we look at the overall performance of the guitar. How does it feel to play and what does it sound like? The ultimate sound you achieve will largely depend on the amp you play through, but the guitar itself will play a huge part in sounding good. Do the pickups give enough clarity? How comfortable is the neck to get up and down? Is it built for speed? The more expensive a guitar, the better the performance should be, and this is taken into consideration when rating it.
I was thinking about my personal favorite and it’s just too hard to choose only one. There are too many brilliant creations and all unique in their own way. I love the simplicity of “highway to hell”, the beautiful, mysterious, wah wah riff of “Voodoo child”, I have a weak spot for almost every guitar riff by John Frusciante or Slash and not to mention the zillion riffs that aren’t even on the list. Thank god it never stops.

Power-tube distortion is required for amp sounds in some genres. In a standard master-volume guitar amp, as the amp's final or master volume is increased beyond the full power of the amplifier, power tube distortion is produced. The "power soak" approach places the attenuation between the power tubes and the guitar speaker. In the re-amped or "dummy load" approach, the tube power amp drives a mostly resistive dummy load while an additional low power amp drives the guitar speaker. In the isolation box approach, the guitar amplifier is used with a guitar speaker in a separate cabinet. A soundproofed isolation cabinet, isolation box, isolation booth, or isolation room can be used.


One of the greatest things about being a touring musician is having the opportunity to see, hear and play with some of the greatest guitarists on the planet. Over the course of my career, I’ve performed with legendary guitarists like Ted Nugent, Steve Cropper, and Glen Campbell, to drop just a few names. Playing lead for a headline act like Toby Keith also allows me to watch fantastic guitarists like Keith Urban and Brad Paisley take the stage before me.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.
Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.
8e FRETTE HAUTEUR La hauteur des cordes est réglée lors de la fabrication des guitares et des basses Ibanez. Néanmoins, plusieurs facteurs peuvent provoquer la variation de hauteur des cordes d'un instrument. Les guitares sont sensibles aux variations de température et d'humidité. Une hauteur de cordes trop importante peut rendre l'instrument difficile à...
Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana
After the dissolve of Kay/Valco in 1968, the Engelhardt-Link company bought the upright bass and cello lines[clarification needed] at the asset auction in 1969, and continue to produce the same instrument lines till today. Manufactured in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Engelhardt basses and cellos are sturdy instruments, widely used by students and touring professionals. The ES9 Swingmaster bass (formerly the Kay S9 Swingmaster), is highly thought-of by jazz, swing, and bluegrass musicians.
The headstock does not come pre-carved, which is good for those who want to personalize its shape, and bad for those who can't do wood work. All needed parts are included, along with hex wrenches for the truss rod and saddle adjustment, it even comes with some solder, so you'll just need a soldering iron and a Philips head screwdriver to complete the assembly.
First of all, let’s clear up some minor confusion over the name. It has been variously reported, including by me, that the name “Teisco” stands for the name of a company in Tokyo; however this is not the case. Teisco was simply the name chosen by one of the company’s founders, Mr. Atswo Kaneko. There was another prominent company called the Tokyo Sound Co., Ltd. which was responsible for making Guyatone guitars, another major early Japanese brand, some of which came to the United States as Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen & Jacobson and others. However, neither of these companies or their guitars had anything to do with the Teisco brand.
Very useful. Today I gave life to a Strat, adding a SD lil´59 in the neck, a noiseless single coil in the middle and a SD hot rails in the bridge. I used a H-S-H diagram from SD website with one volume and one tone pots (500k Alpha pots). I will add a second tone pot later on with a push/pull pot to split the little humbuckers in single coils. The guitar sounds huge now!
Rule 4 - The technology further defines the order. Let's give a couple examples here. If you don't use your noise gate before your compressor, you'll increase the volume of your noise which renders your noise gate useless. If you send an impure signal like heavy distortion to a harmonizer, the harmonizer will be very inaccurate, thus you want to apply distortion to the harmonized signal and not the other way around. If you compress before using equalization, the compressor may act on frequencies you don't intend to keep in the signal, thus you should EQ first.
I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
This is a real nice D-18 it Booms quite nicely with Vintage Tone of that of a much more expensive Big Named guitar for a fraction of what you would pay..its Japanese crafted 29 years ago by the master craftsman in one of the finest Japanese builders factory.. the great Ibanez...the Label inside says... THE MARK OF QUALITY CIMAR Quality Produced under Strict Quality Control by IBANEZ "Made in Japan" Serial # 82110013k ... 1st 2 digits 82 that's the year...now not all Japanese Ibanez old guitars are so great not at all ..many were very low end guitars we saw in the 60's & 70's as a kid myself most were junk or we called them toys.. now that's not true for all of them though I can honestly say that... This is not a cheap guitar nor is it built cheaply ..this example was one of the good impressive one's they used beautiful grade woods on... This particular example it has a Strikingly beautiful straight grained Sitka Spruce Top ... it has ambered nicely now naturally with it's great patina created over the last 29 years . ya don't get that with a new Ibanez or even dare I say Martin with those white looking spruce top "yuck on thanks"... sorry back to this one ... The back sides & neck are all gorgeously grained AA higher grade Mahogany the fingerboard is dark Indian Rosewood with an ebony bridge..even the Original string Pins are aged beautifully amber tipped... I'm lookin pretty hard everywhere and I can not find a crack - separation or a defect to be found anywhere only the most minute microscopic its that clean.... JVG Condition RATED: @ better than average in Excellent used vintage condition wow!..This neck is arrow straight with a perfect medium slim taper neck feels great and action is EZ to play just about perfect...1-11/16ths at the nut very comfortable feel, frets are considered excellent vintage at lest 92%... Comes with a free Chip board case or an optional upgrade to a Hard shell case / ask... Just in.. no pics yet coming very soon stay tuned! Thanks for your interest.

Opening the case, the AE doesn't disappoint. There are the classic lines of the AE body, with just the right amount of bling, you instantly feel that you are looking at a quality instrument. As you'd expect from Ibanez, the neck, quite frankly is a dream. Featuring its advanced comfort profile to be found on all the AE range, it is slim and relatively shallow and combined with the silky satin finish makes it a joy to play. Tonally, the combination of Sitka spruce and the bracing result in a guitar that is seriously bright while still being well balanced and that definitely projects. It also sustains forever and, while uncomplicated, will sit exceptionally well in a band situation. At this price, the AE500 is a serious contender and gives the Martins and Gibsons in this price range a run for their money.
There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.
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The Teisco TG-54 was a two-pickup Les Paul, named for the year it was designed, 1954, not long after the original! It had a large white plastic covered pickup at the neck, set into the pickguard, and a slanted metal-covered pickup set into a metal tailpiece assembly, sort of like a Telecaster. Again, strings passed through the tail assembly and the body. Similar to the J-1, the volume and tone controls (same knobs) sat on a small rectangular plate, this time metal like a Tele, with an added chicken-beak three-way rotary selector switch.
If you’re just getting started playing electric guitar, you’ve definitely come to the right place! Sam Ash is the ultimate destination for all of your electric guitar learning materials! We are proud to offer everything you need to learn how to play electric guitar including instructional guitar books, guitar instructional DVDs, guitar tablature books, guitar music books, guitar reference materials, and even guitar chord charts to assist in your learning! We also carry all the accessories you need to get started, including guitar tuners, guitar picks, electric guitar strings, guitar straps, guitar amps, guitar cables, guitar stands, and much more!
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