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I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.

SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side. 

Played by Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend—among countless other electric guitar innovators—the 1959 Super Lead helped shape rock and roll as we know it. Introduced in 1965 (1959 has nothing to do with its year of release), the amplifier included four inputs, two channels, 100 watts of searing power and a Plexiglas faceplate (hence “Plexi”). Matched with 4x12 cabinets, the 1959 Super Lead helped to popularize the “Marshall stack.” The amplifier can be famously seen being played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock. It’s been highly sought after ever since.
The Kaman Corporation soon diversified, branching off into nuclear weapons testing, commercial helicopter flight, the development and testing of chemicals, and helicopter bearings production. But in the early 1960s, financial problems due to the failure of their commercial flight division forced them to consider expanding into new markets, such as entertainment and leisure. Charles Kaman, still an avid guitar player, became interested in the making of guitars.[2][6]

The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.
The more solid wood there is, the better the overall resonance, sustain and tone of the acoustic guitar. Solid wood, specially those used on the tops of acoustics, also resonate better as it ages. The downside to solid wood is mainly its more premium cost, and not to mention it uses more wood resources than laminate wood. Solid wood is also more prone to damage, so they require extra care especially from changing weather and humidity. Laminate woods are more affordable, and they are also more sturdy and resistant to damage. On the flip side, they will lack the resonance and sustain of solid wood, but this can be a good thing if you're looking for vintage mid-range focused tone.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Mahogany - Back: Solid Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Dovetail - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Maple - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Maple - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Open Pore Natural
In typical pedal effect chains you will most likely be running cable lengths that are much longer than 5.5 meters. The ME-80 allows you to keep your tone pure when running lots of effects. You can run a cable up to 5.5 metres into the input of the ME-80. The multi effects engine processes up to 8 effects in its internal signal chain. Then the ME-80 outputs your guitar signal as a 2,000 Ohm low impedance signal allowing you to run a much longer cable to the amplifier.
Since 1946, the P-90 has been pleasing guitarists with its vintage-soaked tone, that shares qualities of both single-coil pickups and humbuckers. P-90s are primarily single-coil in their construction (although larger and flatter), and come in a range of different housings. Although they feature a relatively low output, they provide a meatier tone than a single-coil, but with a bit more sparkle than a humbucker, and are therefore very versatile. They have been put to great use in rock, blues and jazz music, with Pete Townshend, Tony Iommi, and Carlos Santana all taking advantage of the sweet P-90 tone. On our chart above, the Seymour Duncan Antiquity is a great example, but check out more P-90 highlights on the dedicated page.
An American company that makes some amazing acoustic and electric guitars, Taylor guitars are considered as one of the best in the world. Like Martin, they can be expensive, but surely worth every penny. Taylor and Martin have the upper hand when it comes to acoustic guitar brands in America. One of the popular series is the 200 series and is of great value. For beginners, Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini are perfect choices as they are small-bodied.
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Processors, on the other hand, comprise an entirely different water heating appliance filled with piscean vertebrates, as they tend not to need any of the dry sound, other than in a few specialist applications. As a rule, processors such as EQ and compression are connected only via track, bus or master insert points — at least until you have the necessary experience to understand why you might want to break the rules once in a while. Having got that off my chest, let's look at some specific effects (we'll look more closely at processors another time).
In some ways, the Champion 20 isn’t quite as versatile as the other digital amps. For example, the Line 6 Spider Classic 15 has two effects selector knobs, allowing a guitarist to mix modulated effects such as phaser, flanger, and chorus with different types of reverb and echo. However, our panelists generally felt the Champion 20’s ease of use outweighed this disadvantage, and the Champion 20 does offer 12 different amp models as opposed to 4 on the Spider Classic 15. The Champion 20 also doesn’t play as loud as the Stage Right 611800, but all of our panelists thought it played plenty loud enough for beginners.
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.
The National STEM Guitar Project, in partnership with NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Centers with funding provided through a grant from The National Science Foundation (#1700531, #1304405, & #0903336), hosts innovative Guitar Building Institutes throughout the US. Five-day institutes, combined with additional instructional activities comprising 80 hours, provide middle, high school, and postsecondary faculty training on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) applications as they relate to the guitar. The institutes present and teach participants hands-on, applied learning techniques to help engage students and spark excitement for learning STEM subject matter.
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With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
A switch is a device that segments networks into different subnets. Segmenting the network into different subnets keeps one network from overloading with traffic. Therefore, a switch forwards all data in the data layer and sometimes the network layer as it filters the data. A switch allows a connection to be established and it terminates a connection when there is no longer a session to support. Prior to switches there were hubs. Hubs also connected multiple independent (connected) modules in a network, but they were not as efficient as switches. Since most switches work in Layer 2, and not in Layer 1 like a hub, they are better at filtering data. A switch looks for Ethernet MAC addresses, keeps a table (the bridge forwarding table) of these addresses, and navigates the switch between ports. The switch prevents collisions and gives full bandwidth to each connection at the switch port. Switches save bandwidth by only sending traffic to destinations that have traffic. When a switch switches Ethernet frames, they monitor the traffic for the response from that frame and see what device, on what port, responds to that flooded frame. There are different types of switches that range from "dumb" switches that lack manageability and can monitor only 4-8 ports to "managed" switches that can get statistics on switch traffic, monitor connections, and hard-code up to 96 port speeds and duplex. Then again, there are "chassis-based" switches with blades or cards that perform not just switching, but routing and intrusion detection too! If you are interested in this, look into Cisco's Catalyst 6500 Series. Another type of switch preferred by large enterprises is the "Layer 3 Switch," because it has the functionality of a router .
Before Nathan Daniel started the Danelectro company in 1947, he made amplifiers for Epiphone from 1934 to 1946. Epiphone wanted Daniel to make amps for them exclusively, but he preferred to stay independent. Instead he founded the Danelectro company in 1947 and started making amplifiers for Montgomery Ward. By 1948 Daniel expanded and became the exclusive guitar amplifier producer for Sears & Roebuck. At the same time he was also supplying other jobbers such as Targ & Dinner of Chicago.
Small amps can benefit from being placed on a stand, rather than the floor, as reflections from the floor can muddy the sound. A stool or something similar will do if a stand isn’t available. For the same reason, when using larger stacks or combos with several speakers, try mic’ing one that’s furthest from the floor. Placing an amp against a wall will increase the bottom-end response, and placing it in a corner will emphasise the low end further still. A mellow tone can be achieved by pointing the amp into the corner and mic’ing from behind.

Harmony almost wrote the book on guitars and responsible for so many rock stars. Youngsters all over the world ordered guitars from Sears, Montgomery Ward, and later by JC Penny. These affordable guitars are now very sort after and have become very expensive. Many of these models have been copied and reissued over the years. In their heyday, Harmony was the largest manufacture of guitars in the USA. In 1964-65 they sold over 350,000 instruments. The pickup used during and around those years were made by DeArmond Company. Today Vintage DeArmond Pups are still valued and sold. Look into years of bands, and you will find VIP's of the Rock World, with a Harmony in their hands.
Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
Yamaha continues to rank highly in the entry to mid-tier guitar market, thanks to their student friendly instruments. I for one took classical guitar lessons with a Yamaha classical that still plays and sound great up to this day. As expected, they have an entry in this affordable price range category, in the form of the 3/4 size JR1, which is essentially a smaller version of Yamaha's popular FG acoustic guitar.
Yamaha is famous around the world for its incredible, quality, instruments. Its electric guitars are no exception. The Yamaha Pacifica Series PAC112V Electric Guitar, Old Violin Sunburst is another example of Yamaha's on point production. This guitar has a solid alder body, a maple bolt neck, rosewood fingerboard, and a five-position switch with coil tap. Plus there's the tremolo - a vintage tremolo with block saddles.

Sometimes, the research we do - such as this hunt for the best multi effect pedal - opens up our world to a piece of gear we did not previously know about, and yet completely blows us out of the water. Such is the case with the Line 6 M5 Stompbox Modeler. This is the second item from Line 6 that made it into our top 5 list (the other one being the high-end POD HD500X). The Line 6 M5 is different than the other multi-effect pedals on our list, as it’s the only one that can only model one effect at a time, and also does not do amplifier modeling. With the other pedals on our list, you could replace your entire pedalboard by having multiple effects active at the same time. The M5 is far more simplistic, only letting you use one at a time. You might be asking yourself why we love it so much - well, it’s not for everyone, but there’s a lot of beauty in its simplicity. Read on to see if this is the right pedal for you.
Gibson guitars have a shorter 24.75-inch scale length, giving them a looser feel and a somewhat warmer tone. They feature resonant tonewoods, typically mahogany for the body and neck. The neck is set in place and glued instead of bolted. Les Paul-style instruments have carved tops made from another tonewood such as maple, but other instruments such as the SG have flat tops like the Strat. If something goes wrong with this kind of guitar you may be able to repair it yourself, but issues like broken necks and headstocks require work done by a professional luthier.
Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
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As music professionals, we're all familiar with guitarists and the rows of pedals they set up on stage at every gig. They're definitely on to something when it comes to effects on-the-fly, but when you're setting up a studio or pro audio rig, there's a simpler solution: multi effects processors. These full-sized units bring a ton of versatility to the table (or, more accurately speaking, the rack) and they can play a crucial role in shaping your own signature sound.
Combos or extension cabs with more than one speaker might present some phasing issues when miked at a distance. Such phasing is usually heard as softness/“hollowness”/lack of low-end punch in the recorded sound – a sort of “comb filter” EQ effect like you get from a phaser or a cocked wah pedal. Some mic placements using, for example, a 2×12 speaker cab will induce time differences between the waves from one speaker hitting the mic relative to those of the other, and possibly create frequency cancellations that are deleterious to guitar tone. Even when both speakers are of the same make and model, they are likely to perform slightly differently (thanks to subtle variables of the manufacturing process) and to present ever-so-slightly different resonant frequencies, efficiencies, basic tonalities, and so forth. For all of these reasons, extra care is required when placing a microphone at a distance from any multi-speaker cab (close-miking one of the other speakers will all but eliminate such issues, but also eliminates access to the great sounds of distant miking).
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Ibanez - String Instrument Finish: Satin Oil, Transparent Black Sunburst
Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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