Consider the use of a power soak. A power soak is a supplemental piece of equipment used in-line to reduce the volume output of an amp while maintaining tone and sustain. The signal moves through the line to the power soak, which absorbs part of the full power of the amp. This adjusted signal is transmitted to the amp, resulting in quieter volumes.[26]
Teisco first began importing guitars to the United States under their own brand in 1960. In 1964, the company then switched the name of their U.S. brand to Teisco Del Rey. The company was then sold in 1967, and the Teisco brand name stopped being used for guitars sold in the United States in 1969. Guitars were still sold under the Teisco name in Japan until 1977.
You have to have wood to get wood, and it’s unfortunate that a noticeable depletion on this natural resource is affecting the guitar industry even though guitar-making isn’t the primary reason for this depletion. When you talk about tonewoods, you have to mention sustainability in order to protect the natural resource and ensure a future of musical instruments.

Play it and see. I've owned so many guitars I don't even look at the headstock , I'll play a few riffs or scales and see how well it holds up. how to tell a good guitar from a bad: *what is it made out of , plywood is terrible , where as say alder or mahogany are the industry standard for "tone". Google will tell you if you can find the model and or series. *how good does it sound? unplugged and plugged in assuming it's electric *can you play every fret on the neck without the notes instantly dying or getting an annoying amount of buzz *is it comfortable to play and slide up or down the neck *are the electronics in good places , I hate when my hand hits the volume knob for example when I'm soloing. down the road you can do the following to improve the sound and reliabillity put new strings on the guitar (youtube can help) adjust the string height as low as possible to make it effortless buy new guitar tuners off of say ebay , I recommend Grovers and a guitar processor will make even no name guitars sound incredible.
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
The vast majority of bass amps in the 2010s can be powered solely by AC mains power, obtained by plugging the amp into a wall socket. Inexpensive practice amps may have the AC mains plug hardwired into the unit. Middle-priced to high-priced amplifiers typically have a removable cable and plug, as used with PC computer towers. The benefits of having a removable cable and plug is that if the cable becomes worn or damaged, a new cable can easily be replaced by a layperson. If a hardwired AC mains cable and plug becomes worn or damaged, a qualified technician or electrician will typically be required to replace the cable and plug. Most amps are designed to work for a single voltage. A small number of expensive bass amps designed for touring professionals have user-selectable voltage, which enables a bassist to play with same amp in North America and Europe. A small number of small combo amps can run on both AC mains power and battery power. This enables bassists to play outside where there is no access to power (e.g., for busking on the street). Amps that are battery powered may have a 12 volt input, enabling the unit to be connected to a car battery with alligator clips.
If you're new to distortion and overdrive pedals, you might be wondering what the difference is between them. For the most part, they do the same thing and are both often referred to as gain pedals. How they differ is that distortion pedals usually provide a harsher, grittier tone with increased sustain. When it comes to distortion, think of genres like grunge and death metal. On the other hand, overdrive pedals are designed to emulate the sound of a tube amp when you increase their volume. The result is a warm yet crunchy sound that's ideal for playing blues and classic rock. Of course, one is not better than the other, and the right distortion or overdrive pedal for you will be a matter of personal preference.
What guitar you get will heavily depend on what style you want to play. If you like death metal you probably don't want to buy a pink Telecaster... think about what you like and what you are going to play! But maybe you want to make a statement and be the guy playing a pointy metal guitar at a jazz jam? The guitar should reflect your personality to some degree at least!
Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
Second, you might be wondering if it’s just better to get a cinematic VST or one that takes from a range of instruments. Fractured does have cymbals and bass kicks but, of course, the guitar creates these and this gives them a lot of offbeat character. You could easily get a more rich and deep bass kick with a drum VST, but then you lose that quirkiness that propels and highlights Fractured.  
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.

Nickel ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
The Aston Sedona is an ES-335 inspired design that truly lives up to the standard. With solid maple construction, 23-3/4″ scale length, bound fretboard, body, and F-holes, 22 fret rosewood fretboard, classic toggle, tone, and volume controls, tune-o-matic style bridge, stop tailpiece, and smooth, strong humbucking pickups, this guitar can hold it’s own with the classic designs and shine!
Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold
This kit contains everything you need to build your guitar.  Just add your finish materials to the body and neck.  These kits aren’t just a collection of random parts- each neck has been custom fitted to the body to ensure a good, snug fit.  Includes a finished, predrilled body, fretted neck, all electronics and hardware. Wood is raw and unfinished, may require sanding and patching or other preparation prior to applying a finish.
Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
Gibson gave this guitar a comfortable V neck profile, which together with shorter 24.75" scale length and 1.725" nut width make this guitar one of the easiest instruments to play in this list. My only complaint with this guitar is its bank breaking price, but this steep price point and exclusivity play an important role in making this iconic instrument more appealing. Start saving now if you want to be one of the privileged few who can play this guitar.
First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.

One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.
Near the beginning of Epiphone's thinline semi-acoustic range is 'The Dot', based on the timeless and legendary Gibson ES-335. The Dot feels comfortable to hold and play, and the neck, while by no means clubby, feels substantial in your palm, probably due to the 43mm width at the nut. Its slightly flattened C-profile increases marginally in depth further up the neck, making for a suitably vintage feel. An acoustic strum issues forth a pleasing, resonant ring. We'd wager that the Dot's all-maple construction has got something to do with that, but more obviously, the hollow bouts bolster the acoustic tone, inducing wry smiles to those listening. Before plugging in, listen to Ronny Jordan, then Noel Gallagher, then BB King, then George Harrison and John Lennon. It becomes immediately apparent that this style of guitar is hugely versatile. This Dot is no exception: the pickups, while not packing the punch of USA PAFs, offer everything form smooth and moody, front-position mellowness to screeching, bridge position rawk. It's one of the best electric guitars for jazz at this price point, too. The Dot looks fine, sounds great and plays great. To our minds, that's value for money indeed.
The Ibanez Artcore AS53 is a semi hollow-body guitar created for guitar players from diverse genres as blues, country, rock and jazz. The guitar feels nice and has a compact and comfortable body. The tone is rich, warm and full. If you are looking for that fat hollow body sound, this guitar makes it possible to switch from jazz to every semi-hollow rocking style of music. A combination of quality and affordability.
I hope the list is somewhat correct on peoples lists although it is just an opinion! and just a small thought and insight on angus young he might not make the top 50 for me he plays just a few chords and everything sounds the same, he is with a unique voice and a band who was made by bon scot that put ac/dc on the map!! I know of no really good guitar player that names angus young as their inspiration or was influenced by angus young it is just that his work was too simple!!
The 2-6kHz region is good for adding bite or presence to guitar tracks at the mixdown stage.There is no 'right' electric guitar sound because the instrument has no natural sound, so you can use as much EQ as you like without feeling guilty. Even so, getting something close to the desired sound at source is always the best way to work. Should you need to use EQ, here are a few comments concerning the frequency areas you might want to tweak. Boxiness tends to occur between 100Hz and 250Hz, so if this is a problem, use a parametric to tame it. Experiment with the Q setting as you may be able to notch out a narrower section than you think to get the desired result. Cabinet thump can be accentuated by boosting at around 80-100Hz, but take care not to boost anything much lower than this, as you'll just bring up unwanted resonances and hum.
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
I decided to release the book for public download, which was my initial plan anyways. In the future there will be no official 'second edition' of The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics, as the material will live and float around here in the Internet. If time permits, I will add and edit the material on this pdf-version. This 'upgraded version' will be developed and published only here at this website. The revision date in the first page will updated accordingly on every 'new release' and the listing below will give more detailed information about the changes made to each chapter.

The SD is a classic. This had a more exaggerated Jazzmaster shape than the T-60. It had a dramatically swept back lower horn, and an offset pair of waists, looking as though it’s been slightly melted. These had bolt-on necks with the elongated Strat-style head, with round logo stickers. A rectangular plastic control panel was mounted above the strings, with large thumbwheel controls and on/off rocker switches, while a large-ish pickguard was mounted under the strings. The controls on the SD-4L were especially interesting, taking their cue from the Italians, no doubt. The thumbwheels were for volume and tone, while there were a total of six rocker switches. Four of these were on/off for each of the four pickups, but in between were two more. Their function is unknown, but a good guess would be phase reversal between the front and back pairs of pickups. Both models had the rectangular fingerboard edge inlays. With “L” designations, both had vibratos. These consisted of a fairly simple bar for string attachment with a series of springs behind it, all covered with a hinged metal cover. The handle was extremely long. Pickups were the beefy tall rectangular type with metal cases and black plastic center tops with exposed pole pieces (these could be screws or squares). The SD-4L had four pickups, in two pairs, while the SD-2L had two. If I couldn’t have a Spectrum 5, I’d be looking for one of these (I am!).
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