The H9 is a pedal that can actually run all of Eventide's stompbox effects (apart from the TimeFactor's Looper). All of the effect algorithms (including their associated presets) are available for purchase, but several come already built in - you get Chorus and Tremolo/Pan from the ModFactor, H910/H949 and Crystals from the PitchFactor, Tape Echo and Vintage Delay from the TimeFactor, and Shimmer and Hall from Space. In addition, there's a new UltraTap Delay that's exclusive to the H9, plus a voucher for a free algorithm of your choice. The complex effects algorithms feature loads of editable parameters. The H9 has both wireless (Bluetooth) and wired (USB) connections for the free H9 Control editor and librarian software (iOS app, Mac, Windows) for editing, creating and managing presets, changing system settings and purchasing algorithms. This pedal has been designed to take full advantage of this and it works brilliantly, especially so on an iPad where a few finger swipes zap the pedal through thin air to produce instant results. Other one-effect-at-a-time 'chameleon' pedals exist out there, but the H9 pushes the genre's envelope.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its

Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
I’ve never played a gig without an amp, but I am prepared to… Instead of spending a ton of money on AXE FX (which a good amp can be a small fraction of the cost of AXE FX, especially if you still need to buy monitors, power amp, etc…), I keep a Line6 Sonic Port in my bag I can use with my iPod, iPad, or iPhone. Cheaper than AXE-FX. I do use the Line6 Sonic Port into my iPad for recording tracks for different projects. A lot less than AXE-FX and easier to use. Another option.
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Marshall are king when it comes to stacks and rock where fender leads with combos. Marshall offer a wall of sound with punchy lows, strong mids and aggressive highs. But it's not all shrill highs,dial back the trebble a little and you can also get really nice cleans and some real grunt as the crunch sets in. The classic Marshall sound is so coveted that there the market is saturated with imitators. - Antmax
Straight out of the box, you have 6 x enhanced amp voices to choose from ranging from crystal cleans to bone crushing gains to get to grips with as well as 12 x super wide stereo FX effects that you can use to create your ideal sound. The 10 watts pumping out of the 2 x 3” woofers make it a great desktop amp and something to jam along with friends. The amp is ideal for beginners still getting to grips with their sound as you can choose from Clean Warm, Clean Bright, Crunch, Super Crunch, OD 1 and OD and the budget friendly price tag makes it all the more appealing. This software is a free download that functions as an editor/librarian for your Spider tones. In addition, you also get Presonus Studio One DAW bundled with the amp so you can record loops, craft entire songs, change and store patches using the Blackstar INSIDER software. This is not only one of the best cheap amplifiers, it’s also one of the best amps for beginner guitarists who want to get into signwriting too!

Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."

Thats a major bend of opinions! It all boils down to..the style of music that you play and what you expect out of the guitar! Is playing only a hobby or are you trying to make a living bangin that Ax? The price of a guitar is not as important as the ability of the person strumming the strings! If your abilitys suck,and you have a expensive guitar..You Still Suck..No matter how good the guitar may be! I have owned cheep and expensive guitars of all different brand names..some very good..some very bad..bottom line is..if Your happy with the AX,thats all that matters! Screw the Name or the Price!!

Fujigen Gakki is a musical instrument maker located in Matsumoto, Japan. They began making violins and classical guitars in 1960 and electric guitars in 1962. Their real heyday of guitar production began in the 1970’s when they began producing guitars for major American manufacturers like Fender and Gibson as well as some Japanese manufacturers. In fact, after CBS acquired Fender Electronic Instruments Company they decided to move to larger manufacturing facilities. Between the closing of the old factory and the opening of the new one, the only Fender guitars being made came from the Fujigen Gakki factory. Other factories have been used to manufacture Fender guitars, some for the Japanese market only. Regardless, Fenders made in Japan are considered top-quality.


Originally, a signal would be recorded to two tape machines simultaneously. The playback-head output from these two recorders was then mixed together onto a third recorder. In this form, minute differences in the motor speeds of each machine would result in a phasing effect when the signals were combined. The “flange” effect originated when an engineer would literally put a finger on the flange, or rim of one of the tape reels so that the machine was slowed down, slipping out of sync by tiny degrees. A listener would hear a “drainpipe” sweeping effect as shifting sum-and-difference harmonics were created. When the operator removed his finger the tape sped up again, making the effect sweep back in the other direction.” Famous tunes using flange effects are “Unchained” by Van Halen, “Spirit of Radio” by Rush and “Bold as Love” by Jimi Hendrix. The flange on “Bold as Love” is credited as being the first recorded use of the effect in stereo.
Perhaps the most famous of these sounds—or, at least, the most formative—is that of Dave Davies, the lead guitarist for The Kinks, who got bored of his Elpico amplifier in 1964 and decided to pierce its speaker cone with a razor blade. This effect, known as “clipping,” cuts off the audible waveform at the height of the amplifier’s limits (voltage, current, and thermal), thereby distorting the signal. Although Link Wray had been doing this since the late 1950s, Davies popularized guitar distortion in the first few moments of “You Really Got Me,” changing guitar music.
Until his death in August 2009, Les Paul himself played his personal Les Paul Guitar onstage, weekly, in New York City. Paul preferred his 1971 Gibson “Recording” model guitar, with different electronics and a one-piece mahogany body, and which, as an inveterate tinkerer and bona fide inventor, he had modified heavily to his liking over the years. A Bigsby-style vibrato was of late the most visible change although his guitars were formerly fitted with his “Les Paulverizer” effects.
Either way, the results in the Descent Reverb are nothing short of phenomenal.  If you watch the demo video below, you'll hear some of the most unique sounds capable of being produced by a guitar pedal. Pigtronix did something similar with delay and pitch shifting in the Echolution 2 Ultra Pro, but we think the combination is even better in the Descent.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
List of bass guitar brands that include the most popular and reliable models available. There is a lot to consider when looking for the perfect bass guitar for you. The body style, neck, scale length, tuning machines, intonation, fingerboard, number of frets, pickups and type of wood all make a difference in how your bass guitar sounds and feels in your hand. The most popular bass guitars include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Fender, Yamaha, Warwick and more. Use this comparison of bass guitar brands as a guide when researching the best bass makers.

Midlands trio The Bad Flowers make a concise, bruising power-blues that will appeal to fans of the likes of Jared James Nichols and Blues Pills, both of whom have offered TBF support slots. September single Thunder Child is the first shot fired from their forthcoming debut Starting Gun and packs an uproarious solo that leaves TG reaching for our wah pedal. Think Rory Gallagher through AC/DC’s amp stack and you’re near Tom’s bar-fight-scrapping lead sound.

But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.
My fave...In love...I vowed not to purchase this game as I was done with Call of Duty but after I watched some YouTube videos and Best Buy was running a good deal on the game I decided to pick it up and give it a try....Number 1 game I really like cod games this is best one you have exo pack can run on walls co op campaign best mutiplayer u got xombies best graphics should be game of the year I price matched it got it at great price and im Gamers Unlocked Member every gamer should get the card for $30 dollars you cant beat that for 2 years
I bought mine used in 1989 in a mom and pop music store in the North GA mountains in Cumming GA and have loved it everysence I Know very little about it except that I would not trade it for a new one. The sustain in the body of the overtone note is fantastic and rare to find.I use d'Addario phosphorus bronze strings 11 - 52 and would not change anything about this guitar,fantastic!!! Thanks Victor
The PRS Silver Sky is the result of a close collaboration between Grammy Award-winning musician John Mayer and Paul Reed Smith. More than two and half years in the making, the Silver Sky is a vintage-inspired instrument that is at once familiar but also newly PRS through and through. This model was based off of Mayer and Smith’s favorite elements from 1963 and 1964 vintage instruments, resulting in an idealized version of a vintage single-coil guitar. The attention that was paid to every detail sets this guitar apart.

The first of these guitars was the Slash “Snakepit” Les Paul Standard, which was introduced by the Gibson Custom Shop in 1996. It has a transparent cranberry red finish over a flame maple top, a relief carving of the smoking snake graphic off the cover of Slash’s Snakepit‘s debut album, It’s Five O’Clock Somewhere, hand carved by Bruce J. Kunkel (owner of Kunkel Guitars – kunkelguitars.com), and a mother of pearl inlay of a cobra wrapped up the length of the ebony fretboard. Production was limited to 50, with Slash receiving the first four including the prototype, the only one with the carving on the body turned 90 degrees to be viewed right side up when displayed on a guitar stand. In 1998 Slash’s studio was broken into and his guitars were stolen, including the “Snakepit” prototype, so the Gibson Custom Shop built him a replica. These guitars are by far the rarest and most collectible of any of the Gibson Slash signature guitars, they sold for around $5,000 when new, the Hollywood Guitar Center was asking $20,000 for one in 2002.[citation needed] In 1997, Epiphone released a more affordable version of the “Snakepit” Les Paul, featuring a decal of the smoking snake logo and standard fretboard inlay.[32]

In short, absolutely everything about this guitar screams quality. You can inspect the entire thing in tiny detail, and it’ll leave you amazed at how well it’s been made. And then when the sound hits you, you really feel it too. It’s perfect for chugging, powerful rhythm behind the rest of the band, but is equally adept at more sparkling highs and brighter choruses. What a guitar.


This gives you a wonderful bass line, and will dramatically improve your sound, as well as helping you to develop a good rhythmic strumming style right from the first. Singing the song is a matter of timing. Listen to the song a few times and you’ll get it. It’s easier than trying to explain time signatures, and timing. You’ll know when you get it right. Just keep listening.
Interesting cosmetics and great playing 4-string, Factory, but "custom re-built" Fretless bass. Appears to be re-finished. I had to buy this, as I recognized it immediately as a great "player", fretless bass. Adjustable P-J passive / dynamic pickup configuration sounds great. Separate volume and tone controls. Appears to be a "re-finish", in interesting "Fleck-Tone" gray paint. We think it is not the original finish, but it could be original. Someone did an incredible job it if is a re-fin, as the routed edges are perfectly finished and all parts had to have been removed with room made for the extra finish thickness. No worries about finger prints with this one. Un-bound, graphite? or other synthetic material, ebony black fingerboard  w/ dot inlay side markers on a solid mahogany neck with a 4-bolt neck joint. Black anodized tail piece perfect and rust-free. Finger board near new condition. Features 4 high quality, "sealed" tuning machines that work perfectly and hold tune. Plays and sounds great! Lots of fun. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!). 34.5" scale length. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .040 "Round-wound" strings (yes I know flat wounds are more correct for fretless, but I prefer a bit more brightness. You are free to install flats once you own it). No case or bag included.
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.
I think jackson (particularly the USA models) are truly the most versatile of all the high end electric guitars. The build quality is second to none as they are made at the custom shop by very experienced luthiers, the woods used are exotic and tonally superb. The hardware is the best around Floyd rose/ Seymour Duncan's and the action/playability is fantastic. All in all you feel although expensive, you feel like you're getting your monies worth. But the great thing is that they produce an incredible array of sounds which covers all aspects of musical style from the beefed up classic grind of a Gibson, to the stringy percussive violin sounds of a start and everything in between. The USA ones are expensive but I have 2 (an sl 1 and sl 2) and given the enjoyment and reliability they have given me, they owe me nothing.
Strumming Patterns: Tremolo is a tough fit here for the same reason as delay. Timing and repeating issues both tend to cause problems.Chords: This can work if used sparingly, especially when strumming patterns are simple and chords are allowed to ring.Short Arpeggios: Particularly if played during a verse, short arpeggios are easily benefited and improved by a light tremolo effect.Quick Solos: Any unique, lead guitar part that needs something extra can be a good spot for the tremolo effect. Usually this will occur during the bridge of a song.
PRS scale length falls between Fender and Gibson at 25 inches. These are typically set-neck guitars, often with carved tops. This style is a nice alternative for players who are looking for a middle ground between the warmth and resonance of a Les Paul and the tighter feel of a Strat. You’ll also see a lot of guitars that have that PRS look but are built to a different scale length.

For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.


I am old enough to remember Kay guitars back in the 70's. And what I remember of playing them is they were poorly put together, poor action (like mile high action), poor sounding pickups etc...They also seemed to always be the guitars that were the cheapest in all the mom n' pop stores, and the ones that were just sold to students, if they were sold at all. In other words,
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1]
The first thing I did was solder all the colored pickup wires to their correct positions on the switch. You can solder the components on in any order you want. Make sure that all the wires go to their correct places. A lot of times the jack wire goes through a small hole in the body,  so make sure that the jack is mounted in its correct place before soldering it into the circuit. 
When using subtle detuning to thicken a sound, I suggest trying values of between five and 10 cents and, where possible, adding both positive and negative shifts, to keep the pitch centre correct. Then combine with the dry sound and adjust the level to control the subjective depth of the effect. This is very effective for fattening up guitar solos or backing vocals.
Epiphone are a well respected subsidiary of Gibson, and have been making musical instruments since their founding in what is now Turkey, Europe, in 1873. After being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone are now best known for manufacturing affordable versions of some of the most iconic guitar models around, including the Les Paul and SG. However they do make a couple of original models, such as the Casino, which was famously used by the Beatles.
Artists have been converging on this sound for more than a decade before Davies used it. In 1951, “Rocket 88” by Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm took advantage of a distorted amplifier that had been damaged in transport. The same thing happened to the Johnny Burnette Trio in 1956, when Paul Burlison pulled out a vacuum tube from his amplifier after it fell off the top of the band’s car. He loved the sound so much he used it to record “The Train Kept a-rollin,” which inspired a whole raft of British musicians:
Unless it's broken and will need to be replaced, start with obtaining a new nut that is anything to your liking, preferably a blank nut rather than a pre-cut to avoid improper string height. If cutting a blank try copying your old nut and make adjustments if needed using the neck as a guide after cutting out the nut. To do this take a sharp blade that is easy to work with such as an X-acto and cut the finish that holds the sides of the nut. Make sure to cut all of the finish as it will break apart when you take out the nut.
Also remember pedals change in sound character with different guitars/pickups/amps so it’s worth experimenting before buying. If you’re not sure where to start try a few ‘classics’ as a reference point. Ibanez’ Tube Screamer or one of it’s imitators of which there are many, are mild overdrives that also usefully liven up cheaper amps, particularly when volumes need to be kept low.
I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!
Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.
The Deluxe was among the “new” 1968 Les Pauls. This model featured “mini-humbuckers”, also known as “New York” humbuckers, and did not initially prove popular. The mini-humbucker pickup fit into the pre-carved P-90 pickup cavity using an adaptor ring developed by Gibson (actually just a cut-out P90 pickup cover) in order to use a supply ofEpiphone mini-humbuckers left over from when Gibson moved Epiphone production to Japan. The DeLuxe was introduced in late 1968 and helped to standardize production among Gibson’s US-built Les Pauls. The first incarnation of the Deluxe featured a one-piece body and slim three-piece neck in late 1968. The “pancake” body (thin layer of maple on top of two layers of Honduran mahogany) came later in 1969. In late 1969, a small “volute” was added. 1969 Deluxes feature the Gibson logo devoid of the dot over the “i” in Gibson. By late 1969/early 1970, the dot over the “i” had returned, plus a “Made In USA” stamp on the back of the headstock. The Deluxe could be special ordered with full-size Humbucker T-Top pickups, these full size versions of the Deluxe were “Standard” spec. They were also available with “Gibson” embossed pickups in 1972 only and considered rare, as only 9 were produced. David Bowie Can be seen playing one of the 1972 “Standards” in his 1972 release Jean Genie video. By 1975, the neck construction was changed from mahogany to maple, until the early 1980s, when the construction was returned to mahogany. The body changed back to solid mahogany from the pancake design in late 1976 or early 1977. Inte reintroduced rest in this particular Les Paul model was so low that in 1985, Gibson canceled the line. However, in 2005, the Deluxe was with more popularity due to its association with Pete Townshend [1] and Thin Lizzy.
Unabashedly brute class, with typical German overbuilding, the Schallers shown here are the Incredible Hulk of the bunch (Fig. 17). At a hefty 272 grams, they have the might to get noticed when you fasten them to your axe. If you have a guitar with a tiny headstock, you’ll hear and feel a difference with the Schallers. Whether or not you like the change is subjective, and it depends on the makeup of the rest of your guitar.
Here we SOLD OUT: a real nice vintage 1986 Japanese crafted Ibanez LS-300 this is a unique classic series of hand built quality guitars made for a short era in limited quantities is a wonderful example of very good Japanese quality workmanship that were built with good quality materials these have stood the test of time ... post lawsuit era. This full size Dred has a classic sound and has quite nice articulate tone notes ring true & clear. This Mahogany neck is quite nice it has good and low finger play Action and has room to go either way with truss rod not maxed out at all , room to adjust to taste either way...body back & sides are also mahogany with some slight buckle mars on back but not to bad....it came in with fingerboard grime and a broken nut and old rotten strings so we started from scratch & cleaned & re-hydrated the woods especially the rosewood fingerboard was soaked and cleaned with lemon oil I just polished the frets most are showing little to no where and a few lower frets were polished down further leaving only slight signs of past play not taking hardly any off vintage frets and left its original integrity in tact, NECK WIDTH IS its 1-11/16ths nut width medium slim profile neck is very good its easy to play set up nicely...I did replace its nut with a compensated Martin bone nut and installed new strings....while doing this observing closely its overall condition to be excellent ....its top is nice and flat its made of beautiful straight grained Sitka spruce with some nice visible bear claw figure to it the Spruce is Solid it is center seamed 2 - piece, bridge is flat too with no cracks...x bracing is also tight...no cracks or separations, neck is straight to this day this is a great player folks...this tone is great for recording. Its noticeably fast pro feeling neck makes this one a pleasure to play. These pics were before new strings and clean & set up with new martin bone nut its even more beautiful now. any questions let me know thanks for your interest Joe, You can email me at: jvguitars@gmail.com.
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]

While tube technology is still considered state-of-the-art in countries where a potato is regarded as a square meal, these days solid-state and digital amps offer excellent tone for a lot fewer bucks, and with fewer maintenance headaches. However, tube tone is still considered the standard by many top players. Take a blind listening test, and let your ears be the judge.


To capture aggressive, distorted guitar sounds, my studio partner Bart Thurber likes to use two mics in an XY configuration on a single speaker: a Shure SM57 aimed at the middle of the speaker and a Sennheiser 441 (with the high-end boost switch engaged) pointed at the edge of the cone. The SM57's signal is sent to a compressor, and the two mic signals are then mixed together and recorded to one track. This technique provides some compression for the harshest high frequencies and strong, midrange volume peaks picked up by the SM57, while simultaneously delivering full highs and lows through the 441.


Best Answer:  First, make sure you have new or clean strings that aren't dead. You should hear a metallic harmonic overtone to picked notes particularly on the low E, A, and D wound strings. If your low E sounds in tune but makes a flat dull boww boww boww instead of dang dang dang when you pick change them. Set your amp up for a fairly bright sound clean, playing off the bridge pickup. Make sure the guitar volume knob(s) are rolled all the way on and tones are all the way up, no roll off. If you can't get a nice clear clean sound that doesn't sound distant and muted then you have some issue with the guitar electrics or amp. If you're playing off the neck pickup that's a big muddier right there. The neck pickup is good for clean rhythm playing, jazz, and for a hollow warm tubey sound on single notes but tends to muddy overdriven power chords. Once you have the amp set for a bright clean sound that's not too brassy (if it has a master volume in addition to a gain or channel volume set the gain or volume low for a clean sound and use master for output level, let the RP90 do the effects work, not the amp preamp for now.) bring in the RP90. I'm not familiar with it but try it on a few overdrive and distortion settings. If you've only been an acoustic player high overdrive or distortion "power steering" takes a different play style.
Guitar has a vicious tone, nice wood, great p[ickups. However the guitar I received has a problem with the volume control acting as a tone knob and also cuts out sometimes. The guitar chord had to be replaced because it was cheap and cut out like a bad phone chord. I have to take it in to a local guitar shop and have the volume control fixed. Not too expensive but some additional cost. I didn't want to send it back as I otherwise love the guitar and didn't want them to send me a different one rather than just repairing it. Plus I don't want to wait that long. But certainly a great guitar for the money. No question.
I HAVE A P38-12E I BELIEVE MINE WAS MADE IN SPAIN ALSO. LATER THEY WERE MADE IN MIAMI AND LATER IN CHINA KEEP IT IN GOOD SHAPE I HAVE MANY GUITARS ACOUSTIC AND ELECTRICS. EXCELLENT ACTION AND SOUNDING GUITARS FOR THE PRICE I HAVE GIBSON,EPIPHONE,IBENEZ, THE BEST SOUNDING 12 STRING I EVER OWNED WAS A TAKIMINE. WHICH WAS STOLEN IN LAS VEGAS. EVEN HAVE A 12 STRING ACOUSTIC I MADE. I ADDED A FISHMAN AND MADE IT ELECTRIC I ALSO PUT A TUNEMATIC BRIDGE ON IT. THEY ALL HAD DIFFERENT SOUNDS BUT THE ACTION ON THE PALMER IS THE BEST. I EVEN HAD A VICTORIA VIOLIN BASS WAY BEYOND A HOFNER. JUST BECAUSE YOU DIDN'T PAY BIG BUCKS DOESN'T MEAN ITS NOT BETTER THAN A MARTIN. I PLAYED MY UNCLES MARTIN HE MADE AT THE FACTORY WHEN HE WORKED THERE. AND IT CAME NOWHERE CLOSE TO MY PALMER OR TAKAMINE. PALMER CAME CLOSE TO MY 1960s GIBSON DOVE. DOVE HAD A BETTER SOUND PALMER HAD BETTER ACTION. HOLLYWOOD PHIL. GUITARIST AND SINGER FOR THE GWB BAND. I'M ALSO HEAD SOUND AND LIGHTING TECH FOR THE METAL BAND BLACKFATE.
Modulation, in general electronics, means the altering of signal strength. In audio devices, modulation is a control feature that varies the strength of some effect over time to alter tonal properties. Some modulation effects mix ("modulate") an instrument's audio signal with a signal generated by the effect called a carrier wave.[70] Other modulation effects split an instrument's audio signal in two, altering one portion of the signal and mixing it with the unaltered portion.[71]

alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?


Naturally, it all comes down to manipulating the effect to fit the occasion. There is definitely such a thing as too much reverb or not enough. However, this is the type of thing you will have to figure out on case to case basis. With that said, you would be surprised at just how often reverb is used in music these days. Some sound engineers and producers like to be subtle to a point where you won’t notice the reverb unless you are actively looking for it. Others tend to go overboard in order to express themselves.
Players discovered that, if you put the switch in the right position, you could get the neck-and-middle and bridge-and-middle sounds. Jimi Hendrix is a popularizer of this technique, and it became popular enough that the Strat got wired stock with five-position switches. Eventually the middle pickup was made reverse wound and reversed polarity, so that neck-middle and bridge middle would effectively be noiseless, humbucking positions.
Jackson is another great American guitar manufacturer that has been at the peak of popularity a couple of decades ago. These days they are still considered to be an authority in the industry. Current Jackson lineup includes some of their legendary models revamped in a new edition, as well as brand new guitars. People are usually divided when it comes to Jackson, but no one can claim that their guitars are not among the best.

Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.


Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.


Although fairly small in size, this packs a serious punch thanks to the overdrive control which can produce that classic orange crunch to smooth and creamy British distortion. The Orange Crush 12 is definitely a great small gig and rehearsal amp, but it also makes a fantastic amplifier for practice at home thanks to the headphone/line output which features the Orange CabSim technology. This allows you to plug your headphones in and enjoy a faithfully emulated sound of a mic’d Orange 4×12" cabinet directly to your headphones – ideal for silent practice. This can also be used in conjunction with your audio interface for direct recording and the capturing of authentic Orange tones without dragging a massive cabinet into a room (or destroying your windows!).

If this doesn’t work, or you’re just a little paranoid about hooking the guitar directly into the PC, you can get one of these. This is the Line 6 Pod Studio GX, and it’s a great value and pretty much a one-stop shopping starter kit. The box you see there is a guitar USB interface, with an input designed for guitar. It’s also got a headphone output, so you can listen through the interface. I had an older version of this ages ago, which I used for basic guitar input until I got some more advanced recording gear that worked well with guitars.

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One of  the most widely used guitars in jazz, the ES-175 is a semi-acoustic, hollow-bodied archtop that comes equipped with two humbucking pickups. The ES-175’s deep body produces the thick, dark sound beloved of jazz guitarists and the thin neck allows for fast chording and soloing. The bridge pickup is capable of producing a less jazzy, thinner sound, and ES-175s can be used in blues and rock.


By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
The 52-week part is an excellent way to motivate you to practice. The selection of licks is great too with several genres covered well. It provides info for setting your metronome to get the beat right too. They are challenging, especially when you play them at the recommended speed. The wide selection will give you plenty of choices even if you skip a genre.
As a teacher I use a strat because it’s relatable, comfortable, and clean/clear tones. The gibson doesn’t have warmer overtones. That’s not a thing. It has weaker overtones, so a stronger fundamental. That’s why it sounds warmer/duller, and the fender sounds more lively/brighter, because the fender (longer scale) have more overtones to ring louder. That lets you hear mistakes more easily, and is helpful to improve more quickly.

I have a Norma single pickup electric guitar with 1 volume and the 3 position tone switch. Someone tried to repair the wiring (w/o soldering) so it didn’t work when I found it. I did some simple wiring/soldering and got it working and the pickup sounds great but I cant figure how to wire it so the tone selector works. Any help or a diagram would be great.
Lastly try a fuzz pedal like a Fuzz Face or Big Muff. Fuzz pedals offer huge amounts of drive and low end but are generally used for single notes and power chords. Regular chords can sound pretty nasty with fuzz and it’s probably a bit wild for acoustic guitars. Although if it works with your style and draws the congregation into worship, then why not? The important thing is to be tasteful and selective in how, when and how much you use effects. Follow the golden rule; a little ‘salt’ can bring out flavour but too much kills the dish altogether.
The Jasmine S35 acoustic guitar has its share of criticisms, most notably its heavier strings and bargain basement appearance, but what keeps it popular with customers is the starter kit. Other entry-level acoustic guitars rarely include the accessories that the Jasmine S35 offers. It is also valued as a good back-up guitar for advanced players who want a dependable spare on hand during performances.

Solder is basically a low melting alloy, which in a nutshell means it’s melting point is far lower than the typical materials it will be used to join. It’s melting range is generally between 200 to 800 °F. Solder is available in either lead-based and lead-free. Most commonly you will use a 60/40 (60% tin, 40% lead) rosin core solder when working on guitar wiring.
We spent 39 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Although none of them go up to 11, we are pretty confident that one of the guitar amps on our list will deliver the perfect level of sound and quality of tone for whatever venue or style you need to play. We've ranked them here by their tonal expressiveness and flexibility, durability, control options, and ease of use. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best guitar amp on Amazon.
The really important player on the scene today in the low end and intermediate price bracket is Mainland China. Whereas Yamaha and other makers have produced guitars in Taiwan for quite some time, Mainland Chinese guitars were always noted as being of extremely low quality. In the past few years, however, that situation has changed dramatically. In the past ten years, China has moved rapidly toward entrepreneurial private ownership of business. The new leadership has pushed this process quickly. China now permits foreign ownership of factories and businesses as well as encouraging Chinese citizens both from Mainland China and Taiwan to set up their own ventures. Just as the Koreans were able to progress from very low-end student models with crude workmanship to remarkably sophisticated guitars more quickly than the Japanese had, the Chinese now have all the advantages of the prior experience of Americans, Japanese, Korean and Indonesian ventures. In addition it should be noted that while Chinese labor is remarkably inexpensive, with an average annual income in China today of under $1,000, Chinese labor is by no means unskilled. China has a very high literacy rate and its workers are skilled and motivated. In the past the world has had areas with cheap labor and other areas with skilled labor. China is a major force to reckon with because it offers cheap skilled labor. The Chinese today are producing instruments in many different settings, ranging from small workshops specializing in handcrafted instruments on up to huge industrial complexes with the latest automated technology. Only ten years ago Chinese-made violins were viewed as almost a joke. They were violin-shaped objects but certainly did not play or sound like one. Today we at Gruhn Guitars are selling beautifully crafted Chinese violins made with excellent wood and superb craftsmanship at very reasonable prices. Some of these instruments compare very favorably with European and American violins costing thousands of dollars. Gibson has set up a factory in China to produce Epiphone guitars and numerous American makers, both large and small, are having guitars, banjos and mandolins made there. Whereas it would be prohibitively expensive to make guitars or other instruments in Japan today using techniques similar to those employed by Martin and Gibson in the 1930s with assembly line production but still featuring a high degree of hand craftsmanship and human judgment, in China today it is economically emminently feasible to do so. The violins we import are beautifully crafted and even feature genuine varnish finish for a very small fraction of the cost that companies such as Gibson charge simply for the option of a varnish finish on one of their standard models. The Chinese are very rapidly taking over the student- and intermediate-grade markets. Not only do they produce fretted instruments, but they have taken over a large segment of the piano market as well as producing wind instruments. I have seen and played prototype acoustic Chinese instruments which rival American-made guitars by some of the same American manufacturers bringing in these imports. It will be most interesting to see how this develops.
Schecter is a really great guitar brand. When I was looking for my electric I searched through many guitar brands most of which are on this list and the only one that really felt right in my hands was the Schecter I play. Its got awesome tone quality, gorgeous body design and fret inlay along with very nice balance and it will stay relatively in tune for up to a few days at a time without the pegs slipping. Great for metal and rock and even really lots of other genres as well. Performs very well it should be at least top 5 if not top 3.
Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt are generally held to have initiated the use of the guitar to play melodies and improvisations over other instruments, the former using an early form of amplification, the latter playing forcefully on an acoustic guitar. Over the years, jazz guitarists have been able to solo in standard jazz idioms, such as bebop, cool jazz and so on, while in also absorbing influences from rock guitarists, such as the use of electronic effects.

Here we have a cool vintage piece. Made in USA and is highly Possible this is a Gibson Archtop. Great Original condition make this a great find...this one is a Solid 8.5/10 condition. This one still has the original tuners and pick guard too. The neck is straight and the frets are still OK...and wow what a supprise this one plays great!..nice vintage tone...no repairs or damages just natural play wear and dings etc associated with a true vintage player....EZ on the eyes see the great detailed bindings! and wow this baby sounds very nice...great for Jazz .
Think of Stevie Ray Vaughan, and you’ll have a good idea of what overdrive effects can do. They’re based on the ‘broken’ sound that vintage tube amplifiers would make when they were fed a signal too strong for them to handle smoothly. Modern overdrive pedals can also have circuitry that emulates the same effect even when connected to a solid-state amp. Because they work by boosting the signal, experimenting with the effects of an overdrive pedal can be as simple as adjusting the volume and seeing what happens.
Here we have another Vintage Japanese GREAT find this example a beautiful pretty much exact copy of a vntage Martin D-45 ... this is a very High Quality built Lawsuit era Aria Pro II Model AW40. Made in Japan. From information on the Internet concerning dating these, the guitar's serial number would lead to 1976 manufacture. However, I could not find the AW40 model cataloged until the late 70's... but its a 76.. is consistent with all others. THIS is one beautiful guitar! it exudes fine detailed craftsmanship this was Aria's flagship dreadnought of this time period with D41-ish features. From an original vintage Aria catalog, AW40 features include: "Dreadnought sized, Solid Sitka Spruce top, Solid Brazilian Rosewood back and sides, bridge fingerboard and veneer headstock overlay with MOP logo, Marquetry Purfling" ( Top looks to be solid with the sides & back appears to me to be laminated )The catalog can be viewed at matsumoku.org, a site that deals with the history of Matsumoku made instruments like Aria, Electra and others. This guitar has the Martin classic snowflake mother of pearl inlays, abalone binding and rosette, and fully bound headstock and gorgeous rosewood fingerboard. Headstock also has a Rosewood overlay. The bookmatched rosewood on the back side is especially easy on the eyes. The guitar is all original with no repairs and with original tuning keys. It is in JVG Rated condition as excellent used vintage 8.8/10 WoW...its 35 years old and the woods have opened up now like fine wine the tone is richer & mellowed as only time can provide. No cracks or repairs ever. It plays very well with good action and has a nice warm rich tone. The Neck is arrow straight. Frets have minimal wear with no buzzing anywhere on the fingerboard....this is the one! At this link you can view more pictures of this guitar please cut & paste the following link: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/AriaPro2AW40D45BrazilianRosewood?authkey=Gv1sRgCOmS2c3RvMGpUg#slideshow/5609409732594635106.
Later, on-board electronics allowed guitarists to move about the stage, rather than stay immediately in front of a microphone. On-board electronic tuning, availability, uniformity, and frugal costs facilitated performances by guitar ensembles like Robert Fripp‘s Guitar Craft students. Ovation has also produced solid-body electric guitars and active basses.

When two sine waves with frequencies A and B are ring-modulated, the output will also contain the frequencies A+B and B-A. If frequency B is not a multiple of A, these additional frequencies are inharmonic; e.g. ring-modulating sine waves at 1000Hz and 1250Hz will add the frequency 2250Hz, which is neither a multiple of 1000Hz, nor of 1250Hz. When more complex sounds are ring-modulated, sums and differences of all the harmonic frequencies are added.
as cool as it sounds to say that robert johnson has influenced everyone since him, directly or indirectly, is just nonsense. sure he was a legend in his own right; but a lot of that has to do with his life being shrouded in mystery. yes, he has influenced some players, way back when, but there were so many more players influenced by electric blues; chicago and texas blues, not delta blues. i understand he was somewhat of an innovator, and that is very important, but i think so called ‘music critics’ have over-blown it a bit in the reverence department for fear of being labeled un-hip. dave marsh, the ‘rolling stone’ critic is a perfect example. he claims johnson as one of the most gifted players of all time. but he dislikes david lee roth, singer in ‘van halen’, so right away edward van halen, guitarist in that group is marginalized with: “the basic 12 bar-blues on the louie-louie thump theme” to describe his playing. lol. to sum it up, whenever a critic uses the phrase ’12 bar blues’, you can pretty much assume he has no clue about what he talking about….best wishes.
These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King's famous Lucille.
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