For notation and composition work, some of the common choices are Avid Sibelius 7, Makemusic Finale and PG Music Band-in-a-Box. Or, for DJ-ing and remixing, check out the Native Instruments Traktor series, Avid Torq or the software packages from Venue Magic. There truly are dozens of options available for you to take advantage of the benefits digital editing has to offer. Whether you're an independent artist mixing tracks on your own laptop or a professional sound editor working on a major TV series or indie film, the right music software is here to handle your needs.
The Effect: When it comes to effects pedals, those which offer more than one type of effect are usually seen as the best cost effective solution out there. Although many still prefer that standard, standalone configuration, multi-effects pedals have a lot to offer. Take Carl Martin Multi Effects Pedal as an example. This thing is packed to the brim with boutique level effects. Easy to use, a board such as this one can substitute a whole pedalboard depending on the variety of effects you use. One of the other great features of this design is the fact that multi-effect pedals come in both digital and analog form. They have transcended that artificial sounding performance that plagued effects processors some 10 years ago. Today, a multi-effects pedal is every bit as capable as its standalone counterparts. While this design is aimed at everyone, budget oriented users stand to gain the most from it.
First off, it has three effects loops that let you control pedals (or groups of pedals) right from the MS-3. It can also be used as a foot controller for amplifiers, which allows you to change the channel on your favorite amps and employ effects in the comfort of a single compact box. This makes the MS-3 a very versatile unit, catering to vintage amp/pedal users while adding the comfort of modern digital effects processing and preset control. Since it has its own noise suppressor and global EQ, you can tame noisy pedals and shape their tone a bit more. All of these are on top of the many built-in effects that is already built into the unit, which are Boss quality good by themselves.
The 6260 will keep the high-gain crowd happy. The V22 will satisfy anyone looking for a tube combo for rock, blues or country music. The 1960 will meet the needs of players looking for a British-type overdrive, and the 333 will nail those scooped out metal tones you might be looking for. Bugera is definitely worth checking out for players on a budget, or guitarists just looking to build their collection of classic sounds.
The relationship between perceived volume (loudness) and power output in watts of an amplifier is not immediately obvious. While beginners sometimes assume that there is a linear relationship between perceived volume and wattage (e.g., beginners may think that a 50-watt amp will be much louder, or about ten times louder than a 5-watt amp), in fact the human ear perceives a 50-watt amplifier as only twice as loud as a 5-watt amplifier (which is a tenfold increase in power in watts). Doubling the power of an amplifier results in a "just noticeable" increase in volume, so a 100-watt amplifier is only just noticeably louder than a 50-watt amplifier. Such generalizations are also subject to the human ear's tendency to behave as a natural audio compressor at high volumes.
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.

Soft and soulful is the second name of Fender guitars and basses. They are famous for their fruitful and enchanting tone. It is one of the most recognized brands in the world. Every note that is played on this guitar is pleasant and pure. There are two factors that contribute to such a thrilling tone. Firstly, the majestic shape of the 'strat' in resonating wood and secondly, the perfect configuration of three pick ups. The pick ups are usually singe coiled. However, there are cases where double coiled third pick ups have been used. Fender is a very popular guitar brand, and artists like Eric Clapton who plays extremely soft music, and heavy metal bands such as Iron Maiden have also used the same brand. Models like Stratocaster and Telecaster have etched their names among the greatest guitars ever made. Fender offers myriad of designs, styles, and configurations. If you are a beginner, then go for any Fender model, it's probably the best guitar for novices or amateurs.
by lexxus gomes The amp that you use can fundamentally change the sound of your guitar. For example, many "hard rock" musicians like the "chug chug" of a Marshall stack, while blues guitarists may like a Blues Deville. I kind of like the "clean" sound of a Fender Twin Reverb, myself, although I usually just record without an amp into my mixer, and use a guitar effects processor to simulate an amp sound.
Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.
The classical guitar also became widely used in popular music and rock & roll in the 1960s after guitarist Mason Williams popularized the instrument in his instrumental hit Classical Gas. Guitarist Christopher Parkening is quoted in the book Classical Gas: The Music of Mason Williams as saying that it is the most requested guitar piece besides Malagueña and perhaps the best known instrumental guitar piece today. In the field of New Flamenco, the works and performances of Spanish composer and player Paco de Lucía are known worldwide.

Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.


One of the most important Telecaster players was Clarence White, who, during his short career, contributed more to country electric guitar than almost anyone else, along with being a phenomenal bluegrass flatpicking guitarist and a pioneer of thecountry rock genre. He played with the Byrds, and Nashville West along with the bluegrass bands the Kentucky Colonels andMuleskinner. He enlisted the help of Gene Parsons and invented the StringBender, a device inside the body of the guitar that raises a string’s (either the B- or G-string most of the time) pitch when pressure is applied to the strap. His Telecaster is one of the most recognizable and is now owned by Marty Stuart.

That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.


4.  Cracked end block because customer used a drill bit meant for steel to enlarge hole for the jack used on an acoustic.  Fix:  This can be tricky.  First you have to assess the damage and that can be challenging.  Some of these miniature cameras work great.  I’ve had success using a point and shoot on a timer to take a snap.  If the crack is small you might be able to use cyano to repair it.  If the end block is cracked all the way through, the back may need to come off and the block replaced… Again, not something you’re going to do on a cheap guitar.   The proper way is to use a step reamer to get the correct sized hole.
Next to the great sounds and looks, the most noticeable thing about Seagull guitars is the incredibly reasonable prices. With Seagull, you get a quality guitar made from superior woods and materials for a lot less than it seems like it ought to cost. The Performer CW Flame Maple is definitely one of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000 out there.
For years, Seymour Duncan has provided guitarists with first-rate, handmade pickups and parts that are anything but stock. All of our products are designed and customized to suit the needs of specific musical styles and the musicians thereof. If you’ve got a guitar that doesn’t have a good-quality set of pickups and seems to lack that “extra something” in the tone department, investing in a set of pickups is your first stop.
There's a sick little used Chinese Peavey going for $90 at my local guitar shop. It plays great, but nobody seems to want it. I'm already picking up a MIM strat from there, but after I save up a bit more change I think I'll grab it as well. You always have to dig for the good players, and sometimes you just happen to be lucky enough to find a cheap one on a fluke, doesn't matter where it's from.
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 

With sharp double-cutaways and the recognizable Rickenbacker body shape made from maple, the semi-hollow Rickenbacker 330-12 12-string electric guitar has proven to be one of the brand's most popular models since the 1960s. The 330-12 has been used for its jangly sound, perfect for pop and various other genres, by the likes of Tom Petty, Johnny Marr, and Peter Buck, to name a few.


{ "thumbImageID": "Pro-Mod-So-Cal-Style-1-HH-with-Floyd-Rose-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/J48559000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Charvel Pro-Mod So-Cal Style 1 HH with Floyd Rose Left-Handed Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000035005", "price": "929.99", "regularPrice": "929.99", "msrpPrice": "1,282.74", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Charvel/Pro-Mod-So-Cal-Style-1-HH-with-Floyd-Rose-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black-1500000035005.gc", "skuImageId": "Pro-Mod-So-Cal-Style-1-HH-with-Floyd-Rose-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/J48559000001000", "brandName": "Charvel", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Pro-Mod-So-Cal-Style-1-HH-with-Floyd-Rose-Left-Handed-Electric-Guitar-Black/J48559000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
The EB-18 was a bass version with a 33.825″ scale. According to Longworth, early versions had a single DiMarzio “One” pickup and Grover Titan tuners, while later basses had a DiMarzio “G” pickup and Schaller pickups. Expect to find various combinations of those. Longworth also mentions the possibility that some might have Mighty Mite pickups, but this is uncertain. EB-18 production began in ’79 and about 5,226 (about 1,300 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
{ "thumbImageID": "Casino-Electric-Guitar-Turquoise/518295000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Casino Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Turquoise", "sku": "sku:site51500000240455", "price": "649.00", "regularPrice": "649.00", "msrpPrice": "1,082.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Turquoise-1500000240455.gc", "skuImageId": "Casino-Electric-Guitar-Turquoise/518295000002000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Turquoise/518295000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Cherry", "sku": "sku:site51275860129473", "price": "649.00", "regularPrice": "649.00", "msrpPrice": "999.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Cherry-1275860129473.gc", "skuImageId": "Casino-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/518295000019000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Cherry/518295000019000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51275761455180", "price": "649.00", "regularPrice": "649.00", "msrpPrice": "1,082.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Clearance/Epiphone/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst-1275761455180.gc", "skuImageId": "Casino-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/518295000015000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/518295000015000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Natural", "sku": "sku:site51275761455075", "price": "649.00", "regularPrice": "649.00", "msrpPrice": "1,082.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Natural-1275761455075.gc", "skuImageId": "Casino-Electric-Guitar-Natural/518295000010000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Casino-Electric-Guitar-Natural/518295000010000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
In 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom guitar, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which was used by Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones. Vox guitars also experimented with onboard effects and electronics. The Teardrop won a prize for its design. In the mid 1960s, as the sound of electric 12 string guitar became popular, Vox introduced the Phantom XII and Mark XII electric 12 string guitars. Vox produced many more traditional 6 and 12 string electric guitars in both England and Italy. It may be noted that the Phantom guitar shape was quite similar to that of first fretted electric bass guitar, the Audiovox "Electric Bass Fiddle" of 1934.
Before deciding on how to go about mic’ing the amp, listen to the sound in the room. If the guitar is being recorded as part of a rhythm track in the same room as drums and other instruments, the only option may be to use a close-mic’ing technique, unless you don’t mind dealing with the other instruments bleeding into the guitar track. Recording guitars in isolation, as an overdub, presents more options for ambient room mic’ing. Experiment with mic positioning to achieve the right amount of room sound and the desired bass and treble response. Distance-mic’ing in a very live-sounding room can create an appealing slapback echo-type sound, while close mic’ing gives you absolute flexibility in the mix.   

Although Orbison’s good friend and Sun Records labelmate Johnny Cash may be known as “the Man in Black,” Orbison habitually dressed from head to toe in black in the early Sixties, a decade before Cash adopted his dark uniform. Even Orbison’s raven hair and impenetrable jet Ray-Bans were blacker than the cover to Spinal Tap’s Smell the Glove, adding to his alluring persona as a mysterious, brooding artiste.
Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
Great post a lot of useful information here I found this old acoustic guitar made by lotus I have never heard of this brand and have been trying to research it for about a month now and haven't gotten any closer to finding out the history of it if anyone know anything about them I'm all ears it has a tag on the inside model no. LW 65 or g5 lotus made in japan thanks in advance for any information I can get
{ "thumbImageID": "RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Purple-Neon/K59743000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ibanez RG550 Genesis Collection Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Purple Neon", "sku": "sku:site51500000177727", "price": "999.99", "regularPrice": "999.99", "msrpPrice": "1,333.32", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Purple-Neon-1500000177727.gc", "skuImageId": "RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Purple-Neon/K59743000002000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Purple-Neon/K59743000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Road Flare Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000177726", "price": "999.99", "regularPrice": "999.99", "msrpPrice": "1,333.32", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Road-Flare-Red-1500000177726.gc", "skuImageId": "RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Road-Flare-Red/K59743000001000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Road-Flare-Red/K59743000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Desert Sun Yellow", "sku": "sku:site51500000177862", "price": "999.99", "regularPrice": "999.99", "msrpPrice": "1,333.32", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Sun-Yellow-1500000177862.gc", "skuImageId": "RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Sun-Yellow/K59743000003000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Sun-Yellow/K59743000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Gloss White", "sku": "sku:site51500000177863", "price": "999.99", "regularPrice": "999.99", "msrpPrice": "1,333.32", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ibanez/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-White-1500000177863.gc", "skuImageId": "RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-White/K59743000004000", "brandName": "Ibanez", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/RG550-Genesis-Collection-Electric-Guitar-Gloss-White/K59743000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
I remember choosing a floating tremolo equipped electric guitar as my first ever purchase, and I ended up being so frustrated at how hard it is to keep the guitar in tune and how complex string replacements were. To make the long story short, I felt relief when I traded it up for a simpler Fender Strat. These days, floating tremolos have gotten better and easier to setup, but I'd still recommend a guitar with basic stop tail piece or tremolo bridge for beginners - just so you can focus on learning the instrument and worrying about string setup when you have more experience.

At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar.  I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best.  You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment.  You get treated like a valued customer.  Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars.  They have a great variety of quality instruments.  Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars.  A place like this is so rare nowadays.
For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
Thanks. It sounds good without tone shaping ability but I wanted to hear the original sounds. It now has 2 capacitors tied together from the volume pot to 1 tone leg. I am guessing the original tone switch was wired with one cap. for the low & one cap. for middle and the 3rd tone leg was straight wired for treble high. I also wonder how the ground sweep worked on the tone selector?? I just need to know. I’m a DIY guy.
Some of the more distinctive specifications include, the headstock shape, tuners, neck and fretboard, bridge, and pickups and electronics. The headstock shape is based on PRS’s trademark design, but inverted to both accommodate Mayer’s playing style and also to keep a consistent length of string behind the nut, which makes staying in tune easier. The tuners are a traditional vintage-style, closed-back tuner, but with PRS’s locking design. The neck shape was modeled after 1963/1964 vintage instruments, and the fretboard has a 7.25” radius. The moment your hand grabs this neck, it just feels right. Like the tuners, the steel tremolo takes a classic design and incorporates PRS’s trem arm and Gen III knife-edge screws. The bridge on the Silver Sky is setup flush to the body in the neutral position so that the tremolo bridge only goes down in pitch. By keeping the bridge in contact with the body, the guitar itself is acoustically louder, which improves the signal to noise ratio of the single-coil pickups. The 635JM single-coil pickups are very round and full, with a musical high end that is never “ice-picky” or brash.

In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.
Another example is Ovation, the company that almost single-handedly created the acoustic/electric category and radically altered views about how acoustic guitars should be constructed. No matter how hard they tried, Ovation’s repeated attempts to enter the solidbody electric area have failed. Instead, Ovation finally purchased Hamer. However, Ovation’s marketing failures do not mean it hasn’t made some pretty interesting – even innovative – electric guitars over the years, and these represent one of few areas in guitar collecting where you can find excellent, historically significant instruments, often at remarkably reasonable prices. Here’s the scoop on Ovation electrics (touching only briefly on acoustic/electrics).
The slide part on that track was quite difficult to simulate, but again, the guy I have playing in my band, that I've been playing with for a while, can do it, and he and my son are the only two guys I know that play it right. Recently, I had Ronnie Wood playing with me, and he did a good job with it. I think if you have your head on it, it can be done.
If you decide to use my link to Guitar Tricks when you sign up as a member, I will receive a compensation for my referral. I am not a professional reviewer and my views are biased because I only recommend stuff that I use and like. I appreciate if you follow my links to Guitar Tricks if you like I Really Like Guitars and my review of Guitar Tricks. Thank you!
Over the years in my travels, I've seen more Peavey amps on real working musicians' stages than any other amp manufacturer. The fact that real, everyday working musicians use and depend on them also dictates that Peavey amps are out there making more money for real working musicians in total, than any other amp out there. Yes, I know, the big act shows have huge backlines of Marshalls behind them, but they are in the minority, as there are more lesser-famed bands and musicians out there working than there are "stars". I "stepped down" to Peavey almost 20 years ago, when I was beginning to have reliability issues with my Fender amps...issues I couldn't afford to keep having while on the road. I still have my old Fender amps, but I've been gigging regularly and exclusively with only Peavey for the past almost 20 years now. I still get the tone I want and need and the reliability I expect in order to keep making a living in music. And by the way, I've been gigging since 1963.
Here we have a well made in Japan kinda rare to see these vintage Fender Japanese acoustics now days... interesting well built and is still beauty ..its all mahogany body & neck are very well constructed , offering good cross braced body ala D-18/28 seems to be awfully similar?..to my vintage Yamaha FG180 or 200 Nippon Gakki.....that is to say pretty darn nice!.. almost the same guitar but for the Fender's more stylistic headstock top shape that differs from the vintage Yamaha... this was clearly built for Fender as there import in those days Japan offered more competitive pricing to us manufactures to produce there line...this offering is really quite a nice guitar in its own right... so now its nicely aged well over the years..nice ring tone to it now, its very good overall condition, but sometime in its past history it received a doink to the binding on the back side lower bout a binding touch up repair has been done ...to the back lower bout and is about a foot long area -replaced ..its on the back bottom like I said so its really out of sight and is out of mind the remainder of bindings are otherwise 100% very nice beautiful actually nice looking tortious style..the rest the body has a few nicks or scars not to bad looking though a real vintage Vibe to it with no major cracks or warpage the bridge & top are tight and flat so its a very sound playing instrument, 1 changed tuner. The minor abraiions had been lacquer filled to preserve the original finish integrity ..we just built up low spots with matching lacquer to level off to prevent further degradation pealing or chipping those areas have been french polished built up and then excess has been removed elsewhere leaving only the low spots filled then we polished to gloss and well it looks ... pretty darn GOOD now.. she's preserved & fully ready for another 30 years of play... this example has a NICE NECK and she plays great....Worth preserving?...I think so See pics please... This guitar has no abrasions wood cracks or issues at all just a vintage guitar thats surprisingly such a fine player...action is good not too high at all and it still has room to lower the saddle or nut even more you so the neck set is very good for many years no worries..its a nice sounding & playing 25 years old vintage Japanese guitar...and is overall a nice looking vintage example..stays in tune nicely and is a joy to play... nice vintage Japanese guitar this guitar is JVG Rated: 8.5/10 very good used guitar as described ...still after 25 years it looks & plays good. Interested in this beauty let me know..Thanks for looking, Joe JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come stay tuned!.
The electric guitar is a staple in the music industry. Over the last several decades, the use of the best electric guitar has evolved across many music genres. The electric guitar has made grand entrances in the likes of Rock, Pop, Hip Hop, and more. Today, it is considered one of the most essential instruments in pushing musical creativity forward. Whether you are a beginner or an expert electric guitar player, the variety of sounds and distinct musical styles will surely take any music genius to the next level. We’ve reviewed electric guitars & compiled a guide on how you can best spend your money on the perfect electric guitar.
A Delay or Echo pedal creates a copy of an incoming sound and slightly time-delays it, creating either a "slap" (single repetition) or an echo (multiple repetitions) effect. Delay pedals may use either analog or digital technology. Analog delays often are less flexible and not as "perfect" sounding as digital delays, but some guitarists argue that analog effects produce "warmer" tones. Early delay devices actually used magnetic tape to produce the time delay effect. U2's guitarist, The Edge, is known for his extensive use of delay effects. Some common Delay pedals are:
The MD400 has one Alnico V humbucker at the bridge and one Alnico V mini-humbucker at the neck. Both are ‘rail’-style pickups, which are quieter, and provide more consistent tone and sustain across the strings. Both pickups have been coil-split, too—so push or pull the master “Tone” knob to disable one coil of each humbucker, effectively turning them into single-coil pickups.
The Telecaster is known for its ability to produce both bright, rich, cutting tone (the typical telecaster twang) or mellow, warm, bluesy tone depending on the selected pickup, respectively “bridge” pickup or “neck” pickup. The bridge pickup has more windings than the neck pickup, hence producing higher output, which compensates for a lower amplitude of vibration of the strings at bridge position. At the same time, a capacitor between the slider of the volume control and the output, allows treble sounds to bleed through while damping mid and lower ranges.[3] A slanted bridge pickup enhances the guitar’s treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings’ tone. This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. These characteristics make the Telecaster a versatile guitar, usable for most styles of music including country, blues, rock, and jazz.
Being a sub-brand of Gibson, it is Epiphone's task to get the Les Paul design out to as many hands as possible, and they did just that with many various iterations of the classic single cutaway design. For this list, we chose Epiphone's tribute to Les Paul, who incidentally also worked with the company in the late 30's, which is a bit in the mid-tier price, but worth every penny.
When looking at acoustic pianos, there are so many variations that can lead to differences in tone: upright vs. grand, hammer types, mechanical condition, the player, mic choices, and mic techniques. No matter what, though, the piano tends to be a behemoth in the mix – for better or worse – so most often you'll be looking to cut holes out for other things in your mix.

ATTACHING AND DRILLING THE NECK For this you will want to use a clamp to hold the neck firmly in place while you dril the holes. Attach the neck to the body and clamp it lightly so you can set it in the right possition before drilling. Make sure you have some protection between the clamp and the body so you don't leave any indentions in the wood. A soft piece of plastic or a soft rag will work nicely. Use a long ruler to allign the neck to the position of the bridge. Do this on both sides of the neck to see that you get it centered. Tighten down the clamp a bit more until the neck doesn't move. Drill the holes as straight as possible with a smaller bit that you used on the body. If you can't reach all of the spots that you need to drill at because the clamp is in the way, take a couple of the furreles and neck screws and screw them into the neck. Once you have done this you can finish drilling the other holes with out the clamp.

Combo guitar amplifier cabinets and guitar speaker cabinets use several different designs, including the "open back" cabinet, the closed back cabinet (a sealed box), and, less commonly, bass reflex designs, which use a closed back with a vent or port cut into the cabinet.[26] With guitar amps, most "open back" amp cabinets are not fully open; part of the back is enclosed with panels. Combo guitar amp cabinets and standalone speaker cabinets are often made of plywood. Some are made of MDF or particle board—especially in low-budget models.[26] Cabinet size and depth, material types, assembly methods, type and thickness of the baffle material (the wood panel that holds the speaker), and the way the baffle attaches to the cabinet all affect tone.[26]
Whether you are an acoustic or electric guitar player one of the simplest ways you can add some dynamic or sonic change to your worship set is by stepping on an effects pedal at appropriate moments. However, if you are new to the world of pedals there seems to be endless choice of single or multiple effects units (and no, you don’t need as many as are in the photo!). Whilst multi-effects offer loads of sounds in one box, they can be hard to programme and difficult to adjust quickly on stage. There’s a million things written about effects pedals out there in Googleland but if you’re brand new to this here’s a potted overview of some of the most popular types.
Pickup configuration refers to the number and types of pickups installed on a guitar, and its position on the body. The two most common types of pickups include singlecoil, known for its crisp and punchy sound and the fatter sounding humbucker. For beginners, you'll have to once again look up to artists who play your preferred music genre, to see which pickups they are using to get their sound. In addition to getting the right sound, sonic flexibility is also an important consideration and the general rule is that the more pickups installed, the more sound varieties you can get. The most common configuration is HH, which stand for dual humbuckers, because of their overdrive and distortion friendly sound. The SSS (three single-coils) configuration is also popular, as seen on the Stratocaster, allowing for a more versatile tone options. There are other variations that combine both single coils and humbuckers, such as SSH (two single coils and a humbucker), for an even wider selection of tones.
The first recording of an electric guitar was by jazz guitarist George Barnes who recorded two songs in Chicago on March 1st, 1938: Sweetheart Land and It's a Low-Down Dirty Shame. Many historians incorrectly attribute the first recording to Eddie Durham, but his recording with the Kansas City Five was not until 15 days later. Durham introduced the instrument to a young Charlie Christian, who made the instrument famous in his brief life and is generally known as the first electric guitarist and a major influence on jazz guitarists for decades thereafter.

Body tops are optional. If you're just starting out, you should either skip this option, or choose the veneer top that appeals to you most. We offer veneer tops (paper-thin layer of wood) and cap tops (thick layer of wood). Most people will add a top to their instrument because of the top’s naturally beautiful appearance. Some people will add a top to their guitar because it can affect the overall sound of the instrument, too (only applies to cap tops, not veneers).

Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.


Of course, we’ve already mentioned the cool offset Jaguar shape of the body, which will turn plenty of heads whenever this budding bassist hits the stage. But with an active bass boost circuit, you also have the option to bump the sound of this way up past what’s normally afforded in a passive bass. Not to mention, the chrome hardware and the curved vintage logo print on the head really put this bass guitar over the edge visually.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.

{ "thumbImageID": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ocean-Blue-Burst/J40313000005000", "defaultDisplayName": "Epiphone Limited Edition Les Paul Traditional PRO-II Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Ocean Blue Burst", "sku": "sku:site51500000014857", "price": "399.99", "regularPrice": "499.00", "msrpPrice": "832.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ocean-Blue-Burst-1500000014857.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ocean-Blue-Burst/J40313000005000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ocean-Blue-Burst/J40313000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Wine Red", "sku": "sku:site51500000014856", "price": "399.99", "regularPrice": "499.00", "msrpPrice": "832.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red-1500000014856.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red/J40313000004000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Wine-Red/J40313000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000014853", "price": "399.99", "regularPrice": "499.00", "msrpPrice": "832.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst-1500000014853.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/J40313000003000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/J40313000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Desert Burst", "sku": "sku:site51500000014855", "price": "499.00", "regularPrice": "499.00", "msrpPrice": "832.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Burst-1500000014855.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Burst/J40313000002000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Desert-Burst/J40313000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ebony", "sku": "sku:site51500000014854", "price": "399.99", "regularPrice": "499.00", "msrpPrice": "832.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ebony-1500000014854.gc", "skuImageId": "Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/J40313000001000", "brandName": "Epiphone", "onSale": "true", "stickerDisplayText": "On Sale", "stickerClass": "stickerOnSale", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Traditional-PRO-II-Electric-Guitar-Ebony/J40313000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×