As the name implies, TheFretWire DIY 175 kit is based on the popular ES-175 hollow body guitar, following its shape and configuration, but using more cost effective materials. More importantly, it lets you customize your own archtop as you prefer - you can make it into a classic jazz box, or add some cool paint jobs to turn it into a rockabilly style instrument.
If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location.
I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.

Distortion is a feature available on many guitar amplifiers that is not typically found on keyboard or bass guitar amplifiers. Tube guitar amplifiers can produce distortion through pre-distortion equalization, preamp tube distortion, post-distortion EQ, power-tube distortion, tube rectifier compression, output transformer distortion, guitar speaker distortion, and guitar speaker and cabinet frequency response. Because many factors beyond preamp distortion contribute to a particular guitarist's sound, recording engineers and PA system techs typically put a microphone in front of the guitar speaker, rather than only use the guitar amp's pre-amp out signal. A sound engineer or music producer may send the DI out signal from the pickups to a separate track at the same time, so they can re-amp the signal later. In contrast, it is fairly common to use a DI box with electric bass.
New Mooer Red Truck Multi Effect Pedal. Mooer Red Truck. The Mooer Red Truck is one of the most full-featured effects strip on the market. Featuring several effects modules within one unit, this is designed for players who prefer the simplicity of single effects over multi-effects and want a portable solution for rehearsals, gigs, or where carrying a lot of gear is an issue.
The easiest way to record bass is to just plug it straight into the console/interface—of course, using the correct instrument-level input or dedicated DI box, and not a standard line input. This will provide a nice, clean, deep tone, but it will likely lack the growl and grit that’s often desired—for that, you’ll want the sound of an amp. While you can always use a bass amp sim plug-in later, in the mix (see below), there’s nothing like the pants-flapping wall of low-end sound coming out of a real bass amp, if one is available. But most engineers will record both—a DI’d signal, and a miked-up amp. They can be combined later on, for the best of both worlds—the clean, round, depth from the DI, with the edge and midrange punch of the amp (but see below, for a caveat).

Think of some of your favorite songs. Maybe they get your toes tapping, or get you pumped up and ready to take on the world. Regardless of your musical preferences, the odds are that one thing all of our favorite songs have in common is an absolutely killer bass line. The bass has played a key role in holding down the rhythm throughout the history of popular music, and continues to make an impact to this day. Another One Bites the Dust by Queen, Been Caught Stealing by Jane's Addiction, Money by Pink Floyd, Sweet Emotion by Aerosmith, and Longview by Green Day are just a few examples of songs that are taken to the next level thanks to their incredible bass lines. Now it's your time to make your mark on this instrument with some serious grooves of your own. You'll find bass guitars for every skill level and playing style in this section.
The Hi Flyer guitar and bass would be offered pretty much until the end, in ’77. At some point after, probably around ’73 or ’74, the plastic logo was changed to an outline decal logo. Also, at some point the pickups were changed to the distinctive twin-coil humbuckers with metal sides and a see-through pink insert on top. These changes most certainly occurred by the ’76 catalog, when the Hi Flyers were available in four finishes – sunburst (U1815, U1815B), white (U1816, U1816B), black (U1817, U1817B) and a cool natural with maple fingerboard and black dots (U1818, U1818B).
In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, Brian May and Randall Woolf.
 This Tempo guitar combo amplifier with tremolo and reverb effects is well-used, but still delivers great retro sound. If you're looking for genuine vintage guitar sounds, the Tempo delivers in a delightfully trashy way. The sound is twangy and clear, but you can overdrive the volume a bit to get a raw lo-fi sound perfect for garage punks, mod revivalists, surf rockers, etc. and This solid state amp was made by Japanese guitar manufacturer Tempo. It has three inputs, just like you'd expect from a late '60s - early '70s model. The temolo speed is adjustable from slow to fast, and though the intensity is not adjustable, it has a nice "just right" sound that's not too mellow or too choppy. The reverb sounds like a classic spring reverberation unit, and it gets the job done well. The cabinet measures 18 inches x 13 inches x 7 inches and houses one 8-inch loudspeaker. Check out the short video below to hear the Tempo in action and examples of the tremelo and reverb, both at maximum settings. Finding all of this great stuff for you guys has left me with virtually no free time, so please do not laugh at my years-out-of-practice playing style when you hear the sloppy Link Wray and Duane Eddy riffs...
SG Special is pretty much the same thing as the Les Paul 100. The most obvious difference is the body style. Other than that, you get very similar electronics and overall build quality. A lot of people learned their first chords on this guitar, still keeping it as one of their favorite axes. I’ve played this thing a few times and it definitely has some juice.
Seriously, Yamaha above ESP?! Japanese made ESP guitars are among the best in the world, no wonder so many people play them. They have great designs and an ESP standard is not to high in price compared to a USA Jackson or custom shop guitar. Ibanez prestige are very nice to (I hate the necks personally) but the build is really good. ESP blows Gibson out of the water by a VERY large margin. Gibson has lawsuits against them for selling "USA" made guitars that were discovered to be imports from cheap labor offshore factories. All ESP and Ibanez prestige guitars are made in Japan and are immaculate in terms of quality and consistency. ESP is more a metal guitar but they have much better tone than any of the others listed, the only one here that might have a sweeter tone is prs but for $8,000 and only a fractionally better tone that is subjective they can keep it. I personally like ESP and Schecter best but Jackson is really good too. Not to knock Ibanez, but their necks are way to thin ...more
The first thing that strikes you about Nate Savage’s Guitar Lessons YouTube Channel is how well the structured, numbered lessons are organised on the YouTube Home page itself. Overlays on the opening titles screens and the names of the lessons make it very clear about the content and help you to choose exactly what you need, or let you skip over any unnecessary stuff. His complete beginner topics go right back to “How To Hold The Guitar” which might sound really basic, but Nate’s absolutely right to nip any bad habits in the bud at the very beginning and that particular video could the most important 3:26 of your career. And I have to make mention of the high production levels on Nate’s videos. The vision and audio is excellent, the lessons are well made, and Nate’s friendly, easy-going manner makes you feel like he’s your best friend and guitar tutor at the same time.
However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.

To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!
Okay first of all yes, John Mayer deserves to be on this list. I would've probably put him even higher. I understand if you don't agree but go listen to his Where The Light is album and get back to me on that. I think Eric Clapton should've made the list though. And, although I'm not a big fan of metal I can say as a guitarist anybody can go up and down scales and embelish notes and sound like a metal genius. The artists above put real soul into their music. I think you have an amazing list though. Many people probably would've have thought of some of the people on here… but what about Derek Trucks?

One important thing about caring for a guitar is keeping the wood supple and moist, and quite often, you have to purchase a separate humidifier block with any guitar. Not this guitar, though. The Cordoba C12 comes with its own humidifier block right in the case. You just have to make sure you keep it moist every week. It is now ranked first on the best classical guitar list.


The following year the Standard model received a short-lived redesign seeking to reduce production costs and price on American Stratocasters. This revised version lacked a second tone control, a newly designed Freeflyte vibrato system, and a bare-bones output jack. A reshaped ‘Comfort Contour’ body with deeper forearm and waist contours similar to an early 1960s model was introduced. What it did retain was the 1970s-style headstock decal. The 1982/83 version of the Standard Stratocaster has little in common with the Dan Smith guitar, apart from the period when they were sold, but is sometimes informally (and controversially) presented as a “Dan Smith-era” or “redesign” guitar. After the Standard Stratocaster was discontinued in 1984, Fender Japan produced a 22-fret version with a flat 9.5″ radius and medium-jumbo fretwire until 1986.[14]
Most of these sites offer 'free' TAB, chord sheets, and lyrics. A few provide versions that are endorsed by they musician, the writer, or the company that owns the rights to the song (i.e., a licensed site). There is always a fee for access to the licensed TAB or music notation. There are even some unofficial sites that will charge a 'membership fee'.
For this list and those below we are including both new and used sales data. It's also worth noting that we did not combine multiple variations of the same amp like different wattages or cabinet speaker sizes, or the head and combo versions of the same amp, which we consider to be distinct models. We did, however, combine things like different tolex color and other minor cosmetic variations where applicable.

When using multiple microphones, always remember to check for phase cancellation, and keep in mind that a 2-8kHz boost is probably all that's necessary at mixdown for enhanced electric guitar presence within a track. A small amount of delay (1ms = 12") on an ambient mic track will increase the perceived ambient distance of the microphone without actually moving the mic. This trick works well when blending close and ambient microphone tracks during recording or mixing.


Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...


TC Electronic has literally changed the game with their new polyphonic tuner technology that lets you tune all of your strings at once, no matter what tuning you're using. This is the only logical choice when it comes to pedals, although if you're interested in other formats such as headstock tuners and rackmount options, check out our reviews of the best guitar tuners on the market.
Since we only want to check how straight the neck is, we need to isolate this aspect of the guitar. In other words we don’t want the height of the nut or the placement of the saddles to confuse us, so we take them out of the equation. Don’t worry; we’re not going to remove any of these components, just circumvent them. I use a ruler to do this, but you can do it using only strings. I’ll describe both methods below.
When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.
Essentially the 28s looked very similar to the E/EM/EB-18s. They had the same offset double cutaway body outline and the modified Viennese three-and-three headstock. Instead of maple laminate bodies with glued-in necks, the 28s had mahogany bodies and necks in a neck-through-body design. The basically slab bodies of the E-18 had gained a carved top, with a deep contour in the upper waist. The brass nut had become a Micarta nut. Fingerboards were now ebony. Finishes were sunburst.
Bassists can put an incorrect (that is too low) impedance load on their amplifiers even if they connect multiple speakers that are at the correct impedance rating. For example, if a bassist has a combo amp in which the power amp is rated at 4 ohms, and she/he plugs in a second 4 ohm speaker cabinet in parallel, this will drop the impedance ("load") on the amplifier down to 2 ohms, which is too low for the amplifier. When speakers of different impedance are wired up together (e.g., an 8 ohm speaker cabinet and a 4 ohm speaker cab, the impedance is calculated differently). In most applications, when bass speakers are plugged into an amplifier, they are wired in parallel. The parallel "input/output" speaker jacks on the rear of most bass cabinets, when plugged into additional speakers in a "daisy chain" approach, will cause the speakers to be connected in parallel. More rarely, bass speaker cabs may be wired up in series, which means that the impedance is calculated differently. Series wiring is much more complicated and in cases where a bassist is using series wiring, a custom-made cabling system is typically used. Some bass manufacturers that build large speaker cabinets with multiple speakers may wire some of the speakers in series and some in parallel to achieve a certain impedance rating for the entire speaker cabinet (e.g., in 8x10" speaker cabinets, the speakers inside the cabinet may be all wired up in series, but the overall cabinet's "input/output" jacks are in parallel). Professional bass technicians and speaker designers setting up custom-made bass speaker systems for bass players from major bands may use an electronic meter to test the impedance of the speaker cabinets they design.

Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you’re looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
There isn't a shredder on the planet who doesn't remember their first electric guitar. In fact, it's for that exact reason why your first electric guitar should built with meticulous attention to every detail. In this section, you'll find an impressive range of beginner electric guitars that were designed with your ambitions in mind, so you can enjoy sharpening your skills on that same special instrument for many years to come. Everyone who has a passion for playing music deserves to hone their craft on an electric guitar that is a perfect balance of playability, beauty and tone. But that sentiment especially applies to beginners, so they can build the confidence necessary to continue on with the instrument. Thankfully, all of the most well-known guitar brands specialize in their own beginner electric guitar models. From Ibanez and Epiphone to ESP and Dean, these companies take great pride in nurturing the skills of future pluckers, strummers and shredders. Squier is no stranger to the world of beginner guitars, and their Vintage Modified Jaguar HH electric guitar is everything a budding up-and-comer could ask for. Featuring a 24'' scale fast action neck, and a set of Duncan Designed pickups for a multitude of humbucking tones, the Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar is an updated sunburst classic that looks and plays like a dream. Another big-seller is the Epiphone Les Paul 100 electric guitar. Consisting of open-coil humbuckers and a genuine Les Paul sound, this axe contains superb electronics and a solid tone, while the tune-o-matic bridge ensures you that this beauty will stay tune through an abundance of practicing. It's incredible to think that at one moment in time, Jimmy Page had difficulty forming an open chord, or that Eddie Van Halen had trouble with hammer-ons. But even the greatest guitar players had to start somewhere, just like you. Every guitar player improves with time, and when you have a beginner electric guitar that's constructed by professionals, the learning stages feel will less like a duty, and more like the start of an exciting adventure.
Besides the recognizable brand, there’s the sound quality, that earned it good appreciation even from experienced guitarists who are used to more expensive units. It has a standard 12” speaker that allows it to render treble and bass equally well, for a good range of sound which should make it suitable for country, blues, and jazz, as well as softer rock.
Fender guitars are the most popular and are considered as one of the best brands in the world. Fender guitar is manufactured by the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation of Scottsdale, Arizona. They are specialized in making stringed instruments and are best in making the solid body electric bass guitars. Fender Musical Instruments Corporation was incorporated in the year 1946 and is a relatively new company, but with the quality of products they make and the success they achieved, Fender is easily the best guitar manufacturer in the world.
Washburn is known for producing great value guitars, and they take their reputation seriously. While other guitar builders tend to compromise cosmetics, this company does not hold back on visual details even in the entry-level market. The WD7S shows the company's design philosophy in action, featuring elegant body binding and custom wood inlaid rosette that makes the guitar look far more expensive than its actual price.
Their LP models have a "mahogany" body, and the binding is very thin so I think the maple top is just vaneer. I also noticed the headstocks were not the usual LP angle. In my opinion, Epiphone wins hand down. The Strat types don't look much better in my opinion, again, sharp fret ends and awful looking headstock and logo. If you see any of their relic jobs, you'll notice that they range from passable from a distance to hideous from any range.
I'm sorry to disagree Merlin, but the woods used really do make a big difference to the sound of a solid body guitar. Both the neck and body are resonators, the string energy drives the woods which damp some frequencies and use that energy to emphasise the resonant frequencies. That drives the string's vibration through the bridge/nut/fretboard. It's a feedback loop.

A half-century later, effects are everywhere. Whether they’re built into your amplifier, a single pedal, multi-effects processor, rack-mounted, or controlled through an iOS device, there’s a vast array of tones at your disposal, ready to add sonic magic to your performances or recordings. Most recording and performing guitarists have come to depend on effects to add flavors both subtle and flagrant to their sound, helping them to carve out the signature tones with which they’re identified.
Size & Weight: If the multi-effects pedal will stay in one place at all times, then perhaps size and weight is not a big deal. However, one of the biggest selling points of a unit like this is its portability. If you need to gig with it or simply take it to a friend’s house, make sure you’re fine with its dimensions. The good thing is that a manufacturer like Line 6 makes several versions of the same basic pedal. The Line 6 M13 is a great unit, but if you need it to be more compact you can opt for the M9, or smaller yet the M5.
These special qualities have been used for centuries to create and build various instruments with differing levels of success. Some tone woods do it better than others so, are often more vigorously sought out and because of their growing rarity (due, primarily, to over harvesting) also vary in expense, the rarest most hard to find being the most expensive, of course.
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You wouldn’t guess that this is a low-end electric acoustic, even on close inspection, because the build quality is superb. This translates to some great tone. While it might not have quite the same ring and sustain as an expensive model, only real audiophiles are likely to notice. You get a solid spruce top, good quality hardware, and Fishman electronics.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
Woofer enclosures must be larger and more sturdily built than cabinets for mid-range or high-frequency (tweeter) speakers. As such, in the 1950s, when Ampeg introduced bass amplifier and speaker systems, bass guitarists began to use them. Similarly, Hammond organ players used a specialized keyboard combo amplifier, the Leslie speaker cabinet, which contains a woofer for the low frequencies and a horn for the high frequencies. The Leslie horns rotate and a baffle around the woofer rotates as well, producing a rich tremolo and chorus effect.
One other thing to note is during the 1960's there was a lot of consolidation in the Chicago guitar manufacturers. In the 1940's National and Dobro merged to form Valco. One of Valco's sub-brand's was Supro which sold guitars under the Sears moniker Silvertone but they also manufactured guitars for Montgomery Wards as the "Airline" brand (Jack White of the White Stripes plays an Airline "Layfayette" reso-glas guitar) and there were a few other house brands too. In 1968 the conglomerate Valco closed it's doors. Also in 1968 Danelectro was shut down by MCA which had purchased it in 1966. Kay also went out of business and the remains were bought by Teisco. The only major brand that survived the 1960's to continue making these amazing guitars through the early 1970's was Harmony. We believe that's because they were the largest of all guitar manufacturers in the 1960's.
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.

This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
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Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
Automatic Track Creation & Loop Recording: A new layer (track) is created each time you start recording and each time a Riff loops. Stack layers on top of each other (bass, guitar, vocals) to create a Riff. Use looping to create multiple tracks, do multiple takes, etc. Each layer has controls for mixing and effects. (4 tracks with T4, 24 tracks with Standard)
Play power chords easily with one-finger barre'd across two (or three) strings. Simply place your index finger over the sixth & fifth stings at the same fret. (You can also barre the 4th string, which is also a D, and will match the root of your chord one octave higher.) The resulting power chord is named after the note played on the sixth string. At the first fret, it's D#5, at the third fret, it's F5. For tunes blues-rock tunes that use a lot of 5 & 7 power chords, such as those made famous by Chuck Berry, Drop D tuning allows you to play those 7 chords as though they were normal power chords.
I have 8 guitars and 5 Gretsches and I'm currently playing this one the most. It's very bright, which if you play a Martin you might not like. Like super duper bright. No really, brighter than that. But I like it. Unplugged it's good but not very loud, so it's a nice practice guitar, but you're going to want to plug in at the coffee shop or larger.
Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).
Archives of the best free VST plugins (electric guitar and acoustic guitar plug-ins) for download. We have created audio / video demos for the most of VST plugins so that you can hear how they sound before you decide to download them. You don't have to register for download. The most of VST plugins in our archives are provided with a link to VST plugin developer so that you can donate to the author if you wish.
Takamine has been known for their high quality and highly affordable guitars for years. Their GD51CE comes in just under $500, and is a cutaway dreadnought. It is my top pick if you are looking for the best cutaway acoustic guitar under $500. It has a slim neck for great playability, something that beginners and experts both love. It has a spruce top with rosewood back and sides. You will also be able to amplify this guitar, as it is an acoustic electric. It comes in natural or sunburst finishes. Owners describe it’s sound as loud and balanced, which is expected of a dreadnought cutaway. You can’t go wrong either, as it has an onboard tuner. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
Unlike a piano or the voices of a choir, the guitar (in standard tuning) has difficulty playing the chords as stacks of thirds, which would require the left hand to span too many frets,[40] particularly for dominant seventh chords, as explained below. If in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in closed position, then they often can be played in open position; similarly, if in a particular tuning chords cannot be played in root position, they can often be played in inverted positions. A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Additional chords can be generated with drop-2 (or drop-3) voicing, which are discussed for standard tuning's implementation of dominant seventh chords (below).

These guitars appear to have lasted through 1989 or so. In 1990 the Stinger line shrank dramatically. Three guitars and two basses were listed in the Guitar World 1990-91 Guitar Buyer’s Guide. The three guitars in ’90 were the SSX, SPX and SSL. These were basically Strats (gone were the arched tops). The SSX now had three single-coils and fixed bridge/tailpiece. The SPX offered two humbuckers with a coil tap switch. The SSL had one humbucker and one single-coil, with a tap on the ‘bucker, and a traditional vibrato.


Few non-American guitar brands have meant so much to so many American guitar buffs as Teisco guitars. Indeed, through their mid-’60s connection with the Sears and Roebuck company, many a modern guitar player learned his or her first chops on a Silvertone made in Japan by the Teisco company. Nevertheless, for years Teiscos were the object of ridicule, the penultimate examples of “cheap Japanese guitars” (a reputation more based on cultural chauvinism than objective analysis, truth to tell). Even Dan Forte, who essentially began the category of writing about off-brand guitars (and who has given me many an entertaining moment in my life), chose Teisco Del Rey as his nom de plume, with more than a little tongue-in-cheek humor in the selection, no doubt.


The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.

Combo guitar amplifier cabinets and guitar speaker cabinets use several different designs, including the "open back" cabinet, the closed back cabinet (a sealed box), and, less commonly, bass reflex designs, which use a closed back with a vent or port cut into the cabinet.[26] With guitar amps, most "open back" amp cabinets are not fully open; part of the back is enclosed with panels. Combo guitar amp cabinets and standalone speaker cabinets are often made of plywood. Some are made of MDF or particle board—especially in low-budget models.[26] Cabinet size and depth, material types, assembly methods, type and thickness of the baffle material (the wood panel that holds the speaker), and the way the baffle attaches to the cabinet all affect tone.[26]

However, you don͛t need to fork out over $10k for this version, as it comes with a respectable sub-$1,000 price tag. Sporting a familiar Strat style basswood body, this model is available in three iconic EVH-approved colors. Playability – as you͛d expect – is top-notch, with a reinforced quatersawn maple neck and a compound radius rosewood fretboard.
The Blues Harp has been around since the early 1970s. Until the 1990s, it was functionally identical to the Marine Band, the only differences being the cover plates and the varnish on the front of the wood comb, and the Blues Harp's profile was thinner as well. At one point, Johnny Cash promoted the Blues Harp.[20] In the 1990s, Hohner made the Blues Harp part of its Modular System (MS) line. This new Blues Harp lost its uniqueness, and is interchangeable with the other models in the MS line, but it currently remains the standby of many players who use MS harps.
The guitar sports an AAA flame maple top on a three-piece mahogany body, whose Translucent Black finish was picked by the man in the top hat himself. The iconic Firebird pickguard sits prominently on the axe, but this one features Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” logo. The mahogany neck comes in a custom profile, too, which is rounded but slim enough for searing fretwork. A pau ferro fingerboard with trapezoid pearl inlays completes the cosmetic concerns on the axe.
Hollow-body guitars are best suited for classic jazz, but some musicians have used them in rock, country and blues. If you are a non-jazz guitarist interested in this kind of instrument I’m going to assume you know what you are doing. While these types of guitars can sound great with overdrive in the right hands, they’re probably not the best choice for most rock players.
Jump up ^ "New Sales Avenue Opened with Tone Amplifier for Stringed Instruments". The Music Trades. October 20, 1928. This tone amplifier is electrically operated either by alternating or direct currents. It consists of two major units -- an electro-magnetic pick-up and amplifying unit. The electro-magnetic pick-up is built within the instrument and is attached to its sounding board. The unit is connected with the amplifier, which produces the tone and volume required of the instrument.
Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:
The best way to have a great experience building your first guitar is to do it as a member of as class under the direction of a master Luthier. I built my first Tele-style guitar at Tulsa Wood Arts taught by Seth Lee Jones. You can learn a lot of the tricks and avoid some of the frustrations of doing it on your own. Plus, you make new friends and come away with a beautiful, quality guitar your first time out!
A hillock appeared again, but at 350Hz. This is really into the human voice range now. The curve is no longer a curve, but a flat line, and the -10dB point shifted at 800Hz. the guitar will sound dark, moody, the kind of muted tone they use in clean guitar stereotypical rhytmic jazz chords. On the oscilloscope, we will barely see the small fringes of the higher order magnitude signals, and a more sine-like wave.

Reading the comments, looks like people dont like Ibanez, in my 15 years of guitar playing I have own three, all mid-lowend models in the RG series, those things are of amazing value they can take a lot of abuse and still sound great. I dare to compare them whit my SL3 jackson a guitar that costed me three times more than any Ibanez I had own, the only big difference are the pickups because other than that the built quallity is much the same and I dare to say Ibanez uses better compenets (frets, pots, switch) than Jackson...
While the modifications described above have all been passive (i.e. they don't require an external power source), active electronics considerably increase the number of possible wiring options. These can range from simple preamps that offer a volume boost and buffer the instrument's signal (to prevent loss of higher frequencies in longer cable runs), to multi-band equalisers and more.[30][31] Enterprising guitarists have even built entire effects processors into guitars, such as the Korg Kaoss Pad.[32]
Steve Albini, on the other hand, finds it useful to think in terms of blending 'bright' and 'dark' mics. "Normally I'll have two microphones on each cabinet, a dark mic and a bright mic, say a ribbon microphone and a condenser, or two different condensers with different characters." Eddie Kramer's discussion of his Hendrix sessions reveals a similar preference: "Generally speaking, it was either a U67 or a Beyerdynamic M160, or a combination of both, which I still use today. It might be slightly different, of course, but the basic principle's the same — a ribbon and a condenser."

The HSS pickup configuration with a five-way switch keeps things versatile and beginner-friendly. Two single-coils and an overwound bridge humbucker provide a good mix of glassy Strat-like and fat Les Paul-esque tones that are capable of straight-up rock, funk and blues. They’re good as far as in-house pickups go, but don’t expect tonal authenticity at this price point.
In 2008, Gibson USA released the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, an authentic replica of one of two Les Pauls Slash received from Gibson in 1988. It has an Antique Vintage Sunburst finish over a solid mahogany body with a maple top. Production was limited to 1600.[35] The Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash “Inspired By” Les Paul Standard. This guitar is a replica of the 1988 Les Paul Standard and it features a carved three-piece maple top, one-piece mahogany back, and rosewood fingerboard, with a Heritage Cherry Sunburst finish. Two versions were made available—the “Aged by Tom Murphy,” aged to resemble the original guitar (a limited number of these were signed by Slash in gold marker on the back of the headstock), and the “Vintage Original Spec,” created to resemble the guitar as it was when Slash first received it.[32][36]

In the entry-level market, brand-name guitar companies are usually forced to make their guitars with cheaper materials. There is a simple reason for this. Most major brand-name companies have a brand owner (sometimes an American company). That company buys from a factory in China, and in Australia they will have a distributor who will sell to a retailer (your local music store). It’s pretty easy to see why they can be forced to use cheaper materials. There is a lot of price pressure to get a guitar manufactured at a low enough price for everybody to take their cut of the profit down the chain.
Born in Australia, Stephanie Jones is one of most promising guitarists of young generation. She started to learn guitar at Wembley Primary School in Perth when she was 11. In 2010 Stephanie started her studies at the Australian national University and she graduated with First Class Honours in 2014. After winning several guitar competition, Stephanie was awarded an Australian Music Foundation Scholarship, which included a performance at Wigmore Hall in London. She has performed extensively including two Australian tours, a New Zealand tour, and with the Weimar Guitar Quartet, a Germany tour. Currently Stephanie is studying a Masters in Classical Guitar Performance with Thomas Müller-Pering at the prestigious University of Music Franz Liszt.
Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.
Orville Gibson founded the company in 1902 as the "Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd." in Kalamazoo, Michigan, to make mandolin-family instruments.[1] Gibson invented archtop guitars by constructing the same type of carved, arched tops used on violins. By the 1930s, the company was also making flattop acoustic guitars, as well as one of the first commercially available hollow-body electric guitars, used and popularized by Charlie Christian. In 1944, Gibson was bought by Chicago Musical Instruments (CMI), which was acquired in 1969 by Panama-based conglomerate Ecuadorian Company Limited (ECL), that changed its name in the same year to Norlin Corporation. Gibson was owned by Norlin Corporation from 1969 to 1986. In 1986, the company was acquired by a group led by Henry Juszkiewicz and David H. Berryman.
While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.

When you've put your blood, sweat and tears into developing your talent, you want your music to sound amazing. And with the proper recording gear, you can ensure your sound is captured exactly how you intended. From audio interfaces to studio monitors to extremely powerful subwoofers, this section's wide range of recording gear offers up plenty of examples of ways to make your recordings better than ever. The right audio/video arrangement can take the stress out of recording, giving you more time and energy to concentrate on what's most important - your music. If you're unsure where to start the search for recording gear, checking out some of the top-rated and best-selling products is definitely the way to go. Want to attach your mic directly to your PC or Mac? The Blue Icicle performs dual functions as an XLR to USB adapter and a studio-quality microphone preamp. Offering a quick and easy way to perform digital and audio recording, this handy tool is a must for every musician's gear bag. Maybe you're in the market for a studio monitor? If that's the case, the Mackie MR8 mk3 8" 2-Way Powered Studio Monitor is a fantastic choice. Built with a clear focus on accuracy, this low-profile studio monitor is perfect for musicians who really want to capture the full character of their music. This section is also home to an assortment of GoPro video cameras. With a GoPro, you can record your set firsthand from the stage, giving your fans a unique "view from the top." Take a look at the GoPro HERO+ LCD for example - this camera captures your world in stunning HD video. It's rugged, waterproof and built into its own protective case - exactly what you need to record those high-energy shows. Another fantastic GoPro option is the HERO4 Session. Smaller and lighter than any other GoPro currently on the market, the HERO4 Session captures 1080p60 video and 8MP photos in a simple design that's so compact it can go just about anywhere. This is just a quick sampling of what's available when it comes to recording gear. There are lots more products to consider, so spend some time browsing through them - you never know when the right piece of equipment is going to leap off the page and into your professional setup.
Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.

But having at least a very basic foundation to build upon - such as learning some basic chords, will allow you to learn more songs faster. My best advice is to abandoned any idea of instant gratification and commit to the idea that learning guitar is a slow process in the beginning. It gets exponentially easier to improve your skills after you get past the huge hurdles you encounter in the beginning.


Starting in the early '90s, music gear manufacturers began developing digital effects models that aimed to re-create the sounds generated by classic effects, instruments, and vintage amplifiers. This technology quickly expanded to include models of revered amplifier heads, speaker cabinets, microphones, and even specific microphone placements. Many amps and multi-effects units today incorporate a wide range of models, often grouped into categories such as stompboxes, amps, and mics. Over the last decade, Line 6, one of the leaders in this field, has even created guitars and basses that contain modeled sounds of famous vintage instruments. As the technology has grown more sophisticated, models have become more realistic, often very closely resembling the gear on which they’re based.
The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.
To set up guitar pedals, use a short patch cable to connect your guitar directly into the tuner pedal if you’re using one. If you’re using filter effects pedals, like auto-wahs and envelope filters, connect them next. Plug in your compressor pedal after the filter pedals, followed by pitch-shifting, overdrive, and distortion pedals. Set up your modulation pedals, like chorus, flanger, tremolo, or phaser pedals, near the end of the chain so they’ll have a richer sound.

If straightforward lessons aren't what you're looking for, fear not: Rocksmith 2014 tries to refresh your picking skills through games that veer into the ridiculous. I tried out Return to Castle Chordead, which revels in delightfully bad NES-style graphics (the game challenges the player to zap the hungry undead by playing the correct chords). Scales Racer—which, you guessed it, teaches the major and minor scales—puts the player in a car fleeing the police. Pick the right notes and you zip between lanes, eluding the fuzz.

I'm trying to determine the worth of a korean made fender telecaster. Solid ash,butterscotch blonde,maple neck,abalone inlays,seymour duncan pick-up(the other 1 is silver?)classic bridge.It's probably about 5 or 6 years old,it seems nicer than any mexican I've seen. Serial # 04041144 I paid $500 and I want to sell but don't want to be unfair to self or buyer.Help please-QUICK.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.
Indeed, pros can be picky. Of course, they’ve heard, played and tried out innumerable electric guitars over the years and often have a high standard when it comes to the build, tone, playability and overall quality of the instrument. Many professional guitar players already consider themselves collectors, taking pride in what they have in their guitar arsenal.
I've only been playing guitar for 3 years but it seems like no matter what I do no matter what pedal I use I just can't get that real band sound like the heavy rock bands do on recording but when I tried a marshall that all went away. Marshall has the perfect distorted sound (overdrive) and for the price ha you just can't beat it. I'm getting a mg100fx half stack and it all totals out to only $400 plus this amp can get so loud you can play in a bar or club with only half volume
Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
I have been using a Belcat tube 50R guitar amp. I've owned all the top amps,Fender, Marshall,Mesa,Peavey. This Belcat amp,with pedals, is one of the best sounds I've ever gotten. It's not heavy like a twin,and the clean sound is great, although it's hard to beat a Fender Super reverb,or a twin for pure tone,but I don't like how Fenders sound with distortion pedals. I have a Marshall Combo and a Blackstar HT Club 40,love them both,but I've been using the Belcat. It's distortion,on it's own,is a blues type, not heavy, but with a Rat it screams, or a Boss Blues driver,or Ibanez Tube Screamer,you can get just the sound you're looking for. Too bad they're not making them anymore, it's really a good amp!
Guitar amplifiers vary widely in price and quality. Many music equipment companies import small, low-powered practice amplifiers for students and beginners that sell for less than $50 USD. Other companies produce expensive custom-made amplifiers for professional musicians, which can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars (USD). Most combo amplifiers have a carrying handle, and many combo amplifiers and cabinets have metal or plastic-reinforced corners to protect the amp during transportation.

Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.
So, we’re just over £100 here with the Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo, but we had to include the new version of the world's best-selling amplifier series. At just over £100 you get 18 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets – which is a lot of features for such a small price tag, definitely making it one of the best cheap amps money can buy. With 20 watts of power at your disposal pumping out through an 8" Fender Special Design speaker, it won’t blow the windows out, but it will certainly stand up on its own on stage and when used in a rehearsal or practice situation.

In this guitar lesson you’re going to learn 7 of the most basic guitar chords for beginners. These beginning guitar chords are the first ones every guitar player should learn. They are sometimes referred to as open position chords, because they are played in the first few frets of the guitar and all contain at least one open string. If you are looking for easy guitar chords for beginners, these are the ones to start with.
AJL: It’s a brand that specialises in making Gypsy acoustic guitars and archtop jazz box guitars. Each guitar is handmade by master luthier Ari-Jukka Luomaranta from Finland, and when I say he makes it, I literally mean he makes it all alone without any employees. I’m not exactly a classical guitar or jazz box fan but I understand why people love his guitars. He puts extreme attention to even the most minute details while making each of his guitar. Each AJL guitar is like a testimony of his art and dedication. He chooses the best quality woods to work with and by his undying passion for making guitars he creates masterpieces.
In a pinch, you can check for standard string action using a business card; it should just fit between the fret and the string at the 12th fret. Be prepared to adjust the neck at least a couple of times a year, particularly if you live in an area with large humidity swings between summer and winter. If your action is very low and you're still having difficulty playing bar chords, etc., you may want to switch to lighter gauge guitar strings. Be prepared to re-adjust the neck after you restring, because lighter strings exert less pressure on the neck, so you may now have an underbow.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”

I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.


Yamaha’s Pacifica Series spans many ability levels and price ranges, with notable models such as the entry-level PAC112 proving one of the most popular beginner’s guitars on the market. Then there is the RevStar Series, which launched in 2015 – another beautiful collection, inspired by the street-racing motorbikes of London and Tokyo in the sixties.

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Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.

I think it's fair to say that we all have a pretty good idea of what reverb is, though there are several ways of emulating it in the studio. Early reverb chambers, plates and springs have now given way to digital solutions, which fall into two main camps: synthetic and convolution. Synthetic reverbs take an algorithmic approach, setting up multiple delays, filters and feedback paths to create a dense reverberation effect similar to what you might hear in a large room. Though these often sound a bit 'larger than life', they've been used on so many hit records that we now tend to accept their sound as being the 'correct' one for pop music production. Most can approximate the sound of rooms, halls, plates and chambers, but in comparison with a real reverberant environment, the early reflections often seem to be too pronounced. The advantage of a synthetic reverb is that the designer can give the user plenty of controls for altering the apparent room size, brightness, decay time and so on.
Electronic instruments are well known for their great versatility and all of the amazing sounds that they can produce. In many cases, those effects all come down to skillful use of the right pedals by a talented musician. When you're equipping your pedalboard, some of the first units you should look at are delay and reverb effects pedals. Delay pedals enable you to put a note on a timer and have it come back a few measures later. They're perfect for holding off a chord, then having it kick back in with a new sound layered in on top of it for cool combination effects. For example, you might mix a long, sustained note together with a more complex riff to briefly become your own rhythm guitarist. You can play a chord against itself to double up into a deeper, richer tone, or even simulate an echo for atmospheric effect.
In late 1929, Martin built a prototype batch of six OM guitars. The very first of these had pyramid bridges and no pickguard. Martin soon realized that with the vigorous strumming required in a band setting, a pickguard would be required. Hence all OMs after the prototype batch had a small teardrop-shaped pickguard. The new OMs were not highly sucessful. They sold, but not as well as Martin had hoped. In 1933 the OM designation was dropped and was now called the "000" model. But infact the 1933 "000" models were the same as the 1933 "OM" models, retaining the OM body style and 14 fret neck. Then in 1934 the standard 000 models were modified to the shorter 24.9" scale (for unknown reasons, as the 12 fret 000 body had a 25.6" scale length its inception in 1902 to its demise in 1931). Yet the OM's longer scale was a major factor in the OM's tone. The strings on an OM must be tuned to a higher tension to get concert pitch. This extra tension translates into more drive on the top, hence providing more volume and tone. The OM's scalloped braces and a small maple bridgeplate give the OM a great sound. Although these features were common to other Martin models of the time, the OM's top brace under the fingerboard was missing. This design is unique to OMs making the top very lightly braced. This does lead to some problems with cracks in the upper bout along the side of the fingerboard, but it also contributes to the great sound of the OM models.

Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.


This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please
The earliest documented performance with an electric guitar was in 1932, by guitarist and bandleader Gage Brewer. The Kansas-based musician had obtained two instruments from George Beauchamp of Los Angeles, California, and he publicized his new instruments in an article in the Wichita Beacon, October 2, 1932 and through a performance later that month.

As successor to the Bogner Triple Giant, the Fish is a pre-amp with a legendary status, due to it’s unique character and it’s 4-channel configuration. Originally introduced in 1990, the unit was limited to 250 pieces, and is a rare find now-a-days. But thankfully, Bogner decided to reintroduce the Fish, featuring a “Country”, “Shark”, “Strato”, and “Brown” channel. Just like the original, this amp can take on just about any style you throw at it!
Rotating speakers are specially constructed amplifier/loudspeakers used to create special audio effects using the Doppler effect by rotating the speakers or a sound-directing duct. The rotating speaker creates a chorus-type effect. Named after its inventor, Donald Leslie, it is particularly associated with the Hammond organ but is used with a variety of instruments as well as vocals. The Hammond/Leslie combination has become an element in many genres of music. The Leslie Speaker and the Hammond Organ brands are currently owned by Suzuki Musical Instrument Corporation. The stompbox that simulates this effect is the Uni-Vibe pedal.
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.
The OO-18E was basically the small-bodied OO-18 acoustic with mahogany back and sides, spruce top, and the ring-mounted DeArmond tucked right at the end of the fingerboard. These featured one tone and one volume control, with large two-tone plastic knobs situated down on the lower treble bout. The first prototype was serial number 166839. OO-18Es were produced from 1959 to 1964. Around 1,526 of these were produced.
ESP is yet another Japanese musical instrument brand. The brand has many artist endorsements and a ton of user recommendations. ESP was founded in 1975, and it started as a builder of custom made parts. Guitarists would use ESP parts to personalize their existing instruments. Now ESP is known for their creative versions of popular guitar shapes. The guitars are known for their fast play features and great sound. Their guitars are known for their unique and unconventional designs. For that reason, ESP guitars are most popular among modern rock and metal players.
A guitar amplifier (or amp) is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitar, bass guitar, or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakers, which are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. A guitar amplifier may be a standalone wood or metal cabinet that contains only the power amplifier (and preamplifier) circuits, requiring the use of a separate speaker cabinet–or it may be a "combo" amplifier, which contains both the amplifier and one or more speakers in a wooden cabinet. There is a wide range of sizes and power ratings for guitar amplifiers, from small, lightweight "practice amplifiers" with a single 6" speaker and a 10 watt amp to heavy combo amps with four 10” or four 12" speakers and a powerful 100 watt amplifier, which are loud enough to use in a nightclub or bar performance.
Here we have another very Beautiful and rare "The Aria Model" Vintage Japanese F style Mandolin with such amazing tone!!! nearing 40 years old these are AMAZING! This is the rare " The Aria" Model M700 as seen on the Classic inlay in the headstocks Gorgeous Brazilian Rosewood veneer is a super beautiful Japanese example of the highly revered F style mandolin made famous by Gibson. These older models were put out during the 1970s this example was 1973. These premium examples have become so popular with Players & Collectors over the past several years now. The inlays on the neck and headstock and the classic violin sunburst on this model are simply gorgeous! The top is solid tight grained old growth Sitka spruce and the back & sides are premium AAA figured & flamed maple, the neck is Mahogany This particular M 700 is in very good condition with some minimal wear from playing please refer to the pics for those details. The original case and pick guard are also still present and do come with this fine instrument the guard is simply off for now. With the resurgence in popularity of Bluegrass and other music styles utilizing the wonderful Mandolin sound in recordings and live performances these rare Gibson Replicas vintage mandolins have been steadily increasing in popularity and in value because players are catching onto the great old high end vintage Japanese instruments now so the demand has risen accordingly. If you're looking for a great Vintage Mandolin that is extremely well made with top craftsmanship utilizing top the grade AAA woods that have now aged and have a wonderful vintage patina to them these are the affordable Japanese vintage F Mandolin alternative choice to a $5000.00 - $10,000 vintage Gibson F-5 ..thats why many Pros today are seeking the best vintage for a great deal. This Old Aria M700 is simply a great one!.
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Kay was founded in 1931 by Henry “Kay” Kuhrmeyer. They supplied guitars to Montgomery Wards and others. During the 1950s their electric guitars were competitors for the Silvertone and Danelectro guitars. The company dissolved in 1968. Kay guitars are not currently in production. However, Kay also produced cellos and basses. Engelhardt-Link purchased the acoustic line of instruments from Kay. These are still being produced in Elk Grove Village, IL.
If you want to take your tracks to the next level, a multi effects processor can do the trick. For a high-end example of what one of these units can do, check out the Eventide H8000FW 8-Channel Ultra-Harmonizer Effects Processor. It supports 24-bit audio and comes with an impressive 1,600 pre-set effects. Some are even pre-customized for 5.1 surround sound, so production for home theater playback is a cinch. Its smorgasbord of I/O options includes AES/EBU, ADAT, S/PDIF and FireWire with sampling up to 96kHz, so whatever you're looking to connect to the H8000FW, it's a safe bet that you can get the job done. Of course, not all of the processors here are quite as advanced. There are plenty of setups out there that just need a straightforward solution, and if that sounds like yours, don't worry: you'll find plenty of those here as well. Take the TC Electronic M350 Reverb and Effects Processor, for instance. This single-space rackmount is easy to fit into any budget, living up to TC's reputation of delivering amazing bang for your buck. It's loaded with 15 different effects plus 15 reverbs, and even includes control software for your AU/VST environment.
FU was non-stop work & fun at the 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim California! It was great to be back in the southern California sun with 85 degrees while freezing snow and blizzards were happening back east! The fun started with an opening night party with Eddie Van Halen and the launch of several new EVH Guitar models. The rest is just a blur but here are some out-takes to enjoy, For more behind the scenes photos check out our Facebook page!
While the Boss MS-3 is a fairly recent release, it does have quite the number of reviews, most of them coming from users who have nothing but good things to say about their experience with the unit. One user summarized what most reviewers felt by saying that the MS-3 is a "game changer". But it's not just about its amp and effects switching, because many were just as impressed with the sound quality of many of its built-in effects, including its overdrive and modulation sections. It's compact and portable design is also very much appreciated, making it an easy addition to any setups.
Play a classic 6120 or Duo Jet and it can seem a bit, well, old-fashioned. A growing number of players desire the brand’s looks, sound and unmatched vibe, but also want something a tad more versatile and user-friendly. Enter this latest Players Edition model with its neck set lower into the body for improved access, higher-output Filter’Tron-style humbucking pickup (Full’Trons) and a modernised Bigsby vibrato where through-stringing replaces the notorious ‘hooking the ball-end over a peg’ system that scuppered any chance of a quick change. Mate these modern tweaks with another recent innovation (for Gretsch, at any rate), the Centre Block range, and you have a guitar ready to compete with anything out there - in virtually any style.
While the acoustic-electric guitar isn’t actually its own body type, it’s simply an acoustic guitar with electric pickups to amplify its signal (we’ll talk about pickups soon!), it’s worth mentioning that you’re almost never going to get a comparable tone to that of a hollow body or really, any kind of electric guitar. It’s just not built for that, and in fact, it’s almost always better if you want that acoustic sound, to buy a really resonant acoustic guitar and add a nice soundhole pickup (like this one) instead.
Looking for Used Gear? You may have just discovered your future. Music Go Round franchisees started out as customers of our stores. They have a love of music, they love gear and they understand the industry. Most importantly they’ve taken their passion and turned it into a business they’re proud of which is an asset to the music scene in their community. Who wouldn’t want to own a business where every day they were doing what they truly love? Sound interesting?
Thought you'd like to know. Before Christmas, I stopped by a local music shop to buy my 12 year old granddaughter a new guitar to replace an old Beaver Creek she'd been banging on for a few years. Since I'm an old folky from the 1960s, I thought a low end Gibson or Martin would give her both good sound and some bragging rights at her school's guitar club. The shop owner was in the acoustic guitar room strumming something I had never seen before and quickly told me I should forget Martin or Gibson and get what he was playing. It was a Seagull. An equal sound for half the price, he said, so I looked it over, strummed the few chords I could remember, and bought it on the spot. Later, I was still pondering how a little Canadian guitar could be called better than a Martin or Gibson when I found your ratings post. I do believe I kept repeating "Oh my God, it's true!" over and over. And she loves the guitar, especially the smaller neck and fuller sound. Thanks for helping this old folky who always thought Martin and Gibson were names to be spoken in hushed reverence believe in something new.
The Yamaha's FG series FGX800C is a perfectly machined instrument. If there is one thing Yamaha is known for, it's the quality of their mass-produced acoustic guitars, which people like to pooh-pooh due to the romanticization of extremely expensive handmade guitars. Yamaha has perfected this machining process to a point where you wouldn't really be able to figure out if the instrument was put together by a luthier or if it was made on a factory floor somewhere. This is the case with nearly every accessible guitar these days thanks to machines reducing errors and driving prices down.
If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.
Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.
The first part of this book shows why Guthrie is such a great player, and dives into his mindset when it comes to teaching and playing. I really believe you should go buy this book, so I don't want to give too much away, but he covers great topics like how to avoid guitar injuries, setting goals for yourself, thoughts on technique, tone and gear, and general tips on how to practice.
Guitars feature many different styles of hardware which have different uses. There is usually a direct relationship between a guitar’s cost and the quality of its hardware. Better hardware can make a difference in a guitar’s tuning stability and versatility. As you can imagine, this is an area where many improvements and upgrades can bring a host of benefits to the user. The most significant hardware components are tuning machines, bridges and tailpieces.

• Similarly, insert the Soft Clipper into the third insert slot and click on its Edit button. For settings, try putting the Input at ‑0.0, Mix at 55, 0.0, Second at 100, and Third at 57. As with the Compressor, set the output to a high level, again stopping short of distortion. These settings are intended to get you started; you may want to tweak them depending on your guitar, pickup, playing style, and so on.
Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.
Thanks for popping in! Yeah, that g-string issue's a real pain. I also get it on acoustics for the same reason. I've found that, aside from sloping the slot DOWN on the peghead side, if you also try to provide a gentle (side) edge where it starts to head towards the g tuner, that helps too. What I'm trying to say is that you should try to give as clear a path as possible to the tuner to reduce interference/friction. I've tried to illustrate what I mean here: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-_9c955WEOiM/UI8xvC_nvFI/AAAAAAAADAA/RQmXf_beWUc/s754/nut-slots.jpg but let me know if it's not clear. More on making a nut here, by the way: http://diystrat.blogspot.tw/2010/10/making-bone-nut-from-scratch.html
Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
If you want to get really technical, the electronics “on board” a basic non-battery-powered guitar form an “RLC” circuit, the letters standing for resistance (R), inductance (L, since I is used for current) and capacitance (C), three key values in an AC circuit that determine the relative “impedance” of various frequencies. The inductor is the magnetic pickup (which “induces” voltage/current based on the vibrating metal string), the resistor is the tone knob (a potentiometer or variable resistor), and the capacitor is a tone cap, in this example 0.05 uF (about right for a humbucking pickup like in a Gibson Les Paul).
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or "clip" an audio signal's wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating "warm" sounds by adding harmonics or "gritty" sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument's out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or "valves".[52][53] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or "hard" clipping. Overdrive pedals produce "soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce "clean" sounds at quieter volumes and distorted "warm" sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[54][55] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
Music enthusiasts can find a wide range of new and used guitar amplifiers on eBay, often for deep discounts.  Buyers who want to explore a wide range of possibilities should simply enter the keywords "guitar amplifier" into the eBay search bar, while those with more particular needs can refine their search by adding keywords associated with the make and model of the amplifier, as well as its color or condition.  The "ask the seller a question" feature will enable the buyer to ask additional questions pertaining to style, sound, and condition (if the guitar amplifier is used).
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
Featuring a sound engine derived from the bigger, premium-priced GT-100, the GT-1 contains 99 preset and 99 user patches each built from a chain of blocks that can draw from 108 effects, including 27 amp/speaker sims and a 32-second looper. The first two footswitches scroll through patches, while the third (CTL1) footswitch is used to turn an effect, or a combination of effects, on and off in a patch, or for tap tempo. Sonically, there's some great stuff here. Many of the presets are playable straight off the bat, but the wide range of effects means that you can get really creative with your own patches. As you'd expect from Boss, the modulation effects are a highlight, as well as the delays and reverbs, particularly the Tera Echo. We've heard better pitch-shifting though... While the COSM amp sims will give you an approximation of the real thing for recording, at this price, you don't get the playability and detail of high-end modelers. Likewise, the overdrives and distortions work really well when building a patch but, used as solo effects, have less of the impact of real analogue pedals. The acoustic guitar simulator is class, though. For live use, the GT-1 doesn't have the flexibility of bigger units where you can switch individual effects, although you could get 
by in a live situation with careful sequential use of your own patches and the CTL1 button.
Launch price: $499 / £279 | Body: Laminated maple, semi-hollow | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico Classic humbucker (neck), Alnico Classic Plus humbucker (bridge) | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, neck tone, bridge tone, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: LockTone Tune-O-Matic stopbar, Grover 18:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Vintage Sunburst, Natural, Cherry, Ebony
The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.
Tuner: If you’re new to guitars and playing music, there is absolutely NO way that you know how to recognize all the notes by ear and tune your guitar without a tuner. Even if someone tunes the guitar for you at the shop, it will get out of tune by the time you’re home, so this one’s an absolute must have. Hang on for the price until we discuss the next device.
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.
Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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