That’s not to say you need a specific guitar for each style — if you want a larger range of tones for different genres, a solid-body guitar is a good bet. There are also plenty of guitars on the market that include both humbucker and single coil pickups, thus allowing for even more sound options. Still seem too complex for you? If you look to the pros you’ll see that Gibson’s Les Paul and Fender’s Stratocaster have been used over and over again by recording artists. It’s not a coincidence: they’re capable of a lot of versatility. Yes, they differ from each other in tone, but with the right additional gear, you can replicate a ton of sounds.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
Rotary – A modelling effect that recreates the sound of a rotary cabinet amplifier. A rotary cabinet amplifier was originally designed for electric organs as a way to emulate the wobbling sound of a pipe organ by rotating a speaker within its cabinet. However, the effect soon became popular with guitarists as a type of modulation effect. The RT-20 rotary pedal has two speeds, fast and slow. You can control the speed of rotation and the rise time, which is the amount of time it takes to switch between the fast and slow speeds.
I have a Mahar bass, the one with the epic (haha) zebra stripes. My wife won it at the state fair in Puyallup throwing balloons or something. She thought it would be cute to have it in my collection. I'm a drummer, but I don't want to miss out on the fun of collecting guitars, why should guitarists have all the fun? Anyway, about the Mahar guitar... it's actually not bad! I pick it up and play it once in a while just for giggles, and have had bass players jam on it. They agree. For throwing some balloons, it's a bargain! Plug it into a decent rig and it doesn't sound bad either. I suppose if you are a virtuoso it would be notable if you had issues with it, but for fun and games it really is better than a toy, like First Act or some junk like that. If you are a beginner, this would be ideal. It plays nicely, and sounds as good as your rig can make it sound. Thumbs up!

Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
Ibanez RG20061, also known as the RGT220A CAH, is an RG series Prestige limited edition guitar model specially created for the 2006 Winter NAMM Show. It based on the RGT220A, but stained brown, although claimed to be barbecued to a chocolaty brown color. Features include a neck through body construction, ash body wings, Dimarzio IBZ pickups and the Edge Pro tremolo. Only 153 Made 8/10 Condition
The guitar's contribution to the sound comes from its mechanical construction, including the type of wood used, and the pickup system fitted. The hugely popular Fender Stratocaster uses simple single-coil pickups, which tend to give it a bright, articulate sound that doesn't take up too much room in a mix. Guitars with humbucking pickups, on the other hand, tend to have a thicker, more solid sound that can overpower other guitar parts or other mid-range instrument sounds. Tonal qualities aside, humbuckers by their very nature are designed to reject electromagnetic interference, while single-coil pickups are very susceptible to it. Specialist stacked humbuckers, such as those made by Kinman, Dimarzio, Fender and others, are available for use where something close to the original tonality is desired but without the noise problems, and for serious studio work these are a good option. Note that CRT computer monitors emit a lot of electromagnetic radiation from their scan coils, so a flat-screen LCD display is always an advantage if you need to record guitar into a computer system.
Do you know what does custom shop means? Like custom shop cars and motorcycle, furniture. With Top Guitars it pertains to woodworking, most of us would define a custom shop as one dealing with made-to-order goods with certain specifications. Someone comes into my realm with a certain vision. That vision may be on a set of architectural prints or still locked in their brain waiting for extraction. In either case, it’s a vision or plan that they have, not me.

The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.


The body of the guitar is usually made of wood; different types of woods are used by different manufacturers, and there is ongoing debate concerning which is best. Typical woods include maple, mahogany, swamp ash and alder for quality guitars, and plywood or pine for cheaper, less durable guitars. While the type of wood used in the solid body of an electric guitar will noticeably affect the sound it produces, the quality of the sound is most affected by the pickups which convert the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, as well as the amplifier that's used to shape and model such signal. We could go on and on dissecting the technical aspects of electric guitars, and yet never get close to that which makes that music unique: it's soul. That's something that can be clearly felt and experienced by players and listeners alike, but which all the while can hardly be put into words. Enjoy the electric guitar music loops!
Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.

This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.


Larrivee is much 'closer to home' and have been operating out of California since 2011. Although you can buy their instruments from Guitar Center and Amazon, and I personally like what I've read about their approach to lutherie, they didn't quite score high enough to make the final cut due to the method I used having a bit of a bias toward wide availability - I may rethink the approach if I revisit this topic.
Many web surfers contact me looking for a wiring diagram for an unusual / no name / import guitar after having no luck online. And sometimes you aren't going to find it, however, if you have an electric guitar that is similar to lets say a Strat ... it has 3 single coil pickups (and they are 2 wire pickups), one 5 way switch, 2 tone pots and 1 volume pot then you can simply use a Strat wiring diagram. It's often easiest to think of the instrument in terms of components not brand.
This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.
Before we begin, it should be pointed out that some time ago Guitar Player presented the history of Teisco, based on information painstakingly translated from a Japanese article penned by Mr. Hiroyuki Noguchi of Japan’s Rittor Music, editor of the Guitar Graphic book series. Unfortunately, the article used for reference was an older piece which has subsequently been totally revised and corrected by Mr. Noguchi based on later interviews with principals in the Teisco company. Some of the chronology in the GP story is inaccurate. What follows here is the latest and most accurate information on Teisco (in regards to company history), confirmed in repeated direct communications with Mr. Noguchi in Japan. This information also supersedes some incorrect facts in my own essay on Teisco Del Rey Spectrum 5 guitars in the first issue of Vintage Guitar Classics.
Some more advanced models, like the Wampler Latitude Tremolo Deluxe, bring a much more complex set of features, which include choosing the waveform and more. Whether you are looking for a good way to spice up your tone without impacting the nature of your signal, or you are just in need of a great vintage style effect, tremolo is the one to go for.

Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
Gibbons has also twisted more than a few towering tall tales in his time, but his life is so surreal that it’s hard to tell where the truth ends and the trip takes over. His colorful manner of speech, known as “Gibbonics,” has made him one of Guitar World’s favorite interview subjects, especially since his poetic ponderings are loaded with insight, wisdom and a unique sense of humor.
A second common problem we encounter is a poor mechanical connection. When inserting a cord into a jack, the click you feel is the tip of the cord seating against the metal prong on the end of the jack. With use this prong may spread outward and loose a bit of it's tension. A gentle bend of the prong may be just enough to create a solid connection, however, metal fatigue can dictate the need to replace.
Now, there are some basic terms in the electric guitar lingo that you need to be aware of. Below are some of the terms that you need to know before you go out and research about different electric guitars. But if you are musically inept, there are some ways you can compete with the guitar guy. If you learn some points about the electric guitar, such as terms and mechanics of the instrument, you can impress your friends and possibly even will be the guy holding the guitar at your next dinner party.
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]
Simple answer is, if you have money for the higher end of Taylor, buy a Collings. I've been working as a repair tech in a store that stocks Taylor for around 5 years. Went to lutherie school under one of the best guitar builders in the country. I've played dozens of examples from nearly every model range Taylor has to offer, as well as a few of the more limited edition high $$$$ range. I will give credit where it is due, on the USA made models fit and finish is above many other brands.
At Ibanez, there has always been a goal to be anything but traditional. For over half a century, Ibanez has been pushing the world of guitar manufacturing forward, consistently breaking new ground. It's this drive that led them to become one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to make a name for themselves in Europe and North America. With unparalleled commitment to quality, Ibanez Guitars are considered among the upper echelon by musicians of all playing styles around the world. A quick look at some of the musicians who play Ibanez guitars is sure to leave you very impressed. Artists such as Head and Munky of KoRn, Noodles of the Offspring, Mick Thomson of Slipknot, Fletcher Dragge of Pennywise, Steve Vai, and Joe Satriani all trust their sound to Ibanez guitars. Now it's your turn to do the same. Ibanez makes an impressively wide selection of guitars, so you're sure to be able to find one that is perfect for you here. Say, for example, you're a beginner who's looking for a great acoustic guitar? If that's the case, you'll love the JamPack IJV50 Quickstart Dreadnought Acoustic Guitar Pack. This set features everything you need to get started, including a beautiful dreadnought, as well as an electric tuner, a gig bag, a guitar strap, and an accessory pouch. If you'd rather a versatile acoustic-electric, you'll love an option such as the V70CE Acoustic-Electric Guitar. This guitar is highlighted by its outstanding playability and fantastic tone. With an incredible response and dynamic range, this guitar is perfectly suited for small clubs and larger venues alike. Of course, if all you want to do is plug in and pump up the volume, you're going to want to check out the JS1200 Joe Satriani Signature Guitar. This candy apple dream is built with top-tier electronics and sleek overall construction. With a resonant tone an impressive sustain (thanks, in part, to its DiMarzio humbuckers), this guitar is a progressive player's dream. Regardless of your playing style, there's an Ibanez here with your name on it that is ready to be played. With expertise that is second to none, Ibanez is a name you can trust in the music world.
The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.
Rosewood is another commonly used kind of wood when it comes to the fabrication of guitars. Rosewood is typically dense, a reason why it is used when constructing a guitar’s fretboard. Although it can be employed in the making of guitar bodies, the resulting units are known for being a little heavier than the alternatives. These guitars can be either brown or blonde.
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The Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar is a beauty on it’s own. Back in the days the jaguar was used for country music, early rock ‘n roll and jazz, but eventually it has found it’s way onto the stage of surf, funk, alternative, grunge and rock music. The guitar features include a basswood body, maple neck, circuit selector and tone circuit switches, pickup on/off switches, skirted black control knobs (lead circuit) and black disc knobs (rhythm circuit), vintage-style bridge and non-locking floating vibrato with tremolo arm, vintage-style chrome tuners and chrome hardware. A real good guitar for the price. If you want decent and different, this is it!
This full-sized, 22-fret, single cutaway electric guitar features two single-coil pickups and is capable of producing a wide range of tones. With the bridge pickup, you can get that bright, rich, cutting tone known as the country "twang" made famous by artists such as Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings. With the neck pickup you get a warmer, mellow, bluesy tone, such as that of Albert Collins or Muddy Waters. Additionally, rock musicians as diverse as Syd Barrett, Chrissy Hynde, and Keith Richards have found a way to make their own distinctive sound using this style of guitar.

You know you’re getting great guitar from the outset, because it’s based on Gibson’s legendary Dove model, which has been sued for decades now by distinguished guitarists in numerous genres, including the likes of Elvis himself. It really does look the part, with the dove design on the fretboard and pickguard, and numerous other nice little touches.
But narrower frets were also used on Gibson Les Pauls prior to 1959, so their characteristics apply to these guitars as well. Does a ’57 goldtop with PAFs sound thin or whimpy thanks to its narrow fret wire? Not likely, largely because so many other factors also affect its tone—body woods, set-neck construction, scale length, pickups— and the impact of narrow-gauge frets doesn’t outweigh any of them. It does, however, influence the overall sonic stew of guitars of that era, which is always the product of many different ingredients.

My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!

Most people think of Roy Orbison as the super-smooth crooner who sang songs like “Crying,” “In Dreams” and “Only the Lonely.” But Orbison was also a wicked guitar player, who ripped out several impressive solos on early Sun Records singles like “Ooby Dooby.” In fact, Sun owner Sam Phillips was more impressed with Orbison’s guitar playing than his singing during the early days of the rocker’s career.
In terms of precedent, one of the best known users of a parlour acoustic is Ian Anderson, frontman of eccentric British prog-rockers Jethro Tull. Here the smaller sized guitar enabled Mr Anderson to sling it off his shoulders, often mid song, to embark on a flute solo or child-scaring facial contortion marathon.  So, if that’s your goal, a parlour is the guitar for you.
Mastering guitars isn’t a piece of cake, mainly if you are a greenhorn. You get lost in the labyrinth of types of guitars, each having different size, shapes, and price values. Most of these especially hunt your wallet, burdening down your pockets with hefty price tags. As an amateur, you find no other option but to pay the said amount hoping to get something useful. Indeed, the best electric guitar brands are usually inclined towards the more pricey side. If you have background knowledge about the best brands, who knows you may get your desired guitar in an affordable range. Through this article, you will learn what different types of guitar brands are available in the market.

For an overdrive pedal, turn your attention to the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Drive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal. Compact yet versatile, this pedal is great for anyone who likes a raw vintage-like overdrive, and it even makes a great boost pedal. Now, if it's a distortion pedal that you're after, take a closer look at the Electro-Harmonix Classics USA Big Muff Pi Distortion/Sustainer Guitar Effects Pedal. The Big Muff Pi is a legendary pedal in itself, and this reissue has 3 controls that let you dial in the finest harmonic distortion/sustain ever produced. From warm bass to crisp treble, you'll be blown away by what this distortion pedal can do for your hard-rocking guitar performance.
I have a Lyle Acoustic Guitar Model 690 purchased about 1966 or 67. It appears to be in near brand new condition as I've rarely played it and it has been stored in a felt lined case its entire life. All the keys still turn, it has steel strings. I'm ready to part with it and want to ask a fair price and not get soaked. Does anyone have any idea what this beautiful instrument is worth?

Eddie is #1, or at least tied with Hendrix, who relies on reputation alone. Bon jovi's guitarist is a joke. For some reason, people (who have no idea what they are talking about) think Bon jovi is better than all of the other 80s bands that have solid guitar players that aren't on the list that are better in many ways, specifically the guitar. (definitely leppard, Guns N' Roses, Ratt, motley crue, etc.) Anyway Eddie Van Halens self taught style is the best that there is. This list is more of a popularity contest, a popularity contest where people who have no idea what they are talking about vote for the band they have heard 1 or 2 songs from. The electric guitar was played by many, for all those who can't get on the radio and name the band that is playing most of the time, better yet the album, shouldn't be voting. But if you can, vote whoever.
If you decide to choose a guitar, amplifier and accessories separately, consider spending more on the guitar than the amplifier. A better guitar will often suit a player’s needs longer, and a less expensive amp will be fine for early practicing sessions. If the player decides to upgrade down the road, often they may only need to upgrade the amplifier and not their entire setup.
This JEM is an entry level version of the 7V we mentioned earlier. While it doesn’t have the same range as the guitar it was inspired by, Ibanez JEMJRWH still brings you a good portion of Steve Vai’s core tone. In a lot of ways, it’s a great substitute for those who are on a tight budget. I compared the two and the playability was almost on the same level.
Cool guitar! And you’re right— most Harmony guitars aren’t worth much, or in other words, they aren’t very collectible. That said, I wonder how many guitarists reading this column started out learning to play on a Harmony. There are hundreds of thousands of Harmony guitars out there, and though these are mostly entry-level instruments, they’re very much a part of guitar history.
Guitar cables (or jack leads as they are sometimes called) are a relatively inexpensive part of any setup compared to the instruments themselves, but as the link between your guitar and amp or recording interface, they are a crucial component. A frayed, broken or otherwise imperfect cable will introduce crackle, buzz and other nasties into your signal chain. Even a bunch of distortion pedals may not disguise it. Before recording, make sure your cables are in good order. If not - replace them!
The guitar output jack typically provides a monaural signal. Many guitars with active electronics use a jack with an extra contact normally used for stereo. These guitars use the extra contact to break the ground connection to the on-board battery to preserve battery life when the guitar is unplugged. These guitars require a mono plug to close the internal switch and connect the battery to ground. Standard guitar cables use a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) mono plug. These have a tip and sleeve configuration referred to as a TS phone connector. The voltage is usually around 1 to 9 millivolts.
The Effect: Loop pedals essentially operate as recorders that have the ability to infinitely spin the recorded bits and possibly alternate them in a variety of ways. The main function of any looper is to be able to record a musical part, and then automatically put it on loop until ordered not to do so anymore. Depending on the complexity of the pedal, loopers can offer multiple layers, overdubs, as well as options of recording more than a single instrument. They range from simple single-switch stompboxes all the way to powerhouse loop workstations. Check out our full reviews to see which one is your perfect match. If you are looking for the quick winner, the Boss RC 3 is a great contender.
The Basic Principles: A Valve is an extension of the light bulb. Theoretically inside the valve is a vacuum. The hot filament is called ‘Cathode’ (Let’s not forget a T.V. is a’ Cathode ray tube’ ). Around the outside of the Cathode is a cylindrical metal tube called ‘Anode’. When a +Voltage is placed on the Anode and a -Voltage placed on the Cathode, a large current can flow between them, but not the other way around.

Before we get into the details, it should probably be noted that building a solidbody electric guitar is a much less challenging project than building a semi- or fully hollowbody guitar. Building the latter types from scratch involves sophisticated woodworking skills and tools that will be beyond the reach of all but the most ambitious beginners. And as we note below, designs with bolt-on necks versus set necks are more beginner-friendly.
Perhaps the most dramatic of ambient mic techniques, though, comes courtesy of Chris Tsangarides. His 'Vortex' involves using studio screens to build 30-foot-long walls along each side of the guitar cabinet, creating a flare shape (apparently inspired by the shape of a bass bin). Within this flare, he places a close condenser mic and typically another couple of condenser mics with different distant positionings, perhaps at 15 and 30 feet away. "I walk around while the guy's playing and find a sweet spot and put the mic there", says Chris.
A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.
And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.
Although originally founded in California in 1979 as a company that made replacement parts for guitars, Schecter now produce many models of their own – both mass-produced and custom shop guitars. Like the others on this list, Schecter provide guitars for some big names and have a range of signature models including the guitars of Dan Donegan, Keith Merrow, and Jeff Loomis.
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
We now know why series wiring attenuates the highs, but why is it louder? Why do you end up with such a beefy, meaty tone? Let’s assume each pickup on your Strat puts out 100 x of power. When wiring two pickups in parallel, each pickup loses 3/4 of its output when combined with the other. This drops each pickup’s output to 25 x, instead of 100 x. Together, you get a total of 50 x (25 x + 25 x). This power drop is why any dual-pickup combination on your Strat doesn’t sound as loud as a single pickup.
Let’s take a closer look at what’s known as the switching matrix. A switch’s poles are like separate channels that aren’t connected until you add a jumper wire between them. A SPST or SPDT switch has only one of these channels, while a DPDT switch has two. Likewise, 3PDT and 4PDT switches have three and four channels, respectively. A switch’s throws are simply the different sides of a switch. For example, a DPDT on/on switch has two channels (poles) with three lugs on each channel. Engaging the switch turns on one side or the other. When one signal is turned on, the other is turned off.
Just in early Red Lable Nippon Gakki FG150 in excellent Vintage Condition CLEAN!.............. rare to find one pretty, then to be straight, then sound deep and loud like this one sounds but to have great action too its intonation is dead on upgraded nut & saddle & strings to Martin Marquis 80/20 - 12s This is a pleasure to play with wonderful tone its like 45 years old and the tone woods always sounded great but even better now its the one!!!... serious collectors guitar and is Recording worthy... shes somthing special. to buy it contact Joe: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
A band can sound good with conventional amps and PA gear. But it takes musicians who are sensitive to each other as well as the overall sound of the band. It takes a skilled soundperson who has the gear (and knows how to use it) and enough time to get a proper soundcheck.  Going direct attempts to solve these problems. Adding IEMs (In Ear Monitors) solves more. Yes, you don’t have amps blaring behind you. No, you don’t look like Jimi at Woodstock. Yes, you have to get used to the way things sound and learn how to perform without amps. 
I've only been playing guitar for 3 years but it seems like no matter what I do no matter what pedal I use I just can't get that real band sound like the heavy rock bands do on recording but when I tried a marshall that all went away. Marshall has the perfect distorted sound (overdrive) and for the price ha you just can't beat it. I'm getting a mg100fx half stack and it all totals out to only $400 plus this amp can get so loud you can play in a bar or club with only half volume
Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
There aren’t a lot of professional reviews of inexpensive amps, but James at Guitar Verdict raved about the Champion 20, saying, “For an amp of this price, the Fender Champion 20 watt offers a massive amount of value,” and calling it “a hard to beat offering.” At last count it had earned an average of 4.6 out of 5 stars in 595 Amazon user reviews and earned an A for review integrity from FakeSpot.
These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.
Place one mic on each speaker at the same distance and orientation, and check the pair for phase cancellation by panning them to the same spot and listening in mono. The minute differences between the speakers, mics, and mic positions, combined with double-tracking, creates a monstrous presence when the tracks are hard-panned in the mix, and opens up a world of possibilities for separate EQ and effects processing. If you don't need the guitar to dominate the mix, you also can sum these mono-compatible tracks together to a single pan position for a noticeably bigger sound.
When you have a setup that you like, you can easily save it as a track preset — or, better still, create multiple track presets for different types of sounds. Cubase can even make a fine host for live performance, should you decide to trade your rack of effects for a svelte laptop that patches directly into the PA system, as you can switch instantly between racks. (I'll cover how to do this at the end of the article.)
In 2003 Fender offered Telecasters with a humbucking/single coil pickup arrangement or two humbucking pickups featuring Enforcer humbucking pickups, and S-1 switching. These models were discontinued in 2007. As of 2008, all American Standard Telecasters came with a redesigned Tele bridge with vintage-style bent steel saddles. In March 2012 the American Standard Telecaster was been updated with Custom Shop pickups (Broadcaster in the bridge, Twisted in the neck); the body is now contoured for reduced weight and more comfort.
After the Beatles 1965 summer tour, Paul McCartney frequently used a left-handed 1964 4001S FG Rickenbacker bass, as its tone was better suited to recording than the lightweight Höfner basses he had used previously. The instrument became popular with other bassists influenced by his highly melodic style, as it produces a clear tone even when played high up the neck, its deep cutaways allowing easy access to the higher frets.

The K-4L (Teisco Del Rey ET-460 Super Deluxe) had four of the large, chunky, single-coil pickups with chrome sides and black center insert revealing six square poles. These were controlled by four sliding on/off switches, plus a 3-position switch for solo, rhythm and super bass sounds, as well as volume and tone. The roller bridge had a spring-loaded muffler/mute.

If you are feeling lucky, you can purchase any one of these guitars online. I personally like to sit in a store and play the actual guitar I’ll be taking home. That way I can see if the action is set too high, how it feels, and most importantly how it sounds. You can without a doubt find a great acoustic guitar for under $500. Don’t rule out the option of buying used. You can find a guitar that retails for $900 for maybe $500 used on sites like craigslist.org or reverb.com.
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Edge III - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Devil's Shadow

The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.
Some bridges have a lock position and at this point should be engaged. Other floating bridges will need to be stabilized by using pieces of wood fitted inside the cavity (accessed from the back of the body) to prevent the tremolo block from moving. Vintage Fender-style tremolo bridges can be stabilized by fully tightening the spring tension screws. Whatever method is used, the bridge must sit as we will want it to when we are done with the set-up procedure- parallel to and nearly flush with the top- so care must be taken at this stage to get the position of the bridge right.
Although the hollow bodies of these guitars create a mellow, naturally voiced tone perfect for jazz, vintage country and other styles that require warmth and clarity, they can also snarl. For proof of the latter, check out Lennon’s performances on “Revolution” and “Cold Turkey.” Too much volume or proximity to the amplifier, however, and hollow bodies can howl with feedback unintentionally. And that’s why the semi-hollow body guitar was invented.

Let’s get it straight. Froo – Shawn – Tey. If you don’t know him, he’s the lead guitarist of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Frusciante is the author of the brilliant chord progression on Under the Bridge, the haunting intro to Californication and the simplistic solo and riff on Otherside. If you’re the casual listener of the Chili Peppers, then you may wonder why John has made it so far up this list. But a tad of a closer look will reveal that his simple catchy riffs are the tip of the ice berg. One can catch a glimpse at his technical skill in the Dani California solo. A bit deeper and you’ll run into Lyon 06.06.06 in one of the B Sides. John takes his influences (Page, Hendrix) and mixes his own nuances into a sound that’s pleasantly different, but melodically having the same effects on you. A track to look out for on his solo work – Ramparts – showcasing four or so guitars layered upon each other in an introspective orchestra.


Echo – There is some crossover between delay pedals and echo pedals, but as a general rule, you can think of echo effects as extended delay effects. It’s a brother of reverb pedals, producing the canyon-like echoing you would naturally hear in a wide-open space. With long enough settings, an echo pedal can even let you harmonize against your own notes as they repeat.
When Bob Dylan described the Band's "wild mercury sound," he was really talking about Robbie Robertson's guitar, as exemplified by his torrid, squawking solo on "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" from their 1966 tour. But by the time the Band were making their own LPs, Robertson had pared down his approach, evolving into a consummate ensemble player. "I wanted to go in the opposite direction," said Robertson, "to do things that were so tasteful and discreet and subtle, like Curtis Mayfield and Steve Cropper… where it was all about the song."

Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, 5-ply top binding with pearloid outer layer, elevated tortoise pickguard with b/w binding, backstripe of two horizontal lines surrounded by two rows of diag lines (like a Style 45), bound ebony fingferboard, style 45 fingerboard snowflake inlays, trapeze tail piece, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, bound peghead, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.


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The Epiphone Broadway is a hollow body archtop guitar that has been in the Epiphone guitar lineup since 1931. The Broadway was initially an acoustic archtop, but after Gibson took over Epiphone in 1957 the “Broadway” designation was given to a new electric archtop. The electric model was reissued in 1997 and continues to be in production, and we’ve selected it for this list of best electric guitars.
 Best Answer:  First, make sure you have new or clean strings that aren't dead. You should hear a metallic harmonic overtone to picked notes particularly on the low E, A, and D wound strings. If your low E sounds in tune but makes a flat dull boww boww boww instead of dang dang dang when you pick change them. Set your amp up for a fairly bright sound clean, playing off the bridge pickup. Make sure the guitar volume knob(s) are rolled all the way on and tones are all the way up, no roll off. If you can't get a nice clear clean sound that doesn't sound distant and muted then you have some issue with the guitar electrics or amp. If you're playing off the neck pickup that's a big muddier right there. The neck pickup is good for clean rhythm playing, jazz, and for a hollow warm tubey sound on single notes but tends to muddy overdriven power chords. Once you have the amp set for a bright clean sound that's not too brassy (if it has a master volume in addition to a gain or channel volume set the gain or volume low for a clean sound and use master for output level, let the RP90 do the effects work, not the amp preamp for now.) bring in the RP90. I'm not familiar with it but try it on a few overdrive and distortion settings. If you've only been an acoustic player high overdrive or distortion "power steering" takes a different play style. 

Far as commercial recordings go, the oldest recording seems to be by the Hawaiian group Noelani Hawaiian Orchestra in 1933, which did four songs featuring the electric lap steel recorded on Victor records. However, the guitarist is unknown. Bob Dunn recorded electric lap steel in 1935, as part of the country swing group Milton Brown and His Musical Brownies. George Barnes recorded "Sweetheart Land" and "It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame" with Big Bill Broonzy in early 1938, followed a couple weeks later by  Eddie Durham with the Kansas City Five. Barnes played conventional guitar, not lap steel, so that's the first recording of a "conventional" electric guitar performance.
So to conclude, you don’t have to spend much money on a beginner/practice amp to have a tremendous amount of fun with it. Be sure to check out MusicGoRound stores near you for amazing deals on used practice/beginner amps. The store employees can help pick out the amp that fits your budget and your needs. Odd are that your practice/beginner amp will wind up becoming an old and dear friend to you over the years. Enjoy every minute with it!

The vast majority of guitars use more than one pickup, and provide a switch that controls which pickup, or combination of pickups, is active at any one time. This article adds one more pickup to our circuit and shows how we can wire up a selector switch. We look at both toggle and blade style switches. This brings us to the point where we now know how to wire up a Telecaster in the standard way.
Electric guitars vary greatly in sound, look and playability. Different designs, quality of craftsmanship, electronics and choice of woods make them sound, look and feel different from one another. It's the luthiers' goal to combine the best of these elements to create the next masterpiece. Our task is seeking and offering the finest tonewoods available to make that goal a reality.

@Dax – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with the pedals in your setup. If the pedals work on their own in front of the amplifier isolated one at a time, this is likely related to a setting or connection with the pedals. Please shoot us an email to support@strymon.net with full details on the amp make and model, the inputs and outputs used on both the amp and each of the pedals, and the setting of the switch on the back of the pedals. Also, include whether this happens on every preset or only certain presets with each pedal.
The modern era of Ibanez guitars began in 1957 [3] and the late 1950s and 1960s Ibanez catalogues [1] show guitars with some wild looking designs [2]. Japanese guitar makers in the 1960s were mostly copying European guitar designs and some of the late 1960s Ibanez designs were similar to Hagström and Eko guitar designs. Hoshino Gakki used the Teisco and FujiGen Gakki guitar factories to manufacture Ibanez guitars after they stopped manufacturing their own guitars in 1966 and after the Teisco guitar factory closed down in 1969/1970 Hoshino Gakki used the FujiGen Gakki guitar factory to make most Ibanez guitars.
Next up, Tolerances. The tolerance refers to the accurate rating of the pots ohm, so if it's a 250k pot, then it will be accurately rated at a tight tolerance of around +/-5% to 250k, a true rating. Some low quality pots can creep wildly away from the ratings, you'd be surprised. I've removed CTS pots from US and MIM Fender guitars for example, that were incredibly inacurate. 250k stamped pots that were not even 200k, and also in other cases past 300k. So, why does that matter? Well if for example we're referring to a single coil equipped guitar like a Stratocaster, they recommended a pot ohm value of 250k in both volume and tone positions. If a lower quality pot states 250k but actually reads much lower, perhaps 200k, or even substantially higher, it could result it a darker or brighter tone respectively, than what would bring out the best in the guitars pickups. Quality pots like the CTS 450 series or TVT I have come to trust, have super tight tolerances, +/- 7% and most cases even tighter +/-5%. This accuracy is worth it, a pickup manufacturer sets out to design a certain model of pickup that will sound it's 'best' (obviously this is subjective), optimal is probably a better word, for a certain pot rating. If you're fitting a harness with tight tolerance, accurately rated pots then chances are you're going to be getting the best from your pickup set. That's the important bit for me.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
You might be wondering: “Why the glossy finish?” Having a gloss finish can mean the difference between your guitar cracking—or not--in extreme temperature changes.Of course, like all Cordobas, there is a truss rod with which you can change the string relief, so you’re not having to press the strings down so hard, making it easier for beginners to learn.

The fit and finish are as amazing as one would expect, and the general aesthetics of the guitars are just awesome to look at. They aren't gaudy or try-hard, but refined and subtle in their expression. Strumming a single cord will tell you all you need to know about the tone quality of this guitar, which is what really matters. It has that Martin twang and a lot of it.
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We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.


If you have a little bit more to spend than what you pay for the Epiphone LP Special II you might want to consider the Epiphone Les Paul 100. It has a mahogany body with a maple top, mahogany neck and rosewood fingerboard. It’s got solid tuners and hardware, a 3-way switch and two tone and volume knobs. It’s slimmer and therefore much lighter than the Gibson Les Paul. The Epiphone LP 100 feels and plays good. It’s a reliable and durable guitar. A great choice for rock and blues!

FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.
Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
But note that guitars in this price range aren’t likely to be without their faults. You will probably need to take them to a local guitar pro for a set-up if buying online, as fret edges may be sharp and the action may be too high or low. Finishes can be a little rough in some places, and you won’t get anything in the way of luxury looks or features – there’s a lot more plastic used in the under $150 range!
One special effect I used quite a lot in analogue studios, but which is surprisingly tricky to implement in a lot of software sequencers, is where you feed the left and right outputs of an auto-pan effect to two different effects processors. With this setup, the outputs of the two effects can then be mixed together to create a variety of different modulation-style treatments. This patch always worked well in a send-return loop with a pair of phasers, especially if you also EQ'd the two returns wildly differently. The same setup used as an insert could do great things with distortion and ring-modulation processors, and if you were feeling really adventurous, you could fiddle with the panning rate in real time while mixing down. Mike Senior

OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.


Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…
I'm unsure if this company existed or not, but since many major electronics manufacturers jumped into the electric guitar market in the 1970s, it seems reasonable that Hitachi could have ventured briefly into guitar production. A seller of the badged guitar "Splender" claims it was made by this company. Yet another seller claims the badge Slendon was made by this company.
The ’37 Hawaiian Guitar in both the Sorkin and Grossman books was basically the same squarish, pear-shaped guitar as in ’36, sans pickguard. It had a polished Ebonoid fingerboard with new parallelogram position markers replacing the old dots. Also, the large, two-part rectangular pickup cover/tail assembly was replaced with a more conventional, modern design. The pickup cover was the new rectangular type with the two pole extensions exposed. Off to the side of its surround was a little square plate on the treble side containing the volume control. The strings attached to a small piece of slotted metal hidden under a rectangular cover or “handrest.” Gone were the control wings. The microphone attachment stuck out the bass side of the guitar. The cost was $35, plus $6 for a case.
But add some effects to the blend and the results can be even more interesting. Keyboard-like tones can be generated by rolling off the tone pots and employing digital delay, expanding the sound of your band without overstuffing the van, and the gentle application of a phase shifter or wah-wah can bring an interesting voice to warm, low tones. Jimi Hendrix’s “Pali Gap” is a classic example of the latter.

I said to the guy who greeted me at the door: "I'm looking to my buy very first acoustic guitar." And felt a little nervous not knowing anything about playing. Handed him my note card of guitars and he led me into a practice room where he brought the guitars I was interested in and played them for me (since I had zerrrrrooo experience) so I could hear the tone of the guitars. He was very professional, and also took his time making sure that I picked a guitar that I liked. Even gave me a little history about where they are made and how the company sources their wood, etc. Very nice! I forgot his name, but he had curly blonde hair. (If you read this, Hi! And thank you).
Durability: Unlike individual stompboxes where you might use some sparingly, since your multi-effects unit contains all your effects you’ll be using it frequently. As such, it’s important that the build quality is up to par. This is where brand reputation comes into play as well, since you want the brand to stand behind their product in case anything bad happens. Rest assured the pedals we recommend in this guide are all from very reputable manufacturers with long histories of good customer support.

In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
When looking to buy a guitar, you want to make sure that you’re picking a model that is right for your skill level, playing style, and needs, all that while ensuring that you don’t overspend. If you’re just starting out, there’s probably no need to spend a couple grand on a flashy model when one of the quality cheap acoustic electric guitars will do.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.
Archtop-wise, the PEs apparently went into the ’62 and sometime in that year were renamed with the EP prefix, but otherwise remained the same. No detailed info on the full line is available, but the ’62 PE-8 had a bound fingerboard, small block or strip inlays, a single rounded cutaway, a rosewood pickguard, two � not one � metal-covered pickups (with one row of exposed poles along the edge), a chicken-beak selector on the upper shoulder, and four controls on the lower bout.
Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
Without some kind of amplification, it would of course be possible to “hear” what you’re doing. That is something very different from never hearing what a particular electric guitar sounds like when amplified. In that case get an electric with a soundboard such as an archtop or ask yourself “why would I not amplify a device meant to be amplified through the guitar pickups?”
Photo: Pick up an acoustic guitar and what you have in your hands is mostly empty space! Inside, the large wooden body (which is called the sound box) is filled with nothing more than air. As you pluck the strings, the wooden body of the guitar vibrates, the air inside the body vibrates too, and it's the vibrations of the wooden body and the air that amplify the string sound so you can hear it. Acoustic guitars have those big holes in the middle of the case, under the strings, so the amplified sound can get out and travel to your ears. In other words, the hole works the same way as the hole in the end of a trumpet, flute, or any other instrument. Photo by Greg Pierot courtesy of US Navy.

I received a Dorado 12 string as a birthday present in the late 1990s, installed a passive pickup, and played it around the house and at small venues for fifteen years or more. For an all-laminate, smaller body 12 string with a trapeze bridge, it sounded great. The neck was comfortable, too. I had a 1965 Gibson B-25 12 for a few of those years, but the neck was way fatter than the Dorado, which I passed along to a friend in need. I can't say the Dorado sounded better than the Gibson, but it sure out-jangled it. Wish I still had it!

In the fall of 1964, it's generally accepted that hide glue was replaced with white polyvinyl acetate PVA glue (Elmer's) after the move to the new Martin build facility. (But hide glue was still used until the mid-seventies for gluing tops to the rim and in some other situations.) A notation was written in Grant Remaley's personal memos on Sept 29, 1964 indicating Martin was starting to use "cold" glue. It is generally thought the type of glue used does affect the sound of the guitar. Starting some time in the 1980s Martin started switching from white glue to yellow aliphatic resin (titebond).


Electro-Harmonix’s Memory Man was one of the most popular solid-state delays ever, and even with its meager 5 to 320 milliseconds delay time was little short of revolutionary upon its introduction in 1976. At around $150, it was something of a bargain, too, though not dirt-cheap by any means—considering that at that time you could buy a new Stratocaster for just a little over three times that figure. The Memory Man was launched with Reticon SAD1024 chips, but E-H switched to quieter, better sounding and more adaptable Panasonic MN3005 ICs when these became available, and the latter is the chip found in the better-known Stereo Echo/Chorus and Deluxe models.
There are different types of delay – digital, analogue and tape. Analogue and tape delays behave similarly. As each echo repeats, the sounds slightly distort which can be pleasing particularly for electric guitar. If you want cleaner repeats, go digital. Tip; if you are using it for acoustic, try the pedal set on a high number of repeats before you buy and check the sound quality. Some cheaper digital units can sound ‘grainy’ after a few repeats with an acoustic.
Multi-effects units are exactly what the name implies—single units that offer many different effects and allow those effects to be used singly or in combinations simultaneously. Most will offer just about all the effect types discussed in this guide and many more. Typically they include dozens if not hundreds of effects presets—combinations of effects and effect parameters designed to achieve specific sounds with the touch of button or footswitch. Most also allow you to also save your presets for instant recall.
000-15: Base model of the upper end Martin Guitar line. All mahogany orsapele construction. ‘A Frame’ “X” top bracing, 14 frets clear, Optional model 000-15S 12 frets clear. All -16 and -16 series 000 instruments have long scales (25.4″) and 1-11/16″ nut widths, in contrast to the -18, -28, and -45 series, which have the ‘traditional’ 24.9″ 000 scale, retaining the 1-11/16″ nut width.
Neck Construction – The neck part of the guitar includes the fretboard and headstock. The tuners are mounted on this part of the guitar. The width and profile of the neck affects the playability of the guitar. Most necks are either “C” or “U” shaped. In most cases, the fretboard is made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, but some guitars have maple necks. Fretboard have position dots and other inlaid markers that assist the player. There are generally 3 types of necks – bolt on, set neck and neck through.

MusicPCB.com – offers PCB projects to build guitar and bass effects, and synth modules. All PCBs are professionally manufactured, and include soldermask, a silkscreened component legend, and plated through holes and pads. They are designed to be easy to build, provide simple and clean wiring, to work well with your other pedals, modules, and instruments, and most of all to sound great and provide sounds and features not available in commercial designs. Each PCB comes with a PDF document with wiring diagram, schematic, build notes, and large modding sections with details on how to perform a variety of mods to tailor the design to your needs/taste.


So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).
Giannini guitars were (and are) made by the Tranquilo Giannini S.A. factory, Carlos Weber 124, Sao Paolo, Brazil. They are generally known for being well-made instruments featuring very fancy Brazilian hardwood veneers, as well as for the strange-shaped asymmetrical CraViola models. Probably the most famous, indeed, perhaps only famous, endorser of Giannini guitars was José Feliciano. No reference materials were available on the early Giannini guitars. A catalog from 1971 is available, with a snapshot of the line that probably goes back at least a decade, and certainly forward.
Guitars with better-quality electronics can avoid these traits to an extent, but as you can see when you turn the tone pot all the way to zero, the dynamics of the RLC circuit that the pickup and tone circuit create result in a “hump” in the upper bass/low-midrange frequencies, roughly centered (in this example) around 300 Hz. This happens because the low resistance, coupled with the high “capacitive reactance” of the capacitor and the “inductive reactance” of the pickup’s inductor, creates what’s known as a “band-pass filter”, where a specific frequency range in between very low and very high frequencies has the lowest total impedance and thus becomes the most present in the tone.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
A true guitar polymath, Nels Cline has tackled everything from gothic country rock with the Geraldine Fibbers to a full remake of John Coltrane's late improvisational masterwork, Interstellar Space. He's best known, of course, as Wilco's gangly guitar hero, lurching into extended seizures ("Spiders [Kidsmoke]") or spiraling into lyrical jam flights ("Impossible Germany"). "Nels can play anything," Jeff Tweedy said. "We struggle with his spot in the band sometimes – but we always come to a place that's unique and interesting because we did struggle."

Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
Most of the modern electric guitars are provided with several tones and volume controlling circuits which helps in controlling the string vibration and thus the electrical charge produced. These adjustments are mainly done with the help of knobs provided on the neck of the guitar. Thus, the more the number of electrical circuits, the better the guitar can be adjusted for different sounds.
it is four solders on a guitar on say a les paul needs electricty so two wires pass the electricity through the other two wires are for your pickups the pickups electricity goes through the wires of them , into a potentiometer which is the technical name for the thing under the knob (or two depending on the guitars wiring) .... than into the 3 way and than finally passes out of the guitar and into an amp , pedal or tuner
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...
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The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro
I borrowed the above quote from an article on effects pedals by Robert Keeley (a maker of seriously fine effects pedals) which can help you remember the order to place your pedals. I have a few slight modifications and additions to this that I use, but this is a great way to remember the rough order quickly, and it comes from one of the great pedal masters.
The controls are fairly conventional – one tone and one volume control, each located at the end of a neck, plus a neck selector switch. The switch is mounted on a plastic “bridge” that spans both necks. Each neck features Valco’s usual plastic nut and combination bridge/tailpiece, and the fretboards are similar to ones found on a variety of Valco steels.
OCTAVACIÓN (FAT20) Cada una de las silletas está provista de un tornillo de bloqueo para impedir todo movimiento. Para ajustar la octavación, afloje el tornillo de bloqueo de la silleta con una llave Allen de 2 mm. (D) Para ajustar la octavación, introduzca una llave Allen de 2,5 mm en el tornillo de la silleta situado en la parte posterior del trémolo.

To tell you the truth, in the first few years i started playing, after i learned the use of the switch, I was approach by a man that also a guitarist and asked, "YOur guitar sounds good, I believe it so expensive". Well, I bought the guitar only for $150 dollars, But, I toggled the switch to the right pickup on the right time, makes my guitar sounds like an expensive guitar.
1963 D-28e. This model is a paradox. Martin took a great guitar with great flattop tone, and then added DeArmond pickups and knobs to the top. This ruined the tone (a flattop develops most of its tone from the vibrating top). And the DeArmond pickups don't amplify the acoustic properties of the guitar. So you end up with a electric guitar sound, while playing a flattop. Because of this, the value for D-28e's is really low. Some people go to the extreme of re-topping this model. This essentially gives you a vintage Brazilian rosewood D-28, but with a new top. A double edge sword of originality versus usability. Martin made only 284 D-28e's from 1959 to 1964, before giving up on the model. Rare, but for very good reason (no one wanted them, then or today!).
There are a few ways to save some money on your electric guitar (click for modal analysis). One way is to order online, for example from Amazon, which is usually cheaper than buying from a physical shop. Make sure that you know what the usual price for the guitar you want is, so that you can compare different sites, and in the best of worlds, use a discount code or wait until there’s a sale.
You're close, but not quite where you want to be with your tone.  You are officially a serious tone chaser; you've already swapped the stock burstbuckers in your awesome R9 Les Paul for something better ... but you are still only at 95-percent of the TONE you want, need, and hear in your head.  Keep seeking grasshopper, and you will find.  For only those who persist will drink from the holy grail.
The Gibson L5, an acoustic archtop guitar which was first produced in 1923, was an early “jazz”-style guitar which was used by early jazz guitarists such as Eddie Lang. By the 1930s, the guitar began to displace the banjo as the primary chordal rhythm instrument in jazz music, because the guitar could be used to voice chords of greater harmonic complexity, and it had a somewhat more muted tone that blended well with the upright bass, which, by this time, had almost completely replaced the tuba as the dominant bass instrument in jazz music.

But it might be the ESP LTD Series that has really vaulted this company into contention as one of the top brands, and certainly one of the best for heavy metal. These are more affordable version of USA-made ESP guitars, along with some innovative designs. The EC-1000 in particular has earned a strong reputation as more wallet-friendly alternative to the Gibson Les Paul.
Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..
The 110ce features a dreadnought body with modern cutaway that produces Taylor's signature open midrange and clear treble tone, it works really well with various styles of music. And since it comes with their ES2 under-saddle transducer system, this guitar is ready for the stage or for recording. While it may not be as affordable as we want it to be, the Taylor 110ce more than makes up with its quality and reliability. Mark your entry into the real world with this highly recommended acoustic-electric.

The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."


For easy, go-anywhere amplification, start out with a combo guitar amp. These all-in-one units combine the preamp, power amp and speakers into one piece, which makes them ideal for places where you want to set up and tear down in a hurry. Rehearsals and busking are easier with a combo amplifier, and they're great for small venues that don't need the power of a larger amp. The combo is your basic, high-versatility amp, and no guitarist should be without one.

The Original Blackout humbuckers are designed to be everything metal, handling thick rhythm play and well-defined lead melodies at higher speeds. The tone has an almost shimmering quality, especially on a clean amp setting. The tone profile of both the neck and the bridge version of this pickup emphasize treble with a hollowed out mid-range that helps give you the best of searing leads and heavy power chords.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.
The most important thing to a 5string is the tone ring with a resonator, I've been plays 36yrs. I have an Alvarez Denver belle flat top tone ring, a White Eagle archtop tone ring and my favorite is a Hohner artist flat top tone ring. Regarding a guitar my choice is a Martin D-35 ease of play & tone that is awesome! a 5 string take Many hours & months of practice on your rolls, forward, backward alternating thumb pattern, keeping your timing in check so you do not hit the string with your middle finger out of synch. Good luck have fun, no time better to learn than now!
In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
From the outset, wooden bodies had been sourced from existing guitar manufacturers, particularly the plywood student guitar bodies made by theRegal Musical Instrument Company. Dobro had granted Regal a license to manufacture resonator instruments. By 1937, it was the only manufacturer, and the license was officially made exclusive. Regal continued to manufacture and sell resonator instruments under many names, including Regal, Dobro, Old Kraftsman, and Ward. However, they ceased all resonator guitars production following the U.S. entry into the Second World War in 1941.
Another great book by Nicolas, this one shows you exactly how to create your own personal tone using amplifiers, effects and your guitar itself. Any beginner will benefit from this clearly written guide including everything from a breakdown of all the different ways to individualize your guitar playing technique, to information about virtual effects.
Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!

The Les Paul Custom single cutaway was discontinued in 1961 and replaced with the SG (as we know it) designation for “solid guitar”. This model featured a thin 1-5/16″ body and a double cutaway. Confusion abounds to this day over the name Les Paul Custom. Since the single cutaway was discontinued, Gibson transferred the name Les Paul Custom to the new models.


How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.
Polytone Mega Brute, Jazz guitar amplifier fully functional. Has loads of clean head room but also has 3 settings: Warm, Edge and drive.  I think they’re rated and 65watts, into 8ohm 8” speaker. Super light and portable, approx. 22lbs. Probably from the mid ‘80s production. Hi and low gain inputs, bright switch, effects loop. Spring reverb. Mint condition and everything works like brand new. Shipped to the lower 48 for $50.00. Local pick up would be great. Return if unhappy but ship in same packing and also pay return shipping. Thanks  

This preamp can also offer a gain control. Essentially, it’s what drives the power levels of the signals to the amp, but it can also boost volume. If the preamp doesn’t have a gain control, it can be assumed that it’s already factory-set to a certain level of gain. One way around the lack of a gain control is to use the volume control on the main amp. Either way, it’s very helpful when you find you need to compete in a multi-instrument band when you feel like you’re being drowned out or you’re experiencing unwanted feedback when you do try to vie for being heard.

My impression of the advice offered so far, is that compression on the electric guitar may solve the problem. However, I have found through experimentation and practice that a compressor used on an acoustic can highlight the more fragile aspects of it's sound, which when amplified can better compete with an electric guitar. I advise plenty of trial and experimentation before trying it in public, because compressors used incorrectly can create serious feedback headaches.
There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot.
A frequency is determined normally by the position of a foot pedal. The input signal is boosted at, and around, this frequency, above the rest of the signal. As you move the pedal, the frequency being amplified changes up or down. The frequency range is set so that it sits well with a guitar, which in turn isn't hugely dissimilar to the human voice's frequency range.
A variety of labels are used for level attenuation potentiometers (knobs) in a guitar amplifier and other guitar equipment. Electric guitars and basses have a volume control on the instrument that attenuates the signal from selected pickups. There may be two volume controls on an electric guitar or bass, wired in parallel to mix the signal levels from the neck and bridge pickups. Rolling back the guitar's volume control also changes the pickup's equalization or frequency response, which can provide pre-distortion equalization.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22, Medium - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tone Pros - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Duncan Designed - String Instrument Finish: Vintage White, Vintage Gold Top, Black
This is a Supro Supreme Hawaiian Guitar Model 1400 from somewhere around 1945. I've seen an identical one that was purchased new by the original owner during that year exactly. That date appeals to my love of WWII history, of course, because it was the last year of the war. I found this one languishing in the back of a vintage guitar store in Williamsburg, Virginia, while my wife and I were on our 30th anniversary holiday trip. The guitar is covered in lovely reddish-brown "mother of toilet seat" and has a non-slip back.

An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, or taps the strings. The pickup used to sense the vibration generally uses electromagnetic induction to do so, though other technologies exist. In any case, the signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker, so it is fed to a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.
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