Artwork: George Beauchamp's original "frying-pan" electric guitar design from 1934. On the right, you can see a top view of the guitar with the pickup unit shown in dark blue and the pickup coil (green) sitting underneath the six strings (shown in orange). On the left, there's an end-on, cross-section of the pickup unit (looking down from the head of the guitar toward the bridge). You can see that Beauchamp has used a pair of horseshoe magnets, with their north poles (red) and south poles (blue) aligned and the strings threading between them. The pickup sits between the magnets under the strings. From US Patent 2,089,171: Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument by George Beauchamp (filed June 2, 1934, issued August 10, 1937). Artwork courtesy of US Patent and Trademark Office.
He’s sauntered down through the decades unfazed by stints in jail and hospital, heroin addiction, assorted femmes fatales, copious boozing, rampaging Hells Angels and assaults from fellow icons like Chuck Berry and Peter Tosh. Unconstrained by the grinding gradations of clock, calendar, public morality or legal prohibition, he has defined life on his own terms.
For example, Pat Metheny took his Gibson ES-175 and ran it through some lush chorus, delays, and compression to create his signature jazz sound. On the flipside, John McLaughlin plugged his guitar into a Marshall stack for the wild rock tones heard on records with Tony Williams Lifetime and Miles Davis. In fact, Joe Perry of Aerosmith plays a Gretsch Falcon. The hardest thing to do when playing a hollow body guitar through a loud amp, or a hollow body with a dollop of distortion, is not to get bowled over with feedback. Either way, these guitars are celebrated for their big, full sounds, and can be applied to many musical situations.
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.
The vast majority of guitars use more than one pickup, and provide a switch that controls which pickup, or combination of pickups, is active at any one time. This article adds one more pickup to our circuit and shows how we can wire up a selector switch. We look at both toggle and blade style switches. This brings us to the point where we now know how to wire up a Telecaster in the standard way.
Brian Moore - Known for their innovative custom electronics and distinctive designs, Brian Moore Guitars continue to produce guitars that go beyond the conventional. Aside from their custom-built instruments, they now carry a host of artist signature models. One of their more popular products is the iGuitar, which feature acoustic MIDI, piezo, 13 pin Synth and more.
Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).
As the ’70s dawned, the market for electric guitars began to revive, significantly but conservatively. Gibson retracted its hopes for the flagship SG and reintroduced the Les Paul in ’68. Fender, likewise, was moving away from Jazzmasters and Jaguars, concentrating on its earlier successes, the Stratocaster and Telecaster. Paced by Shiro Arai of Aria, who’d been inspired by the reissue of the Les Paul (a “copy” of the ’50s classic), Japanese manufacturers were beginning to explore making copies of popular American designs, and the “copy era” was getting underway.
As for the nuts and bolts of digital delays, any thorough, from-the-ground-up explanation is more than can be entered into in this space (and most of you at least know the basic principle behind binary encoding by now anyway, right?). Simply think of the digital delay pedal as another form of sampler: it makes a small digital recording of your riff, and plays it back at a user-selectable time delay, with depth and number of repeats also more or less selectable. The higher the sample rate, the better the sound quality. Early affordable 8-bit models really did leave a lot to be desired sonically, but as 16, 20 and 24-bit designs emerged, the reproduction of the echoes increased dramatically in quality.
FuzzPlus2 is an update of our popular free download Fuzz+. The basis of the plug-in is a transform model of a famous vintage fuzz pedal. There are four controls: Fuzz knob: This controls, as you might imagine, exactly how much fuzz is applied to the signal. Tone knob: This controls the brightness of the distorted signal. Output knob: This is the output volume of the device, when it is active. Bypass button: This works just like the switch on a stomp box. When the blue light is lit, you're money. When it's not, the input is passed directly to the output. This can be automated for a slightly different vibe than automating the effect bypass of your host. free vst plugin.
In 1941, CMI became the national distributor for National Dobro products. In ’42, Victor Smith, Al Frost and Louis Dopyera purchased controlling interest in the company. By this time, however, the world was at war and almost all instrument manufacturing ground to a halt as all segments of industry converted to production of materials to support the war effort. In October of 1943, with builders in wartime hiatus, the new owners changed the company name to Valco Manufacturing, incorporating the first initial of each partner’s given name (V-A-L-Co).
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We’ll talk more about the sound quality shortly. To give you a gentle introduction, Line 6 has been in the amp and effects modeling game for a long time. Their POD line of guitar effects processors has been around for a while, and you might be familiar with their Pocket POD. Some of you might also know them for their extremely popular digital delay pedal and looper, the DL4 (an absolute mainstay on pedalboards everywhere). Line 6 makes several multi-effects units, and according to the research we did the POD HD500X (from their POD HD X series) is the one mentioned and recommended most often. They make a rack-mountable version of it, but we’re more interested in the floor pedal unit. This is a multi-effects pedal, amp simulator, incorporates an expression pedal, tuner and looper, and doubles as a USB audio interface, just to name the basics.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on.
Even cooler was the ’66 Vibra Twin (Teisco Del Rey EP-12T), a twelve-string version of the Vegas. This had a slothead variation of the check mark head, with tuners facing alternatively out or back. The trapeze tail picked up the same angular design of the Vegas vibrato. Despite the Del Rey number, the EP-12T did not have a vibrato. The Teisco Del Rey in the ’66 catalog differs from the Vibra Twin shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars in that it adds a third rotary select for solo/rhythm/bass sound tones, whereas the Teisco omitted this feature. Figure on finding either.
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Increasing the bass and treble while reducing or eliminating the centre midrange (750 Hz) results in what is popularly known as a "scooped" sound (since the midrange frequencies are "scooped" out). Conversely, decreasing the bass while increasing the midrange and treble creates a punchy, harsher sound. Rolling off all of the treble produces a dark, heavy sound.
I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.
Schecter Guitar Research is a company that has really established themselves as one of the best guitar brands out there in recent years. Many of their guitars are focused on the heavy metal market, but players of any genre can find a Schecter that meets their needs. With superb craftsmanship and high-end appointments you’d expect to find on much more expensive guitars, they are also among the best values in the guitar world.
Our pick here is the PAC112V version, for a few reasons. First off, the solid alder body offers you the same tonewood you’ll find in a lot of higher end S-style guitars. The maple neck and diecast tuners will feel really premium in your hands, too. But the 112 series further boosts its value with two Alnico V single coil pickups and an Alnico V humbucker. The addition of the humbucker in the bridge position will open up a whole other world of tones for a budding musician, giving the option for both clean, crisp single coil sounds and thick, high-output humbucker growls.
Every beginner guitarist deserves to learn on an instrument that's built by experienced craftsman who use only the finest materials. However, for many novice players, it's difficult to know for sure what's considered a high quality instrument. To make things easier, many popular guitar brands offer guitar value packages. These packages consist of all the essential pieces of equipment that a learning guitarist would use in the developmental stages of their playing. Within this section, you'll find more than enough guitar value package options to choose from.
Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.

I Shopped for a long time looking for a suitable nylon for both around the house and live performing. I ordered this Yamaha sight unseen and couldn't be happier with it. Fit and Finish is top notch. Price for value is incredible. playability is remarkably nice. Sound is great. I love the 14th fret to the body configuration vs my other nylons. The dual volume controls on the preamp give me a chance to glisten the high end in a band situation when my lines call for it. Honestly, i am a big fan of the Fishman electronics in my other acoustics, but this yamaha system leaves little to be desired. I did call yamaha support tto order a fitted soundhole cover and it took them a couple of days to get to me, but eventually called me until i


the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….

Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.


An American company that makes some amazing acoustic and electric guitars, Taylor guitars are considered as one of the best in the world. Like Martin, they can be expensive, but surely worth every penny. Taylor and Martin have the upper hand when it comes to acoustic guitar brands in America. One of the popular series is the 200 series and is of great value. For beginners, Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini are perfect choices as they are small-bodied.
On electric guitars, you do a lot of plugging and unplugging of your cable, and these actions can eventually loosen the output jack, causing a crackling sound through the speaker. This crackling indicates a disconnected ground wire. To fix this problem, you first need to take off the jack plate or pick guard and locate the detached wire causing the problem.
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Another great thing about this guitar is the Min-ETune system that offers 16 tuning presets. This not only makes it super quick to tune your guitar for everyday use, it’s also great if you need to tune your guitar up or down. It saves you a lot of work and time! It’s also a feature that makes these electric guitars for beginners who don’t know how to tune their guitar, and even if they of course can use a tuner this is still a faster option.
This guitar is awesome. If you are on the fence, get off and buy it. It's beautiful and sounds awesome. I'd give it 10 stars if I could. The tone is so much better than my old acoustic. All mahogany I love it. Looking forward to years of getting better with this beauty. I have zero negative to say. Had it a few months have played everyday. I hate to leave it to go to work. Wish I had all day to play it.
I have had some truly “nightmare” scenarios with repair people in my time, and you must beware of these folks who love to take your money, but who can totally botch a repair job on a nice guitar! It’s happened often enough to me to make me be very careful whenever I am “trying out” a new repair shop for guitar-related problems. Due to this, I often like to start with bringing them some relatively un-complicated guitar repair problems such as fret jobs and wiring problems, but even these have sometimes turned into nightmares. Today for example, I brought of all things, 3 Lap Steels and one semi-hollow guitar for repairs, but unfortunately the store’s repair guy was not there. We had a good communication though, and they made sure I wrote down the repairs I felt were needed, with a separate sheet for each instrument, and said that he’d be calling me with any questions regarding the guitars and their repairs before tearing into them!
Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.
I use a coat hanger wire to hang the body and neck from when I paint. It keeps the guitar from touching any thing and makes it easier to move from one place to another. I like to dedicate one place for painting and another for drying to avoid any free floating particales from landing on the wet paint. I use a shed for painting and hang the guitar to dry in my garage.
Ovation Guitars, in conjunction with the DW Music Foundation (DWMF) will debut the RS Rockstar™ guitar. This six-string, “RS” model guitar will be donated to each Notes for Notes location along with a DW drumset and an LP cajon to equip each studio with professional level musical instruments. The DWMF will also work with other partnering charities to donate RS Rockstar™ model guitars to music education programs in underserved communities worldwide.
As you will see, our list embraces outsiders, trailblazers, outliers, and Eugene Chadbourne playing a rake. We don’t worship “guitar gods,” but prefer our axe-wielders to be resourceful, egalitarian, flawed, and human. We’re not drawn to Olympic feats of fleet-fingered athletics, unless they’re used for unique and exploratory ends. We see the mewling histrionics of Jeff Beck as tyranny instead of catharsis. The name Derek Trucks is practically alien to us.
The classical series includes GA series of which GA 15 series is known for its cedar top with mahogany backs and sides while other ones are famed for their spruce top. The acoustic line comes with perfectly projected design and tone offering. The pick of the lot is AEL, EWP and PF series. As for electrical options RGX, GRG and GRX series make up as the finest of the lot. For other series players around, the RG and AR series are the picks.
Set-ups include diagnostics, redressing and buffing frets, cleaning fret board, tightening hardware, restring, adjusting nut slots, truss rod adjustment, balancing tremolo, adjusting action, setting intonation, checking electronics, adjusting pick ups, detail and cleaning. Electro/acoustics get balance of output, and archtops have bridge located and taped. 

Accompanying the Supro frying pan in the ’36 Peate catalog was the Supro amplifier. This had a small, rectangular cabinet with a round grillplate with the screws attaching the speaker showing around the edges. The grille cover was still similar to a resonator cover, with large diamond cutouts, backed with cloth, and finished with black wrinkle paint. A leather handle sat on top, and metal bumper guards graced the lower corners. No information is available regarding specs.
When you buy an acoustic guitar that you’re drawn to because of its aesthetics, you will become more motivated to play it. This is especially important for beginners who may find it tedious to do the same exercises over and over again, or who may be tempted to skip practice sessions. A good-looking guitar is something you will love playing again and again.
Many artists discovered that the 3-way pickup selector could be lodged in between settings (often using objects such as matchsticks or toothpicks to wedge it in position) for further tonal variety, resulting in a unique sound when two pickups are combined. Jimi Hendrix would also move the switch across the settings while sustaining a note, creating a characteristic ‘wobbly’ sound, similar to that created by the wah-wah pedal. This effect can be heard in the Woodstock recording of Star Spangled Banner. Since 1977, the Stratocaster has been fitted with a 5-way switch to make such switching more stable. This switch is the same electrically as the original 3-way, but with extra detents for the in-between settings. Other subtle changes were also made to the guitars over the years, but the basic shape and features of the Strat have remained unchanged. In the 1970s and 1980s, some guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with humbucking pickups, especially in the bridge position, to create what became known as a Fat Strat. This was intended to provide a thicker tone preferred in the heavier styles of hard rock and heavy metal. The popularity of this modification grew and eventually Fender began manufacturing models with a bridge humbucker option (HSS), denoted and separated from the original triple single coil by the title of “Fat Strat“, as a reference to the humbucker’s distinct sound, as well as models with dual humbuckers (HH), better known as “Double Fat Strats“. Fender also started making Stratocaster pickguards specially designed for guitar bodies routed for HSH (humbucker-single-humbucker) and HHH (humbucker-humbucker-humbucker) pickup configurations.
The three pickups were originally identical in their construction. With the rising popularity of using pickups in combination, Fender introduced a new feature in 1977 coinciding with the standard 5-position switch; a reverse-wound, reverse-polarity middle pickup. As the description implies, the magnetic polarity of this pickup is opposite the other two, as is the direction of the wire winding around the bobbin. This provides a hum-canceling effect (removing hum induced by poorly shielded, medium to high output AC devices) in positions 2 and 4 on the selector switch. This principle had been known for many years beforehand, being applied in the form of Gibson’s humbucking pickup and Fender’s own split-coil pickup used on the Precision Bass.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.
With the Seagull S6 Classic, you get an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a solid design and an impressive sound that will delight, regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amplifier or PA. This model features a cedar top that has been tested for pressure resistance, so you know you have a tough guitar on your hands to use for many years.
“Well, the legends didn’t use pedals.” Whenever somebody says something like this, and you ask them to whom they are referring, they’re often misinformed and factually wrong. “Jimmy Page”. Uh, ever see him use a Tone Bender Mk II? “Jimi Hendrix.” Please feel free to complete a Harry Potter novel while I finish laughing. “Stevie Ray Vaughan.” Ibanez and Maxon should retire a green Tube Screamer colored banner with his name hanging from their company rafters. This list goes on and on. Yes, there are lots of cool dudes back in the old times who didn’t use pedals to help them create some classic tones, but once they had the chance, they chose to.
Let us move from the best amplifiers among the mid range priced small amplifiers to the more affordable ones. The gap between affordable and less affordable has never been felt this much, in terms of money of course. In terms of quality, the gap is not that noticeable, especially not when you have a contender like the Orange Amplifier Micro Crush PiX 3 Watt 9-Volt mini amp. This little orange cube of happiness provides the side of the person it spends it time at, with a whole lot of brightness and a seeming ray of light. Whether it is because of the bright coloring of the amp, or because it is actually a great sound being amplified from it. Whatever it is, I really do enjoy this little piece of vocal citrus, especially since it has the best combination of so many important qualities for an amp. It sounds good, it looks good and it is so easy to maintain and carry with you wherever you go.
Lists like these come down to personal taste, but since you like Ryan Adams you should give Uncle Tupelo’s album March 16–20, 1992 a listen. After Uncle Tupelo pretty much defined the modern alt-country genre with the electric guitar driven albums “No Depression” and “Still Feel Gone” they released one of the best acoustic albums you will ever hear.

In 1977, Gibson introduced the serial numbering system in use until 2006.[71] An eight-digit number on the back shows the date when the instrument was produced, where it was produced, and its order of production that day (e.g., first instrument stamped that day, second, etc.).[72] As of 2006, the company used seven serial number systems,[71] making it difficult to identify guitars by their serial number alone.[71][72] and as of 1999 the company has used six distinct serial numbering systems.[72] An exception is the year 1994, Gibson's centennial year; many 1994 serial numbers start with "94", followed by a six-digit production number[citation needed]. The Gibson website provides a book to help with serial number deciphering.[72]
The acoustic guitar lends itself to a variety of tasks and roles. Its portability and ease of use make it the ideal songwriter's tool. Its gentle harp-like arpeggios and rhythmic chordal strumming has always found favor in an ensemble. The acoustic guitar has a personal and intimate quality that is suited to small halls, churches and private spaces. For larger venues some form of amplification is required. An acoustic guitar can be amplified by placing a microphone in front of the sound hole or by installing a pickup. There are many entry-level acoustic guitar models that are manufactured to a high standard and these are entirely suitable as a first guitar for a beginner.
Further simplifications occur for the regular tunings that are repetitive, that is, which repeat their strings. For example, the E-G♯-c-e-g♯-c' M3 tuning repeats its octave after every two strings. Such repetition further simplifies the learning of chords and improvisation;[71] This repetition results in two copies of the three open-strings' notes, each in a different octave. Similarly, the B-F-B-F-B-F augmented-fourths tuning repeats itself after one string.[73]
10. Behringer Ultracoustic ACX450 45-watt ($229.99): Not to leave our acoustic-centric players out of the list entirely, the Behringer Ultracoustic not only looks amazing, but it has a ton of features to keep you inspired and sounding great. Two channels are utilized so while you plug your acoustic into channel one, channel two allows you to input a microphone or another source. The FBQ Feedback Indicators allow you to control the feedback coming out of your amp by monitoring the LEDs on the graphic EQ. Need your own guitar effects? The ACX450 allows for 16 different presets on each channel, including delay and reverb. A great bargain for those looking to take their acoustic playing to the next level!
Launch price: $1,499 / £1,211 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 70 | Amp models: 41 guitar, 7 bass | Connections: Standard guitar input, standard aux input, XLR mic input, standard main outputs (L/mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/mono, R), standard stereo phones output, 4x standard send, 4x standard return, s/pdif digital in, s/pdif digital out, AES/EBU and L6 Link out, Variax, MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, 2x expression pedal, Ext amp, CV | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)
Multi-effects processors come in various configurations, too. Some are floor units that have built-in foot pedals and controllers so they can be operated while your hands remain on your guitar. There are rackmount processors (these can be fitted into a rack of recording gear in line with your signal chain) that incorporate a preamp for your guitar. The more sophisticated models have MIDI I/O for connecting guitar synthesizers to keyboards, modules, computers and other MIDI devices and include a divided pickup to attach to your standard guitar. These processors pack effects libraries that offer combinations of effects, amp models and stompboxes that can number in the thousands. Switching can be controlled by onboard knobs, foot controllers or guitar-picking technique. Expect to pay considerably more for a rackmount effects processor, in a range of three- to four-digit prices. 
PLUG THE PORES What you use to prep the body for paint depends on the chosen finish that you will go with. For a solid color finish you will want to fill any of the pores with a wood filler or Bondo glazing putty. I prefer Bondo because it dries quickly and sands smooth. Use one of those plastic speaders that you can get for mud at a paint or hardware store and press the filler firmly into the pores and gaps in the wood. Cut diagonaly accross and against the grain to fill the pores and gaps better. Use a sanding block and a 220 grit paper and after the filler dries to ensure an even flat surface. Only use your hands to lightly sand on the rounded edges or hard to reah areas of the guitar. The roundness of your fingertips can cause depressions in the woods surface so stick with the sanding block on the flat areas. Inspect the surface to see if any pores or gaps remain and repeat the steps if needed. Then clean the surface with a tack cloth to remove any dust.
Hollow-body guitars are best suited for classic jazz, but some musicians have used them in rock, country and blues. If you are a non-jazz guitarist interested in this kind of instrument I’m going to assume you know what you are doing. While these types of guitars can sound great with overdrive in the right hands, they’re probably not the best choice for most rock players.
I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.
Semi-Hollow: As the name suggests, you’re getting a smaller type of sound box while some support of amplification at the same time. This allows us to use an amp (with proper adjustments — there will definitely be some feedback worries of course), but they’re a lot lighter in weight than solid bodies and people tend to say they’re more versatile than our previously explained type. The superlatives used when it comes to hollow-body sound usually include “warm”, “bright”, and nice overtones. Preferred guitarists? Jazz, rockabilly, vintage country, etc.
SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .
Decca's flat-top acoustic guitars seem to usually sell for $50-75. They're not highly regarded because (a) acoustic guitars don't have the collecto-mania of electric guitars, except for certain brands (Martin, Gibson, etc.), and (b) the tonewoods Decca used were inferior to solid spruce as used by the aforementioned makers. Indeed, Decca often used plywood, which doesn't yield very good tone in an acoustic.

High-end builders of today have gone back to germanium en masse for their classic fuzz tones, and most of them test their transistors to sort out the few that will do the job correctly. They put them in anything from vintage-style units—like Fulltone’s ’69, Frantone’s The Sweet, and Roger Mayer’s Classic Fuzz—to way-out updates of the breed—such as Z.Vex’s Fuzz Factory.

Two types of switches are commonly used for guitar mods. One is a potentiometer with a switch—a push/pull, push/ push, or the Fender S-1—and the other is a common toggle, which is available in different sizes, shapes, and configurations. When adding a switch to a passive circuit, you don’t have to worry about voltage and power ratings—all that matters is that switch will fit your guitar!
Even with tone control maxed some high frequencies get cut. To let all the frequencies through you can either get a no-load pot or make one. CTS makes them for Fender and what they do is simply break the connection between the wiper and conductive element when pot is maxed. Additionally, they have an indentation so once they reach maximum setting they “click” and it’s not that easy to turn them back. To make your own just cut (or cover with nail polish) the element near the end, so that resistance between the wiper and the opposite lug reads infinite when maxed, at lower settings it should read as usual.
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Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the ubiquitous ii-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression (which, in contrast to a blues-style 12 bar progression, may have two or more chord changes per bar) the minor jazz-style blues form, the I-vi-ii-V based "rhythm changes" progression, and the variety of modulation-rich chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.

Compressors also have the ability to increase the sustain of notes beyond sounds that are normally usable on the instrument; yet another reason the effect is a popular tool in the soloist’s arsenal. The tiniest signal can be normalized to the same amplitude of a fierce pick attack, and a trailing note will resonate at the exact same volume until the string stops inducing a signal on the pickup.

The more pedals you collect, the more you should consider investing in a pedal board as well. Some pedal boards are simply that – boards – to which you can stick your stompboxes to keep them organized. But you can also get powered pedal boards, which have built-in DC power supplies. That means no need for batteries or individual adapters connected to each pedal: just tether them to the central source, and you can power them all up by plugging the pedal board into a single outlet.
I am a beginner and based on your recommendation, I bought the Dummies book, and signed up for Guitartricks.com as well. This combo is turning out to be really effective for me, I haven’t been playing long but I can feel the progress with each passing day. The videos at Guitartricks are my main guide through this maze of learning, and the Guitar for Dummies is my go-to resource for reading about anything I want to find out. I’m sure doing a search on the internet would get me the same result, but the Dummies book is easier to hit up I think, and at least I’m sure it’s accurate.
While I have been able to find ways to get it to work for me most of the time, I have found that the controls for the video looping feature are not as precise as I would like them to be. There is definitely room for improvement. Another thing that I am missing is the option to control the speed of the video playback. Some competitors allow for the video playback to be slowed down or sped up while retaining the correct pitch. Guitar Tricks have been listening – Improvement have been made!This is a great help if you want to practice to play along at a slightly slower speed or if you want to review something in more detail. Luckily I have found a little helper too that allows me to control the speed of the video until Guitar Tricks are including this feature into their video player. I am using the MySpeed tool from Enounce. They advertise it to speed up videos to save time watching them. It also works a treat slowing videos down.

AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.

String Tension: Acoustic guitars must be built stronger, because the tension of the metal strings is approximately twice that of nylon. This is done with bracing. Any acoustic guitar top must be thin enough to resonate, but so thin that the top alone could not hold it together against the string tension. The bracing adds strength with a goal of minimal damping of resonance. Bracing patterns vary widely, but most Spanish guitars use "fan bracing" and most acoustics use "X bracing."
by lexxus gomes The amp that you use can fundamentally change the sound of your guitar. For example, many "hard rock" musicians like the "chug chug" of a Marshall stack, while blues guitarists may like a Blues Deville. I kind of like the "clean" sound of a Fender Twin Reverb, myself, although I usually just record without an amp into my mixer, and use a guitar effects processor to simulate an amp sound.
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
Late 1934: "T" frets (aka tang frets) replace Bar frets on flat tops. (Most other guitar makers had stopped using bar frets much earlier.) Martins Hawaiian style guitars retain bar frets until at least 1938. The first Martin model to use T frets was the 00-17, introduced on a lot of 00-17 guitars #57305-57329 in 1934. Initially the first T-frets were special ordered by Martin to contain 30% nickel ("normal" fret wire is 18% nickel, 65% copper and 17% zinc). The higher percent of nickel, the harder the fret wire. This special 30% nickel fret wire was ordered from the Horton-Angell Company (the inventor and patent holder for barbed alternating "fish hook" T frets) on 8-31-1934 in an 100 pound lot, along with 100 pounds of "normal" 18% nickel fret wire. It's unclear if Martin ever used 30% nickel fret wire after this, because it was more expensive and not the norm. The same instruments also introduced the "T" neck reinforcement bar. Shortly thereafter T frets were standard. (Like with steel strings in 1922, Martin tried these innovations first on inexpensive low-end models to minimize financial damage in case the experiment was a failure.)
The aim of this paper is to analyze through the finite element method (FEM) the dynamical behaviour of the ligno-cellulose composite plates from the structure of guitar. First it had been done the geometrical modelling of the structures from the plates, as the body of the classical guitar - size 4/4. Then the different structures were analyzed with finite element. The dynamical response had... [Show full abstract]
Struggling to get your guitar sounding sweet and creamy? Don't fret! STUDIO GUITARS is here to warm up your sound with a selection of certified studio-fresh guitar loops recorded by Prime Loops' own professional master of the strings! Using some of the most classic equipment around, we've covered every curve of this awesome instrument's sound with an incredible collection of acoustic and electric guitar samples.
Breedlove is a semi-recently founded guitar manufacturer that has a main focus of acoustic guitars. Breedlove doesn’t have a massive following like some other brands, so it can be difficult trying to find one to test before purchasing. Breedlove tends to evolve their guitars and tries to push the world of acoustic guitars forward. Their Oregon Concerto Myrtlewood acoustic, for example, manages to produce a big, refined sound and the notes are more resonant. This is due to their tapered myrtlewood body and smaller sound-hole. The body shape is also very important as it’s part of the reason they sound so good and it’s even comfortable to play. All of their guitars are very high-quality and work well for all fingering styles and genres of music. If you want a really great acoustic, you really can’t go wrong with Breedlove.

I couldn’t find a professional review of the Les Paul Express. The last time we checked, it had earned an average of just 3.8 stars out of 5 in 17 user reviews on Amazon, but most of the complaints I found on Amazon and elsewhere were from people who got samples that weren’t set up well at the factory. This wasn’t true of our sample, but it was true of the other Epiphone sample we received—and it was true of many of the cheap Epiphones I played in stores.

Epiphone began in Manhattan in 1903 when Anastasios Stathopoulo set up shop (not as Epiphone). When Anastasios died of cancer in 1915 his son Epaminondas (Epi) took over the business. Epiphone and Gibson had an on-going rivalry first in banjos and then in archtop guitars. Gibson finally acquired Epiphone in 1957. Although Epiphone guitars continued to be made in America for a time after the acquisition (often in the same factory, side-by-side with similar Gibson models), Epiphone is now a Gibson brand for overseas, imported lower cost guitars, though many are based on Gibson designs.


Includes hand cutting and shaping new fingerboard nut from scratch, and fitting it specifically for each instrument. Some variation in pricing is due to the unexpected difficulty in removing some nuts. It is highly recommended each instrument be set up to ensure optimal playability. Restringing is NOT included. Price excludes cost of blank ($6 for bone/synthetic)
So, I was looking for a single-ended amp. Say what you will about class A/B amps (and, to be fair, most of the great recorded tones in rock history are class A/B push-pull amps), some of them don’t really get singing until they’re too loud for the bedroom or studio. Sometimes you just need to hear that cranked tone without getting the knock from the neighbors. To quickly recap:

The neck and fretboard (2.1) extend from the body. At the neck joint (2.4), the neck is either glued or bolted to the body. The body (3) is typically made of wood with a hard, polymerized finish. Strings vibrating in the magnetic field of the pickups (3.1, 3.2) produce an electric current in the pickup winding that passes through the tone and volume controls (3.8) to the output jack. Some guitars have piezo pickups, in addition to or instead of magnetic pickups.
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