Delay/echo: Delay/echo units produce an echo effect by adding a duplicate instrument-to-amplifier electrical signal to the original signal at a slight time-delay. The effect can either be a single echo called a "slap" or "slapback," or multiple echos. A well-known use of delay is the lead guitar in the U2 song "Where the Streets Have No Name", and also the opening riff of "Welcome To The Jungle" by Guns N'Roses.[86]
Back in the control room, audition each mic, preferably as the guitarist plays along with the other instruments. Listen carefully to how each microphone sounds on its own and, more importantly, to how it works in the mix. Usually, one microphone will come up a winner on the first pass. Don't stop there, however. Instead, leave the "winning" microphone where it is and experiment with the placement of the other two mics. Time-and mic selection-permitting, you may also wish to do a second round of testing with other microphones.
In a pinch, you can check for standard string action using a business card; it should just fit between the fret and the string at the 12th fret. Be prepared to adjust the neck at least a couple of times a year, particularly if you live in an area with large humidity swings between summer and winter. If your action is very low and you're still having difficulty playing bar chords, etc., you may want to switch to lighter gauge guitar strings. Be prepared to re-adjust the neck after you restring, because lighter strings exert less pressure on the neck, so you may now have an underbow.
Passive pickups are similar to internal microphones that essentially just pick up the vibrations and soundwaves and send it straight to the amp. You bypass the need for a preamp that means you typically lack the ability to enhance, shape, and change sound and tones. Simply put, if you just want the ability to plug in for acoustic goodness, a passive pickup is a decent device. However, if you want to achieve more controlled volume and other features, you’re going to need to install a preamp at some point or simply opt for a guitar with an active pickup.
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
JS32 Dinky is one of those old school models that has stuck around, and for a good reason. The guitar is similar to the SL2, however it brings a much more neutral experience. It’s all about that Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge, two kicking humbuckers, and a fretboard that is built for speed. While I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar I’ve ever played, Jackson JS32 Dinky gives its competition a run for their money.
48-HOUR RISK FREE TRIAL PERIOD (Includes guitars, effect pedals; excludes speaker cabinets and amps). Returns for 100% refund will be issued if the customer expresses their desire to return the item by email, phone or Reverb Message, within 48-hours of receiving the product. If done so, Moore Guitars will issue a FedEx prepaid and insured shipping label via E-mail at our expense. We require that the item be return shipped within 24 hours of contacting Moore Guitars of your desire to return the item. If the item is not shipped within the 24 hour time period the you will be moved to the next tier of our return policy. This is our "try it out in your own jam room" return policy. Just FYI, this is not a "Gig it, and Return It" Opportunity. Items purchased during Official Sales Events are not eligible. See "After 48-Hours" for returns on these items. AFTER 48-HOURS Returns after 48 hours and up to 14 days may be authorized and a full refund will be issued for any item, for the purchase price. Moore Guitars will issue a FedEx prepaid and insured shipping label via E-mail. If your purchase originally qualified for free shipping, the actual shipping charges will be deducted from your refund, as will any/all return shipping charges. Returns occurring between 15 and 30 days will be exchanged for 100% toward a trade of equal or lesser value of in-store product, OR 85% of the purchase price less shipping to and from the customer. All returns for any reason and at any time must be cleared through a Moore Guitars Representative. No exceptions. Any damage due to shipping must be reported immediately upon receiving the item. If an item is damaged due to shipping, we will refund the purchase price and the shipping costs to ship the item back to Moore Guitars. All returned items must be complete, unregistered and in the original condition and packaging with all accessories and complete documentation (Owner's Manual, Warranty Card, quick start guides etc.) No returns on Special Orders, Pre-orders, Trades, Close-outs, or Blow-out items. Return requests on all non-domestic United States shipped items must be submitted via email or phone within 24 hours. A full refund will be issued less shipping costs to and from the buyer on any item once we have received it and inspected it. No refunds will be issued for non-domestic United States shipped items after the 24 hour window has closed. ALL RETURNS ARE SUBJECT TO AN INSPECTION BY A MOORE GUITARS REPRESENTATIVE AND A REFUND WILL ONLY BE ISSUED ONCE WE DEEM THE ITEM TO BE IN THE SAME CONDITION AS WHEN WE SHIPPED IT. Our return address is- Moore Music, 301 North Royal Avenue, Evansville, Indiana 47715 Thanks, The Crew at Moore Guitars
By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".
Gibson’s new version of the Les Paul Standard was released August 1, 2008 and features a long neck tenon, an asymmetrical neck profile to make for a comfortable neck, frets leveled by Plek machine, and locking Grover tunerswith an improved ratio of 18:1. With the 2008 model Gibson has introduced their “weight relief” chambering, which includes routing “chambers” in specific areas of the mahogany slab body as specified by Gibson R&D. Before 2008, Les Paul Standards were “swiss cheesed.” In other words, it had holes routed into the body, but it was not chambered like most of Gibson’s Les Paul lineup now is.[17]
First and most importantly is our set up. Instruments that have been set up properly to insure appropriate string height, nut slot width/depth, intonation and neck relief have been done using the string gauge the player is using. If one changes string gauges, more or less tension is being placed on the instrument depending on whether they go up or down in string gauge. This can affect everything about your set up and require several adjustments.
It comes in arctic white, fiesta red, black and vintage sunburst, so there’s a healthy level of customization available. Finally, there are three classic Strat single coils, two volume knobs and a tone knob. Accompanying that is a five-way selector switch, so you can dial in your tone and fine tune it with the knobs. It all comes in a really nice package that will feel really good right out of the box. You really can’t go wrong with a classic like this. 
The material in the neck and fretboard also matters. Some guitars have both neck and fretboard in maple, and they will typically have a bright and open sound. Rosewood has traditionally been used for fretboards, usually combined with a maple neck, because it is a hardy and oily wood that can stand up to extensive human contact. Rosewood will give a darker tone than maple alone.
Electronics installs are one of my favorite jobs here at the shop and this project was one of the funnest.  Installing a Clapton pre-amp is more then just a quick wiring job because of the surface mount board.  The board needs to be routed into the body underneath the pickguard.  Setting up the router is the most time consuming part of this job and once the routing in complete the actual wiring takes only a few minutes.  The guitar was then topped off with a fret level and setup. -Evan
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.
If you really want ultimate tone and control, it’s hard to beat a w/d/w type rig. You have ultimate power and control over your tone in a rig like this. Of course, a rig like this probably isn’t going to fit in the trunk of your car! But the massive tones and ultimate control will have you running out to buy a bigger vehicle (or hiring roadies). Don’t say I didn’t warn you....
The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
"Of course using effects pedals isn't cheating. I personally would define cheating as using corrective technology of some sort to falsify an artist's performance/musical ability, and I don't think that's what using pedals do. They're used for creative purposes, to manipulate sounds for artistic effect and suit personal tastes/whatever suits the mood of a song. They expand the range of timbres you can get from only using one instrument.
The Guitar Store is not only the best guitar store in Seattle, but the best guitar store in the WORLD. First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful. My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do. Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff. Can't rave enough! Definitely found my guitar store for life! Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)
Go to the blues and jazz though and things change. Listen to the guitars. Warm, mellow, beefy, thick, with tons of butter. And those guitar sounds are mostly clean or overdriven (not distorted as with a distortion pedal). Using the neck pickup works well for this, but in addition to that, guitarists roll off the tone knob to cut more of the treble to warm up the tone and make it blend with the rest of the music. It also keeps the tone beefy and thick so the soloist can cut through the mix but without sounding as harsh like a rock player. Don’t get it wrong though, some blues and jazz tones will require trebley tones, but the guitarist will use the tone knob to change his tone instantly without having to change his amp settings for each movement or song, especially when improvisations and long instrumentals are involved.
The trust you place in a guitar master's steady hand, keen mind and eye for detail when you hand him your baby is almost too much to bear. It's more hope than faith. For you need someone who's knowledgeable, but not just book smart. A guitar master needs to know more than just how to solder the yellow and green wires together, glue a new bridge and replace a few strings. He must know its rhythm, that steady beat pulsing through the wood.

While there's nothing necessarily wrong with plonking your mic right at the centre of the speaker cone if it gets what you're after, a lot of producers take the time to experiment with different positionings off axis, where the sound is typically warmer. Mike Hedges: "Depending on where you have [the mic] — outer speaker or inner speaker — you get the difference in tone from the edge of the speaker and the centre of the cone." In fact, Mike Clink also tries small changes in position even when working with basically on-axis sounds. "I'll point [the SM57] exactly dead on, though I might move it an inch or two to get the right sound."


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Here are the reasons why you MIGHT want to raise it: 1. The break angle (the angle change of the strings as they pass over the saddles) is so severe that the strings keep breaking as they pass over the bridge. 2. The break angle is so steep that the strings hit the edge of the bridge before they go over the saddles. I’ve never had a problem with 1 above. However, 2 often happens and it’s not something that bothers me unless it’s severe.
Some bonehead really put the WRONG pickups in a guitar you just bought. So you bought a sweet vintage Strat from a guy who put P-Rails in it because now it can get "any tone".  He failed to mention that all of those tones kinda suck.  Hey, you just want a great sounding STRAT!  Drop in the right vintage Strat pickups and you'll be there baby'.  Then off-load those jack-of-all-trades tone-suckers to some idiot who actually believes one weird pickup can nail EVERYTHING.
Next up in your signal path comes the trusty gain pedal, or two or three even.  These effects will pass your signal through a transistor or diode to produce the clipping sound of a tube amplifier cranked up loud.  They can go from subtle drive of a loud Fender to the high gain insanity of a Mesa Boogie Triple Rectifier.  Most players call these effects distortion pedals, but there are different varieties of distortion that produce distinctly unique tones, all driven by the amount of gain you push.
4) Aside from enough publishing errors that, to my sensibilities, mean that the book is not ready to be published, instructions are shown on how to add a Varistor switch to a guitar, and a Les Paul is used for the example. The drilled hole given as the example is nothing less than a hack job, I hate to say it, but it is. I would faint if I saw a tech do that to my guitar. Besides its being really bad advice in the first place, if you are going to do it, DONT follow this example!
From a perfectionist/engineering standpoint, there is a lot wrong with this circuit. The controls are complexly interactive. There is no really flat setting, as there is a residual midrange scoop unless the Treble and Bass controls are fully down. The action of the Bass control is very uneven for normal taper controls. While the Mid control appears to affect only the mids, it is actually a form of volume control that affects all frequencies, but is the only control that also affects mids. Although it has several imperfections, this tone stack actually helps some of the quirks of guitar, so it works well.
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.
Some single cabinets use mixed speaker sizes, although this is less common. Examples include MESA Engineering's 1x15"/4x10" cabinet,[8] Peavey's PVH 1516, which has 1x15" and 2x8" speakers.[9] and Traynor's TC1510 combo, which has 1x15" and 2x10". Other large single cabinets with speaker sizes other than 10", 12" or 15" are less commonly used, but they do exist. Examples include the 6x8" and 8x8" cab configurations. Users of two cabinets may use two 4x10" cabinets (more easy to transport than a single 8x10" cab), a 15" cab and a 2x10" cab, or other variations (e.g., a 2x15" cab and a 4x10" cab).
Hello, Our rhythm guitarist had a 12- string Mark X11 guitar by Vox back in 1967. It had a protective back pad ( 8 sided) on the back that snapped on. It was only made from 1964 - 1967. In mint shape, the Italian made one is worth at least $1,000.00 and the Engish made one is worth at least $1,500.00. Remember that is for a Mint shape guitar.(Info from Blue Book of Electric guitars -7th Edition 1999) You can see our guitarists sunburst Vox Mark X11 at Myfirstband.com ,click on Indiana -(SOS) Society of Sound page. There is a group shot and a close up in color of him with it. Peace........Rockin Rory in Indiana
The guitar builder for the giants of jazz, Ibanez now introduces the Artstar AS153 Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar, to answer the needs of the working professional player. Crafted from specially selected tone woods, this guitar features a bone nut, ebony fingerboard, hand-rolled frets and Ibanez's famous Super 58 pickups-capable of tone magic any place...  Click To Read More About This Product
The USA-made variants of Jackson guitars are somewhat pricey, yet they are also custom-made. However, you can also find the same options bearing affordable price tags too. These inexpensive models come with slightly downgraded specs as they aim at the beginners and intermediate level guitarists. It means Jackson guitars provide an excellent opportunity to the metal players to choose any of the guitars that fit in their budget and meet their requirements.
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After putting 13 inexpensive guitars to the test for 24 hours with a panel of instructors, students, musicians, and a guitar repair person, we think the Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat is the best electric guitar for beginners. It’s comfortable and reasonably light in weight, it played well right out of the box (and even better when properly set up), and its complement of pickups and controls offer enough variation of tone that beginners will get a good start on finding their own sound, regardless of the styles of music they’re interested in.

While he could put out an album of his farts or slap his name on any shitty guitar and still make millions, he is a painstaking perfectionist who spent years agonizing over every minute detail of his EVH Wolfgang guitar and EVH 5150 III amp before offering it to the public and who has refused to release a new Van Halen album until he feels it’s ready.
Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.
Purchase a more suitable microphone, if necessary. If you have found that your mic really doesn't capture sound the way you need, you'll have to research to find the right mic for your situation. For example, you might use a large diaphragm condenser mic to capture crisp, pop rock tones.[32] However, you should be able to achieve consistently good recordings with the use of either a common:
The valvetronix XL-series builds on the success of the original valvetronix digital amplifier. A range of tube-powered modelling amplifiers, with hi-gain sounds designed to span the entire range of heavy rock music. The XL-series uses VOX's patented Valve Reactor technology, producing the sound and feel of an all-tube amp. Models: AD15VT-XL 15-watt 1×10" speaker, AD30VT-XL 30-watt 1×12" speaker, AD50VT-XL 50-watt 2×12" speakers, AD100VT-XL 100-watt 2×12" speakers.

Vintage Guitars has been around since 1985. We know what professional guitar players want. Our authentic guitars combine the classic design of vintage guitars with the modern playability of newer ones. The retro look is combined with patented new hardware that gives you the best of both new and old worlds. Whether your preferred genre is rock, country or jazz, we have vintage guitars for every working professional musician. If you’re looking for great features and old-school style, you’ve come to the right place. Check out all of our electric, acoustic and bass guitars!
Another factor to consider is the frequency with which you play. If you’re an occasional guitarist who plays just a few times a month and tend to play with a light touch, you may find less expensive strings perfectly suitable. On the other hand, if you’re devout about practice or play often and hard, premium-grade, heavy-duty strings may prove a better buy in the long run. Many manufacturers grade their strings according to their durability.
While it can be a troubling task to find the perfect electric guitar to bring out your inner rock star, we hope that our electric guitar reviews & our comprehensive guide has helped you narrow down your choices. Our best piece of advice is to determine the type of genre you’re interested in playing. That will be a good basepoint for you to work from in order to determine the best electric guitar that fits your needs. Afterward, it is important to select the guitar that has the best components to give you the highest quality of sound. The color does not matter too much but the next most important factor to think about is certainly the wood type used to build the electric guitar. Picking the right type of wood is going to more or less, create better or worse sound.
Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).
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Breedlove Guitars was established in 1990 by luthiers Larry Breedlove and Steve Henderson, while working at Taylor Guitars. After moving to Oregon, Breedlove and Henderson began specializing in custom, fingerstyle six and twelve string guitars. In 1991 the first Breedlove guitar model appeared, after experiments with the JLD bridge truss system and various bracing techniques. Around 1994, Larry’s brother, Kim Breedlove, joined Larry and Steve as a master craftsman. Breedlove strives to be environmentally conscious, and is “dedicated to selecting alternatives to endangered rainforest woods.”[1] Breedlove has since expanded to include mandolins and ukuleles.

When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.


I agree with play with effects if you want to, they're a lot of fun. I do think playing with distortion and practicing with it on is a good idea. I don't think it's a good idea to practice with distortion all the time. It will mask a lot of mistakes and imperfections in your technique. If you can play something in a clean tone perfectly, it will sound that much better when you add effects. – Tony May 3 '13 at 20:09
Founded by the American Orville Gibson in 1902, Gibson is without a doubt the other legendary electric guitar brand. Their most famous model holds the name of the very popular guitarist Les Paul, who collaborated with Ted McCarty in its design back in the 1950's. Unlike the Telecaster and Stratocaster, the Les Paul boasts a mahogany body, a set mahogany neck, a rosewood fingerboard, and a maple top. Among the many Les Paul players we find Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin:
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930’s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950’s to eliminate the “hum noises” resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pickup is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.
The flanging effect is created by mixing two identical signals together while delaying the second signal by a small and gradually changing period of time. This delay is often no longer than 20 milliseconds. A simple way of thinking about the differences between phasers and flangers is that phasers work by affecting the frequencies with a filter, while a flanger affects frequencies with a time-delay.
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In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.
Modulation, in general electronics, means the altering of signal strength. In audio devices, modulation is a control feature that varies the strength of some effect over time to alter tonal properties. Some modulation effects mix ("modulate") an instrument's audio signal with a signal generated by the effect called a carrier wave.[70] Other modulation effects split an instrument's audio signal in two, altering one portion of the signal and mixing it with the unaltered portion.[71]
Serious quality, 20 foot Guitar / Instrument connection cable. I have sold these for years. They come with a lifetime warranty, that is very rarely needed! Double  (redundant) 20 gauge, center conductors almost makes impossible ever having one go "dead" in the middle of a show! 100% Braided copper shield (not spiral wrapped like most cheaper cables) for silent / noise free operation (means less chance of picking up a radio station or wireless mic during your performance). Super-quality, Neutrik, all metal 280, 1/4" ends / plugs that are shrink wrapped for extra strain relief. The internals are hot-glued between to reduce internal flexion for even greater longevity. Built by the largest manufactured cable company in the US. Very rugged and durable, yet flexible jacket. These are not the cheap cables, nor are they built like most cables. Cheaply!
X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.
However, these two companies were not always in as direct competition as might be assumed; yes they both made guitars, basses and amplifiers, but both tended to play to their strengths; Gibson's expertise was it's luthierie; they stuck to high end electric-acoustics, semi-acoustics and skillfully made solid bodies, whilst Fender excelled at electronics; they made amplifiers and easily built solid body basses and guitars.
I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
Treadle-based volume pedals are used by electric instrument players (guitar, bass, keyboards) to adjust the volume of their instrument with one foot while their hands are being used to play their instrument. Treadle-style volume pedals are often also used to create swelling effects by removing the attack of a note or chord, as popularised by pedal steel guitar players. This enables electric guitar and pedal steel players to imitate the soft swelling sound that an orchestra string section can produce, in which a note or chord starts very softly and then grows in volume. Treadle-based volume pedals do not usually have batteries or require external power. Volume effects: Electro-Harmonix LPB-1, Fender Volume Pedal, MXR Micro Amp, Ernie Ball Volume Pedal.

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The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.

Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.


Tonality is an important consideration for many musical instruments, and that’s especially true when it comes to acoustic guitars. The strings, fretboard, sound holes, and body of a guitar all play a role in how the guitar will sound to an audience. The distance between the strings and the fretboard (called the “action”) can also affect sound quality.
Next in line after pitch shift/harmonizer and envelope follower effects are pedals that directly interact with the pickups’ output levels, such as vintage fuzz, treble booster and Octavia/fuzz octave pedals. As with the dynamic filter pedals, placing any other effects that compress the signal in front of these pedals will limit their overall performance.
Flanger – a time-based effect likened to the sound of an aeroplane taking off and landing. The “whooshing”effect is created by feeding the output of the guitar tone back in on itself with a very short delay (usually less than 20 milliseconds) causing comb filtering (boosts and cuts along the frequency range). The delay time is then varied which causes the comb filter to move up and down the frequency range.
Optocoupling Compressor using a LED and a LDR. Similar to Colorsound Supa Sustain or DOD 280. As others have mentioned, instructions are a single photocopied sheet showing component layout. There's no mention that you'll need a piece of heat shrink to fab up your optocoupler. If you have some experience you can figure it out. Wire was not supplied.
Kaman began producing guitars in 1966, and Charles went on the road to promote his new creation. His first stop was a visit to his old stomping grounds, Washington, D.C., where he showed his guitar to jazz guitar great Charlie Byrd. Byrd was impressed and felt the guitar – which was quite loud – had considerable potential. He later remarked that the guitar “deserved an ovation,” thus providing the guitars with a name.
Most Gibson guitars feature two humbucking pickups, giving them a very full, clean sound. They are very simple in design, and easy to use with a focus on quality. Maintenance is also easy with Gibsons. Their bridge style places the strings closer together than the likes of Fender or Ibanez guitars, making them slightly different to play. While there is slightly less room for error in finger placement, the strings’ proximity makes them a better fit for small hands and for instrumentalists who need to rapidly navigate the fretboard.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.

Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States
In 1950 and 1951, electronics and instrument amplifier maker Leo Fender through his company, designed the first commercially successful solid-body electric guitar with a single magnetic pickup, which was initially named the "Esquire". The two-pickup version of the Esquire was called the "Broadcaster". The bolt-on neck was consistent with Leo Fender's belief that the instrument design should be modular to allow cost-effective and consistent manufacture and assembly, as well as simple repair or replacement. The Broadcaster name was changed to Telecaster because of a legal dispute over the name.
Fender Pro Series Stratocaster and Telecaster Case   New from$119.99In Stockor 4 payments of $30 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone E519 Hardshell Case for 335-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Hardshell Case for Les Paul-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Fender Deluxe Molded Case for Stratocaster or Telecaster   New from$149.99In Stockor 4 payments of $37.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Cases
All of the hardware is gold on this model, and while it’s stock Epiphone stuff rather than licensed equipment, it’s of good quality, and we don’t expect it to be difficult to keep in tune. The eSonic preamp and NanoFlex pickup system are both excellent and really help the guitar to come alive. In terms of looks, there are no particularly notable features, but the combo of gold hardware and florentine cutaway make for an attractive design.
In his early days, Jimmy James, as he was then known, played in rhythm sections, backing artists like Little Richard, B.B. King and Ike and Tina Turner. It isn’t until 1966, when he moved to London and formed the Experience, that Jimi Hendrix was able to cut loose and start getting the attention he deserved for his magnificent guitar work. Alarmingly, Hendrix was virtually unknown in the U.S. until he played at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—the legendary performance in which he doused his Fender Stratocaster with lighter fluid and set it on fire.

Squier Affinity Telecaster: The Tele features the same tonewoods as the Strat, with a slightly different single-cutaway body style. It also has two pickups instead of three, and a fixed bridge. Single-coil pickups have a thinner sound compared to humbuckers, and it case of the Telcaster they create the signature twang that put the guitar on the map.
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A passive pickup doesn’t produce a very strong signal, which can result in a small amount of volume and an anemic tone. However, the signal can either be boosted at the p.a., your amp, or the most versatile option' via an Acoustic Preamp. Active pickups don’t require any external technology to boost, though they do require a battery, but some people still use acoustic preamps for the tone shaping and DI benefits..
The solid state amp isn’t really new either, but it only came into its own following William Shockley’s world-changing invention, the transistor. Its use for the audio circuitry allows the amp to be more adaptable and easier to tune, but despite innovations in recent years, the overdrive of solid state amps isn’t yet on par with what a tube can offer, and only a few manufacturers can boast of products that come close to sounding as clean as a tube amp.
This workshop includes: lecture, demonstration and hands on experience in advanced guitar electronics.  Students will study alternate guitar wiring schemes demonstrated by instructor Scott Walker, and stereo wiring and Onboard Effects loop options will also be covered.  This class will focus on signal paths, diagrams, and component selection, in passive and active circuits.  Students will learn about basic preamp design.
The Supro brand name was introduced by the National-Dobro Corporation to sell its less expensive electric instruments. The first Supro Spanish and Hawaiian guitars appeared in 1936, and the brand would thrive until the bankruptcy of Valco in 1968. (The modern Supro line of amps bears no relationship to the original brand name). By the end of the 1930s, a pattern was established that would last for the next 30 years: Supro guitars and amps would generally be more affordable than their closest National counterparts, but built to similar quality and sometimes incorporating features not found in any National. Supro instruments were sold through a much less exclusive network of dealers than National, and as a result they have acquired a name recognition that surpasses their “superior” siblings.
Epiphone Zakk Wylde Les Paul Custom Plus Bullseye Solidbody Electric Guitar at a Glance: Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Totally solid mahogany body and hard maple neck deliver freakish sustain Premium hardware put this Les Paul in a class all of its own Loaded with Zakk's blazing-hot custom EMG active humbuckers Turn up the heat with a pair of the most outrageously amp ...

Steve is the best! He does great work and loves talking about all kinds of guitars. I brought my Squier Affinity Stratocaster to him for a setup and a pickup replacement job, and I learned more about Stratocasters from him than I ever would have expected. I will definitely be a repeat customer! From what I've seen, he treats all of his customers' guitars, from my Squier to an Eric Clapton signature Strat, with the same level of respect and quality of work.


The Epiphone DR-100 acoustic guitar definitely falls under the category of “entry-level” or “student” instrument, but sound quality has not been sacrificed for the sake of a lower price point. Many guitar instructors urge their students to invest in this model because of its resonant mahogany components. There can be some buzzing because of its lower action, but beginners will have a better learning experience because of the improved tonality. Epiphone is a strong name in guitars, and considering the low price, the DR-100 is a good buy. We recommend it for the mahogany alone, but the tone quality is also appropriate – and perhaps even better than it should be – for the price.
SHAPING THE BODY This is totaly up to you. You can carve down the body however you want. For my project I chose to carve down the body as close to the way the guitar I was modeling it after was. I used a verity of different sanders. I used a belt sander for the arm contour on the top back of the guitar, a dremmel tool with a sanding attachment for the small carve down under the neck, a 6" sanding disk attachment on my drill for the body contour on the back of the guitar, and a Black and Decker mouse sander for the neck area and smoothe down of all the other areas that had previously been carved. One rule of thumb is to only sand with a 220 grit when carving the body down. This will prevent any deep scratches any lower grit will cause. Don't use any electric sander on the falt parts of the guitar either, like the top or the back. Use a 220 grit paper with a sanding block to smooth out those areas. You can also run a slightly dampened cloth along the surface of the body and let dry before the final hand sanding. This will raise the small grains in the wood so they can be cut by the paper easier. Sand in the direction of the grain.
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.

It doesn't even seem to matter which kind of Guitar amp you have or when plugged into any PA system. This guitar is a keeper. it comes with Godin Nickel Strings which is why unplugged it may sound too tinny to some ears, but after changing to Elixer Acoustic Strings, it sounds much better unplugged and really shows off plugged in. It now can give my Acoustic six strings a real run for my attention. At gigs and open mics, people come up and ask,,,what the Heck is this Bruce? Looks and sounds amazing. My only wish is that it had the same Pick-up system as on my A6 Ultra, two separate Pick Ups and Controls and two 1/4 in outputs.
John Mayer and Frusciante are very talented guitarists, but to include them at the expense of legends like Clapton, Duane Allman, Neil Young, The Edge, Brian May, George Harrison…that's unforgivable. I'll admit that Jack White needs more time to prove himself too, but of all the recent guitarists listed, he is the one with the most vision and confidence in his ideas. He is his generation's Jimmy Page.
As someone else mentioned, it depends if this will just be a practice amp, or if it will be used to jam with others. Personally, I think a beginner should just get a small practice amp, but a good one. The reason is that you don't yet know what you will want tone-wise out of a gigging/jamming amp yet. So just get the best solid state modeling amp you can afford and worry about a bigger amp later.
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!

SOLD OUT: ASK we may have another in stock Here we have a wonderful example of the Alvarez answer to the classic Martin 000-18 now famously linked to the Eric Clapton version from Martin om guitar today. Imported to the US by Saint Lewis Music 36 years ago. This fine example of the Alvarez 5014 is in excellent vintage condition you will not believe that she is over 36 years old when you see this in person you will realize it has been amazingly well cared for these past 3.6 decades. Its fit and finish is excellent as is its play action / neck angle ... this guitar is a pleasure to play and is truly EASY on the eyes... The neck is 1-11/16" at the nut and very comfortable to play with very little visible play wear to fingerboard or frets one will notice that this example is WELL above average condition for this age of guitar its really rare to see. Its beautiful SITKA SPRUCE top is solid and the back and sides are excellent grade Mahogany as is the neck please refer to the pics ... with nice details like its herringbone rosette, celluloid tortis pick guard, exotic Brazilian Coral Rosewood headstock overlay this guitar is more fancy than the other 5014's we have had and is in near mint vintage condition. The woods are well aged and the tone and volume has nicely opened up and aged like fine wine it takes time... a lot of guitar for this kind of price. Crafted in Japan over 36 years ago and kept in Amazing condition all these years just for you... Nicely set up with a NEW Martin Bone Nut & compensated bone saddle here at JVGUITARS. get this gem before she's gone! questions let me know... jvguitars@gmail.com .
Wherever you purchase your first guitar from, make sure to take it to a local professional or friend with some experience and ask them to set it up for you. They may charge you a few dollars, but it’ll be worth it to have fresh strings, a good action, and correct tuning. If possible, ask them if you can watch how they set it up, so next time you can try it yourself.
Smaller speaker cabinets with one, two, or four speakers, are more commonly used than the 8x10", because while the 8x10" cabinet is able to produce huge volume and powerful bass tone, the cabinets are very heavy and hard to transport. The 2x10" and 4x10" designs are popular for bassists who need less stage volume and an easier-to-transport cabinet to take to rehearsals and gigs. Some bassists own two or more smaller cabinets, such as two 4x10" cabinets. This way, a bassist playing a stadium concert on one day can bring both of her 4x10" cabs, but then if she is playing a nightclub show the next day, or going to rehearsal, she only needs to bring one 4x10" cab.
In 1971 Larrivee began adding inlay designs to their guitars and in 1977 inlays became a standard for their guitars. Beginning in 1978 their inlay designs took on a more romantic style. Since 1979 all engravings were designed by Wendy Larrivee except for a 1998 inlay called the “Joker.” In 2007 Larrivée began using laser engraving for their inlays.
From a perfectionist/engineering standpoint, there is a lot wrong with this circuit. The controls are complexly interactive. There is no really flat setting, as there is a residual midrange scoop unless the Treble and Bass controls are fully down. The action of the Bass control is very uneven for normal taper controls. While the Mid control appears to affect only the mids, it is actually a form of volume control that affects all frequencies, but is the only control that also affects mids. Although it has several imperfections, this tone stack actually helps some of the quirks of guitar, so it works well.
Possessing great look and feel, the LyxPro, the amp is small and would work best for headphone, something that is normal with beginner instrument. It also features a digital clip-on tuner that is so perfect for tuning the 6 strings that are designed on the rosewood fretboard. The Canadian maple neck also compliments the rosewood fingerboard and the overall solid wood body finishes for greater sound quality.
There was a second single-cutaway version, also called the TRG-1, with a thick waist and vaguely tubby Tele shape. It had a different grill shape and a slightly more rounded version of the Bizarro Strat head, but otherwise it was the same. There was also a version of the double-cutaway guitar with a vibrato. This was a small, metal-covered tailpiece with three springs in the housing and a handle that screwed into a hole in the cover.

Last fall, Ubisoft released a new version. But Rocksmith 2014 is considered a replacement rather than an update: The company is trying to rebrand the franchise not as a game but as a teaching tool. The box bears a fat label proclaiming "The fastest way to learn guitar," and Ubisoft launched an ad campaign promising that Rocksmith 2014 could teach prospective shredders to play guitar or bass in just 60 days.
In 1967, McCartney gave his 4001 a psychedelic paint job, as seen in the promo film for Hello Goodbye, and in the Magical Mystery Tour film.[7] A year or so later the finish was sanded off; a second over-zealous sanding in the early 1970s removed the “points” of the bass’ cutaways. McCartney predominantly used the Rickenbacker bass during his time with Wings, until the late 1970s.
Beyond those generalities, replicating a standard formula for the be-all-end-all tone isn’t possible. Why? Because some people will genuinely pass on a ’59 Les Paul and Marshall stack combination—they might prefer what sounds like a vibraphone under water. Sometimes, a certain “it” factor just grabs musicians and won’t let them go. Waara explains that even in a business as technologically advanced and specialized as Line 6’s tone research, “There’s no escaping that we emotionally say ’Man, that just sounds cool.’ ” Frequently, part of that “cool” factor is imprinted on our brains as a result of a component that we often overlook.
Since we have already covered amp modeling software, this time we will focus on software that provides quality guitar effects. These popular software effects applications will get you as close as technologically possible to your favorite stomp box and rack mount effects - minus the bulk, weight and the hassle. Note that certain packages excel in specific effect types, so do check out your favorite effect types via the demos before you decide on which is your top pick. We have included both paid and free guitar effects software for you to sink your teeth, and mouse, into.
All that being said the best guitar is the one that allows you to express yourself to the best of your ability and makes you feel good doing so. If you need a custom shop Les Paul to do it then by all means go for it. If a Godin or Ibanez or Dean or Jackson is the one for you who are we to tell anyone they are wrong. Personally I think the best guitarists on the planet play Telecasters! :-)
This general tip applies to all so-called temporal effects. Anything that messes with the timing of the signal should come last. If you were to put reverb before distortion, which is often one of the first effects in a chain, that distortion would be applied to both the original signal and all of the echoes. In other words, you’d get a mess. Naturally, this isn’t a rule written in stone. There are always exceptions. However, it is best to start with reverb at the end as this is the most neutral position.
He was barely known for decades after his 1938 death. But the 29 songs Robert Johnson recorded in 1936 and 1937 became holy writ to rock guitarists from Clapton to Dylan. They were dazzled by the way he made a guitar sound like an ensemble – slide and rhythm parts yelping in dialogue, riffs emerging from the mist. Dylan remembered playing King of the Delta Blues Singers, the 1961 LP that rescued Johnson from obscurity: "The vibrations from the loudspeaker made my hair stand up. The stabbing sounds… could almost break a window."

Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.
Along with these effects are 10 guitars: Strat Marshall, Valve ODX, Garcia Guitar, Bleeding Guitar, Blues Guitar, Power Guitar, Mondo Guitar, Synth Guitar, Clean Guitar, and Electric Sitar. The sound of each somewhat matches the guitar it’s supposed to be, but more importantly, there is a notable change in tone with each and since it’s free, I was happy just to have that.

Johnny Thunders’ snot-nosed New York take on Keith Richards’ cool is one of the pillars on which punk rock was built. An Italian-American guy (birth name John Anthony Genzale Jr.) from Queens, he was born a little too late to be part of the Sixties rock explosion. But the bands of that era were his influences, and he put his own spin on them in the early Seventies as the New York Dolls came together with Thunders on lead guitar.


Those items considered -- performance notation and computational capacity for emulation of stringed instrument sounds otherwise reinforced by the same speaker systems that amplify synthesized sounds -- the other significant factors in the realism matrix involve economics of VST production, listener preferences and, least we forget, performer or producer preferences.


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When you’re starting to become serious about playing the guitar, the question of “what amp should I get” is bound to pop up. There’s quite a deal of variety out there, with many brands and models, and constant innovation adding new features to choose between with each passing year. It’s enough to baffle even an intermediate player, let alone a rookie who’s just getting started. To ensure that you get the right amplifier for your needs, you’ll first need to know a bit about how the amp’s specifications translate to real life.
Although originally founded in California in 1979 as a company that made replacement parts for guitars, Schecter now produce many models of their own – both mass-produced and custom shop guitars. Like the others on this list, Schecter provide guitars for some big names and have a range of signature models including the guitars of Dan Donegan, Keith Merrow, and Jeff Loomis.
“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.
The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
During the late 1930s and through the 1940s—the heyday of big band jazz and swing music—the guitar was an important rhythm section instrument. Some guitarists, such as Freddie Green of Count Basie’s band, developed a guitar-specific style of accompaniment. Few of the big bands, however, featured amplified guitar solos, which were done instead in the small combo context. The most important jazz guitar soloists of this period included the Manouche virtuoso Django Reinhardt, Oscar Moore who was featured with Nat “King” Cole’s trio, and Charlie Christian of Benny Goodman's band and sextet, who was a major influence despite his early death at 25.
Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitar players, who wanted to play single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Les Paul, Lonnie Johnson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, T-Bone Walker, and Charlie Christian. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in popular music.[1] It has evolved into an instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles in genres ranging from pop and rock to country music, blues and jazz. It served as a major component in the development of electric blues, rock and roll, rock music, heavy metal music and many other genres of music.
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