In the mid-1960s, as the sound of electric 12-string guitars became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII, which has been used by Tony Hicks of The Hollies, Captain Sensible of early English punk band The Damned and Greg Kihn, and Mark XII electric 12-string guitars as well as the Tempest XII, also made in Italy, which featured a more conventional body style. The Phantom XII and Mark XII both featured a unique Bigsby style 12-string vibrato tailpiece, which made them, along with Semie Moseley's "Ventures" model 12-string Mosrite, the only 12 string electric guitars to feature such a vibrato. The Stereo Phantom XII had split pick-ups resembling the Fender precision bass, each half of which could be sent to a separate amplifier using an onboard mix control. Vox produced a number of other models of 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy.

As a beginner most people are not very sure of the sound, style or type of guitar that they would ultimately like to play, but after playing for 6 months or so I’m sure you will know a lot more about guitars and when it comes time to choose your next guitar it will be an easy choice. The key features a beginner needs is a guitar that is well set-up and easy to play, but you don’t really need to spend too much money on getting a better quality of sound. Higher level guitars will only sound better when your playing has progressed to the level that you can play quite well.
We've already shown you one of Epiphone's Les Pauls. However, that guitar and this model we're looking at here are simply not comparable. Les Paul Standard features a much better set of pickups as well as hardware. Each of the four available finishes on this thing is superb and includes a number of subtle details which really add to the beauty. Most importantly, Epiphone's Les Paul Standard will give you a true taste of what a legit Gibson Les Paul tastes like without breaking the bank.
Samick is a Korean guitar manufacturing company, that is known first for constructing their pianos using imported pieces. The corporation is capable of manufacturing more than one million guitars each year. They have an acoustic guitar with good quality which makes an exceptional sound. The company sell its guitars under its own brands such as Abilene, Silvertone, Greg Bennett, and Samick.
Yet, there’s still a lot to like about the JS140. First, the use of solid basswood for the body of the guitar is a plus, despite the fact that basswood is plentiful and affordable. While it’s typically used in economy guitars (like this one) its tone is quite good, providing a thick low end with a punchy mid range. As tonewoods go, it’s a decent compromise.
The OM model came about due to Perry Bechtel, who was a virtuoso plectrum banjo player. Perry came to see the Martin family in the early summer of 1929. He wanted Martin to make him a guitar which he could easily adapt his banjo style (remember by the late 1920s guitar was the hot instrument, replacing the banjo). He requested 15 frets clear of the body and a 27" scale in Martin's largest standard body size (which at that time was the 000, with 12 frets clear of the neck). The 27" scale would retain the fret spacing of the plectrum banjo, and 15 frets clear of the body would closely resemble the length of a banjo neck.
Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.
Even apparently crude solutions can produce useful results. For example, I was recording at a friend's flat many years ago and the amp I had only sounded any good when it was played flat out. The answer was to place the speaker cabinet on its back, place the mic right up against the grill, then cover the whole thing with blankets, sleeping bags and anything else that came to hand. It made the level in the room far more tolerable yet still produced the sound I wanted!
One of the most important Telecaster players was Clarence White, who, during his short career, contributed more to country electric guitar than almost anyone else, along with being a phenomenal bluegrass flatpicking guitarist and a pioneer of thecountry rock genre. He played with the Byrds, and Nashville West along with the bluegrass bands the Kentucky Colonels andMuleskinner. He enlisted the help of Gene Parsons and invented the StringBender, a device inside the body of the guitar that raises a string’s (either the B- or G-string most of the time) pitch when pressure is applied to the strap. His Telecaster is one of the most recognizable and is now owned by Marty Stuart.
Another factor to consider is the frequency with which you play. If you’re an occasional guitarist who plays just a few times a month and tend to play with a light touch, you may find less expensive strings perfectly suitable. On the other hand, if you’re devout about practice or play often and hard, premium-grade, heavy-duty strings may prove a better buy in the long run. Many manufacturers grade their strings according to their durability.
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Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.
The guitar output jack typically provides a monaural signal. Many guitars with active electronics use a jack with an extra contact normally used for stereo. These guitars use the extra contact to break the ground connection to the on-board battery to preserve battery life when the guitar is unplugged. These guitars require a mono plug to close the internal switch and connect the battery to ground. Standard guitar cables use a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) mono plug. These have a tip and sleeve configuration referred to as a TS phone connector. The voltage is usually around 1 to 9 millivolts.
When you’re starting to become serious about playing the guitar, the question of “what amp should I get” is bound to pop up. There’s quite a deal of variety out there, with many brands and models, and constant innovation adding new features to choose between with each passing year. It’s enough to baffle even an intermediate player, let alone a rookie who’s just getting started. To ensure that you get the right amplifier for your needs, you’ll first need to know a bit about how the amp’s specifications translate to real life.
Fender is considered as an American manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments, which was founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. They provide a wide range of guitar. It has comfortable necks and  smooth fingerboard. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The guitar will available at Rs. 12,199/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit fender.com.
The Korg Kaoss Pad is a small touchpad MIDI controller, sampler, and effects processor for audio and musical instruments, made by Korg. The Kaoss Pad's touchpad can be used to control its internal effects engine, which can be applied to a line-in signal or to samples recorded from the line-in. Effects types include pitch shifting, distortion, filtering, wah-wah, tremolo, flanging, delay, reverberation, auto-panning, gating, phasing, and ring modulation. The Kaoss Pad can also be used as a MIDI controller.
This budget price range is home to compact, low-powered combo amps, which are mainly designed for beginners and home practice. Despite their low volume and limited features, you can find some exceptional sounds and versatility that will make practice sessions good fun. This category can throw up some poorly made cheap amps, so stick to bigger brand names, such as the Blackstar ID:Core 10 V2, which is a great example of what a $100 guitar amp should offer, including low power, decent tone, good EQ and a variety of amp voices. While you may outgrow one of these affordable amps after a year or so, they are a great way to begin.

With JH’s encouragement, I’ve made the decision to produce my own line of premium acoustic guitars, handbuilt as before, to the same high quality, and with an extended option list including other rare woods, finishes, and trim options. The brand I will be using is “Madeleine”, in honor of my late granddaughter who passed away May 2, 2011 at age 1 month.
There are over 200 choices of electric guitar strings, combining Ernie Ball's diverse selection of materials, string gauges, and styles. Ernie Ball electric guitar strings come in a variety of different high quality materials including M-steel, cobalt, nickel, stainless steel, titanium, and bronze. Our guitar string sets are available for 6-string, 7-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 12-string guitars.
The Effect: Metal has become the prevalent genre when it comes to music that involves guitars. Dialing in a proper distortion can make or break the sound of your guitar as well as your entire band. Coincidentally, it’s so easy to go overboard with distortion, all while being certain you are on the right track. The very first step is to get a dist box that is suitable for metal. Something like Electro­Harmonix Metal Muff carries just enough punch to get the job done, but not enough to drown your tone completely with gain. You’ll find this to be a reoccurring theme with a number of great metal dist boxes. At the end of the day, it all comes down to your prowess and skill. Every good metal guitarist know that it’s all about the unity of equipment and knowledge. With that said, these pedals will get you started.

In 2013 Vox released updated "G2" versions of the 15 watt and 50 watt heads, and added a combo version of the NT15H-G2 called the NT15C1. Compared to the original NT15H, the NT15H-G2 adds a foot-switchable Girth channel (which first appeared on the original NT50H) with an additional 12AX7 in the preamp section, a "Dark" switch, a digital reverb, and an effects loop. However, Vox did not retain the pentode/triode output section modes from the "G1" version that allowed for full or half power operation as well as a broader tonal palette. The NT50H-G2 differs from the original NT50H with the additions of an XLR D.I. out and a digital reverb, and the deletions of one 12AX7 preamp tube and the "Tight" switch. It also appears the FX loop is no longer bypassable. Gone is the bright chrome look of the "G1" models as both heads received new cosmetics in the form of a black mirror finish on the tube cage and a new suitcase-type handle. Vox also released "G2" versions of their matching cabs: the V112NT-G2 (one Celestion G12M Greenback speaker), and the V212NT-G2 (two Celestion G12H 70th anniversary model speakers), each also sporting the suitcase-type handle. The new NT15C1 combo combines an NT15H-G2 chassis with a single 16Ω 12” Celestion G12M Greenback speaker in a black tolex cabinet with a suitcase-type handle.
The whole point of having a DIY guitar kit is to build a guitar that you like, so make sure that you get one with you're preferred shape and profile. Kits with classic guitar body shapes are the safest choice, as evidenced by their continued popularity in the market. But don't limit yourself with just the familiar, spend time looking at other designs to see if you're missing out on something cooler, something that better matches your personality.
Say that three times fast.  Don't even bother yourself about halfround strings.  They aren't that popular for a reason, but it is good to know they exist.  The roundwound strings feature a textured surface created by winding a round wire around the core metal.  Flatwound strings are far more flat along their length because the core is surrounded by a smooth wire, as pictured below:
Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.
When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.
Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
Solid-body electric guitars are the most common style on the market today. The first widely-available solid-body electric was the Fender Broadcaster, which later evolved into the Telecaster. It was super simple compared to other electrified instruments that came before it, and the basic design premise continues on in every solid-body instrument to this day.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved sruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, unbound elevated tortoise pickguard, style 28 type multiple bound top and back with white outer layer, zipper zigzag backstripe, trapeze tail piece, rosewood fingerboard, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”
Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
Humbucker pickups were designed to deal with hum while also offering tonal characteristics beyond those of single-coil models. This design incorporates two single-coils wound together in series, with the polarity of the magnets arranged opposite each other. This design helps to eliminate hum. Hence it’s name. Humbuckers usually have a thicker, louder, more powerful tone when compared to single-coils. While they are very versatile, humbuckers lend themselves to rock, heavy metal, and jazz styles. Famous guitarists who use humbuckers include Slash, Jimmy Page, Joe Pass, and Duane Allman.
Solid body guitars offer a fantastic platform for builders, allowing them to craft the wood into literally any shape. Naturally you’ll probably want to opt for a guitar with a single-cutaway Les Paul or Telecaster style shape, or a double-cutaway shape like a Stratocaster, Yamaha Pacifica, or Ibanez’s RG. However, the more extroverted beginner can check out some cool styles that always catch the attention, such as V or Z shaped guitars, or anything from Dean Guitars – especially if you want an eye-catching paint job!
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Hollowbody guitars feature full hollow bodies much like acoustic guitars do, and are used often in jazz and mellow style music as exemplified by Jazz greats that include Joe Pass, Pat Martino to name a few. It is however not limited to just that as exhibited by Brian Setzer and his Rockabilly style, along with Chet Atkins and his iconic country guitar playing.
It looks like there was no information about Lyle guitars on google back in the day.Now you can find some info, but very little. I purchased my first guitar of my life age 14 from a seller on ebay for $100. I baught an awesome looking black SG style guitar with the name Lyle on it. Years later now, I know a lot more... Lyle is one of the rarest brands of guitar manufactured in the world. This rarety however does not increase the value of the instrument. Lyle is not a brand that can even be found in the guitar Pricing Guide. I have looked. The value is determined usualy by the seller. If your selling one, hit me up. Lyle was never associated with Gibson. Lyle was never purchased and closed down by Gibson. However, Lyle started manufacturing Gibson style guitars at a cheaper rate but they failed to observe copyright laws. Lyle was created by the Motsimoku Company in Japan from 1965 to 1970. In 1970 the Motsimoku Company was slapped with such high lawsuits by the Gibson Corp of the US, that they bankrupted and closed. Making Lyle one of the rarest brands of guitar because of their extreamely limited production life of 5 years.
Guitar techs specialize in stringed instrument technology, providing support for all issues relating to electric and acoustic guitars. They might work in music shops repairing, tuning and finishing guitars for customers. Techs may also be hired by bands to maintain and prepare instruments before, during and after shows, including the set-up, stringing and tuning of guitars, bass guitars, pedals, cables and amplifiers. Additional responsibilities include instrument shipment between shows and maintenance during recording sessions. Securing employment with a band may be a competitive endeavor, and travel is often required for those positions.

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On electric guitars, you do a lot of plugging and unplugging of your cable, and these actions can eventually loosen the output jack, causing a crackling sound through the speaker. This crackling indicates a disconnected ground wire. To fix this problem, you first need to take off the jack plate or pick guard and locate the detached wire causing the problem.
The HeadRush Pedalboard's quad-core processor-powered DSP platform enables a faster and more guitarist-friendly user interface, reverb/delay tail spill-over between presets, the ability to load custom/third-party impulse responses, a looper with 20 minutes of record time, and more. The unit's most notable feature, however, is the seven-inch touchscreen, used to edit patches and to create new ones. In form, the Pedalboard most closely resembles Line 6’s Helix in that it has a treadle and 12 footswitches with LED ‘scribble strips’ showing each switch’s function and a colour-coded LED for each. There are several modes available for calling up sounds, easily changed by a couple of footswitch presses. In Stomp mode, the two footswitches to the left scroll through and select Rigs, while the central eight footswitches call up stompboxes within a selected Rig. Then in Rig mode, the left switches scroll through the Rig banks, while the eight select rigs. Sound-wise, there's no 'fizz' here, even on higher-gain patches, and the closer you get to a clean amp sound, the more convincing it is. If amps matter to you more than effects, the HeadRush is well worth looking into.
So last week I wrote about if it made sense to replace the speaker in an amp, or if it would be better to just get a different amp, I'll bet some of ya saw this weeks topic coming, right?  Once again I must begin by stating that even though we design, build and sell pickups here, we will NOT offer biased information (I promise); remember, we are real-world guitar players too.  Yep, we also need to carefully watch how we spend our money lest we find ourselves without a roof over our head!  And I mean really, I could take being homeless ... but I'd NEVER do that to a good GUITAR! Shall we dive in?
The heaviest heffalumps in this year’s roundup, share a few strands of DNA with early Mastodon, blending bludgeon and benign  in ambitious and unpredictable ways. Brady Deeprose and Dan Nightingale form the two-pronged guitar attack, leading these lofty compositions from blast-beaten brutality to doom-y sludge and back again. Their debut album Mire was released last month and is the sort of fully-formed statement that requires metallers to pack a spare pair of pants.
There are different ways to play electric guitar. One is to just play the electric guitar, and to take it as it is. Another way is to play the guitar as a sort of synthesizer. With the right effects (delay, reverb, volume swells, added octaves), no one would even know that it was a guitar. Neither way is wrong, but we refer to both as "playing electric guitar" even though they're being used in completely different ways that may as well be different instruments. Drama ensues.
Although there’s no clear delineation for when Phase Two officially began, the Hi-Flier began to develop new features. While it maintained the P90-style pickups, other aspects of the guitar were changed. The fret markers shrunk and were made uniform in size, the rocker switches were replaced by three-way toggles and a plain white pickguard was made standard.
Most new electric guitars tend to ship pre-strung with "super light" guitar strings. Depending on your technique, and the style of music you play, that string gauge may or may not be too light for you. The following is a list of the standard string gauges included with each set of electric guitar strings. Note though that different manufacturers include slightly different string gauges in their sets of strings.
Here you get a very bright sound but the output will be less than if it were wired in series and you no longer have hum canceling. Since you are using just one half of the humbucker, "coil-cut" sounds best when using a high output pickup (DiMarzio "X2N", DiMarzio "Distortion", Seymour Duncan "Invader", Seymour Duncan "Distortion", etc). A coil cut switch is relatively easy to wire up and it is just a matter of connecting one end of an SPST switch to that junction that was created for series wiring and connecting the other end of the switch to ground. So, we now have another 2 tone humbucker arrangement that can easily be switched back and forth between 2 tone options.
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.
The Effect: When it comes to effects pedals, those which offer more than one type of effect are usually seen as the best cost effective solution out there. Although many still prefer that standard, standalone configuration, multi-effects pedals have a lot to offer. Take Carl Martin Multi Effects Pedal as an example. This thing is packed to the brim with boutique level effects. Easy to use, a board such as this one can substitute a whole pedalboard depending on the variety of effects you use. One of the other great features of this design is the fact that multi-effect pedals come in both digital and analog form. They have transcended that artificial sounding performance that plagued effects processors some 10 years ago. Today, a multi-effects pedal is every bit as capable as its standalone counterparts. While this design is aimed at everyone, budget oriented users stand to gain the most from it.
Play heavy rock or metal music? Listen up! These guitars feature a twin horn cutaway shape and a long-neck design. They are lightweight compared to the Les Paul, but can be difficult to get used to. They can feel unbalanced because of the long neck. They have two humbucker pickups like Les Paul guitars but have different volume and tone controls for precise settings.
Set-ups include diagnostics, redressing and buffing frets, cleaning fret board, tightening hardware, restring, adjusting nut slots, truss rod adjustment, balancing tremolo, adjusting action, setting intonation, checking electronics, adjusting pick ups, detail and cleaning. Electro/acoustics get balance of output, and archtops have bridge located and taped.
There have been several changes in the amplifier world since we last took a look at this mega amp article, spurring us to refresh a lot of content. We have replaced some models in our top ten chart, such as the Bugera Trirec and the Vox AV15, with a host of new additions. These include classic combos like the Fender Champion 100 and the Vox AC15C2, with some awesome heads such as the EVH 5150III and the Boss Katana, as well as the super portable Roland Cube Street.
To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy electro acoustic guitars at the lowest prices in India.
The materials and the methods of classical guitar construction may vary, but the typical shape is either modern classical guitar or that historic classical guitar similar to the early romantic guitars of France and Italy. Classical guitar strings once made of gut are now made of such polymers as nylon, with fine wire wound about the acoustically lower (bass side) strings.
If you really want your guitar strings to stand out as well as your playing does, then these colourful options from DR are a novel eye-catcher. For even more fun, stick them under a UV light and they’ll glow, too! They might also serve a practical purpose for beginners, too, as new guitarists can quickly identify specific strings based on their colour.
PICK GUARD - KRAMER 450 - LO GIBSON - GOLDTOP - GIBSON SG CUSTOM SHOP - THUNDER JET - TAKAMINE - GIBSON 1959 - 450 12 - 66 ES-330 - 1972 - HAGSTROM F-300 RED LEFTHANDED - GIANNINI - BALLADEER - WHITE LES PAUL - HAGSTROM BRIDGE - CONRAD - LES PAUL 1953 - PROJECT - WASHBURN EA27 - KALAMAZOO KG - FRAMUS BASS - BASS VI - 1967 - ES-330 - HOLLOW - 1981 LES - BALDWIN BABY BISON - STELLA ACUOSTIC - MARTIN N-20 - VAN EPS - LES PAUL RECORDING - PIG - MARLBORO - HAGSTROM F12-S - FENDER STRATOCASTER 63 - LS 6 - HARMONY - J-45 - UNIVOX BASS

The Wave's all tube design utilizes four dual triode vacuum tubes - three 12AX7s and one 12AT7 - and comes with a MOD® three-spring reverb tank. MOD® reverb tanks are deemed the closest to the original reverb tanks from the '60s made today. The Wave's reverb function can be switched in and out pop-free via the front panel toggle or with a footswitch. Footswitch sold separately (see P-H470 for compatible footswitch).
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Six full steps (one octave) down from standard tuning. The Low E has the same fundamental frequency as a bass guitar, essentially the same standard tuning as a bass guitar but with a high B and E added to mimic a regular guitar. This tuning is used on the Fender Bass VI and similar instruments. Notably used by John Lennon with The Beatles, Robert Smith of The Cure and Jack Bruce of Cream. In his early days with Ronnie Hawkins, future Band bassist Rick Danko was also seen with a Fender Bass VI. This is the tuning Earth used on their seminal drone doom album, Earth 2. Also used in some Doom Metal and Sludge Metal bands such as Thou.
While Paul's Rick bass surged like an undertow, George Harrison's double-bound 360/12 (the second one made by the company) defined a new tone at the other end of the audio spectrum. Its ringing sound embellished "You Can't Do That," "Eight Days a Week," and "A Hard Day's Night," to name just three 12-string cuts from the 1964-65 period. Thus the Beatles created unprecedented, international interest in Rickenbackers, which many fans actually believed came from Britain...  (Before 1964 all Rickenbacker guitars had been made at the original Electro String factory in Los Angeles. That year Hall moved it over a six month period to Santa Ana, in nearby Orange County. )
The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.
While these sum up the most significant Gibson tone woods, other species do occasionally contribute to the brew. Swamp ash lends the Les Paul Studio Swamp Ash a degree of twangy sweetness and a round, slightly scooped midrange, while the most common Gibson fingerboard woods, rosewood and ebony, even make their mark on the frequency spectrum. Rosewood generally helps to add a certain thickness and creaminess to the tone—warming up the voice of a maple neck, or adding depth and cohesiveness to that of a mahogany neck—while an ebony fingerboard, long considered an upmarket option, contributes tightness, brightness, and a quick attack.
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The modern era of Ibanez guitars began in 1957 [3] and the late 1950s and 1960s Ibanez catalogues [1] show guitars with some wild looking designs [2]. Japanese guitar makers in the 1960s were mostly copying European guitar designs and some of the late 1960s Ibanez designs were similar to Hagström and Eko guitar designs. Hoshino Gakki used the Teisco and FujiGen Gakki guitar factories to manufacture Ibanez guitars after they stopped manufacturing their own guitars in 1966 and after the Teisco guitar factory closed down in 1969/1970 Hoshino Gakki used the FujiGen Gakki guitar factory to make most Ibanez guitars.
The key feature that makes the GT-1000 stand out from the crowd is the inclusion of the ingenious AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology which ensures your effects respond correctly with the likes of tube amps and don’t muddy your sound. You can read more about the AIRD technology here, but in a nutshell, it ensures the dynamics of your unique amp are preserved. With other multi effects, you might find have to turn your amp emulations off if you want your effects to respond correctly to YOUR amp, but with the GT-1000 you won’t have to do that as you can select which type of amp you’re playing with and the pedal will respond correctly.
as cool as it sounds to say that robert johnson has influenced everyone since him, directly or indirectly, is just nonsense. sure he was a legend in his own right; but a lot of that has to do with his life being shrouded in mystery. yes, he has influenced some players, way back when, but there were so many more players influenced by electric blues; chicago and texas blues, not delta blues. i understand he was somewhat of an innovator, and that is very important, but i think so called ‘music critics’ have over-blown it a bit in the reverence department for fear of being labeled un-hip. dave marsh, the ‘rolling stone’ critic is a perfect example. he claims johnson as one of the most gifted players of all time. but he dislikes david lee roth, singer in ‘van halen’, so right away edward van halen, guitarist in that group is marginalized with: “the basic 12 bar-blues on the louie-louie thump theme” to describe his playing. lol. to sum it up, whenever a critic uses the phrase ’12 bar blues’, you can pretty much assume he has no clue about what he talking about….best wishes.
The best acoustic electric guitars solve the inconveniences of playing a traditional acoustic in a very preferable way. No longer do we need to play a guitar size and shape we don't enjoy in order to project more volume. We don't have to strum and pick harder. We don't need the nuisance of setting up and staying positioned behind a mic to be heard through the loud speakers. Today we look at how this is achieved and share our top recommendations for every budget...
I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.
The Ibanez TSA15H gets most of its high ratings from users who love the sound of a cranked tube amp, because this is where it excels. This is especially true of guitarists who use single coil guitars, but there are some humbucker users who are just as impressed. Even experts commend the amp's dynamic response, Premiere Guitar's Kenny Rardin comments: "It feels and responds like a good tube amp, and varying the controls dials in the response even further". Value for money and reliability are also commended, as expected from Ibanez.
This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:
Fujigen Gakki began operation in 1960 as a classical guitar manufacturer, moving into the lucurative electric guitar markets in 1962. The company was the largest producer of Japanese guitars during the 1960-1980 period. They were known for producing high quality products, especially for the badged guitar market, which is why the company was selected by so many major American brands. It wasn't until 1970 that the company began making products for the venerable Ibanez brand, which was an unqualified success. Fujigen Gakki was the main manufacturer of choice for Greco badged guitars in the 1970 to 1980 period. They also produced guitars for major manufacturer Yamaha. Badged guitars made by Fujigen include Antoria, Epiphone, Jason and Mann. Badged guitars that may have been made by Fujigen Gakki were Marlin and St. Moritz.

Rule 2 - This order is defined by nature and physics. Consider this scenario. You scream and your lungs, mouth shape, and vocal chords define the frequencies that come out. You cup your hands around your mouth to shape the waveform and affect the stereo width. Then your voice goes out into the air and into the Grand Canyon where it bounces around and comes back at you with reverb and delay. If you don't at least follow this fundamental order, you'll be too far out of touch with your listeners and you won't be able to sound acceptable within the mix of a song.
Its very obvious very few on this list have never picked up a guitar in their life as this looks like a what brand does my favorite band play list... Considering Gibson these days are garbage and only were good for a few style to begin with no way they're number one... Fender has very solid build quality, but to diversify them to play numerous styles takes heavy modification. As far as electric are concerned there is a number that can top the list, as schecter, esp and Jackson are too low on the list and I've heard good things about rickenbacker. Ibanez is also excellent. Its really a toss up for me...I haven't played much esp do I phased them out...I have extensive time with Ibanez schecter and Jackson... Ibanez is gone because the build quality is no better and the playability is pretty much the same as a Jackson but the Jackson gives you far more bang for the buck... As for schecter and Jackson they put out some fully loaded guitars that are only going to rock you maybe a weeks ...more
All product names, logos, and brands are property of their respective owners, and are in no way associated or affiliated with The Top Guitars.  Product names, logos, and brands are used solely for the purpose of identifying industry-standard products and brands used by The Top Guitars for the business of post production sound, and any related awards or honors therein. Use of these names, logos, and brands does not imply any co-operation or endorsement.
The most underutilized sonic tool that electric guitarists have is built right into their instruments: the volume and tone dials. Most players tend to leave their guitar’s volume up full and set the tone knobs in one place and work from there, but with a little practice it’s easy to get used to using these potentiometers or pots — which are contacts that control voltage — to sculpt interesting sounds.

STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
As you will note in the earliest catalogs, Ibanez guitars were first "copies" or "reproductions" of guitar models originated by several American guitar manufacturers and manufacturers from other countries. They were not forgeries, as they were never sold with misleading logos or with the intent to deceive. Ibanez models replicated such styles as the Gibson Les Paul, Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster, Rickkenbacker styles, and others. Due to their high quality, Ibanez guitars and those made under other brands, such as Greco and Aria, quickly earned a reputation around the world as quality instruments at a great value. There is a form of urban legend that circulates in the guitar community that has many variations, but usually involves either Gibson or Fender suing Ibanez, Aria, or some other Japanese manufacturer, with the intent to stop that company from manufacturing superior copies. The truth is less glamourous. Only one company ever sued another, and it was Norlin (the owner of the Gibson brand at the time) suing Hoshino (owner of the Ibanez brand) and the suit was focused only on the "open book" headstock shape common to Gibson guitars and replicated on the Ibanez guitars. The suit was brought in 1977, but by then Ibanez had already changed the headstock shape on its copy models, so the suit was settled out of court. No other company was ever sued by any other company. However, this episode has given rise to the term "lawsuit" guitar, which is used to describe any Japanese copy guitar made in the shape of an American manufacturer's model.
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.
The specifications of the neck and string setup dictate the guitar's overall playability. As such, it is important to get a handle of important specs which include scale length (the length by which the string is stretched from the bridge saddle to the nut), nut width, fingerboard radius, and neck profile (shape of the back of the neck). Beginners normally want guitars to play easier, and will prefer those with shorter scale length, thin nut width and neck profile, and flatter fingerboard radius. On the other hand, experienced players will have grown accustomed to a specific neck configuration, if this is your case, you will want your new guitar to have similar specs to what you already like. 

The Thunderhead had two humbuckers, gold hardware, a master volume with two tone controls, a pickup blender knob, and a phase reversal switch. Some had DeArmond pickups with metal covers, a large black insert with nonadjustable poles, plus six tiny adjustable pole screws along one edge. The ebony fingerboard was bound with diamond inlays and had the characteristic “mustache” on the end of the fingerboard. The tops and backs featured figured maple laminates. Colors options included a wine red, sunburst natural, and green (on Thunderhead only). The Thunderhead K-1360 had a trapeze tail, the K-1460 a vibrato. The Tornado (K-1160 with trapeze, K-1260 with vibrato) was a downscale version with plain top, chrome hardware, two volume and two tone controls (no phase), and the Schaller pickups.
Focus on the new chords you have learned and get physically used to changing between these and other chords you've learned in previous sessions. This is where you can use a metronome or backing drums to develop your rhythm and timing around these chord fingerings. Try and strum a simple sequence using these chords. Create a simple 3-4 chord song. This is about putting the theory you have learned into context.

@Joe Mullikin – Yes, you can place each of the Strymon pedals within their own loop while engaged in your switcher using the LEFT INPUT and LEFT OUTPUT jacks of these pedals and just use the loop switcher controls to bring the effects in and out of the signal path. Make sure to use standard mono TS instrument cables as the jacks are unbalanced and do not benefit from TRS connections.
As mentioned above, the Martin DSR2 comes with an all-solid wood body, with traditional solid spruce as its top. In conjunction with the solid sapele back and sides, this configuration produces premium level Martin dreadnought tones, albeit with stripped down aesthetics. The neck is as familiar as it gets, with its 1.75" nut width and 25.4" scale length.
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."
Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.
700-Series, which are all solid-bodies are probably worth $250-$350, maybe a little more for the 4-pickup 742 model. I’m pretty sure that they were on the market at the same time as the 800s but not as many are being seen. Since the 800s were a step-up in quality compared to previous Kents and the 700s used similar design features, they should be pretty decent instruments. Although collectors haven't shown a lot of interest in them, rarity has to be considered an influence on the price at this point.Recently a 742 sold on Ebay for over $1000 and a 740 recently sold for $999. Previously most of the 700s had been selling for $200-400.

This cutoff is based on the average used price on Reverb over the past year, and while the $1000 cutoff is relatively arbitrary, it is as good a point as any to divide between entry-level gear and more heavy artillery. Here again, we are not combining wattage and cabinet size variations on the same models, which inherently decreases the ranking of any amp series with a multitude of different configurations.


Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.
There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.
Almost every guitar you see on our website is available in our Chicago guitar showroom. While we carry hard-to-find, top of the line vintage guitars, Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop also carries new guitars and basses from Fender (Squire), Martin, Seagull, Lakland, Hofner, Kay, Hanson, EGC, and other top brands. You can also find top of the line amps including Ampeg, Analog Outfitters, Divided By 13, Fender, Hi-Tone, Laney, Magnatone and Orange to name a few.
For example, if you plug into a .7V power amp and you get good sound – great! However, if you plug into a 1.25V power amp and find the signals are weak, it’s not the tonal lack of the power amp that’s the problem. The preamp signals are too weak to be driven to the powerful 1.25V power amp. The issue is the sensitivity input of the power amp is too high for the preamp to be driven well.

Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!
The Effect: The octave effect does exactly what its name says. It takes the raw signal from your guitar and adds one or more of its copies which are pitch shifted for an octave up, or down. Some models come with both upper and lower octave available, while others allow you to use as many as three octaves. One of the best examples of this type of pedal is the Electro-Harmonix Pitch Fork.

The size of your strings affects your playability, depending on the genre you're working within.  If you are a Blues player who is going to bend strings constantly, you may prefer a lighter gauge of string to offset your workload.  If you are a Jazz player who will never bend more than a quarter step, you can afford to play thick, flat, wound strings.


One cheaper ampless option mentioned in the article is the Tech 21 Fly Rig used with pedals in front of it – I actually got a $270 Tech 21 RK5 (very close to being the same thing as the Fly Rig 5 mentioned in the article, but the Richie Kotzen signature version with his signature OMG distortion replacing the “Plexi” OD which is on the Fly Rig 5). I’ve used it direct into a cheap PA at practice and it doesn’t sound good to me that way – however, it sounds really pretty good going into an amp, which is what I did for a set-up-quick-and-get-out-after-playing hour-long gig a few weeks ago, plugging into an amp provided at the place we played at. It still didn’t come close sound-wise to my relatively cheap amp setup (hybrid Marshall JMD 50 watt head into Marshall 1960A 4 x 12 cabinet, no additional effects), but a lot more portable of course. So maybe I need to experiment with adding OD pedals to the RK5 for an improvement in sound.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Walnut - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 55mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 8 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Fixed - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: IBZ-8 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, White
The aim of Audio Issues is to help interested newcomers get started in the world of audio production with easy to use practical audio production tips for beginners and advanced. If you are just starting out doing some home recording or have been engineering for a while, these quick and easy audio tips are guaranteed to be of interest and use to you.
While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.
As I’ve mentioned before, the topic of guitar pedals can really be a rabbit-hole and some people get really, really into them. They are very often the key to the tone you keep chasing after. However, at the end of the day, a lot of your sound depends on your ability to play your instrument, so please don’t neglect practicing your instrument over trying out different effects.

In the fall of 1954, Daniel started production of solidbody guitars for Sears, under the Silvertone name. He also produced the same guitars under the Danelectro name, sold to other jobbers. These early models didn't have truss rods but had a 3/4" square aluminum tube beginning at the peghead and through the body to the bridge. The bodies were constructed of solid Poplar wood. The Silvertone models were covered with a dark maroon vinyl covering, while the Danelectro models were covered in a whitish tweed material. Both lines came with either 1 or 2 pickups, concealed under a baked melamine pickguard. Concentric stacked tone and volume knobs were used on the two pickup models only. Notably, when both pickups were used together, the tone was much stronger. This was due to wiring the pickups in series, instead of parallel like most other maker's two pickup guitars.
Valve amplification is more or less linear—meaning the parameters (amplitude, frequency, phase) of the amplified signal are proportional to the input signal—so long as the voltage of the input signal does not exceed the valve's "linear region of operation". The linear region falls between "1." the saturation region: the voltages at which plate current stops responding to positive increases in grid voltage and "2." the cutoff region: the voltages at which the charge of the grid is too negative for electrons to flow to the plate. If a valve is biased within the linear region and the input signal's voltage exceeds this region, overdrive and non-linear clipping will occur.[40][43]
Perhaps not as famous as its brother, the EMG 81, this awesome EMG 85 still rocks and makes a worthy appearance in our chart. Perfect for the neck position (although equally solid in the bridge), the EMG 85 features Alnico V magnet-loaded close aperture coils to deliver a natural tone with a huge output, with no loss of clarity as the volume is pushed to its highest.
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I took the Gearank scores we have calculated for individual guitars for each brand and combined them using a weighted average to produce a rating for each brand. I can best explain this by saying if a hypothetical brand had 2 models and one of them had 99 rating sources and the other one only had a single rating source then the first model's ratings would contribute 99% of the final rating for the brand. An interesting statistic; we processed more than 17,000 sources for these calculations.
Barely used in my home, NUX Cerberus multi pedal. Not a modeler, it has true bypass distortion, overdrive, modulations(chorus,flange, phase, univibe and trem) as well as delay and reverb- all completely programmable and can be used as a pedal board or as presets. Built in tuner and cab simulator- great multi pedal can be used as a fly rig or in front of an amp- Comes in the original packaging with power supply. US buyers ONLY- I will not ship internationally- No returns accepted
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.
Guitar Tuners lets you tune your guitar in seconds for free using a microphone so that you guarantee the perfect pitch of your instrument every time. Just play a note, and Guitar Tuners will display which note you''re playing, and how close you are to having that note in tune. The needle on this Guitar Tuner will turn blue you have an exact match. Just play each note on your guitar (E, A, D, G, B, E) or other musical instrument, and get in tune !
In standard Boss fashion, you get a set of four no-nonsense controls and a footswitch that is as durable as the case it’s installed in. However, none of this means anything if the reverb effect isn’t up to the expected level. Fortunately for us, Boss didn’t disappoint with this one. You get a reverb effect that is in that sweet spot when it comes to versatility and quality.
While many appreciate its bulk of features, there are a few who feel that Fender went overboard, and should've limited the voicings to just a few to ensure that sound quality is not compromised. On the other hand, there are some who felt that the extra features are nice, but they are turned off by the need to use a computer to get full access to all the controls.

The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.
The Blues Harp has been around since the early 1970s. Until the 1990s, it was functionally identical to the Marine Band, the only differences being the cover plates and the varnish on the front of the wood comb, and the Blues Harp's profile was thinner as well. At one point, Johnny Cash promoted the Blues Harp.[20] In the 1990s, Hohner made the Blues Harp part of its Modular System (MS) line. This new Blues Harp lost its uniqueness, and is interchangeable with the other models in the MS line, but it currently remains the standby of many players who use MS harps.
Once you start getting into reverb, it won’t be long before you start noticing different nuances of this effect. A good portion of digital reverbs sound too sterile, while some analog can be too narrow in range. Finding that perfect type of reverberation matters if you are serious about building your guitar tone properly. Built in reverbs you usually see in lower quality amps are good for home practice and not much more. That isn’t to say that the added value of them being available in the first place is a bad thing. No, but you can’t really rely on those reverbs to get you anywhere serious. On top of that, a good analog reverb pedal is a one time purchase.

The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.
The bass guitar has a long neck (scale-length) and thick strings. The open strings of the bass guitar corresponds to the four lowest strings of the guitar and are pitched an octave lower. The standard bass has four strings though five and six string basses are available which extends the range of the instrument. Though the bass guitar is the bass instrument of the guitar family and the double-bass is the bass instrument of the orchestral string family their similar roles have drawn bass players to both instruments.
Lastly, if what you're really asking is "Can I play my electric guitar without making any noise that would bother my neighbors/housemates?" Many amps and all direct in setups will allow you play with headphones. I plug headphones in a small tube amp. The sound is quite nice. I find this setup allows me to experiment even more than usual since I am not self conscious about anyone hearing what I am playing. I've seen little tube amps for as little as about $125 that have headphone jacks. At that price don't expect Fender, Dr Z, Vox, Marshall or Mesa Boogie quality sound, but they get the job done of basic tube drive and bypass the loudspeaker by driving the headphones.
This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please
If you do have logic of GarageBand they come with a vast sample library including lots of different guitar sounds, now combine that with melodyne and you can get some pretty convincing custom guitar parts. It's a slow process but it will sound a lot better than most straight VI's, I've done the same with brass section stuff in the past to good effect.
When the lyrics of hit songs feature your brand by name, as a company, you know you must be on the right track. At nearly 150 years in business, innovation has kept this guitar maker constantly on the list of top acoustic guitar brands. Vintage models are coveted and new designs live up to the classic name and reputation. And with a lifetime guarantee, you know these beauties are built to last.
Ask anyone at all if they've heard of Ibanez, and you'll most likely get a 'yes'—even if it's not a guitarist or even a musician that you're asking. It takes a lot for an instrument maker to become as well-known outside the music community as it is inside, and Ibanez is one of the elite luthiers that has managed to do just that. How have they done it? Simple: by making instruments so sought-after that they can be found nearly everywhere. Originally founded in 1957, Ibanez is one of the "original" manufacturers from the formative decades of the electric guitar as we know it today. Ibanez was one of the first Japanese companies to break through to the international music industry as well as, even more impressively, the very first brand to mass-produce seven and eight-string guitars. That makes extended-range guitars an important part of the Ibanez legacy alongside their many classic 6-string models. Some of the most renowned Ibanez instruments include hollow body guitars like Pat Metheny's signature model, and distinctive solid body axes such as the Iceman and Fireman series. You'll also find a wide assortment of basses, including 5 and 6-string models that join the 7 and 8-string guitars in the extended-range Ibanez family. There are plenty of acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars and basses to choose from as well, not to mention mandolins, banjos and ukuleles. Ibanez has a prolific catalog that spans the whole guitar family, offering something for anybody who loves to work the strings. In addition to stringed instruments, Ibanez is also renowned for a broad range of effects pedals, amplifiers and accessories. The TS808 Tube Screamer, for example, is an effects pedal that's beyond legendary. The unmatched warmth and tone of its overdrive makes the TS808 a must-have item for countless guitarists. Connect it to an amplifier like the TSA30 Tube Screamer 1x12 Combo Amp, and you're rocking an amazing recipe for serious vintage sounds. Ibanez was an early player in the electric guitar game, and their instruments, pedals and amps are certain to be on stages the world over for decades to come. Make yourself one of the artists that takes Ibanez onstage at every gig and this gear will pay off in spades with the incredible sounds that made them an industry giant in the first place.
The Effie was also joined by the Coily U1825 guitar and U1835 bass. These were essentially the same except the Coily guitar had a Bigsby-style vibrato, roller bridge with flip-up mute, and a pair of chrome-covered screw-and-staple humbuckers, typical of early-’70s Arias. The Coily bass had similar four-pole screw-and-staple pickups and a fancy trapeze tail with a diamond design on it. These were available in orange sunburst, red and jade green. The guitar cost $122.50, the bass $135.
The auditorium style is a standard mid-sized acoustic guitar, with a lower bout that is generally the same width as a dreadnought, but with a smaller waist. Sometimes referred to as an "orchestra" body, these guitars balance volume, tone, and comfort, and have been regaining popular ground in recent decades. In 1992, Eric Clapton used an acoustic guitar of this body size, when he appeared on MTV Live to record his Unplugged album.
Launch price: $499 / £445 | Body: Chambered basswood body with arched-maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Black Top humbuckers | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, tone, master volume, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Gold, Silver Sparkle, Black
I was lucky. Went into to a small local music store and they had it for a long time and were trying to get rid of it quick. Got it for about $800. The previous Rick 12 I had (with narrow neck) I bought for $400, fixed broken nut, then sold to West LA Music for $750 cash so I could get the Petty model. Transactions that were definitely worth it at the time.
It helps if you shop frequently but at my Guitar Center the tech is frequently going through guitars on the wall and setting them up so it's ready to be sold without the need for a setup. They have motivation to keep their guitars setup. I mean, have you ever went to a shop, picked up a guitar you wanted, and it had stupid high action? You're not gonna buy it until it's setup right? If they're setup, they'll play better and it'll be a lot easier to sell.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.
Fender guitars are generally equipped with single coil pickups, resulting in a brighter tone compared to humbucker pickups, for instance. This is part of Fender’s charm, and contributes to the characteristic tone of their instruments. Single coils are designed to cut through the mix with their bright sound, but a drawback is that this can cause issues with humming (1).
Look for additional symbols in the tab. As you can see in the example above, many tabs aren't just collections of lines and notes. Tabs use a wide variety of special symbols to tell you how to play the notes in the tab. Most symbols refer to specific playing techniques - to make a song sound as much like the recording as possible, pay attention to these special markings.
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Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
The best electric guitar isn’t one that just sounds good (however you may define good as) — it’s how it feels in your hands. We remember when we could barely start forming memories, going to our dad’s shows and him using his telecaster on stage. He had been playing since he was 5 years old (which we actually used his opinion for in this guide as well) and continues to play today 50 years later. As we grew up and learned guitar ourselves, it was more about what was comfortable and felt as natural as possible. Paired up with the sound and feel, there are a few more factors to take into consideration when you’re looking for the best electric guitar.
Designed by Todd Langner (who also engineered the ADA MP-1), the Langner DCP-1 possesses somewhat of an infamous reputation. Very few know about it, but everyone who does, swears by it’s greatness. Built with much of the same blueprint as the Bogner Fish, the Langner features two independent channels with fully adjustable boost functions. Using five 12ax7a tubes, it’ll produce the glassiest cleans to the highest of high gain tones. Presets can be front panel selected or footswitched. If you’re into rare gear, this is the amp for you. Good luck finding one!
Working with Dimebag Darrell Abbot, Rex Brown, Mike Scaccia, Scott Shelby and others, this guitar master has had to work overtime to keep up with these guitarslingers' abuse. These guys make their guitars scream on stage, and it's King's job to make them sing again. "Everbody knows -- other than Scott -- that they're at my mercy when it comes to working on their guitar," he says. "That's why I'm not out on the circuit. I'm pretty picky about which guitar players I work with." (Although Darrel and Mike are no longer with us - may they ignite heaven with their notes - Scott is still tearing it up with Warbeast.) Rabid Flesh Eater, Warbeast, Rigor Mortis, Pantera, this guy has worked on some brutal guitars. "If you're going to buy a Cadillac, put the right parts on it" is one of his mottoes.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  250K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
Octave/Pitch Shift – A frequency-based effect that takes the input of your guitar tone and shifts it in pitch anywhere up to an octave above or below. This is useful to simulate a bass guitar line or the higher pitched strings of a twelve-string guitar. Some octave or pitch shift pedals double your guitar tone before shifting making them more akin to Harmoniser pedals.
Scratch and Dent - Demo Model full size electric guitar from Davison is the perfect way to start playing at an affordable price with features you'd normally expect on a much more expensive instrument. With a built-in humbucker pickup for that "rock" sound, you can plug this guitar into any amplifier or software system. It has a high gloss finished body and a contoured body for ultimate play-ability. Perfect for the aspiring guitar player of any age, this Davison is also Teacher Approved.
These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King's famous Lucille.
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