Great sounding pedal reasonably easy to assemble. First, if you havent much experience, take the time to study up on PCB's, it's not step by step. If you have trouble reading the resistors there are apps that tell you the values by scrolling through the band colors. My only problem was wiring the jack outlets because the print isn't that great in that area. 2 or 3 components didn't match the PCB's labeling but I looked at the product's pic and figured it out. It took about 3 1/2 hrs with eating dinner in there somewhere. Now some friends want me to make them one also! 4 stars because of the jack outlet picture and no green wire
In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.
Like his conversational singing, Willie Nelson's guitar playing is deceptively laidback, playfully offbeat and instantly recognizable. Amazingly, Nelson has been playing the same Martin M-20 classical guitar, nicknamed Trigger, since 1969; it has defined his sound, a nylon-stabbing mix of country, blues and Django Reinhardt's gypsy jazz. Though the guitar now has a large gaping hole, Nelson still plays it nightly. "I have come to believe we were fated for each other," he said. "The two of us even look alike. We are both pretty battered and bruised."

Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.


“Stoner rock” has to be the most useless classification in the long history of futile attempts to describe what music sounds like. (What rock isn’t stoner rock, amirite?) Despite the misleadingly mellow connotation, the term is really just shorthand for Josh Homme’s thick-necked guitar playing, first in Kyuss, but more famously in Queens of the Stone Age, blending ’70s-vintage proto-metal sludge with high-desert lawlessness, Black Sabbath playing Jesse Pinkman’s house party. Tall, ginger, and wielding a sense of humor as dry as his Mojave stomping grounds, Homme doesn’t exactly look the part of an alt-metal godhead, which only makes the poison easier to swallow.
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
Searching for Guitars market values? You have come to the right place! IGuide?is proud to host the online Guitars Price Guide.The price guide is maintained by Jon R. Warren, whose price guide books have been the authority on collectibles values since 1985. The searchable database consists of detailed reports on a ever-growing list of items. Each report includes current market values in ten different grades, as well as a section for "Real Market Data", actual prices fetched at auction. The database is updated daily.
Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]
Nut slots too deep: Take a course file and file the top of the nut 1/2 the distance you want to raise the slots. Catch the filings on a piece of paper. Tape both sides of the nut with masking tape and then fill the slots with the filings. Soak the filings with thin superglue. Press into place with a toothpick. When dry, refile the slots. The slots should be made so the string sits in about 1/2 to 3/4 thier diameter. Slots should be wider, and taper downwards on tuner side. Square slots are acceptable.

A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.

Since there are 2 coils, you can have up to 4 wires with which to work, providing you with a great many tone options. Almost all independent pickup companies manufacture humbuckers with 4 conductor cable. Stock guitar humbuckers rarely have 4 wires coming out of them but sometimes it is possible to convert 2 wire humbuckers to 4 wire types. This is an exacting procedure with little room for error but the tone rewards can be well worth the effort. If you really want to give this a try, then click here.
One other effect that depends on EQ modulation is the wah pedal. As you rock forward on the pedal, the sound becomes more trebly. As you rock back, the treble range is muted. In the middle positions, a wah produces a nasal, midrange-heavy tone that is interesting and useful in its own right. Since you can change the wah's tone constantly while you're playing, it's a very dynamic and expressive effect that can become an integral part of your playing. Jimi Hendrix was one of the first guitarists to exploit the wah’s capabilities.
Due to the great sensitivity of some advanced vibrato systems like the Kahler, the Steinberger and the Floyd Rose, a light touch is required. Simply placing one’s hand on the bridge can cause notes to drift in and out of tune. So players — especially the heavy handed— would be wise to try a variety of vibrato-equipped guitars out before making an instrument purchase or modifying a valued six-string friend.

I understand and concur with you totally, as a sound man, I love it when everyone is direct, it makes life so much easier. every mike you eliminate adds roughly 3 db headroom overall to the max level without feedback. But as a bassist, and a Chapman Stick player, ampless just feels too flat and lifeless for me. I recently worked a John McLaughlin and Fourth Dimension gig in Bali, Both John, and Gary Husband went direct, it was wonderful. The bassist was amped though, for the same reasons I prefer to be amped If I am playing bass. Nathan East is another who doesn’t like bass in the monitors, preferring the sound and dynamic control of having his own amp. By and large, I find that generally (with some VERY notable exceptions) people who grew up playing concerts “back in the day” prefer amps, subsequent generations of people who grew up playing with small “portable” amps (think SWR, etc.) generally don’t mind going ampless, they have pedal racks, and have the sound they want from that. They don’t miss the air moving on their strings, because they never had it.. Perhaps because I am a dinosaur, I need the feel of 6, or 8 10s behind me, (or at least 2 15s), the resonance effect it has on the strings, makes my instrument come alive and it breathes with a feeling no pedal rack can duplicate. You should see Bootsy Collins’ rig, he had 2 1x18s, 2 2x15s, and 2 4×10 boxes, and that is what he calls his “small gig rig”! I guess I grew up regarding the amp as an integral part of my instrument, without it, playing feels, well, like you don’t have an amp! Even in the studio, I run a DI into the board, but I play through an amp for my own feel. Peas.

The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
You're close, but not quite where you want to be with your tone.  You are officially a serious tone chaser; you've already swapped the stock burstbuckers in your awesome R9 Les Paul for something better ... but you are still only at 95-percent of the TONE you want, need, and hear in your head.  Keep seeking grasshopper, and you will find.  For only those who persist will drink from the holy grail.
Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.
Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
Both pickups were controlled by a separate volume control, with one master tone control. Another toggle served as a coil tap. The Ripley project went nowhere, however, the body styling would reappear on the upcoming Korean Celebrity series. It is very possible, since this shared the Ultra Hard Body model designation and was made in Japan, that the mystery Japanese guitars were essentially the same.

I've used 3 effects applications till now: Amplitube podfarm and guitar rig 5. The best software I found so far is guitar rig the sound it gives is amazing it has some pretty good presets and it has an intuitive interface I recommend trying out demos of every software to see which better suits you. I recommend guitar rig. I would suggest using a PC instead of a laptop because they're processor intensive. Anything that's part of the is series is great (i3 i5 i7). Good luck and remember to get asio4all drivers google it and get the newest drivers

Maybe the pickups that came with your guitar are just cheap and not up to your standards. At that point, an upgrade might be less of a stylistic issue and would done for the purpose of improving the overall sound quality of your instrument. In most cases, upgrading the pickups on your guitar are the single most effective way to improve the overall tone and sound quality.
But here’s the thing: every single useful DAW is available for a 30-day demo or so. So you can at the very least try before you buy. The only downside is that some of these are only available in their full “pro” versions, so if you’re on a budget, you can get the 30 day (or more : REAPER has a 60 day demo and only costs $60 if you keep it, but I don’t know if you’d do live stuff with it… some of the fun will be figuring out all the tech).
This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.

The key to getting a great guitar sound really is in the hands of the engineer, not his equipment. I've gotten great sounds in multi-million dollar rooms, and topped them in the smallest of home studios. You can do it too. The key is to constantly experiment and apply some basic physics. Try different mics, try moving them closer and farther, try different angles, try putting the amp in a corner, try putting the amp on a concrete floor, try it on a wood floor, try it on a floor with green shag carpeting, just try anything!
Let’s face it, without people listening and responding to your music, there’s not much point in you throwing all you have into that hobby or business. Furthermore, it is relatively hard to be a passionate musician and to work in a more reliably financial-rewarding job alongside it, so one of your primary goals as a musician is bound to be to crack the music business and start making millions.

There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings. For a six-string guitar in standard tuning, it may be necessary to drop or omit one or more tones from the chord; this is typically the root or fifth. The layout of notes on the fretboard in standard tuning often forces guitarists to permute the tonal order of notes in a chord.
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We specialise in 1960s and 1970s parts and literature, relating to American and European guitars and basses. Specifically Gibson, Guild and Vox. The parts for sale on this site are sorted by brand and type, or you can search for keywords in the box above. We have a lot of parts unlisted on this site - if you do not see the part you need, please ask.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.
Gibson’s electric guitars generally sport humbucker pickups, known for their thicker, rounder tone. You also get less feedback, which limits the types of delay and overdrive tones you can experiment with, but ensures a cleaner and more consistent sound. Gibson mainly uses mahogany for their guitar bodies, which is what gives it that slightly darker sound.
One other effect that depends on EQ modulation is the wah pedal. As you rock forward on the pedal, the sound becomes more trebly. As you rock back, the treble range is muted. In the middle positions, a wah produces a nasal, midrange-heavy tone that is interesting and useful in its own right. Since you can change the wah's tone constantly while you're playing, it's a very dynamic and expressive effect that can become an integral part of your playing. Jimi Hendrix was one of the first guitarists to exploit the wah’s capabilities.
For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.
Wonderful and excellent nicely summarize how the market feels about the Washburn WL012SE. Many are impressed by its solid build, while others are into it for the aesthetics. It also gets plenty of love for its build and sound quality. Even experts like Ed Mitchell of Music Radar have mostly good things to say, he concludes his review with this statement: "The WLO12SE is a beautifully realized reminder that you should take the time to narrow your search and find a playing experience and tone that suits your needs perfectly."

As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
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Hertz Guitar company was originated from Shanghai/China & North Korea. This brand of guitars produces electric and other wide range of guitars that can be used in studio recordings and live shows. This brand also manufactures guitar accessories. The starting price of guitar from this brand is 12,504 INR approximately. Anyone looking for an affordable electric guitar at a beginner and advanced level can buy this brand of guitar.
The most important thing to a 5string is the tone ring with a resonator, I've been plays 36yrs. I have an Alvarez Denver belle flat top tone ring, a White Eagle archtop tone ring and my favorite is a Hohner artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a guitar my choice is a Martin D-35 ease of play & tone that is awesome! a 5 string take Many hours & months of practice on your rolls, forward, backward alternating thumb pattern, keeping your timing in check so you do not hit the string with your middle finger out of synch. Good luck have fun, no time better to learn than now!
Ok, funny enough last week i got my old squire Tele out the loft to perform a maintenance on it and i adjusted the Truss rod, action, innotation. I've installed some nee pick ups too. But it still doesn't mean that there aren't easier guitars out there to play. There are differen't necks, frets, body shapes etc that all factor in. Someone has already said that a Tele is one of the hardest to play so i still think my question is valid
Gibson and Fender have been ripping the public off for years, they're not even close to being worth what they charge especially Fender with such a mass produced bolt on neck and lame finishes design. Carvin is a superior guitar in every way and what people fail to mention is that you can choose what wood and finish you would like as well as bolt on neck, set neck or neck through designs and their pick up's are impeccable. A truly great guitar co. With excellent customer relations and real musicians will all show respect for Carvin when mentioned if not already owning one.
Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.

Guitar effects pedals can range from just £30 each for cheap, Chinese-made copies to over £200 for boutique hand-made pedals with unique sounds. For the average good-quality pedal (made by a company such as BOSS, for example), you’ll be looking at around £50-£100. This might seem like a lot for one effect, but if you’re careful that one pedal could last years.


9. Boss Katana 50 1x12 Combo Amp ($199): The Boss Katana 50 is nothing to sneeze at. Perhaps one of the coolest functions is its immediate access to 15 awesome Boss pedal tones, supporting up to 55 of the BOSS family of effects. You can also customize your effects and amp settings via the Tone Studio Software or even download preamps from the Boss Tone Central website. You can also completely bypass the speaker by connecting the amps line output to a line input on your favorite device, which also comes in handy for connecting to a PA system.

If you have a little bit more to spend than what you pay for the Epiphone LP Special II you might want to consider the Epiphone Les Paul 100. It has a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard. It’s got solid tuners and hardware, a 3-way switch and two tone and volume knobs. It’s slimmer and therefore much lighter than the Gibson Les Paul. The Epiphone LP 100 feels and plays good. It’s a reliable and durable guitar. A great choice for rock and blues!
Great post a lot of useful information here I found this old acoustic guitar made by lotus I have never heard of this brand and have been trying to research it for about a month now and haven't gotten any closer to finding out the history of it if anyone know anything about them I'm all ears it has a tag on the inside model no. LW 65 or g5 lotus made in japan thanks in advance for any information I can get
You are right, we will have the whole guitar amplifiers section of out website completely revamped in the next few weeks! We made vast content improvements on all other sections of GuitarFella and now it is time to work on the amps. Thanks a lot for the remark and make sure you check us out in 2-3 weeks, I guarantee you that you will like the results!
Now, the body size isn’t the only thing to think about. There’s also whether or not there’s a cutaway, and how this is implemented. A cutaway makes it easier for you to access the higher frets, because you can place your hand right next to them. Naturally this will reduce some of the resonance because there’s less body beside the neck, but it’s a tradeoff that a great many guitarists are happy to make if they want to be able to play those higher frets well.
Out of all the hopped-up Caucasians who turbocharged the blues in the late Sixties, Texas albino Johnny Winter was both the whitest and the fastest. Songs like his 1969 cover of "Highway 61 Revisited" are astonishing showpieces of his lightningfast thumb-picked electric slide playing. Jimi Hendrix sought him out as a sideman, and Muddy Waters recognized his talent at first glance, becoming a friend and collaborator: "That guy up there onstage – I got to see him up close," Waters later said. "He plays eight notes to my one!"

Jackson is a renowned guitar manufacturing company. It is named after its founder, Grover Jackson. Jackson Guitars was founded in the year 1980 and has its headquarters in the State of Arizona, United States. Jackson guitars are considered as one of the best guitars in the world. Jackson Guitars are known for its slender and elegant designs. Jackson Guitars are popular for their typical pointed headstock which is similar in design with the “shark fins”. This design is most popular and has inspired many other guitar brands to shape themselves as the Jackson’s.
The guitar is hand-made by Martin's top luthiers, using exotic cocobolo wood for the back and sides, mixed with a more conventional solid sitka spruce top. As expected from a high-end instrument, this guitar features impressive visual appointments, most notable of which is its ivoroid binding, beautiful rosette and fretboard inlays. While its price tag and looks may push you to just hide this guitar in the closet, know that this instrument is built to make music in the road or in the studio. Martin employed modern bracing and construction techniques to ensure the guitar stays reliable, beautiful and great sounding for a long time. Those that are lucky enough to own this guitar have themselves a treasure that they can pass down to the next generation of players.
Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.
The ’37 Spanish Guitar ($40, $5 for a case) illustrated in both the Sorkin and Grossman catalogs was basically the same as before, but now with plastic button tuners. This still had no f-holes. The previous basic Regal trapeze tail is now shown replaced by a stamped National trapeze. Indeed, despite the fact that catalog illustrations remain retouched versions of the old Regal-made guitars, these probably had Kay bodies and bolted-on National Dobro necks. Gone is the 1/4″ jack in favor of the screw-on microphone attachment. Finally, the new cylindrical-magnet pickup is offered as the “Mated Pick-Up.” This is significant both intrinsically and in light of later Supro features. This pickup is “mated,” i.e., attached by three screws, to the bridge saddle. The pickup sat inside the guitar contained in a wooden box. This was the beginning of National Dobro/Valco’s association with what would later be called the Bridge-Tone under-bridge pickup featured in many of its electric guitars.
At some point, I'm guessing near the end of the Buegeleisen & Jacobson ownership-era, a few hollow and semi-hollow body guitars were sold. They shared some of the hardware and necks of the 7-800 series guitars but had symmetrical bodies and no tilted pickup. The bodies resembled the Gibson ES-335 and ES-175T. They appeared to be equiped with humbucking pickups. I'm not following those, but I'd love to have that 175T copy. See the very end of the Varieties page for some photos.
A simplistic design and an affordable price make the Squier Bullet Stratocaster SSS an ideal guitar for those who are just beginning their foray into the musical world. Here’s a huge drop in price and mentioned halfway in our list just in case you wanted to find a budget-friendly and cheap electric guitar to start with. With a basswood finish and a ‘C’ shape design, this electric guitar is lightweight and comfortable, making it ideal when just beginning to learn basic chord progressions and needing long periods of time to practice. The twenty-one frets that are included come in a medium-jumbo size, making it easier to learn the basics of strumming and moving from chord to chord. The string pickup is only a single coil, which provides an adequate sound and balanced tone when utilizing the 5-position pickup blade. With three different color options to choose from (Candy Apple Red, Sea-foam Green, and Lake Placid Blue) the Squier Bullet is one of the best electric guitars for those who are looking to begin their musical journey in style.
Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation.[1] The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in blues and jazz.
The Salamander Grand made by Alexander Holm (details above) who sampled his Yamaha C5 Grand and is quite well known for having a great sound. Most sf2/sfz versions seem to be lacking the proper dynamics, have latency problems or have been oversimplified. This sf2 version has addressed these issues yet retains its essential character including optional resonance but removes other non-essential sounds such as pedal noises.

I disagree, not saying that you can hear tonewoods but saying that it isnt just the string and pickups that make a difference. There is a huge difference in how a string vibrates and pickups do pickup resonances, otherwise a semi hollow would sound exactly like a solidbody and would never feedback. Get some humbuckers put them in a telecaster and then put them in a 335 and tell me they sound exactly the same. What is important is scale length (string tension), weight and various things like bridge design. Get a hardtail strat with strat pickups and then route it for a trem bridge ... it will sound different, maybe minor or major depending on what but it will change the tone.

I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
Great condition. With the exception of the gold foil missing from the back pad, allowing the pink to show thru, the guitar is entirely original. Has a couple of small spots of edge wear, and a chip on the front, the size of this 'o'. Plays and sound fine. Has correct amount of neck relief (.010") at the 7th fret, when fretted at the first fret and the body fret. Includes original chipboard case.

Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future.


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In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
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Boasting the title of the “world’s largest guitar manufacturer,” Fender is responsible for the creation and production of a number of the most iconic guitars ever conceived. The one Jimi Hendrix set on fire on stage? That was a Fender Stratocaster – similar in shape to the one pictured above. The one Bruce Springsteen plays at every concert? That’s a Fender Telecaster. Look at nearly any band on stage around the world and the likelihood is you’ll see a Fender guitar up there. And that’s no accident. Founded by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1946, this brand hasn’t just pioneered iconic looks – they pioneered iconic sound. And that’s what keeps musicians like Eric Clapton, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, and Jeff Beck so viciously loyal to the brand: unrepentant quality.


If you want to measure the fret size on existing instruments, a good way to do it is to get an inexpensive dial caliper (think Harbor Freight etc).  You can measure the width with the outer jaws (make sure to zero out the calipers for accurate measurements), but for the height (unless you are going to notch the depth rod and subtract the difference), use a piece of something of a uniform thickness and drill a hole in it to accomodate the depth rod, place it across two frets and measure thru the hole (usually near the crown) to the fingerboard and subtract your piece's thickness.  When measuring fret height, it is always good to measure a few different places on the neck as the height may vary according to leveling and wear. On many guitars (but not all) the upper frets (if there is not a neck joint area hump that was accounting for during leveling) will be a good indicator of fret height.
Ovation guitars have a history of innovative design, reflecting its founder’s engineering training and development of Kaman helicopters. Ovation guitars have composite synthetic bowls; earlier acoustic guitars have had wooden sides abutting a flat back since the 1700s. Kaman diagnosed structural weaknesses in the orthogonal joining of the sides, and felt that a composite material could be used for a smooth designed body. Ovation’s parabolic bowls dramatically reduced feed-back, allowing greater amplification of acoustic guitars. Improved synthetics used techniques from helicopter engineering to control vibrations in the bowl. Ovation has developed a thin neck, with the feel of an electric-guitar’s neck, but with additional strength from layers of mahogany and maple reinforced by a steel rod in an aluminum channel.[1] The composite materials and thin necks reduced the weight of Ovations.
I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
As we mentioned before, the first mass-produced solid body electric guitar was introduced in the early ‘50s as a way for guitar players to avoid getting that unwanted feedback that amplified hollow body electric guitars were infamous for. Today, there are countless solid body guitars to accommodate any type of player and price range—from beginner guitar players to seasoned pros playing genres spanning hard rock, country, blues, heavy metal, jazz, and more! Some of the most popular solid body electric guitars include the Fender Telecaster, the Fender Stratocaster, the Gibson Les Paul, the Gibson SG, the Ibanez RG, and the ESP Eclipse.
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